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1.    Honey Badgers

Directions: Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow. Refer to
the text to check your answers when appropriate.

(1) What's fiercer than a lion but smaller than a beagle? The honey badger, one of the
toughest mammals in Africa and western Asia. Honey badgers stand less than a foot
high. They are only a couple feet long. They weigh just over 20 pounds. Yet they have a
reputation for toughness that is far greater than their size. Some honey badgers will
chase away lions and take their kills. I guess that goes to show you that size isn't the
only thing that matters in a fight.

(2) So what makes the honey badger so tough? They have speed, stamina, and agility,
but so do many animals. They aren't stronger than lions, so how do they stop them?
The thing that sets the honey badger apart is their skin. Their skin is thick and tough.
Arrows, spears, and bites from other animals can rarely pierce it. Small bullets can't
even penetrate it. Not only is their skin thick and tough, it is also loose. This allows
them to twist and turn to attack while another animal is gripping them. The only safe
grip one can get on a honey badger is on the back of their necks.

(3) Honey badgers have long, sharp claws. These claws are good for attacking and
even better for digging. Honey badgers are some of nature's most skilled diggers. They
can dig a nine-foot tunnel into hard ground in about 10 minutes. They love to catch a
meal by digging up the burrows of frogs, rodents, and cobras. They also use their
digging skills to create their homes. They live in small chambers in the ground and
defend them fiercely. They will attack horses, cows, and even water buffalo if they are
foolish enough to poke around a honey badger's den.

(4) You don't get a reputation like the honey badger by running from danger. The
honey badger is fearless and a tireless fighter. They will attack any creature that
threatens them, man included. Because of the honey badger's reputation, most
predators avoid them. Some animals use the honey badger's rep to their advantage.
Adult cheetahs have spotted coats, but their kittens have silver manes and look like
honey badgers. Some scientists believe that their coloring tricks predators into
avoiding them. Wouldn't you walk the other way if you saw a honey badger?

(5) You might be wondering: "If honey badgers are so tough, how did they get a name
that makes them sound like a piece of candy?" The answer makes sense. Since honey
badgers have such thick skin, bee stings rarely harm them. So honey badgers love to
raid beehives. I can't blame them. Who doesn't like free honey? Honey badgers chase
after honey aggressively. So much so that beekeepers in Africa have to use electric
fencing to hold them back. There's nothing sweet about that.

(6) Beekeepers aren't the only people who have grown to hate honey badgers. Honey
badgers may be fun to read about, but they are nasty neighbors. They attack chickens,
livestock, and some say children, though they usually leave people alone. But if a
honey badger moves in your backyard, there's not a whole lot that you can do about
it. I mean, are you going to go and tangle with an animal that eats the bones of its
prey? An animal with teeth strong enough to crunch through turtle shells? An
animal that never tires, gives up, or backs down? Yeah, I wouldn't either...

Which best expresses the main idea of the third paragraph?


Page 1 of 16
A Honey badgers have sharp claws that they use for fighting.

B Honey badgers digging skills assist them in many ways.

C Honey badgers use their claws to defend their homes.

D Honey badgers will defend their homes to the death against any animal

2.    Honey Badgers

Directions: Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow. Refer to
the text to check your answers when appropriate.

(1) What's fiercer than a lion but smaller than a beagle? The honey badger, one of the
toughest mammals in Africa and western Asia. Honey badgers stand less than a foot
high. They are only a couple feet long. They weigh just over 20 pounds. Yet they have a
reputation for toughness that is far greater than their size. Some honey badgers will
chase away lions and take their kills. I guess that goes to show you that size isn't the
only thing that matters in a fight.

(2) So what makes the honey badger so tough? They have speed, stamina, and agility,
but so do many animals. They aren't stronger than lions, so how do they stop them?
The thing that sets the honey badger apart is their skin. Their skin is thick and tough.
Arrows, spears, and bites from other animals can rarely pierce it. Small bullets can't
even penetrate it. Not only is their skin thick and tough, it is also loose. This allows
them to twist and turn to attack while another animal is gripping them. The only safe
grip one can get on a honey badger is on the back of their necks.

