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PREFACE

Welcome to UDAAN- a program to give wings to the girl students!

The UDAAN programme has been initiated with the primary objective of increasing the
enrollment of girl students in leading engineering institutions. The program is designed to
provide a platform to deserving girls who aspire to pursue higher education in engineering and
assist them in preparing for the entrance examinations.

The study material covers the syllabus of the Joint Entrance Examinations. It has been designed
to ensure that it is easy to understand. The progression of the content moves from simpler to
complex concepts as the Unit/Chapter proceeds. Each topic and subtopic is followed by some
practice questions for you to attempt. Answers to these questions are given at the end. In case
you have difficulty in solving any of them, please email us at udaanhelpdesk2017@gmail.com
or contact at 011-23231070.

Best of luck and happy learning!

Chairperson, CBSE
INDEX

Unit No. Topic Page No.

Unit–1 Physics & Measurements 01

Unit–2 Kinematics 118

Unit–3 Laws of Motion 287

Unit–4 Work, Energy and Power 434

Unit–5 Rotational Motion 584


UNIT–1 : PHYSICS + MEASUREMENTS
Learning Objectives
After going through this unit, you would be able to understand, appreciate and apply the following concept:
 Need for measurements and basic ideas related to the “measurement process”.
 Fundamental and derived units.
 Systems of units.
 The seven base units of the SI.
 Use of multiples and sub-multiples in SI.
 Derived units of some important physical quantities.
 Dimensions of physical quantities.
 Dimensional formulae of different physical quantities.
 Dimensional analysis.
 Main applications and limitations of dimensional analysis.
 Principle of dimensional homogenity.
 “Least count”.
 Precision and Accuracy in measurements.
 Errors in measurement.
 Systematic and random measurements.
 Absolute, relative and percentage errors.
 Combination of errors.
 Rules, for calculation of net error, in calculations involving.
– addition and subraction.
– multiplication and divison.
– raising to the power ‘n’.
 Significant figures.
 Meaning of
– Average / mean error.
– Mean sqaure error and root mean square error.
– Standard deviation.

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The ‘Need’ for Measurements
Measurements, as we all know, have played a very significant role in the development of all physical
sciences. It is ‘observations’, coupled with (progressively precise and accurate) ‘measurements’, that
have helped scientist to develop, and improve, their basic theories of nature and natural phenomena.
The ‘Measurement Process’
Measurement is basically a process of comparison. The ‘measure’, of a given physical quantity is obtained
by comparing it with a standard, or reference, measure of that quantity and finding how many times (say n
times), that standard measure is contained in the given physical quantity. The ‘measure’, of the given
physical quantity, is then expressed as (n) units), n is known as the numerical value.
Unit
The standard, or reference, ‘measure’ of a given physical quantity (chosen after due delibrations, followed
by international agreement, as far as possible), is known as the unit of that physical quantity.
Standard
It is often (but not always) possible to have physical embodiments, of the units of different physical quantities.
Such a ‘physical embodiment’, of the UNIT of a physical quantity, is known as the standard measure, or
just the STANDARD, of that physical quantity.
Fundamental Units
It turns out that one need not define out a ‘unit’ for all the (vast number of) physical quantities. A suitable
choice, of an appropriate number of (selected) physical quantities, enables us to define the units of ‘all
other physical quantities’, in terms of the units of these (few, carefully selected) physical quantities. The
unit, of these few (selected) physical quantities, are known as the fundamental units.
Derived Units
The units of other physical quantities can be defined in terms of the units of these (selected few) units. We
call the units of all the other physical quanties, as ‘derived units’.
Derived units may thus be viewed as units that are defined through the (selected, few) fundamental units.
Number of the Fundamental Units
In the initial stages, it was thought that one could define the units of all the other physical quantities by
assigning, and defining, the unit of length, mass and time. These three physical quantities – length, mass and
time – were, therefore, regarded as the fundamental quantities. The number of fundamental units, in the
initial stages, was, therefore, three.
Later on, it was realized that there was a need for taking an additional number of physical quantities as
‘fundamental, or base, quantities.’ The number, presently being used is seven. We now take the seven

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quantities. “Length, mass, time, electric current, thermodynamic temperature, luminous intensity and amount
of substance” as the (seven) base or fundamental quantities.
Systems of Units
We have had several systems of units, in use, at different places and at different times. The three more
prominent systems of units, that have been used earlier, are
(1) The FPS (Foot - found - second) system
(2) The CGS (Centimeter - gram - second) system
(3) The MKS (Meter - kilogram - second) system
In the year 1971, the general conference on weights and measures (CGPM - the conference general
despoids et. Measures - having its central office at Sevres, near Paris, in France) developed and
recommended a system of units, now known by the abbreviation SI units. It is the system that is now being
used internationally for scientific, industrial, technical and commercial works.
The SI Units
The SI or the international system of units (Systeme International d’ units), has seven base (or fundamental)
units, two supplementary units (for the angle and the solid angle) and a large number of derived or secondary
units.
Two important features, of the SI, namely:
1. It being a coherent system (i.e., a system in which the derived units are obtained from the basic units,
by multiplication, or division, without introducing any additional numerical factor).
2. The use of the decimal system in it (which makes conversions, within the system, as simple and
convenient).
make this system logically superior to all the earlier system of units.
The definitions, of the seven base units, of the SI, are given below:
metre (m) (Physical quantity : Length) – The metre is defined as the length of the path, moved by light,
in vacuum, during a time interval of 1/299 792 458 of a second. (Note that the effect of this definition is to
fix the speed of light in a vacuum at exactly 299 792 458 ms–1).
kilogram (kg) (Physical quantity : Mass) – The kilogram is the mass of a cylinder of platinum-iridium
alloy kept at the international Bureau of Weights and Measures in Paris.
second (s) (Physical quantity : Time) : The second is the duration of 9 192 631 770 periods of the
radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of the caesium
133 atom.
ampere (A) (Physical quantity : Electric Current) – This is defined as the constant current which, if

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maintained in each of two infinitely long, straight, parallel wires, of negligible cross-section, placed 1 m
apart, in vacuum, produces between the wires a force of 2 × 10–7 newton per meter of their length.
kelvin (K) (Physical quantity : Thermodynamic Temperature) – In SI units, temperatures are measured
on the thermodynamic scale with absolute zero as ‘zero’, and the triple point of water (i.e., the temperature
at which ice, water and water vapour are in equilibrium) as the upper fixed point. The interval is divided
into 273.15 divisions and each division is taken as the unit of temeperature. This units is called the kelvin.
candela (Cd) (Pysical quantity : Luminous Intensity) – The candela is the luminous intensity, in a given
direction, of a source that emits monochromatic radiation of frequency 540 × 1012 hertz and that has a
 1 
radiant intensity, in that direction,   of watt per steradian.
 683 
mole (mol) (Physical quanity : Amount of Substance) – The moe is the amount of any substance which
contains as many elementary entities as there are atoms is 0.012 kg of the Isotope, 126C , of carbon.

The two supplementary units, for the angle and the solid angle, may be defined as follows:
Radian (rad) (The unit of angle) : One radian equals the plane angle, subtended at the centre of a circle,
by an arc of that circle that has a length equal to the radius of the circle.
Steradian (sr) (The unit of solid angle) : One steradian equals the solid angle, subtended at the centre
of a sphere, by an area (A) on the surface of the sphere where that area (A) equals the area of a square of
side equal to the radius of the sphere.
Multiples and Sub-multiples in SI
The SI units, as we have noted, use the decimal system. A number of multiples, and submultiples,
correspondings to different powers of ten, are, therefore, an integral part of the SI units.
We list the names of the multiples, and the sub-multiples, associated with the different powers of ten, in the
table given below.
Multiples Submultiples
Power of ‘ten’ Name of multiple Symbol Power of ‘ten’ Name of submultiple Symbol
1018 exa e 10–18 atto a
15 –15
10 peta P 10 femto f
1012 tera T 10–12 pico p
9 –9
10 giga G 10 nano n
106 mega M 10–6 micro 
103 kilo k 10–3 milli m
2 –2
10 hecto h 10 centi c
1 –1
10 deka da 10 deci d

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Derived SI Units of Some Important Physical Quantities
The table, given below, gives the names of some important derived units. Here it is important to remember
that some derived units have been given names of their own. This has been done for the twin purpose of (i)
practical convenience and (ii) honouring distinguished scientists, for their contribution in the field relevant to
the concerned physical quantity.
For example:
(a) The derived unit of force [ = kilogram – meter / (second2)], has been given the name ‘newton (N)’.
(b) The derived unit of pressure [ = newton / (meter)2], has been given the name ‘pascal’ (Pa).
(c) The derived unit of ‘potential difference’ [= joule / (ampere-second)] has been given the name ‘volt’
(=V).
and, so on.

Physical Quantity Name of the SI Unit Symbol


Velocity meter per second ms–1
Acceleration meter per seond squared ms–2
Momentum kilogram - meter per second kg ms–1
Force newton N
Pressure pascal / (newton per meter squared) Pa/Nm–2
Work joule J
Energy joule J
Power watt W
Frequency hertz Hz
Quantity of heat / heat energy joule J
Moment of inertia kilogram meter squared kg m2
Elastic module newton per meter squared Nm–2
Stress newton per meter squared Nm–2
Sound intensity watt per meter squared Wm–2
Illumination lux lx
Luminous flux lumen lm
Surface tension newton per metre Nm–1

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Coefficient of viscosity pas / (N-s/m2) (N-s/m2)
Electric charge coulomb C
Capacitance farad F
Inductance henry H
Resistance ohm 
Potential / emf volt V
Absolute permittivily farad per metre Fm–1
Electric dipole moment coulomb metre Cm
Electric field newton per coulomb or volt per metre NC–1 or Vm–1
Electric polarisation coulomb per metre sqaured Cm–2
Electro chemical equivalent kilogram per coulomb kg C–1
Specific heat capacity joule per (kilogram kelvin) Jkg–1 K–1
Specific latent heat capacity joule per kilogram J kg–1
Coefficient of thermal conductivity watt per (metre-kelvin) Wm–1K–1
Coefficient of linear / area / per kelvin K –1
volume expansion
Magnetic flux weber Wb
Magnetic field intensity tesla T
The vector H ampere per metre Am–1
Intensity of magnetisation ampere per metre Am–1
Absolute per meability henry per metre Hm–1

Names of Some Units in General Use


We list below the names, and symbols, of some units (of different physical quantities), that are not a part of
the SI units, but are still used, quite often, in actual pratice.

Name of Physical Its Unit, Still in Relation with the


Quantity General Use Relevant SI Unit
Name Symbol
mass carat C 1C = 2 × 10–4 kg
mass quintal q 1q = 100 kg
mass tonne t 1t = 103 kg

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time minute min 1 min = 60s
time hour h 1h = 3600s
time day d 1d = 86400s
time year y 1y = 3.156 × 107s

length micron m m = 10 –6 m

length angstorm A 1A  10 –10 m


area barn b 1b = 10–28 m2
area are a 1a = 102m2
area hectare ha 1 ha = 104m2
volume litre L 1L = 10–3m3
pressure bar bar 1 bar = 105 Pa
pressure standard atm 1 atm = 1.013 × 105 Pa
pressure torr Tr 1 Tr = 1 mm of Hg  9.8 N/m2

0
  
angle degree 10 =   rad
 180 

Dimensions
The dimensions, of a physical quantity, are the powers, to which the fundamental (or base) quantities, must
be raised to represent it.
The number of fundamental (or base) quantities, needed to represent a given physical quantity, depends on
the nature of that quantity. While dealing with mechanical phenomena, we generally need only three
fundamental quantities (mass, length and time) to represent the different mechanical quantities. However,
while dealing with
(1) thermal phenomenon, we also need another fundamental quantity, which has been taken as the
(thermodynamic) temperature.
(2) electric and magnetic phenomenon, we also need an additional fundamental quantity which has
been taken as the electric current.
(3) Optical phenomenon, we use the additional fundamental quantity, the luminous intensity.
The seventh fundamental quantity, the amount of substance, is generally not needed in defining the dimensions
of different physical quantities.