(3) Honey badgers have long, sharp claws. These claws are good for attacking and
even better for digging. Honey badgers are some of nature's most skilled diggers. They
can dig a nine-foot tunnel into hard ground in about 10 minutes. They love to catch a
meal by digging up the burrows of frogs, rodents, and cobras. They also use their
digging skills to create their homes. They live in small chambers in the ground and
defend them fiercely. They will attack horses, cows, and even water buffalo if they are
foolish enough to poke around a honey badger's den.

(4) You don't get a reputation like the honey badger by running from danger. The
honey badger is fearless and a tireless fighter. They will attack any creature that
threatens them, man included. Because of the honey badger's reputation, most
predators avoid them. Some animals use the honey badger's rep to their advantage.
Adult cheetahs have spotted coats, but their kittens have silver manes and look like
honey badgers. Some scientists believe that their coloring tricks predators into
avoiding them. Wouldn't you walk the other way if you saw a honey badger?

(5) You might be wondering: "If honey badgers are so tough, how did they get a name
that makes them sound like a piece of candy?" The answer makes sense. Since honey
badgers have such thick skin, bee stings rarely harm them. So honey badgers love to
raid beehives. I can't blame them. Who doesn't like free honey? Honey badgers chase
after honey aggressively. So much so that beekeepers in Africa have to use electric
fencing to hold them back. There's nothing sweet about that.

(6) Beekeepers aren't the only people who have grown to hate honey badgers. Honey
badgers may be fun to read about, but they are nasty neighbors. They attack chickens,
livestock, and some say children, though they usually leave people alone. But if a
honey badger moves in your backyard, there's not a whole lot that you can do about

Page 2 of 16
it. I mean, are you going to go and tangle with an animal that eats the bones of its
prey? An animal with teeth strong enough to crunch through turtle shells? An
animal that never tires, gives up, or backs down? Yeah, I wouldn't either...

Which best defines the meaning of the word burrows as it is used in the third
paragraph?
A Lily pads or other seaweeds in which animals hide

B Holes or tunnels in which animals live

C A nest or animal dwelling in a tree or bush

D A water supply where small animals come to drink

Page 3 of 16
3.    Honey Badgers

Directions: Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow. Refer to
the text to check your answers when appropriate.

(1) What's fiercer than a lion but smaller than a beagle? The honey badger, one of the
toughest mammals in Africa and western Asia. Honey badgers stand less than a foot
high. They are only a couple feet long. They weigh just over 20 pounds. Yet they have a
reputation for toughness that is far greater than their size. Some honey badgers will
chase away lions and take their kills. I guess that goes to show you that size isn't the
only thing that matters in a fight.

(2) So what makes the honey badger so tough? They have speed, stamina, and agility,
but so do many animals. They aren't stronger than lions, so how do they stop them?
The thing that sets the honey badger apart is their skin. Their skin is thick and tough.
Arrows, spears, and bites from other animals can rarely pierce it. Small bullets can't
even penetrate it. Not only is their skin thick and tough, it is also loose. This allows
them to twist and turn to attack while another animal is gripping them. The only safe
grip one can get on a honey badger is on the back of their necks.

(3) Honey badgers have long, sharp claws. These claws are good for attacking and
even better for digging. Honey badgers are some of nature's most skilled diggers. They
can dig a nine-foot tunnel into hard ground in about 10 minutes. They love to catch a
meal by digging up the burrows of frogs, rodents, and cobras. They also use their
digging skills to create their homes. They live in small chambers in the ground and
defend them fiercely. They will attack horses, cows, and even water buffalo if they are
foolish enough to poke around a honey badger's den.

(4) You don't get a reputation like the honey badger by running from danger. The
honey badger is fearless and a tireless fighter. They will attack any creature that
threatens them, man included. Because of the honey badger's reputation, most
predators avoid them. Some animals use the honey badger's rep to their advantage.
Adult cheetahs have spotted coats, but their kittens have silver manes and look like
honey badgers. Some scientists believe that their coloring tricks predators into
avoiding them. Wouldn't you walk the other way if you saw a honey badger?

(5) You might be wondering: "If honey badgers are so tough, how did they get a name
that makes them sound like a piece of candy?" The answer makes sense. Since honey
badgers have such thick skin, bee stings rarely harm them. So honey badgers love to
raid beehives. I can't blame them. Who doesn't like free honey? Honey badgers chase
after honey aggressively. So much so that beekeepers in Africa have to use electric
fencing to hold them back. There's nothing sweet about that.

(6) Beekeepers aren't the only people who have grown to hate honey badgers. Honey
badgers may be fun to read about, but they are nasty neighbors. They attack chickens,
livestock, and some say children, though they usually leave people alone. But if a
honey badger moves in your backyard, there's not a whole lot that you can do about
it. I mean, are you going to go and tangle with an animal that eats the bones of its
prey? An animal with teeth strong enough to crunch through turtle shells? An
animal that never tires, gives up, or backs down? Yeah, I wouldn't either...

Which best expresses the main idea of the last paragraph?


A Honey badgers are a nuisance to the neighborhood.

B Beekeepers and honey badgers do not get along well.

Page 4 of 16
C Honey badgers have very strong jaws and teeth.

D Honey badgers eat chicken and livestock.

4.    Honey Badgers

Directions: Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow. Refer to
the text to check your answers when appropriate.

(1) What's fiercer than a lion but smaller than a beagle? The honey badger, one of the
toughest mammals in Africa and western Asia. Honey badgers stand less than a foot
high. They are only a couple feet long. They weigh just over 20 pounds. Yet they have a
reputation for toughness that is far greater than their size. Some honey badgers will
chase away lions and take their kills. I guess that goes to show you that size isn't the
only thing that matters in a fight.

(2) So what makes the honey badger so tough? They have speed, stamina, and agility,
but so do many animals. They aren't stronger than lions, so how do they stop them?
The thing that sets the honey badger apart is their skin. Their skin is thick and tough.
Arrows, spears, and bites from other animals can rarely pierce it. Small bullets can't
even penetrate it. Not only is their skin thick and tough, it is also loose. This allows
them to twist and turn to attack while another animal is gripping them. The only safe
grip one can get on a honey badger is on the back of their necks.

(3) Honey badgers have long, sharp claws. These claws are good for attacking and
even better for digging. Honey badgers are some of nature's most skilled diggers. They
can dig a nine-foot tunnel into hard ground in about 10 minutes. They love to catch a
meal by digging up the burrows of frogs, rodents, and cobras. They also use their
digging skills to create their homes. They live in small chambers in the ground and
defend them fiercely. They will attack horses, cows, and even water buffalo if they are
foolish enough to poke around a honey badger's den.

(4) You don't get a reputation like the honey badger by running from danger. The
honey badger is fearless and a tireless fighter. They will attack any creature that
threatens them, man included. Because of the honey badger's reputation, most
predators avoid them. Some animals use the honey badger's rep to their advantage.
Adult cheetahs have spotted coats, but their kittens have silver manes and look like
honey badgers. Some scientists believe that their coloring tricks predators into
avoiding them. Wouldn't you walk the other way if you saw a honey badger?

(5) You might be wondering: "If honey badgers are so tough, how did they get a name
that makes them sound like a piece of candy?" The answer makes sense. Since honey
badgers have such thick skin, bee stings rarely harm them. So honey badgers love to
raid beehives. I can't blame them. Who doesn't like free honey? Honey badgers chase
after honey aggressively. So much so that beekeepers in Africa have to use electric
fencing to hold them back. There's nothing sweet about that.

(6) Beekeepers aren't the only people who have grown to hate honey badgers. Honey

Page 5 of 16
badgers may be fun to read about, but they are nasty neighbors. They attack
chickens, livestock, and some say children, though they usually leave people alone.
But if a honey badger moves in your backyard, there's not a whole lot that you can
do about it. I mean, are you going to go and tangle with an animal that eats the
bones of its prey? An animal with teeth strong enough to crunch through turtle
shells? An animal that never tires, gives up, or backs down? Yeah, I wouldn't either...

Which best describes one of the author's main purposes in writing this text?
A To persuade readers to join the efforts to protect honey badgers

B To compare and contrast honey badgers with beagles and lions

C To describe how honey badgers select their partners

D To explain why honey badgers are so tough

Page 6 of 16
5.    Honey Badgers

Directions: Read the following passage and answer the questions that follow. Refer to
the text to check your answers when appropriate.

(1) What's fiercer than a lion but smaller than a beagle? The honey badger, one of the
toughest mammals in Africa and western Asia. Honey badgers stand less than a foot
high. They are only a couple feet long. They weigh just over 20 pounds. Yet they have a
reputation for toughness that is far greater than their size. Some honey badgers will
chase away lions and take their kills. I guess that goes to show you that size isn't the
only thing that matters in a fight.