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Example:
1. The dimensions, of the physical quantity, area / volume, are zero each in mass and time but are 2/3 in
length. This is because an area / volume is obtained by multiplying a length with another length / two
other lenghts. Hence the power to which length, needs to be raised, to represent an area / volume, is
2/3. Thus the dimensions of area / volume are zero in mass, 2/3 in length and zero in time.
2. The specific heat capacity of a substance equals the heat (energy) needed to raise the temperature,
of a unit mass of the substance, through one kelvin.
Now energy / work, equals force × length, which, comes out to be mass multiplied by the square of
length divided by square of time. Hence,
Specific heat capacity would correspond to

mass×(length)2 ×(time)–2
mass×(temperature)

This equals (length)2 × (time)–2 × (temperature)–1


We may thus say that the dimensions of specific heat capacity are zero in mass; 2 in length; (–2) in
time and (–1) in temeperature.
3. Electric potential equals ‘work per unit charge’. Now electric charge equals (electric current × time).
Hence the dimensions of electric potential would correspond to

 mass  ×(length)2 ×(time)–2


 electric current  ×(time)
This equals (mass) × (length)2 × (time)–3 × (electric current)–1.
Thus the dimensions of electric potential are 1 in mass, 2 in length, (–3) in time and (–1) in electric
current.
We may thus obtain the dimensions, of a given physical quantity, through a use of its basic definition.
Dimensional Formula
The dimensional formula, of a given physical quantity, is a compact way, of expressing its dimensions. For
writing the dimensions formula, of different physical quantities, we generally use the symbols M, L, T, (I/
A), K, (C/cd) and (mol), for representing the seven fundamental quantities. The dimensional formula, of a
given physical quantity, is thus an expression, in terms of these symbols, that tells us how the given physical
quantity is co-related to the seven fundamental quantities. However, a general ‘convention’, that is followed
here, is to write out only those fundamental quantities that need to be raised to a fixed (non-zero) power to
represent the given physical quantity. This ‘ convention’ helps in writing the dimensional formula in a compact
form and avoids unnecessary confusion.

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For the examples, discussed above, we could then say that the dimensional formula of:
(i) area, is L2
(ii) volume, is L3

(iii) specific heat capacity, is  L2 T –2 K –1 

(iv) electric potential, is  ML2 T –3 I –1 

and so.
The table, given below, gives a list of the dimensional formula of a number of physical quantities. The
examples, given above, indicate that we can get the dimensionl formuae, of ofther physical quantities also,
once we know their definition.
The following table gives the dimensional formulae of some physical quantities:

S. No. Derived Physical Quantity Defining Formula Dimensional Formula

1. Area l×b [M0L2T0]


2. Volume l×b×h [M0L2T0]
M
3. Density [M1L–3T0]
V
Density of Substance
4. Specific Gravity Density of Water [M0L0T0]

No. of Vibrations
5. Frequency [M0L0T–1]
Time
Arc
6. Angle [M0L0T0]
Radius

Displacement
7. Velocity [M0L1T–1]
Time
Distance
8. Speed [M0L1T–1]
Time
Area
9. Areal velocity [M0L2T–1]
Time
Change in Velocity
10. Acceleration [M0L1T–2]
Time
10
11. Linear momentum M×V [M1L1T–1]
12. Force mass × acceleration [M1L1T–2]
13. Weight (= a force) W = mg [M1L1T–2]
14. Moment of force/Torque/Couple Force × distance [M1L2T–2]
15. Impulse Force × Time [M1L1T–1]
Force
16. Pressure [M1L–1T–2]
Area
17. Work Force × Distance [M1L2T–2]
1
18. Kinetic Energy mv 2 [M1L2T–2]
2
19. Potential Energy mgh [M1L2T–2]
2
Force×  Length 
20. Gravitational constant 2 [M–1L3T–2]
 mass 
Force
21. Gravitational field strength [M0L1T–2]
mass
Work
22. Gravitational Potential [M0L2T–2]
mass
F
23. Force constant (k), (of a spring) [M1L0T–2]
L
Work
24. Power [M1L2T–3]
Time
25. Moment of Inertia ( I ) Mass × Distance2 [M1L2T0]
Force
26. Stress [M1L–1T–2]
Area
Changein length
27. Strain Origional length [M0L0T0]

Stress
28. Modulus of Elasticity [M1L–1T–2]
Strain

Lateral Strain
29. Poisson’s Ratio [M0L0T0]
Longitudinal Strain

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Change in velocity
30. Velocity gradient [M0L0T–1]
Distance
Tangential stress
31. Coefficient of dynamic viscosity [M1L–1T–1]
Velocity gradient

Force
32. Surface Tension [M1L0T–2]
Length

Arc
33. Angular displacement    [M0L0T0]
Radius
Angular displacement
34. Angular velocity ( ω ) [M0L0T–1]
Time

Change in angular velocity


35. Angular acceleration ( α ) [M0L0T–2]
Time
36. Angular momentum L [ML2T–1]
37. Angular Impulse ΔL [ML2T–1]
38. Temperature [K]

  2 – 1 
39. Coefficient of linear expansion (·) 1   Temp.  t 2 – t1   [K–1]

 Heat  Energy
40. Specific heat capacity [L2T–2K–1]
Mass × Temp

Energy
41. Specific latent heat capacity [L2T–2]
Mass
Q
42. Entropy [M1L2T–2K–1]

H
43. Thermal capacity [M1L2T–2K–1]

PV
44. Gas constant [ML2T–2K–1]
nT

Qd
45. Coefficient of thermal conductivity A   –   t [M1L1T–3K–1]

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46. Pole strength ampere × meter [M0L1T0I]
47. Magnetic Moment [M0L2T0I1]
48. Magnetic flux  [ML2T–2I–1]

49. Magnetic field, magnetic

flux density (B) [MT–2I–1]



50. Permeability of free space r [MLT–2I–2]

51. Magnetic susceptibilty m  r – 1 [M0L0T0]

52. Electric Charge I×T [M0L0T1I1]


Work
53. Electric potential [M1L2T–3I–1]
Charge
Work
54. E.M.F [M1L2T–3I–1]
Charge
q
55. Capacity (Electric) [M–1L–2T4I2]
V
V
56. Resistance (Electric) [M1L2T–3I–2]
i
RA
57. Resistivity  [M1L3T–3I–2]
L
1
58. Conductivity  [M–1L–3T3I2]

59. Permittivity     r  0  1  x  0 [M–1L–3T4I2]
1
60. Electric conductance [M–1L–2T3I2]
R
61. Electric power V×I [M1L2T–3]
V
62. Electrical Impedance (Z) [M1L2T–3I–2]
i
63. Electrical admittance 1/Z = (Reciprocal of electric [M–1L–2T3I2]
impedance)
di
64. Self Inductance (L) V L [ML2T–2I–2]
dt
13
Energy
65. Boltzmann's constant [M1L2T–2K–1]
Temp

E
66. Stefan's constant [M1L0T-3K–4]
TA4
F
67. Co-efficient of friction = , N = Normal reaction [M0L0T0]
N
68. Dielectric constant It is also called relative permitivity [M0L0T0]
69. Planck's constant E = hv [ML2T–1]
70. Refractive index  [M0L0T0]
Dimensional Analysis
The concept of dimensions has led to the development of ‘dimensional analysis’. Dimensional analysis has
very many uses and applications; its simple uses include.
(a) Checking the correctness, or otherwise, of a given formula or result.
(b) Conversion, from one system of units, to another.
(c) Obtaining relations showing the nature of dependance of a given physical quantity (X) on other
(related to it) quantities.
The last of these uses, however, has two built in limitations:
(i) We cannot obtain the exact values of the numerical ‘constants’, or the nature of dependence of x, on
any (related) dimensionless quantity.
(ii) The form, of the relation (f of x), can be obtained only for that many number of physical quantities as
is the number of fundamental, or ‘base’, quantities, being used.
For example, in mechanics, where we generally use, and need, only three fundamental quantities (mass,
length and time), we can obtain the form of relation for x only in terms of (up to) three other (related)
physical quantities.
Principle of Dimensional Homogenity
The above listed uses, and application, of dimensional analysis, are based on the “principle of dimensional
homogenity”; According to this principle:
“A relation, between different physical quantities, can be an acceptable (or correct) relation, only if the
dimensions, of all the (different) terms, on both sides of the relation, are identical”.
In simple terms, this principle implies that we can equate say, a force only to those terms whose “net
dimensions” are identical to those of force. Thus a force cannot be equated to ‘momentum’ but can be
equated to ‘rate of change of momentum’.

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We now give below some examples, illustrating the above listed uses of ‘dimensional analysis’.
Example:
Check the correctness, or otherwise, of the following dimensional formulae:
(i) Dimensional formula, for specific latent heat capacity, is [ML2T–2K–1]
(ii) The dimensional formula for Planck’s constant (h) (as per the Planck / Einstein suggestion :
h × frequency of radiation = energy of a ‘photon’ of the radiation) is [ML2T–1].
Solution:
(i) We know that specific latent heat capacity equals the heat (energy) needed per unit mass, for change
of state, at the melting point of the solid / boiling point of the liquid. Hence specific latent heat
Energy
capacity =
Mass

 MLT –2 × L 
 Its dimensional formula is  M 
 

i.e. [M0L2T–2]
The given dimensional formula (= ML2T–2K–1) is, therefore, incorrect.
(ii) We have h × frequency = energy

Energy  MLT –2 × L 
 [h] = Frequency =  T –1 
 

= [ML2T–1]
The given dimensional formula, for Planck’s constant, is, therefore, correct.
Example:
Check the correctness, or otherwise, of the following relations:
(i) EP = kmgh
(EP = gravitational / potential energy, k = a numerical constant, m = mass, g = acceleration due to
gravity, h = height (of mass m)
3
(ii) t = k  12 r 2 s 12

(where t = time period of oscillation of a drop inside a liquid, k = a numerical constant,  = density
of liquid; r = radius of drop; s = surface tension of liquid).

15
Solution:
(i) In the relation
EP = kmgh,
The dimensions, of the term, on the left, are
EP = (Energy) = [ML2T–2]
On the right hand side, the dimensions, of the product of the three terms, on the right, are
(M0L0T0) × (M) × (LT–2) × (L) = [ML2T–2]
The dimensions, on the two sides of the relation are thus seen to be the same. Hence the given
relation is (dimensionally) correct.
(ii) In the relation
3
t = k  12 r 2 s 12

We have,
Dimensions, of the term, on the left = [M0L0T]
and dimensions, of the product of the terms, on the right
1
 MLT –2 
2
1 3

=  M L T  ×  ML 
0 0 –3 2
L 2
  ( surface tension = force/length)
 L 

=  MT –1 

The dimensions, on the two sides of the relation, are thus seen to be different. The given relation is,
therefore, (dimensionally) incorrect.
Example:
Given that the relations between the fundamental units of mass, length, time, in the FPS (feet, pound,
second) system, and the MKS (metre, kilogram, second) system, are
1 pound = 0.4536 kg
1 feet = 0.5045 metre
1 second = 1 second,
find the relation, between the units of energy (foot poundal in FPS system, and joule in the MKS system).