(2) So what makes the honey badger so tough? They have speed, stamina, and agility,
but so do many animals. They aren't stronger than lions, so how do they stop them?
The thing that sets the honey badger apart is their skin. Their skin is thick and tough.
Arrows, spears, and bites from other animals can rarely pierce it. Small bullets can't
even penetrate it. Not only is their skin thick and tough, it is also loose. This allows
them to twist and turn to attack while another animal is gripping them. The only safe
grip one can get on a honey badger is on the back of their necks.

(3) Honey badgers have long, sharp claws. These claws are good for attacking and
even better for digging. Honey badgers are some of nature's most skilled diggers. They
can dig a nine-foot tunnel into hard ground in about 10 minutes. They love to catch a
meal by digging up the burrows of frogs, rodents, and cobras. They also use their
digging skills to create their homes. They live in small chambers in the ground and
defend them fiercely. They will attack horses, cows, and even water buffalo if they are
foolish enough to poke around a honey badger's den.

(4) You don't get a reputation like the honey badger by running from danger. The
honey badger is fearless and a tireless fighter. They will attack any creature that
threatens them, man included. Because of the honey badger's reputation, most
predators avoid them. Some animals use the honey badger's rep to their advantage.
Adult cheetahs have spotted coats, but their kittens have silver manes and look like
honey badgers. Some scientists believe that their coloring tricks predators into
avoiding them. Wouldn't you walk the other way if you saw a honey badger?

(5) You might be wondering: "If honey badgers are so tough, how did they get a name
that makes them sound like a piece of candy?" The answer makes sense. Since honey
badgers have such thick skin, bee stings rarely harm them. So honey badgers love to
raid beehives. I can't blame them. Who doesn't like free honey? Honey badgers chase
after honey aggressively. So much so that beekeepers in Africa have to use electric
fencing to hold them back. There's nothing sweet about that.

(6) Beekeepers aren't the only people who have grown to hate honey badgers. Honey
badgers may be fun to read about, but they are nasty neighbors. They attack chickens,
livestock, and some say children, though they usually leave people alone. But if a
honey badger moves in your backyard, there's not a whole lot that you can do about
it. I mean, are you going to go and tangle with an animal that eats the bones of its
prey? An animal with teeth strong enough to crunch through turtle shells? An
animal that never tires, gives up, or backs down? Yeah, I wouldn't either...

Which animal is the honey badger afraid to attack?

A Lion

B Poisonous snake

Page 7 of 16
C water buffalo

D None of these

6.    An Indonesian endangered species, the Red Bird of Paradise is distributed to


lowland rain forests of Waigeo and Batanta islands of West Papua. This species
shares its home with another bird of paradise, the Wilson’s Bird of Paradise.
Hybridization between these two species are expected but not recorded yet.

The Bird of Paradise, Paradisaea rubra, is large, up to 33 cm long, brown and yellow
bird with a dark brown iris, grey legs and yellow bill. The male has an emerald green
face, a pair of elongated black corkscrew shaped tail wires, dark green feather
pompoms above each eye and a train of glossy crimson red plumes with whitish tips
at either side of the breast.
The male measures up to 72 cm long, including the ornamental red plumes that
require at least six years to fully attain. the female resembles the male but is
smaller in size, with a dark brown face and has no ornamental red plumes. The diet
consists mainly of fruits, berries, and arthropods.

We know from the text that ...


A The female Red Bird of Paradise is bigger than the male

B The Red Bird of Paradise is rare nowadays

C The Red Bird of Paradise cannot live alone

D The Red Bird is as large as the female

E The Red Bird of Paradise lives in highland of West Papua

7.    The Red Bird of Paradise


An Indonesian endangered species, the Red Bird of Paradise is distributed to
lowland rain forests of Waigeo and Batanta islands of West Papua. This species
shares its home with another bird of paradise, the Wilson’s Bird of Paradise.
Hybridization between these two species are expected but not recorded yet.
The Bird of Paradise, Paradisaea rubra, is large, up to 33 cm long, brown and yellow
bird with a dark brown iris, grey legs and yellow bill. The male has an emerald green
face, a pair of elongated black corkscrew shaped tail wires, dark green feather
pompoms above each eye and a train of glossy crimson red plumes with whitish tips
at either side of the breast.
The male measures up to 72 cm long, including the ornamental red plumes that
require at least six years to fully attain. the female resembles the male but is
smaller in size, with a dark brown face and has no ornamental red plumes. The diet
consists mainly of fruits, berries, and arthropods.