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Solution:
We have,
[Energy] = [ML2T–2]
 The units of energy, in the FPS, system,
Foot poundal = (pound) (foot)2 (second)–2
Similarly, the unit of energy, in the MKS system,
joule = (kilogram) (metre)2 (second)-2

2 2
1foot poundal  pound   foot   second 
     
1joule  kilogram   metre   second 

2
 0.4536 kg   0.5048 m  2
=   1
 1 kg   1m 

= (0.4536) (0.5048)2 × 1  0.1255


Thus 1 foot poundal  0.1255 joule
Example:
The period, of rotation (t), of a planet, round the sun, depends on the (i) universal gravitational constant
(G), (ii) mass of the sun (M) and (iii) radius (R), of the planetary orbit.
Use the method of dimensional analysis to obtain a formula for t, in terms of G, M and r.
Solution:
We assume that,
t = k [G]a [M]b [R]C (k = a numerical constant)
Taking dimensions, of the all terms, on the two sides, we get
[M0L0T1] = [M–1L3T–2]a [M]b [L]c

 M
–a +b 
L
3a +c 
T
–2a 

The dimensions, on the two sides, have to be equal. Hence, we get


(–a + b) = 0; (3a + c) = 0 and (–2a) = 1
 We get a = –1/2, b = –1/2 and c = 3/2
 The required relation is

17
1 1 3
t = k G  2
M  R 2 2

1
 R3 
2

 k 
 GM 

3
2 2 R 
or t = k  
 GM 

We thus get the result:


The square, of the time period of a planet, is proportional to the cube of the radius of the planetary orbit.
[This result, first obtained by Kepler, is known as Kepler’s third law of planetary motion].
Example:
The dimensional formula, for the universal gravitational constant (G), would equal that of the term:

momentum×area
(1)
density

velocity× volume
(2) 2
 mass 

acceleration × area
(3)
mass

energy × distance
(4)
mass
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:
From Newton’s law, namely

M1 M 2
F= G
r2
We get,

 MLT –2 × L2 
  
G  2    M –1L3T –2 
 M 

18
Also the term,

acceleration ×area  LT –2 × L2 
    M –1L3T –2 
mass  M 

Hence the dimensional formula, of this term, is identical to that of [G].


[It can be checked that this equality does not hold for the other terms.]
Example:
Out of the following, the only formula that is dimensionally acceptable, is

(1) vc   k rd 

krd
(2) vc 

kr 2 d
(3) vc 

k
(4) vc 
r 2d

where vc is critical velocity, of a liquid of viscosity  , flowing in a tube of radius r. (d is the density of the
liquid).
Correc answer: (1)
Solution:
From Newton’s law, for viscosity, namely

dv
F =  A , we get,
dz

 MLT –2 
   2 –1 L    ML–1T –1 
 
 L .LT 

Now,

L.H.S. = velocity =  LT –1 

19
 ML–1T –1 
and R.H.S. (for option (1) =  LML–3 
 

=  LT –1 

Hence, for this option, the dimensions of the two sides are the
same. Hence this option is dimensionally acceptable.
[It can be easily seen that the other three options are not
dimensionally acceptable options].
Example:
A dimensionally acceptable formula, for the frequency (n) of a
tuning fork, is
(k = numerical constant,  = length of prongs; Y and d denote Young’s modulus and density of the material
of fork):

y
(1) n  k
d

d
(2) n  k
y

k y
(3) n
 d

k d
(4) n
 y

Correct answer: (3)


Solution:
We have L.H.S = frequency = M0L0T–1

 1 ML–1T –2   1 2 –2   LT –1 
and R.H.S. (for option (3) =  L  LT  
 ML–3   L   L 

=  T –1 

20
Hence this option gives us a dimensionally acceptable formula. [It can be easily seen that the other three
options do not correspond to dimensionally acceptable formulae].
Least Count
The concept of ‘least count’ is a concept that is associated with every measuring instrument or device. It
equals the smallest magnitude of the physical quantity, that a given instrument, apparatus or device (designed
for measuring that physical quantity), can measure on its ‘measuring scale’.
We need to remember that it is not just the vernier calipers, or the screw gange, that have a ‘least count’
associated with them. All measuring instruments, (be it the meter scale, the spring balance, the thermometer,
the ammeter, the voltmeter, and so on); have an appropriate least count associated with them.
It is interesting to note here that a lower value of the “least count”, is regarded as a ‘better least count’.
Thus a vernier calipers, having a least count of 0.1mm, has a “better least count’ than a meter scale whose
“least count” is (usually) 1 mm only. This means that a vernier caliper can measure a length more precisely
than a meter scale.
Precision in Measurements
The precision, associated with a measurements, depends on the “least count” of the instrument used for
making that measurement. An instrument, with a “better least count” gives a more precise measurement.
Thus a temperature measurement, done with a thermometer of ‘least count’ 0.10C, would be more precise
than that done with a thermometer whose least count is 0.50C. Similarly, an unknown emf, measured with
a potentiometer having a potential gradient of 10 mV/cm, would be more precise than that measured with
a potentiometer having a potential gradient of 100 mV/cm. And so on.
Very often, an unknown quantity is ‘calculated’, by using a “formula” for it; after measuring the different
physical quantities, present in that formula. The precision, of such an indirect measurement, can be calculated
through a knowledge of the “least counts” of the different instruments used (for measuing the different
quantities present in the formula) and the form of the “formula”.
Accuracy of a Measurement
It many appear logical to think that an increase in the precision of a measurement, would result in a more
accurate measurement. This is generally true but we can have situations in which the result of measurements,
done with more precise (having “better” least count) instruments, may be less accurate than the result
obtained by using less precise measuring instruments. ‘Accuracy’ and ‘Precision’ thus do not, necessarily,
go “hand-in-hand”.
Why is this so? This is because of the way “accuracy” (of a measurement) is defined. A measurement of a
physical quantity (having a known standard value), is regarded as more accurate if the measured value is
closer to its known standard value. Thus, if some physical quantity, having a standard value of say, 10 units,
is measured using.
(i) less precise instruments and the result obtained is 9.8 units.

21
(ii) more precise instruments, and the result obtained is 9.75 units,
the first measurement would be regarded as ‘more accurate’, even though it is ‘less precise’.
Errors in Measurement
The measurement, of any physical quantity, has a ‘built-in’ limitation, due to the least count/s of the measuring
instrument/s, used for its measurement. However, based on the results of different experiments, done with
(as high as possible) precision instruments, we generally have standard or accepted values, for different
physical quantities.
The result of a particular experiment, done for measuring a given physical quantity, may not match with the
accepted, or standard, value of that quantity. The difference, between the result of the experiment, and the
standard value, then gives a measure of the error in that experiment.
We can also speak of ‘error’ in another context. Suppose one takes a large number of observations during
a particular experiment. The mean, or average value of all these measurements, then represent the (best)
result of that experiment. The results obtained, from the different individual measurements, generally do not
quite match this (best) results of the experiment. The difference, between the result of a particular individual
measurement, and the ‘mean value (or best) result’, may than be regarded as a measure of the error in that
individual measurement.
It is imortant to note that the term ‘error’ and ‘mistake’ are not quite the same. A mistake may be due to
carelessness on the part of the experimentalist, or use of faulty apparatus or devices, or to some other such
cause, which can be avoided, or corrected for. Errors, on the other hand, are there inspite of the best
inputs of the experimentalist as well as the use of the (best possible) precise instruments. Errors may be
viewed as an integral, or essential, ‘unavoidable’ part of the ‘experiments’.
Systematic and Random Errors
Errors, in measurements, are generally classified into two broad categories: (i) Systematic errors and (ii)
Random errors.
Systematic errors may be regarded as errors that are due to causes that tend to follow the same pattern, or
rule, during different observations. They may be thought of as errors that tend to be governed by some
definite rule.
For example, some built-in error / defect in the measuring instrument used; some definite imperfection or
error in the technique / procedure of the experiment, some definite ‘personal error’ in the observer, are
some of the causes that would lead to a ‘systematic error’ in the measurements.
It is easy to realize that once the cause of any such systematic error is located / recognized, one can correct
for, or avoid, that systematic error.
Random Errors, on the other hand, are errors that do not have a definite, or well / specified cause. They,
therefore, lead to random, or irregualr, error in measurements. Physicists have developed a ‘theory’ of
such errors; this ‘theory’ helps us to obtain the ‘best value’ of the result of (careful and precise) measurements

22
of different quantities. It also helps us to estimate the ‘net error’ in a result, obtained through different
algebraic operations, on the different measurements, of two or more physical quantities.
The following definitions, and rules, are a part of the ‘theory’ of ‘random errors’.
Normal, or Gaussian, Law
Random errors, generally, tend to follow the normal, or Gaussian law. This law, expressed through the
graph shown here, implies that the probability of small errors is high while that of large errors decreases
(exponentially) with an increase in the magnitude of these errors.
In the graph shown
x = value of the random error.
n (x) = number of times the error x occurs.
Absolute Error
Let the result of n measurements, of a given physical quantity,
1 n
be x1, x2, x3...... xn. The mean value of these n results, would be x   xi
n i 1

The difference

xi   xi  x 

i.e., the difference between the result of the ith measurement and the mean (or ‘best’) value of all the n
measurements, is known as the absolute error in the ith measurement.
For the case where the result (say x) of the measurements of a physical quantity, is compared with the
standard, or accepted value (say X) of physical quantity, the difference.
(x–X)
is known as the absolute error in the result of the measurements done.
Relative Error
The mean, of the magnitudes of the absolute errors of the different (n) measurements, would give us the
mean absolute error  x  of all the measurement.

 x 
The ratio, is, said to represent the (mean) relative error, in the measurements, done for the physical
x 
quantity (x).

23
 xi 
Inclidently, the ratio would give the ‘relative error’ in the ith measurement.
x
Percentage Error
The relative error, expressed as a percentage, is known as the ‘percentage error’ in the measurements (of
 x  100%
x). Thus (mean) percentage error =
x

 xi  100%
and percentage error in the ith measurement =
x
Combination of Errors
The values, of different physical quantities, are generally obtained by carrying out different algebraic
operations, (multiplication / division, addition / subtraction, raising to a power etc.) on the measurements of
two or more physical quantities. We, therefore, need a ‘set of rules’, for finding the ‘net-error’, in the
‘result’, obtained through such algebraic operations. We state below the ‘rules’ that are generally followed,
for combining ‘different individual errors’, to get the ‘net-error’ in the result.
Rule for Addition / Subtraction
The absolute error, in the sum / difference, of two different physical quantities, must always be taken as the
sum of the absolute errors in each of these two different physical quantities. Expressed mathematically, for
x = (a  b),  x =  [  a +  b].
Rule for Multiple / Division

a x  a b 
Let x = ab, or x = . Then it can be shown that   
b x  a b 

The relative error, in the product / quotient, of two different physical quantities, must always be taken as the
SUM of the relative errors, in each of these two different physical quantities.
Rule for ‘error’, due to taking a power (say n), of a measured physical quantity:

x  a 
Let x  a n . It can be shown that   n 
x  a 
The relative error, in the nth power, of a measured physical quantity, is n times the relative error in that
physical quantity.
We aften need to combine these rules to calculate the relative error / percentage error in a given measurement.

24
Let a physical quantity, P, be defined as

a b m
P
cn
Combining the above discribed rules, we can then write

P   a   b   c  
     m   n  
P   a   b   c 

Example:
Two masses, M1 and M2, are measures with accuracies of  5g and  2g, respectively. The error, in their
sum, and their difference, would then be, respectively,
(1) 7g and 3g
(2) 3g and 7g
(3) 3g and 3g
(4) 7g and 7g
Correct answer: (4)
Solution:
The (absolute) error, in the sum, or difference, of two quantities, is always taken as the sum of the (absolute)
errors in them. Hence the error, in both cases is (5+2)g, i.e. 7g.
Example:
The length (L), of a table, is measured (in m) to an accuracy of 0.01m while its breadth (B) is measured
(in m) to an accuracy of 0.02m. The errors, in the area (A ) of the table, and the ratio, x, of its length to
breadth, would then be, respectively,

 0.01L  0.02B 
(1) (0.01 B + 0.02 L) and  
 L2 

 0.01L  0.02B 
(2) (0.01 L + 0.02 B) and  
 L2 

 0.01B  0.02L 
(3) (0.01 B + 0.02 L) and  
 B2 

 0.01B  0.02L 
(4) (0.01 L + 0.02 B) and  
 B2 

25
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:
We have,
A = LB

A L B 0.01 0.02
    
A L B L B

 0.01 0.02 
A     × LB =  0.01B + 0.02L 
 L B 

L
Also, x=
B

x L B 0.01 0.02
    
x L B L B

 0.01 0.02   L 
x      
 L B   B

0.01 0.02L  0.01B + 0.02L 


=   
B B2  B2 
Example:
The formulae, for resistivity (  ) and Young’s modules (Y) are, respectively,,

r 2 R FL
 and Y  2
 r 
The relative errors, in  and Y, would then be, given, by the respective expressions.

  2r R    ΔY dF L 2r  
(1)      and      
  r R    Y F L r  

  2r R    Y dF L 2r  
(2)      and      
  r R    Y F L r  

  2r R    Y F L 2r  
(3)   2    and     2  
  r R    Y F L r  
26
  2r R    Y F L 2r  
(4)   2    and     2  
  r R    Y F L r  

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:
The relative errors, in all the products as well as the quotients, have to be all added to get the relative error
in the given quantity.

 r   r 
Note the relative error in r2 is 2   and NOT 2  2  . Hence, the two expressions, given only in
 r  r 
option (1), correspond to these rules.
Example:
The height (h), and the base radius (r) of a cone, are measured to have values of 9.3 cm (using a meter
scale of least count 0.1 cm) and 2.45 cm (using a vernier calipers of least count 0.01 cm). Find the volume,
 1 2 
V,   r h  of the cone, along with the error in it.
 3 
Solution:
We have,

1 2
V =  r h
3

1 2
=      9.3cm 3  58.466 cm 3
3

1 2
As V =  r h ,
3
We have,

V  r h 
  2 
V  r h 

 0.01 0.1 
=  2   
 2.45 9.3 

27
   0.0082  0.011    0.0192

V = 0.0192×58.466 cm 3  1.12 cm 3

The error, in V, is, therefore, of the order of 1.1 cm3. We would therefore, approximate the value of V and
write it as

V   58.5  1.1 cm3

Example:

The length,  , of the sides of a cube, equals  4.0  0.1 cm. The mass of the cube is measured to be
 64.8  0.2  g. Obtain the value, of the density of the material of the cube, on the basis of these
measurements.
Solution:

mass
We have, density =
volume

m m
d  
v 3

d  m  
   3 
d  m  

 0.2 0.1 
=   3 
 64.8 4.0 

=   0.0031  0.075  0.078

64.8
d = 4.0 3  g cm  1.0125 g cm 
3 3
But
 
d  1.0125  0.078  g cm3   0.079  g cm3 

 0.08 g cm3 

We would, therefore, write (after rounding off to the second place of decimal) the value of d as

d  1.01 0.08  g cm3 

28
Additional Notes
A. Significant Figures
We know that the limit of precision of any measurement is dependent on the ‘least counts’ of instruments
used for that measurement. We, therefore, need to express ‘our experimental results’ only up to that
number of digits that are ‘permitted’ by the limitations of the measuring instruments. The concept of ‘significant
figures’ has been introduced to keep this point in mind.
The ‘significant digits’, in a result, are normally those digits that are known reliably, plus one additional digit
that is uncertain. Here it is important to note that (i) a ‘change of units’ (ii) the location of the ‘decimal
point’, do not affect the number of significant digits in a number.
We generally follow the following rules / conventions in (i) deciding / counting the number of significant
digits in a number and (ii) in fixing the number of significant digits in a result obtained through addition /
subtraction; multiplication / division of two or more numbers having their own (respective) number of
significant digits.
(1) The number of digits, in a number, counted from the first non-zero digit, on the left, gives the number
of significant digits in it.
(2) The last significant digit, in a number, is the (first) digit in it that is (not reliable) / (is uncertain).
(3) The ‘zeroes’, present in a number, are
(i) not counted as significant when they are present immediately after the decimal point.
(ii) not counted as significant when they are present towards the end of a number that has no
decimal point in it.
(iii) counted as significant when they are present on the right of a decimal point.
(4) The sum, or difference, of two numbers, is regarded as having only as many significant digits as is the
(lowest) number of significant digits, in the numbers being added / subtracted. We, however (increase
the previous digit by one) / (do not change the previous digit), if the first digit, being rejected, in the
sum / difference, is (5, or more than 5) / (less than 5).
(5) The product / quotient, of two numbers, can have no more significant digits than are present in the
less precise, of the two numbers, that are used for calculating it.
It is usual, however, to initially retain ‘one more’ digit, in the product / quotient and then do the
‘rounding off’, following the rule of (more than / less than) 5, quoted above in point (4).
(6) When the (first) insignificant / uncertain digit in a number is 5 itself, we (i) increase the previous digit
by 1, if it is an even digit (ii) do not change the previous digit, if it is an odd digit.
In addition to all these rules / conventions, we may have to rely on ‘common sense’ to decide the number
of significant digits in a ‘result’ obtained through a combination of different algebraic operations.

29
We also often define / use the following terms in the context of ‘ERRORS’.
Average / Mean Error:
The average, of the mod (magnitudes) of errors, is called the average mean error.

1  2  3  .....   n

n
Mean Sqaure Error:
The mean, of the squares of errors, is called the mean sqaure error.

12  22  .....  2n


 
n
Root Mean Square Error:
The square root, of the mean square error, is called the root mean sqaure (rms) error.

12 22 ...2n


rms  δ2 
n

Standard Deviation
Let x be the mean value of a (large) number of observation, say x1, x2, x3......, xn. The deviation, i , of the
ith observation, from the mean value, is then

i   xi  x 

The mean value, of the sqaures of all the deviations, is then given by

n
2
 i
2  i 1

The square root, of this mean square value, is taken as an indicator of the standard deviation    , for the
given set of observations / data.

1
 n 22 1

 i    x  x 2 
2

i
  2   i1    
 n   n 
 
 

30
The standard deviation, in the sum / difference, product / quotient of two numbers, is calculated through
their own standard deviations, by using the follwoing rules:

(i) If A = B  C; we have 62A = 6 2B + 62C

2 2 2
 6   6   6C 
(ii) If A = B ×C; we have  A  =  B  +  
A  B C

2 2 2
B  6   6   6C 
(iii) If A = ; we again have  A  =  B  +  
C A  B C

ADDITIONAL EXAMPLES

1. Let    denote the dimensional formula of the permittivity of vacuum. If M = mass, L = length,
T = Time and A = electric current, then:

(a)    = [M–1L–3T4A2] (b)    = [M–1L2T–1A–2]


(c)    = [M–1L2T–1A] (d)    = [M–1L–3T2A]
Correct option is (1) (IIT 2013)
Solution:
According to Coulomb’s law

1 q1q 2
F
40 r 2

 A 2 T 2 
0    M –1L–3 A 2 T 4 
 MLT –2 L2  

2. A train is moving on a straight track with speed v = 20ms–1. It is blowing its whistle at the frequency
of 1000 Hz. The percentage change in the frequency, heard by a person (standing near the track), as
the train passes him is (v = speed of sound = 320 ms–1) close to
(a) 18% (b) 24%
(c) 6% (d) 12%
Correct option is (4) (IIT 2015))

31
Solution:

  
We know that v '   v
 V  

v  
  2  
v V 
This gives a percentage change of 12%

PROBLEMS FOR PRACTICE (SET–I)


1. Find the dimensions of (i) universal constant of gravitation (ii) permeability of free space.
2. In the formula, for acceleration (f), given below, a, b and c are constants and t represent time.
f = at + bt 2 + ct3

The dimensions, of b and c, should then be, respectively,


(a) LT–4 and LT–5 (b) MLT–2 and MLT–3
(c) LT–2 and LT–3 (d) MLT–4 and MLT–5
3. The dimensional formula, for specific latent heat capacity is
(a) M0L2T–2 (b) MLT–2
(c) ML2T–2 (d) ML2T–2
4. The dimensional formula, for Planck’s constant (h), is
(a) ML–2T–3 (b) ML2T–2
(c) ML2T–1 (d) ML–2T–2
5. The number of particles, crossing per unit area, perpendicular to X-axis, in unit time is given by:

n –n 
N = –D  2 1 
 x2  x1 

Here, n1 and n2 are, respectively, the number of particles per unit volume, for the values x1 and x2 of
x. The dimensions, of the diffusion constant D, are:
(a) M0LT2 (b) M0L2T4
(c) M0LT–3 (d) M0L2T–1

32
6. The relation beween the SI unit (watt) and the CGS unit (erg s–1), of power, is
(a) 1W = 105 erg s–1 (b) 1W = 106 erg s–1
(c) 1W = 107 erg s–1 (d) 1W = 108 erg s–1
7. If p and v stand for pressure and volume, respectively. The dimensions, of the constant, a, in the term
 a 
 p  2  , should be:
 V 

(a) ML6T–2 (b) M2L2T–2


(c) ML5T–1 (d) ML5T–2
8. The dimensional formulae, for specific heat capacity and thermal conductivity, are, respectively
(a) MLT–3K–1 and ML2T–2K–1 (b) MLT–3K–1 and L2T–2K–1
(c) ML2T–3K–1 and L2T–2K–1 (d) L2T–3K–1 and ML2T–2K–1

9. The dimensions, of the constant  , in Coulomb’s formula, (for the force (F), between two charges
1  Q1Q 2 
(Q1, Q2), separated by a distance (r), F  4  r 2  , would be
0  

(a) M–1L–3T4I–2 (b) M–1L–3T4I2


(c) ML2T2I2 (d) M–1L2T2I2
ANSWER KEY
1. (a) 2. (a) 3. (a) 4. (c) 5. (d)
6. (c) 7. (4) 8. (b) 9. (b)

PROBLEMS FOR PRACTICES (SET–II)


1. Find the ‘least coutnt’ of (i) a ‘vernier’ that has 50 divisons on its vernier scale coinciding with 45
divisions on the main scale; the main scale is graduated in (½) millimeters, (ii) a ‘screw gauge’, that
has 100 divisons on its circular scale and a pitch of 0.5 mm.
2. Find (with error limits) the surface area of a sphere, whose radius is measured to be (4.1  0.1) cm.
3. A particle covers a distance of (20.5  0.5)m in a time interval of (4.1  0.1)s. Find its average
speed along with the ‘percentage error’ in the same.
4. In an experiment on verification of Ohm’s law, the current in the circuit is measured to be 1.3A (using
an ammeter of least count 0.1A) and the voltage, across the resistor, is measured to be 5.2V (using
a voltmeter of least count 0.2V). Find the resistance of the resister used, along with the ‘error’, in the
result.