“...with a dark brown iris, grey legs and yellow bill ...” (paragraph 2) The
underlined word is closest in meaning to....
A Wing

B Tail

C Breast

D Eyes

E Beak

Page 8 of 16
8.    Read the following text to answer the question

Napoleon is a favorite fish divers in many regions of the world. The fish can
instantly be recognized by its size, color, and shape. It is one of the largest reef fish
in the world. They can grow up to 230 cm and weight 190 kg. They have fleshy lips
and a hump over the head that is similiar to a Napoleon hat. The hump becomes
more prominent with age.

Colors vary with age and sex. Males range from a bright electric blue to green or
purplish blue. Mature males develop a black stripe along the sides, blue spots on
their body scales, and blue scribbles on the head. Juveniles can be identified by
their pale greenish color and two black lines running behind the eye. Females, both
old and young, are red-orange on the upper parts of their bodies and red-orange to
white below.

Napoleon fish are carnivorous and eat during the day. They can be seen feasting on
shellfish, other fish, sea stars, sea urchins and crabs, crushing the shells to get the
animal within. They also crush large chunks of dead coral rubble with peg-like teeth
to feed on the burrowing mussels and worms.

Pairs spawn together as part of a larger mating group that may consist of over 100
individuals. The planktonic eggs are released into the water, and once the larvae
have hatched they will settle out on the substrate. Adult females are able to
changes sex but the triggers for this development are not yet known.

The Napoleon is mainly found on coral reef edges and drop-offs. They move into
shallow bays during the day to feed, and tend to move into deeper waters as they
grow older and large. Adults, therefore, are more common offshore than inshore.

Which of the following statement is mentioned in the text?


A Napoleon fish tend to move into shallow waters as they grow older and large

B Napoleon fish move into deep bays during the day to feed

C Adult females are not able to change sex

D Napoleon fish are not carnivorous

E The male fish has more attractive colours than the females

Page 9 of 16
9.    Read the following text to answer the question.

A kangaroo is an animal found only in Australia. It has a small relative called a


wallaby, that lives in Tasmania and New Guinea. Kangaroos eat grass and plants.
They have short front legs, long and strong back legs and a tail. These are used to sit
up and jump. Kangaroos are well known for their 8-meter forward jumps and more
than 3-meters high leap across fences. They can also run at the speed of over 45
kilometers per hour. The largest kangaroos are the Great Grey Kangaroos and Red
Kangaroos. Adult kangaroos grow to a meter in length and 90 kilos in weight.
Kangaroos are marsupials. This means that the female kangaroo has an external
pouch on the front of her body. The baby kangaroo is very tiny when it was born. It
right away crawls into its mother's pouch where it spends the first five months of its
life.

What is the purpose of the text?


A To inform Kangaroo's uniqueness.

B To report the features of Kangaroo.

C To encourage Kangaroo's preservation.

D To describe how a Kangaroo looks like.

Page 10 of 16
10.    Read the following text to answer the question.

There are two basic types of glaciers, those that flow outward in all directions with
little regard for any underlying terrain and those that are confined by terrain to a
particular path.

The first category of glaciers includes those massive blankets that cover whole
continents, appropriately called ice sheets. There must be over 50,000 square
kilometers of land covered with ice for the glacier to qualify as an ice sheet. When
portions of an ice sheet spread out over the ocean, they form ice shelves.

About 20,000 years ago the Cordilleran Ice Sheet covered nearly all the mountains
in southern Alaska, western Canada, and the western United States. It was about 3
kilometers deep at its thickest point in northern Alberta. Now there are only two
sheets left on Earth, those covering Greenland and Antarctica.

Any domelike body of ice that also flows out in all directions but covers less than
50,000 square kilometers is called an ice cap. Although ice caps are rare nowadays,
there are a number in northeastern Canada, on Baffin Island, and on the Queen
Elizabeth Islands.