33
5. If the errors, in ten observations, of a physical quantity, are –0.55, +0.43, +0.05, –0.36, 0.08, 0.05,
0.00, –0.03, –0.05 and +0.06, find the ratio of the (i) average mean error and the (ii) root mean
square error, of these observations.
6. Give the number of significant digits in the following numbers:
(a) 235.4 (b) 8300
(c) 0.00357 (d) 625.0
(e) 3.46×103
7. State the result, up to the appropriate number of significant digits, in the following:
(a) (66.23 + 3.5) (b) (8.305 – 3.27235)
(c) (4.052 × 60.18) (d) (7400 ÷ 21.25)
8. In the relation

WL
Y ,
πr 2 
The percentage errors in W,  , r, and L are 1.0%, 0.5%, 1% and 2% respectively. The percentage
error in Y would be
(a) 4.5% (b) 5%
(c) 5% (d) 1%

 pr 4
9. In the formula V = ,
8 

the fractional relative errors in V, p,  and  are known to be 0.06; 0.01, 0.01 and 0.02, respectively..
The fractional relative error in, r, would be
(a) 0.02 (b) 0.01
(c) 0.005 (d) 0.0025
10. The diameter (d), and length (  ), of a cylindrical wire, are measured by instruments having least
counts of 0.0005 cm and 0.01 cm, respectively. The fractional relative error, in the curved surface
area, and volume, of the wire, calculated from these observations, would be

 0.0005 0.01   0.001 0.01 


(a)  +  and ,  +  , respectively
 d    d  

 0.001 0.01   0.002 0.01 


(b)  +  and,  +  , respectively
 d    d  

34
 0.001 0.01   0.001 0.01 
(c)  +  and,  +  , respectively
 d    d  

 0.0005 0.01   0.0005 0.01 


(d)  +  and,  +  , respectively
 d    d  

ANSWER KEY
1. (i) 1/20 mm, (ii) 0.005 mm 2.  211 ± 10 cm2
3.  5.0 ± 0.2  ms-1 4.  4.0 ± 0.5 Ω
6. (a) 4, (b) 2, (c) 5, (d) 4, (e) 3 7. (a) 69.7, (b) 5.033, (c) 243.85, (d) 350

8. (b) 9. (c)
10. (a)

35
36
QUESTION BANK

37
Key Learning Points
1. The process of measurement has played a very significant role in the development of all physical
sciences.
2. Measurement is basically a process of comparison.
3. ‘Fundamental quantities’ are a few selected physical quantities that can be used to define other
physical quanties.
4. All physical quantities, that are defined in terms of the ‘fundamental quantities’, are knwon as ‘derived
quantities’.
5. In the initial stages, only three physical quantities - mass, length, time - were taken as ‘fundamental
units’.
6. The number of ‘fundamental quantities’ has now been increased to seven. The seven fundamental
quantities are:
Mass, length, time, electric current, thermodynamic temperature, amount of substance, luminous
intensity.
7. In addition to these seven fundamental quantities, two supplementary quantities - the angle and the
solid angle - are also used in defining other quantities.
8. A number of system of units - like the FPS units, the CGS unit and the MKS units - have been used
over different times, and in different countries.
9. In the year 1971, a system of units - now known by the abbreviation ‘SI units’, - was developed and
recomended, (for use by all countries), by the general conference on weight and measures. The SI
units are now being used (almost) all over the world.
10. The seven fundamental, or ‘base’ units, in SI, are are the metre (m), kilogram (kg), second (s),
ampere (A), kelvin (k), mole (mol) and candela (cd), for length, mass, time, electric current
(thermodynamic) temperature, amount of substance and luminous intensity.
11. The SI units, for the two supplementary quantities - angle and solid angle, are the radian (rad) and
steradian (sr), respectively.
12. All the units, in SI, have been given very precise, and well defined, meaning and definitions.
13. We also use a number of multiples (corresponding to different positive powers of ten) and subultiples
(corresponding to different negative powers of ten) in SI. These have all been given definite names
and symbols.
14. A number of units, of the ‘derived quantities’, have also been given names of their own.
15. We can co-relate different ‘derived quantities’, with the ‘fundamental quantities’, (in a ‘compact
way’) by introducing the concept of ‘dimensions’.

38
16. The ‘dimensions’, of a given physical quantity, are the ‘powers’, to which the fundamental quantities,
must be raised, to represent it.
17. The ‘dimensional formula’, of a physical quantity, is the representation of that quantity, in terms of the
(i) symbols of the fundamental quantities and (ii) its own ‘dimensions’.
18. The dimensional formulae, of force and momentum, for example, are [MLT–2] and [MLT–1],
respectively.
19. We have a very useful principle – the principle of dimensional homogenity. According to the principle:
“The ‘dimensions’ of all the terms, on both sides of a physically acceptable (or valid) relation, must
be identical.”
20. We use ‘dimensional a nalysis’ (based on the concept of ‘dimensions’ and ‘principle of dimensional
homogenity’) for a number of useful practical applications.
21. The applications of ‘dimensional analysis’ include:
(i) Checking a given formula, or relation.
(ii) Conversion, from one system of units to another.
(iii) Obtaining ‘dimensionally valid’ relations, between different physical quantities.
22. The concept of ‘least count’, of a given measuing device / instrument, helps us to know the precision
of our measurement.
23. The terms “precision” and ‘accuracy”, in the context of “experimental measurement and their results”,
have different meanings.
24. The terms ‘mistake’ and ‘error’ have different meanings for experimental measurements.
25. Errors can be “systematic” (which can be reduced, or even eliminated) and “random” (which cannot
be eliminated all together).
26. Random errors, generally, tend to follow the normal or ‘Gaussian law’. The probability, of an error
x, decreases (exponentially) with an increase in the value of x.
27. We define the absolute error, in a measurement (say xi ), as the difference between that measurement,
and the standard (or mean value x of a large number of observations) value, of the relevant physical
quantity.
Absolute error =  xi  x 
28. The relative error, of a measurement, equals the ratio of the (i) mean of the absolute errors of all the
quantities and (ii) mean value of the measured quantity.
29. The relative error, expressed as a percentage, gives the ‘percentage error’.

39
30. The values, of different physical quantities, are generally calculated by using a relation or ‘formula’,
that expresses that physical quantity in terms of ‘other physical quantities’.
31. We, therefore, need to have a set of ‘rules’ that enable us to calculate the absolute / relative error, in
the ‘value’ of a given physical quantity, that has been obtained by using a ‘formula’ or a ‘relation’.
Each of the different physical quantities, present in that relation, and measured, has an error of its
own.
32. The following rules are generally followed for calculating the ‘net error’, due to a number of ‘individual
errors’.
(i) The absolute error, in a sum or difference, is always taken as the SUM of the absolute errors
in the quantities being added / subtracted.
(ii) The relative error, in a product / quotient, always equals the SUM of the relative errors in the
terms being multiplied / divided.
(iii) The relative error, in the nth power of a physical quantity, is n time the relative error in that
quantity.
33. We often need to combine these rules to calculate the ‘relative error’ in a given situation.
34. We also follow a set of rules, coupled with ‘logical reasoning’, to decide the number of ‘significant
figures’, that need to be used, while stating the ‘final result’, that is based on a number of algebraic
calculations.

40
Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement
Easy Derived Units
1. The SI Unit, of surface tension, equals:

joule – s
(1) newton / metre2 as well as (Incorrect)
m3

watt – s
(2) newton / metre as well as (Correct)
m2

joule – s
(3) newton / metre as well as (Incorrect)
m2

watt – s
(4) newton / metre as well as (Incorrect)
m3
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
Surface tension, by definition, equals
(1) force per unit length as well as,
(2) (mechnical) surface energy per unit area.
The SI units of force and energy are the newton and joule (= watt – s). Hence the SI units of surface
watt – s
tension are (newton / metre) as well as .
m2

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Derived Units
2. The SI unit, of the coefficient of viscosity, can be equated to
(1) (joule × s) as well as the unit of pressure × (length × acc)½ (Incorrect)

torque× time period


(2) (joule × hertz) as weel as the unit of (Incorrect)
volume
(3) pascal (hertz)–1 as well as the unit of modulus of elasticity × (length / acc.)½ (Correct)
(4) pascal (s) as well as the unit of stress × (length × acc.)½ (Incorrect)

41
Correc answer: (3)
Solution:
We have, by Newton’s law,

dv
F  A
dx

newton × m
Hence, , has units of , i.e.,
m 2  ms –1

 pascal   newton 
(newton m–2s). This equals    pascal = 2
and hertz = s –1  . It also equals the unit of
 hertz   m 
–1 ½
modulus of elasticity × [length × (acceleration) ] . This is because the unit of modulus of elasticity is
(newton/m2) and that of [length × (acceleration–1]½ is [m×(ms–2)–1]½, i.e., s.

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Derived Units
3. The SI unit of moment of inertia can be equated to the SI units of

 force×area 
(1) [density × volume × area] and   (Correct)
 acceleration 

 energy ×area 
(2) [density × volume / area] and   (Incorrect)
 acceleration 

 energy ×area 
(3) [density × area / volume] and  2  (Incorrect)
  velocity  

 force×area 
(4) [relative density × mass × area] and  2  (Incorrect)
  velocity  

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:
The SI unit of moment of inertia is (kg – m2)
The SI unit of

42
kg
density × volume × area =  m 3  m 2   kg – m 2 
m3
and the SI unit of

force× area kg ms   m 
–2 2

  kg – m 2 
acceleration  ms –2

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Easy Derived Units
4. The ‘pair’, having identical SI units, is
(1) Work and torque (Correct)
(2) Surface tension and pressure (Incorrect)
(3) Pressure and Poisson’s ratio (Incorrect)
(4) coefficient of viscosity and thrust (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:
We have,
Work = force × distance
and torque = force × (per pendicular arm’s length)
The SI units, of both these terms, is therefore, the same; equal to (N–m).

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Easy Derived Units
5. The unit of capacitance, (the fared), expressed in terms of the fundamental units, inSI, is
equal to
(1) kg–1m–4s2A2 (Incorrect)
(2) kg2m–2s2A4 (Incorrect)
(3) kgm–2s2A2 (Incorrect)
(4) kg–1m–2s4A2 (Correct)

43
Correc answer: (4)
Solution:

coulomb
We have farad =
volt
2


coulomb

 coulomb 
 joule / coulomb  joule


 ampere – s 
kg m 2s –2
= kg–1m–2s4A2

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Easy Change of Units
6. The unit of pressure, in SI units, is related to its unit in CGS units as
(1) 1 pascal = 105 dyne / cm2 (Incorrect)
(2) 1 pascal = 103 dyne / cm2 (Incorrect)
(3) 1 pascal = 10 dyne / cm2 (Correct)
(4) 1 pascal = 10–2 dyne / cm2 (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:

force
We have pressure =
area

 MLT –2 
 2   ML–1T –2
 L 

1 2
Unit of pressure in SI unit  kg   m   s 
   
Unit of pressure in CGS units  g   cm   s 

–1
= 103  102  1  10

 1 pascal = 10 dyne / cm2

44
Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement
Easy Change ofUnits
7. The ratio of the SI units, to the FPS unit, of pressure, is equal to the ratio of the corresponding
units of
(1) ‘Energy per unit volume’ as well as Poisson’s ratio (Incorrect)
(2) ‘Bulk modulus’ as well as ‘energy per unit volume’ (Correct)
(3) ‘Poisson’s ratio’ as well as ‘modulus of rigidity’ (Incorrect)
Stress Force / area –1 –2
(4) ‘Coefficient of viscosity’ as well as Young’s modulus = Strain   dimensionless    ML T 
(Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
We have,
force
Pressure =   ML1T 2 
area 
Also,
Stress Force / area
Bulk modulus    ML1T2 
Strain  dimensionless 

force × distance
and, energy per unit volume =
volume

 ML2 T –2  –1 –2
=  L3    ML T 
 
 The ratio, of the SI and FPS units, will have the same value for these three quantities.

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Derived Units
8. The SI unit of specific heat capacity (say ‘s1’) would be related to its CGS unit (say ‘s2’) as

 104 
(1) 1s1    s2 (Incorrect)
 274 

(2) 1s1   273104 s2 (Incorrect)

45
 10 4 
(3) 1s1    s2 (Incorrect)
 273 

(4) 1s1  104 s2 (Correct)

Correct answer: (4)


Solution:
We have specific heat capaicty

heat (energy)
=
mass× changein temperature

ML2 T –2

M K

= L2T–2K–1

2 2
s1  m   s  K 1
 2    
s  cm   s   C  1

= (100)2 × 1 × 1
( A change in temperature of 10C also equals a change of one kelvin on the thermodynamic, or
kelvin, scale.)

s1
  10 4
s2

or s1 = 104s2

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Difficult Derived Units
9. The horse power (H.P.), a pupular unit of power in the FPS units, is related to the SI Unit of
power (the watt), as
1 H.P. = 746 W
[The FPS unit of force is the poundal;

46
Givern that 1 kg = 2.205 pound and
1 m = 3.28 feet] the relation between the FPS unit of power (= ft – poundal/s) and the HP is,
(1) 1 HP = 17.7 × 103 ft–poundal/s (Correct)
(2) 1 HP = 550 ft–poundal/s (Incorrect)
(3) 1 HP = 31.5 ft–poundal/s (Incorrect)
(4) 1 HP = 41.03 × 104 ft–poundal/s (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:

work  MLT –2 L  2 –3
We have power = time   T    ML T 
 

2 3
SI unit of Power  kg   m   s 
  
FPS unit of power  pound   foot   s 

watt 2 3
or  2.205   3.28  1
 ft - poundal / s 
 23.72
1watt  23.72 ft–poundal / s

 1 HP = 746 W = 746 × 746 × 23.72 ft–poundal/s


 17695 ft–poundal/s
 17.7 × 103 ft–poundal/s

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Difficult Derived Units
10. The SI value, of R, (the universal gas constant) occuring in the equation of state (pv = nRT)
for a perfect gas, would be related to its CGS value as
(1) SI value of R = CGS value of R (Incorrect)
(2) SI value of R = 107 CGS value of R (Correct)
(3) SI value of R = 273 × 107 CGS value of R (Incorrect)

47
(4) SI value of R = 274 × 107 CGS value of R (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:

 MLT –2 3 
×L 
pV  L2
R  
We have nT  K 
 

= [ML2T–2K–1]

2 2
SI value of R  kg   n   1s    k  1 
          
CGS value of R  g   cm   1s    c  

= 103 (102)2 (1) (1)–1 = 107


( per kelvin equals per 0C; the size of the degree, on the kelvin scale, equals that on the celsius
(or 0C) scale)
 SI value of R = 107 CGS value of R

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Changing over to new (assumed) fundamental units
11. If force (F), velocity (V) and surface tension (S) were taken as the ‘fundamental units’, the
dimensional formula, for momentum (p), would be

(1)  VSF –2  (Incorrect)

(2)  F2 V –1S–1  (Correct)

 F2  2 –2 –1
(3)  V 2S   F V S  (Incorrect)
 

(4)  V 2SF –2  (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (2)

48
Solution:
We have, [F] = [MLT–2]
[V] = [LT–1]
and [S] = (force / length) = [MT–2]
 We get

F
 L 
S

F –1
Also     MT 
V
 

 F  
     S  T
 V  

 F  
 T    
 VS  

S.F2  F2 
 M   ST 2    
V 2S2  VS 

Now momentum [p] = mass × velocity = [MLT–1]

 F2 F VS   F2 
  p   . .  
 VS S F   V.S 

= F2V–1S–1

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Difficult Changing over to new (assumed) fundamental units
12. If mementum (P), acceleration (A), the specific heat capacity (S) and time (T), were taken
as the fundamental units, the dimensional formula, for the coefficient of thermal conductivity
(  ), would be

(1)     PA –2S+1T –4  (Correct)

49
(2)    P –1A 2S –1T 4  (Incorrect)

(3)    PA 2S –1T –4  (Incorrect)

(4)    P –1A –2S+1T 4  (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:
We have [P] = [MLT–1],
[A] = [LT–2]

  Heat  energy 2 –2 
–1
[S] =  mass × temperature    L T K 
 

P 
  L    AT 2   M    T 
L 

 P 
 M    2 .T    PA –1T –1 
 AT 

L2 T –2  A 2 T 4 T 2 
Also,  K    
S  S 

 S –1A 2 T 2 

σ  area  temp.difference 
Now rate of heat flow =
 distance 

 ML2 T –2  σ  L   K 
2

 
 T  L

ML2 T –3
 σ    MLT 3K 1 
LK
Substituting values, we get

50
σ    PA –1T 1   AT 2   T –3   S1A –2T –2 
= [PA–2S+1T–4]

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Difficult Changing over to new (assumed) fundamental units
13. If Planck’s constant (h), velocity of light (C) and the universal gravitational constant (G),
were to be taken as the fundamental units, the dimensinoal formula, for surface tension
(S), would be
(1) [h–3/2 G–1/2 C–11/2] (Incorrect)
(2) [h3/2 G1/2 C–11/2] (Incorrect)
(3) [h1/2 G3/2 C–11/2] (Incorrect)
(4) [h–1/2 G–3/2 C11/2] (Correct)
Correct answer: (4)
Solution:
We have h × frequency = energy
 [h] = [ML2T–1]
Also, [C] = [LT–1]

 Force×  distance  2 
and [G] =    M 1L3T 2
mass × mass 
 

 [hG] = L5T–3
and C5 = L5T–5

 hG  5
  5   T 2 or  T   h ½ G½ C 2
C 

½ ½ 3
Also, [L] = [CT] =  h G C 2 

5
 h.h ½ G½ C 2 
 M    h.L T   
–2
–3 
 hGC 

51
1
  h½ G ½ C 2 

force
Now surface tension S =
length

= [MT–2]


  S   h ½ G ½ C
1
2
   hGC1 –5


½ 3 11
=  h G 2
C 2 

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Changing over to new (assumed) fundamental units
14. If moment of inertia (I), torque (  ) and frequency (v), were to be taken as the fundamental
units, the dimensional formula, for Reynold’s number (NR) could be

(1)    1v 2  (Incorrect)

(2)    1v –2  (Incorrect)

(3)   v –2  (Incorrect)

(4)   v 2  (Correct)

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:
Reynold’s number (NR) is defined as a ‘combination’, of terms, that is dimensionless in mass, length, and
time. We, therefore, need a ‘combination’, of I,  and v, that is dimensionless in M, L and T. Now,,
[I] = ML2
[  ] = (force × distance) = [ML2T–2]
and [v] = 1/T

52
 1 
It is easy to see that the combination   2  has zero dimensions in M, L and T..
I v 

Hence a dimensional formula, for NR, in terms of I,  and v, could be  N R    I –1v –2 

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Changing over to new (assumed) fundamental units

15. A ‘hypothetical system’ uses the acceleration due to gravity (g), the areal velocity  vA 
and the momentum (p) as its ‘base’ units. The dimensional formula, for the force (F), in this
system, would be
2 1
(1)  p g 3 vA 2  (Correct)
 
2 1
(2) p g 3
vA 2  (Incorrect)

2 1
(3)  p –1 g 3
vA 3  (Incorrect)

2 1
(4)  p –1 g 3
vA 3  (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (1)
Solution:

We have g  LT –2  ,vA   L2T–1 

and  p    MLT –1 
 We get,
1 2
 T   vA 3
g 3 

1 1
 L  g 3
vA 3 

1 1
and  M    p g 3 vA 3 

Now force = [MLT–2]

53
 [F] = p g vA
2
 1 1
3
g 1
3
vA
2
3

p g 1
2
vA
1
3
g 1
3
vA
2
3
 v A
2
3
g
4
3

2 1
  p g 3 vA 3 

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Comparing dimensions
16. The ‘dimensions’, of the constant a, in the Van-der-wall equation of state

 a 
 p + 2   V  b   nRT
 V 

can be obtained by multiplying the dimensions, of the universal gas constant, G, by

(1)  M 2 LT 2  (Incorrect)

(2)  M 2 L2 T 0  (Correct)

(3)  M –2 L2 T 0  (Incorrect)

(4)  M 2 L2 T  (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:

 a 
The ‘dimensions’ of  2  , must be the same as that of ‘p’.
V 
Hence dimensions of ‘a’ would correspond to

Force 2 4
  volume   force   length 
area
The dimensions of ‘G’, would correspond to

54
2
force   length 
2
 mass 

dimensions of a 2 2
   mass    length 
dimension of G

 The ‘required multiplication’ needs to be done by the term [M2L2]

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Comparing dimensions
17. The dimensions, of the constant  , obtained from Stokes’ law

F = 6rv
(F = force, r = radius, v = velocity)
when used in the Poiseuelli equation

pr 4
V=
 8  ,
(p = pressure,  = length)
would give the dimensions of V as
(1) [M0L3T0] (Incorrect)
(2) [ML–3T] (Incorrect)
(3) [M0L2T–1] (Incorrect)
(4) [M0L3T–1] (Correct)
Correct answer: (4)
Solution:
From Stoke’s law equation, we get

force  MLT –2 
    –1 
  ML1T 1 
length  velocity  L  LT 

Using this, in Poiseuelli’s equation, we get

55
3
pressure ×  length 
 V 
 

MLT –2 3
2
L
 L –1 1   L3T 1 
 ML T 

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Comparing dimensions

di
18. The dimensions, of the inductance (L), (induced emf =  L (i = current, t = time)) and the
dt
1
capacitance (C) (angular frequency = ) are, respectively,,
LC

(1) [ML2T–2I–2] and [M–1L–2T4I2] (Correct)


(2) [M–1L–2T4I+2] and [ML2T–2I–2] (Incorrect)
(3) [M–1L–2T–2I–2] and [ML2T4I2] (Incorrect)
(4) [ML2T4I2] and [M–1L–2T–2I–2] (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:

di
From induced emf =  L ,
dt

time
We get  L   emf ×
current

 work time   ML2T 2  T 


   
 charge current   I× T× T 

= [ML2T–2I–2]

1
Now angular frequency, 
LC

56
1
  C 
 L   
= M–1L–2T2I2.T2
= [M–1L–2T4I2]

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Comparing dimensions
19. Magnetic field strength (B) is known to equal force on a unit charge moving with a uniform
velocity. We also have

  Id sin  
B    d / r  length 
4  r 2 

The dimensions, of B and   , are, therefore

(1) [MT–2I–1] and [ML–1T–2I–2], respectively (Incorrect)


(2) [MLT–1I–1] and [MLT–2I–1], respectively (Incorrect)
(3) [MT–2I–1] and [MLT–2I–2], respectively (Correct)
(4) [MLT–2I–2] and [MT–2I–1], respectively (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:
We have,

 force  MLT –2 
 B  
charge velocity   IT   LT –1 
= [MT–2I–1]
Also,

 B length 2   MT –2 I –1  L2 
  
 current length   I L 
= [MLT–2I–2]

57
Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement
Average Comparing dimensions
20. Electric field strength (E) equals force on a unit charge. Also,

1 q
E=
4  r 2  (q = charge, r = distance)

The dimensions of E and  are, therefore,

(1)  MLT –1I –1  and  M –1L–3T 2 I 2  , respectively (Incorrect)

(2)  MLT –3 I –1  and  M –1L–3T 4 I 2  , respectively (Correct)

(3)  M –1L–3T 4 I 2  and  MLT –3 I –1  , respectively (Incorrect)

(4)  M –1L–3T 2 I 2  and  MLT –1I –1  , respectively (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:
We have,

force  MLT –2 
E  
charge  IT 

  E  MLT–3I–1 

Also,

1 q
E=
4  r 2 

    
Charge

 IT 
 E  length 2   MLT –3I –1  L2 

  M –1L–3T 4 I 2 

58
Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement
Easy Identifying physcial quantity from given dimensions
21. The dimensions
[ML2T–1]
can correspond to
(1) rate of change of force (Incorrect)
(2) impulse (Incorrect)
(3) rate of change of momentum (Incorrect)
(4) angular momentum (Correct)
Correct answer: (4)
Solution:
We have angular momentum = mv r

 [Angular momentum]
= [MLT–1× L ] = [ML2T–1]
[It is easy to verify that the given dimensions do not correspond to the other listed quantities.]

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Identifying physical quantity from given dimenions
22. The dimensions
[ML2T–3I–2]
can correspond to
(1) Electrical resistance (Correct)
(2) Self inductance (Incorrect)
(3) Capacitance (Incorrect)
(4) Rate of change of electric field (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (1)

59
Solution:

V
We have R =
I

Work
and V =
Charge

 MLT –2  L 
 V      ML2T –3I –1 
 IT 

2 –3 –1
 V   ML T I 
 R      
I  I 

= [ML2T–3I–2]
[It is easy to see that the given dimensions do not correspond to the other listed quantities.]

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Identifying physical quantity from given dimenions
23. The dimensions
[ML3T–3I–1]
can correspond to
(1) Rate of change of electric field (Incorrect)
(2) Rate of change of the capacitance of a parallel plate capacitor with distance between its two
plates (Incorrect)
(3) Flux of electric field through a surface (Correct)
(4) Rate of change of potential difference between two points (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:

Force
We have electric filed =
Charge

 MLT –2 
    MLT –3 I –1 
 IT 
60
 Flux of electric field through a surface

  ES cos     MLT –3 I –1    L2 

= [ML3T–3I–1]
[It is easy to see that the given dimensions do not correspond to the other listed quantities.]