The second category of glaciers includes those of a variety of shapes and sizes
generally called mountain or alpine glaciers. Mountain glaciers are typically
identified by the landform that controls their flow. One form of mountain glacier
that resembles an ice cap in that it flows outward in several directions is called an
ice field. The difference between an ice field and an ice cap is subtle. Essentially, the
flow of an ice field is somewhat controlled by surrounding terrain and thus does not
have the domelike shape of a cap. There are several ice fields in the Wrangell. St.
Elias, and Chugach mountains of Alaska and northern British Columbia.

Less spectacular than large ice fields are the most common types of mountain
glaciers: the cirque and valley glaciers. Cirque glaciers are found in depressions in
the surface of the land and have a characteristic circular shape. The ice of valley
glaciers, bound by terrain, flows down valleys, curves around their corners, and falls
over cliffs.

According to the passage, where was the Cordilleran Ice Sheet thickest?
A Alaska

B Greenland

C Alberta

D Antartica

Page 11 of 16
11.    Read the following text to answer the question.

Derived from the penicillium mold, penicillin is one of the most powerful
antibacterial agents ever developed. Penicillin and its derivatives have saved
countless millions of lives by reducing once lethal infections to the status of minor
inconveniences. Countless others have kept limbs that once would have needed
amputating to stop the spread of infection because penicillin stopped that spread in
its tracks. The history of the discovery of such a wondrous medicine is long and
complicated, but the man who normally gets the credit for discovering it is
Alexander Fleming, who published papers on penicillin in 1928. It is well-known that
several others, including a French medical student and a Costa Rican scientist, had
noted the mold's antibacterial properties prior to Fleming. However, it was Fleming
who drew the attention of the Western scientific establishment to the mold, and
whose work eventually led to penicillin being developed into a potent medicine.

What can be inferred from the text above?


A Mortality rates from infections are much lower today than they were in the 1920s.

B Penicillin has proven very useful but can also have potentially deadly side effects.

C Alexander Fleming was disorganized in several aspects of his professional life.

D A Costa Rican scientist should really get the credit for first discovering penicillin.

Page 12 of 16
12.    Most bees lead solitary lives. After mating, females dig or find suitable nests in
soil or wood. They begin visiting flowers, making dozens of trips for pollen and
nectar. (Think of solitary bees as single moms with families back home to feed).
Sugar from nectar provides flight fuel for their trips to and from the nest. The
proteins and amino acids in pollen are vital nutrients needed for the bees young
(larvae).

Females lay eggs on masses of pollen mixed with nectar within urnshaped earthen
nest cells. The eggs hatch and the grub-like larvae devour the food placed for them.
Over a period of weeks they eat pollen, defecate, and pupate, often spinning a silk
cocoon. The new adult generation may emerge then or during the spring or summer
of the coming year.

Solitary bees use diverse building materials for their nests: leaves, mud, sand,
stones, plant resins, downy plant fibers, even abandoned snail shells. Because of
the materials they collect, solitary bees are often called carpenter bees, mason
bees, leafcutter bees, carder, or plasterer bees.

About 20% of the worlds more than 20,000 species of bees are social. They live
communally in colonies of hundreds to tens of thousands of individuals. Each
colony has one queen who is the mother of sterile daughters (the worker bees) and
a few males called drones.

The best-known social bee around the world is the honey bee (Apis mellifera).
Originally native to Europe, honey bees traveled with their human caretakers and
now are found worldwide. Another well-known group is the fuzzy and charismatic
black-and-yellow bumblebee (Bombus spp.). The sacred stingless bees (Melipona
and Trigona) kept by both the ancient and modern Maya also live as highly social
colonies, producing a surplus of honey.

Social bees don't specialize in a particular floral color or shape -- their forte is
finding and exploiting rich sources of nectar and pollen. In fact, their efficiency and
numbers can cause problems for the solitary bees that land on flowers that honey
bees have depleted. Honey bees communicate through a waggle dance in which
scout bees return to the nest and inform other bees about the distance and
direction to a newly discovered flower patch.

What can be inferred about social bees?


A They live by themselves and their larvae.

B They do not live in colonies.

C They have defined roles and must cooperate with each other

Page 13 of 16
13.    Read the following text to answer the question.

The elephant is one of the largest and strongest animals. It is a strange looking
animals with its legs, huge sides and back, large hanging ears, a small tail, little
eyes, long white tusks and above all its long nose, the trunk. The trunk is the
elephant's peculiar feature, and its has various uses. The elephant draws up water
with its trunk and can squirt it all over its body like a shower. It can also lift leaves
and put them into its mouth. In fact, the trunk serves the elephant as a long arm
and hand. An elephant looks very clumsy and heavy, and yet it can move very
quickly. The elephant is a very intelligent animal. It intelligence combined with its
great strength makes it very useful servant to humankind and it can be trained to
serve in various ways such as carrying heavy loads, hunting for tigers and even
fighting.

The trunk is the elephant's peculiar feature....(paragraph 2) The underlined word


is close in meaning to
A Large

B Tough

C smooth

D strange

E long

Page 14 of 16
14.    Read the following text to answer the question.

A volcano is an opening in the Earth’s surface where molten rock can escape from
underneath. The Earth’s surface is made up of tectonic plates, which are spreading
apart, crunching into each other, or sliding beside one another. Volcanoes are
typically found at the fault lines between these plates. There can be active
volcanoes, which are currently, or have recently erupted. There are also dormant
volcanoes, which haven’t erupted recently, and extinct volcanoes, which will never
erupt again.
There are 4 major types of volcanoes:
Cinder Cone Volcanoes
These are the simplest type of volcano. They occur when particles and blobs of lava
are ejected from a volcanic vent. The lava is blown violently into the air, and the
pieces rain down around the vent. Over time, this builds up a circular or
oval-shaped cone, with a bowl-shaped crater at the top. Cinder cone volcanoes
rarely grow larger than about 1,000 feet above their surroundings.
Composite Volcanoes
Composite volcanoes, or strato volcanoes make up some of the world’s most
memorable mountains: Mount Rainier, Mount Fuji, and Mount Cotopaxi, for
example. These volcanoes have a conduit system inside them that channels magma
from deep within the Earth to the surface. They can have clusters of vents, with lava
breaking through walls, or issuing from fissures on the sides of the mountain. With
all this material coming out, they can grow thousands of meters tall. As we’ve seen
with the famous Mount Saint Helens, composite volcanoes can explode violently.
Shield Volcanoes
These are large, broad volcanoes that look like shields from above – hence the
name. The lava that pours out of shield volcanoes is thin, so it can travel for great
distances down the shallow slopes of the volcano. These volcanoes build up slowly
over time, with hundreds of eruptions, creating many layers. They’re not likely to
explode catastrophically. Perhaps the best-known shield volcanoes are the ones
that make up the Hawaiian Islands, especially Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea.
Lava Domes
Volcanic or lava domes are created by small masses of lava which are too viscous
(thick) to flow very far. Unlike shield volcanoes, with low-viscosity lava, the magma
from volcanic domes just piles up over and around the vent. The dome grows by
expansion of the lava within, and the mountain forms from material spilling off the
sides of the growing dome. Lava domes can explode violently, releasing a huge
amount of hot rock and ash.

Which volcano has low-viscosity lava?


A Composite volcano

B Shield volcano

C Explosion volcano

D Cinder Cone

E Lava volcano

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15.    Read the following text to answer the question.

An eclipse is an astronomical event that occurs when one celestial object moves
into the shadow of another. The term is most often used to describe either a solar
eclipse, when the Moon's shadow crosses the Earth's surface, or a lunar eclipse,
when the Moon moves into the shadow of Earth.

Eclipses may occur when the Earth and Moon are aligned with the Sun, and the
shadow of one body cast by the Sun falls on the other. So at New Moon (or rather
Dark Moon), when the Moon is in conjunction with the Sun, the Moon may pass in
front of the Sun as seen from a narrow region on the surface of the Earth and cause
a solar eclipse. At Full Moon, when the Moon is in opposition to the Sun, the Moon
may pass through the shadow of the Earth, and a lunar eclipse is visible from the
night half of the Earth.

An eclipse does not happen at every New or Full Moon, because the plane of the
orbit of the Moon around the Earth is tilted with respect to the plane of the orbit of
the Earth around the Sun, so as seen from the Earth, when the Moon is nearest to
the Sun (New Moon) or at largest distance (Full Moon), the three bodies usually are
not exactly on the same line.

What will happen if the Moon's shadow crosses the Earth's surface? There will be
….
A A lunar eclipse

B Solar eclipse

C New moon

D Full moon

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