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Identifying physical quantity from given dimenions
24. The dimensions
[ML2T–2I–1]
can correspond to
(1) Flux of electric field through a surface (Incorrect)
(2) Magnetic moment of a magnet (Incorrect)
(3) Flux of magnetic field through a surface (Correct)
(4) Rate of change of magnetic field (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:
We have,

 Force 
 Magnetic field    
 Charge× Velocity 

 MLT –2  –2 –1
=  IT  LT –1    MT I 
 

 Flux of magnetic field through a surface


(= magnetic field × (normal) area)

= [MT–2I–1 × L2]

= [ML2T–2I–1]

[It is easy to see that the given dimensions do not correspond to the other listed quantities.]

61
Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement
Difficult Identifying physical quantity from given dimensions

25. The dimensions

[M0L2T0I]

can correspond to

(1) Magnetic dipole moment (Correct)

(2) Rate of change of magnetic field (Incorrect)

(3) Flux of magnetic field through a surface (Incorrect)

(4) Magnetic permeability of a medium (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (1)

Solution:

We know that,

Torque = (Magnetic dipole moment × magnetic field)

 [Magnetic dipole moment]

 Torque   ML2T –2 
  –2 –1 
 Magnetic Field   MT I 

= [IL2]

= [M0L2T0I]

[It is easy to see that the given dimensions do not correspond to the other listed quantities.]

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Comparing Dimensions
26. The following are four pairs of physical quantites:
(A) (Planck’s constant; rate of change of momentum)
(B) (Bulk modulus; pressure)

62
(C) (Areal velocity; (angular momentum / mass)
(D) (Impulse; momentum)
From this, the one pair, that is dimensionally incompatible, is the pair labelled as:
(1) A (Correct)
(2) B (Incorrect)
(3) C (Incorrect)
(4) D (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:

Energy
We have [Planck’s constant] =
Frequency

 ML2 T –2 
 –1   ML2 T –1
 T 

 Change in momentum 
and [rate of change of momentum] =  
 Time 

 MLT –1 
    MLT –2 
 T 

Thus, the two quantities, in this pair, are dimensionally incompatible.


[It can be verified that the two quantities, in each of the other three pairs, are dimensionally compatible
with each other].

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Difficult Comparing Dimensions

L
27. The dimensions, of the product      
R

(   = magnetic permeability;  = electric perimittivity, L = Inductance; R = resistance)

are,

63
(1)  MLT –2 I –2  (Incorrect)

(2)  M –1L–3T 4 I 2  (Incorrect)

(3)  ML2 T –3 I –2  (Incorrect)

(4)  M 0 L–2 T –3 I 0  (Correct)

Correct answer: (4)


Solution:
The dimensions, of the different terms, are

     MLT –2 I –2 
     M –1L–3T 4 I2 
 L    ML2T –2 I –2 
 R    ML2 T –3I –2 

L
  0  0      L–2 T 2  .T   L–2 T 3 
R
Alternatively, We know that
1
 C  Velocity
 

 1   1 
  0  0   2    2 –2 
 C  L T 

L
and = time constant = time = [T]
R

L  1 
   0 0      2 –2 .T    L–2 T 3 
 R  L T 

64
Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement
Easy Comparing dimensions
28. In the dimensional formula
[X] = [ML–1T–2],
the quantity, X, can be
(1) Surface tension of a liquid (Incorrect)
(2) Coefficient of viscosity of a liquid (Incorrect)
(3) Universal gas constant (Incorrect)
(4) Atmospheric pressure (Correct)
Correct answer: (4)
Solution:
We have,

 Force 
[Atmospheric pressure] = [Pressure] =  
 Area 

 MLT –2  –1 –2

L2    ML T 
 

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Comparing dimensions
29. In the dimensional formula
[Y] = [MLT–3K–1],
the quantity Y can correspond to
(1) Specific latent heat (Incorrect)
(2) Specific heat capacity (Incorrect)
(3) Coefficient of thermal conductivity (Correct)
(4) Heat energy per unit rise in temperature (Incorrect)
Correc answer: (3)

65
Solution:
The coefficient of thermal conduction (say  ), is defined through the equation

H   
 A  
t  x 

   
 H . x 
 t  A  

 ML2 T –2  . L 
 ( H = Heat = energy)
 T   L2   K 
= [MLT–3K–1]

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Difficult Comparing dimensions
30. In the dimensional formula
[Z] = M0L0T0K–1],
the quantity [Z] can correspond to the
(1) (ratio of specific heat capacity to specific latent heat) as well as (coefficient of linear expansion)
(Correct)
(2) (ratio of specific latent heat to specific heat capacity) as well as (coefficient of thermal
condcutivity) (Incorrect)
(3) (cofficient of thermal condcutivity) as well as (coefficient of volume expansion) (Incorrect)
(4) (coefficient of volume expansion) as well as (thermal capacity) (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:
We have,

 Heat  energy    ML2T –2 


Specific heat capacity =  mass  risein temperature   M K
      

66
= [L2T–2K–1]

2 –2
 Heat  energy    ML T 
Specific latent heat =  
 Mass  M
= [L2T–2]
 [Ratio of the two] = [K–1] = [M0L0T0K–1]
Also,

 Change in length 
[Coefficient of linear expansion] = Original length  Rise in temperature
   

 L –1
= L K   K 
  
= [M0L0T0K–1]

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Identifying ‘dimensional equality’ of different physical quantities
31. “A given ‘dimensional formula’, cannot give a unique unambigous identification, of the
relevant physical quantity.”
The above statement is illustrated through the fact that the ‘dimensional formula’, of ‘specific
latent heat’, is identical with the ‘dimensional formula’ of
(1) gravitational P.E. per unit mass (Correct)
(2) angular momentum per unit mass (Incorrect)
(3) linear momentum per unit mass (Incorrect)
(4) power per unit mass (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:
We have,

2 –2
 Heat energy   ML T 
Specific latent heat =  
  M 
 Mass   

67
= [L2T–2]
Also,

 mgh 
Gravitational P.E. per unit mass =     gh 
 m 
= [LT–2.L] = [L2T–2]
The ‘dimensional formula’ of ‘specific latent heat’, is thus sen to be identical with the ‘dimensional formula’
of gravitational P.E. per unit mass.

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Identifying dimentinoal equality
32. The ratio, of the dimensional formulae, for ‘thermal capacity’ and ‘coefficient of volume
expansion’, can correspond to the dimensional formula of the
(1) universal gas constant R. (Incorrect)
(2) universal gravitational constant, G. (Incorrect)

(3) product pv (p = pressure, v = change in volume) (Correct)

(4) angular momentum (Incorrect)


Correct answer: (3)
Solution:

 Heat energy 
We have  Thermal capacity   Risein temperature 
 

 ML2 T 2 
    ML2 T 2 K 1 
 K 

 Changein volume 
and [coefficient of volume expansion] =  Original volume  Risein temperature 
 

 L3  1
=  L3 K    K 
 

 [Ratio of the two] = [ML2T–2]

68
Also,

2
 Force   MLT  1 –2
[Pressure] =  Area   L2    ML T 

   

and [Change in volume] = [L3]


 [Product of the two] = [ML2T–2]
Thus the dimensional formula, of the (specified), ratio, equals that of the (specified) product.

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Checking ‘dimentinoal compatibility’
33. The relation, for the rate of flow (V) of a liquid, through a capillary tube of radius (r) and
length  , in terms of the coefficient of viscosity (  ) of the liquid, and the pressure difference
(p), across the ends of the capillary tube, could have the form:

(1) V  k  pr 2 /   (Incorrect)

(2) V  k  pr 4 /   (Correct)

(3) V  k  p 2 r 2 / 2   (Incorrect)

(4) V  k  pr 2 / 2   (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:

 Volume flowing  3 –1
We have V (= rate of flow) =  Time taken   L T
 

 MLT –2  –1 –2
Also, p = Pressure difference =  L2    ML T 
 

r = radius = [L]

 = length = [L]
 = coefficient of viscosity = [ML–1T–1]

69
 pr 4   ML1T 2  L4  3 1

     ML1T –1  L    L T 
   

 pr 4 
 V  k.   is a dimensionally compatible relation. It is, therefore, a ‘possible’ relation. (The
  
same is NOT true for the other relations).

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Difficult Dimensional Compatibility
34. The term

 0 0  C2Gm
r 3 2

(  0 = permeability, 0 = permittivity, C = velocity, G = gravitational constant, m  = mass,


r = radius,  = frequency) is dimensionally compatible with the term

 I 
(1)   (I = moment of inertia,  = angular velocity,  = torque) (Incorrect)
  

 Gh 
(2)   (G = gravitational constant, h = Planck’s constant, 0 = permittivity, C = velocity)
  0C 
(Incorrect)

  0 0 
(3)   (  = permeability; 0 = permittivity; C = velocity) (Incorrect)
 C 

 rv 
(4)   (  = density, r = radius, v = speed,  = coefficient of viscosity) (Correct)
  

Correct answer: (4)


Solution:
We have dimensions of

70
 1  2
 0 0  C .G.m  C2    
2 C  M 1L3T 2   M 
 2
r 3v 2  L3  T 1 

= [M0L0T0]
Thus the given term is a dimensionless term.
We also find that the term

 rv   ML3 .L.LT 1  0 0 0


     ML1T 1    M L T 
   

Thus this term is dimensionally compatible with the given term (Other terms are not so).

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Difficult Dimensional Compatibility

 s 
35. The term   (  = coefficient of viscosity,, s = surface tension,  = torque), would become
 
dimensionally compatible with a term obtained by multiplying, G, (the universal gravitational
constant) with another quantity, having the dimensions of
(1) (Velocity) × (pressure) (Incorrect)
(2) Time × (density)2 (Correct)
(3) Frequency × (force) (Incorrect)
(4) Momentum / (acceleration)2 (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:

We have,   = [ML–1T–1]
[s] = [MT–2]

  = [ML2T–2]

71
1 1 2
 s   ML T  MT 
   
   ML2T 2 

= [M+1L–3T–1]
Also, [G] = [M–1L3T–2]

 The required multiplier is [M2L–6T]


This equals time × (density)2 because the dimensional of this term are (T) × (ML–3)2
= [M2L–6T],
which are the required dimensions.

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Relative Error
36. The length of a wire is measured to be (10.25  0.01) cm. The radius is measured to be
(0.840  x) cm. If the relative error, in the volume of the wire, is calculated to be 0.0158,
the least count of the instrument, used for measuring the radius, is
(1) 0.004 cm (Incorrect)
(2) 0.002 cm (Correct)
(3) 0.001 cm (Incorrect)
(4) 0.0005 cm (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:

We have, V = r 2 

V 2r 
  
V r 

V
Here, = 0.0158
V

 0.01
and   0.011
 10.25

72
2 r
 = 0.0158 – 0.011 = 0.0048
r

0.840
r  0.0048 
2
= 0.002
Thus the least count of the instrument, used for measuring r, is 0.002 cm.

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Relative Error

pr 4
37. The formula V 
8

(V = rate of flow, p = pressure difference,  = radius, l = length,  = Coefficient of viscosity)


is used to find  for water. The percentage error, in  , is found to be 9%. If the percentage
errors, in the determination of p, V and  were 2%, 3% and 2%, respectively, the percentage
error, in the determination of r, is
(1) 12% (Incorrect)
(2) 3% (Incorrect)
(3) 2% (Incorrect)
(4) 0.5% (Correct)
Correct answer: (4)
Solution:

pr 4
From the formula V  , we get
8

pr 4

8V

 p r v 
  4  
 p r v 

73
r
 9%  2%  4  3%  2%
r

r 2%
   0.5%
r 4

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Relative Error
38. In an experiment on determination of resistivity (  ) of the material of a wire, the following
measurements were made:

Resistance of wire =  40  1 

Length of wire = 120  0.1 cm

Radius of wire =  0.26  0.02  cm

r 2 R
Given that   , the value of  would be quoted as

(1)  7.08  1.3 10–4   m (Incorrect)

(2)  7  1 10–4   m (Correct)

(3)  7.079  1.27  10–4   m (Incorrect)

(4)  7.  1.3 10–4   m (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:

r 2 R


 r R 
 2  
 r R 

74
0.02 1 0.1
 2  
26 40 120
= 0.154 + 0.025 + 0.0008  0.18

2
  0.26   40 104
Also,     m
120 10 2
= 0.0708 × 10–2   m
= 7.08 × 10–4   m

   1.3  10 –4   m

    7  1 10 –4   m

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Relative Error
3
39. The relation Y  p 2 q 2 r 5s 1 2 is used to calculate Y, on the basis of measurements of p, q, r
and s. The relative errors, in the measurement of p, q, r and s are 0.005, 0.04, 0.004 and
0.02, respectively. If the calculated value, of Y, comes out to be 3.528 units, the result
should be quoted as:

(1)  3.528  0.3528 units (Incorrect)

(2)  3.53  0.35 units (Incorrect)

(3)  3.5  0.4  units (Correct)

(4)  4  0.4  units (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (3)


Solution:
3
We have Y  p 2 q 2 r 5s 1 2

Y p 3 q r 1 s
 2  5 
Y p 2 q r 2 s

75
 3 1 
  2  0.005   0.04  5  0.04   0.02 
 2 2 
= (0.010 + 0.06 + 0.02 + 0.01)
= 0.1

Y  0.1 3.528  0.3528  0.35  0.4


We should, therefore, quote Y as

Y =  3.5  0.4  units

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Easy Relative Error
40. The volume, V, of a cube, is calculated to be

V  1000  6  m3

The side of the cube is

(1) 10  2 m (Incorrect)

(2) 10.0  0.2 m (Incorrect)

(3) 10.0  .2  m (Incorrect)

(4) 10.00  0.02 m (Correct)

Correct answer: (4)


Solution:

We have V   3
1 1
   V 3  1000  3  10 m

V 
Also, 3
V 

76
6 
 3
1000 10

6 10 2
     0.02
1000 3 100
We, therefore, have

  10.00  0.02  m

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Finding dimensional formula

CG
41. The dimensional formula, for the product X  (C = velocity of light, G = Universal
e
gravitational constant, e = electronic charge), would be

(1)  ML4 T 3 I 2  (Incorrect)

(2)  M 1L4 T 4 I 1  (Correct)

(3)  ML3T 3 I 1  (Incorrect)

(4)  M 1LT 2 I 2  (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:

We have  C    LT 1 

 F.r 2   MLT 2 L2 
G   2 
 2 
m   M 

  M 1L3 T 2 

 e   IT 

77
 CG   LT M L T 
1 1 3 –2
 X   
  
 E    IT  

  M 1L4 T 4 I 1 

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Difficult Finding dimensional formula

L
 
42. The dimensional formula, for the ratio  R  (L = inductance, R = resistance,  0 =
  0 0 
permeasility, 0 = permittivity) equals:

(1)  M 0 L2 T  (Incorrect)

(2)  M 0 LT  (Incorrect)

(3)  M 0 L–2 T  (Incorrect)

(4)  M 0 L2 T –1  (Correct)

Correct answer: (4)


Solution:
We can do this problem quickly if we rembmer that:

L
  = time constant
R

1
and  C = velocity of light
0 0

L
    T 
R 

78
1 
and 0 0    2 
  L2 T 2 
C 

 L 
 R  T L2
     2 2 
   0 0   L T T
 

  M 0 L2 T –1 

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Dimensional formula

 LVs 
43. The dimensional formula, of the term Y, where Y   K  (Lv = specific latent heat, s =
 0
specific heat capacity, K0 = thermal conductivity), equals:

(1)  M 1LT 2 K 1  (Incorrect)

(2)  M 1L2 T 2 K  (Incorrect)

(3)  M 1L3 T 2  (Correct)

(4)  M 1L4 T 1  (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (3)


Solution:

 Heat  energy  
We have LV   
 Mass 

 ML2T 2 
  LV       L2T 2 
 M 

79
 Heat  energy    ML2 T2 
s  
 Mass  changein temperature   MK 

  M 0 L2 T 2 K 1 

d
Also, Q  K 0 A
d
Heat energy  length
 K0  
Area  changein temperature

 ML3T 2  2 1
 2
L  K    MLT K 
 

2 2 2 2 1
 L S  L T  L T K 
  V  2 1    M 1L3T 2 
 K   MLT K 

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Dimensional formula
44. The physical quantity, whose dimensional formula matches that of the quantity

 L s T 
Z f 
 K0 

(Lf = specific latent heat of fusion, s = specific heat capacity,  = density, T = time of heat
flow, K0 = thermal conductivity), is:
(1) frequency (Correct)
(2) time period (Incorrect)
(3) velocity (Incorrect)
(4) momentum (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:

 Heat energy 
We have  L f   
2 2
   L T 
 Mass 

80
 Heat energy 
s   2 2 1
   L T K 
 Mass  change in temperature 

   ML3  ,  T    T 

 K 0    MLT 2 K 1 

 L2 T 2    L2 T 2 K 1    ML3   T 
  Z  
 MLT 2 K 1 

= [T–1]
 This matches the dimensional formula of frequency..

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Dimensional formula
45. The ‘dimensional formula’, of the term

 e2 C 
Z 
 0 R 

(e = change, C = capacitance, 0 = permittivity, R = resistance), equals:

(1)  M 0 L2 T 0 I 2  (Incorrect)

(2)  M 0 L2 T 0 I 2  (Correct)

(3)  M 2 L2 TI  (Incorrect)

(4)  M –2 L2 T –1I  (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:
2
We have  e 2    IT    I 2 T 2 

81
 C    LT 1 

 0    M 1L3T 4 I2 

 R    ML2 T 3I2 

 I2 T 2   LT 1 
  Z 
 M 1L3T 4 I 2   ML2 T 3 I 2 

 L2 I 2 

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Difficult Dimensional incompability

46. The term 0 E 2 ( 0 = permittivity, E = electric field) is dimensionally incompatible with the
term
(1) p (p = pressure) (Incorrect)

k
(2) (k = spring constant, x = displacement) (Incorrect)
x
(3) CV 2 (C = capacitance, V = potential difference) (Correct)

 mgh 
(4)   (m = mass, h = height, V = volume, g = acceleration due to gravity) (Incorrect)
 V 

Correct answer: (3)


Solution:

The term 0 E 2 has the dimensions of energy density, i.e. energy per unit volume. [We know that the energy
1
density, of the electric field, is 0 E 2 . (The dimensions of the term can also be obtained through a substitution
2
of the dimensions of 0 and E)].

 ML2 T 2 
  0 E 2    3    ML1T 2 
 L 

82
 Force / length 
Now p =     ML1T 2 
 length 

 mgh    M   LT   L    1 2 
2

 V      ML T 
  L3   
These terms are thus dimensionally compatible with the term 0 E 2 .

2  Ch arge 2
However, CV      potential  
 potential 

work
 Charge    work    ML2 T 2 
charge

This term is, therefore, dimensionally incompatible with 0 E 2 .

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Difficult Dimensional incompability

 B2 
47. The term    (B = magnetic field,  0 = permeability) is dimensionally incompatible with
 0
the term

 p2 
(1)   (p = momentum, m = mass, V = volume) (Incorrect)
 mV 

(2) LI (L = self inductance, I = current) (Correct)

 I 2 Rt 
(3)   (I = current, R = resistance, t = time, V = volume) (Inorrect)
 V 

S
(4)   (S = surface tension, x = distance) (Incorrect)
x

Correct answer: (2)

83
Solution:

 B2 
The term    has the dimensions of energy density, i.e. energy per unit volume. [We know that the
 0

B2
energy density of the magnetic field is ; (This may also be worked out through a direct use of the
20

 B2   ML2 T 2 
dimensions of B and  0 )]. Hence the dimensions of  are  L3  i.e.  ML1T 2 
 
 0  

 p 2   M 2 L2 T 2  1 2
Now  mV    M.L3    ML T 
   

 I2 Rt   ML2 T 2  1 1
 V    L3    ML T  ( I2Rt = Heat produced)
   

S  Force / length 
   ML T 
1 1

x  length 

 B2 
All these terms are, therefore, dimensinoally compatible with the term    .
 0

 emf  time 
However, in the term (LI), we have  L    Self inductance    
 current 

  LI   emf  time

Work
  time
ch arg e

= (ML2T–2I–1)

 B2 
This term is, therefore, dimensionally incompatible with the term    .
 0

84
Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement
Difficult Dimensional incompability

s
48. The term Z  (s = distance, u = speed) is dimensionally incompatible with the term
u
(1) LC (L = self inductance, C = capacitance) (Correct)

L
(2) (L = self inductance, R = resistance) (Incorrect)
R
(3) RC (R = resistance, C = capacitance) (Incorrect)


(4) ( = length, g = acceleration) (Incorrect)
g 

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:

 s
The term Z    has the dimensions of time.
 u

Using the dimensions of L  L   ML2 T 2 I 2 

R  R   ML2 T 3 I 2  and C  C   M –1L–2 T 4 I 2 

L
We find that the terms   and (RC) both have the dimensions of time.
R

1
   L 2
Also,  g    LT 2    T 
   

 This term also has the dimensions of time.

However, the term  LC    T 2 

It, therefore, is dimensionally incompatible with the given term, i.e. Z.

85
Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement
Average Dimensional incompability
49. From the following relations, the one, that does not meet the requirement of dimensional
compatability, is the relation:

pr 4
(1) V (V = rate of flow, p = pressure, r = radius,  = length,  = coefficient of viscosity)
8
(Incorrect)

(2) F  6r 2 v (F = force ( viscous), r = radius, v = velocity (terminal),  = coefficient of


viscosity) (Correct)

rhg
(3) S (S = surface tension, r = radius, h = height,  = density, g = acceleration,
2 cos 
 = angle of contact (Incorrect)
(4) W = pV (W = work, p = pressure, V = volume) (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
On substituting the dimensions of different terms, we find that the dimensions of the LHS and the RHS, are
equal in relations (1), (3) and (4). Hence these relations meet the requirement of dimensional compatibitility.
However, in relation (2), dimensions of LHS and RHS are different. Hence this relation is ‘dimensionally
incompatible.”

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Easy Dimensional Compatibility
50. The dimensions formula [M–1L3T–2] can correspond to the dimensional formula of

 I 
(1) G as well as  2  (G = universal gravitational constant, I = moment of inertia,
M 
 = acceleration, M = mass) (Correct)

 A 
(2) G as well as  2  (G = univeral gravitational constant, A = area, M = mass, t= time)
 Mt 
(Incorrect)

86
 h   V 
(3)  2  as well as  2  (h = Planck’s constant, V = volume, t = time) (Incorrect)
M   Mt 

 hv   S 
(4)  2  as well as   (h = Planck’s constant, v = frequency, M = mass, S = surface
M   MV 
tension, V = volume) (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:
2
Force   distance 
We find that  G   2
  M 1L3T 2 
 mass 

 I    ML  LT    1 3 2 
2 2

Also,  M 2     M LT 
    M 2   
Both the terms, in option (1), thus match the given dimensinos.
However, one, or both the terms, in the other three option, are NOT dimensionally compatible with the
‘given dimensions’.

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Writing dimensional formulae in terms of
a new set of (assumed) fundamental units
51. If force (F), acceleration (a) and surface, tension (S), are taken as the ‘fundamental units’,
the dimensional formula, for G, the universal gravitational constant would be:
(1) [F a s–1] (Incorrect)
(2) [F2 a2 s–2] (Incorrect)
(3) [F2 a s–1] (Incorrect)
(4) [F a2 s–2] (Correct)
Correct answer: (4)
Solution:
We have, [F] = [MLT–2]; [a] = [LT–2] and [S] = [MT–2]

  M    Fa –1 

87
1

 12 1  12
 S 2 
Also,  T   S F2a 
  T    
 M 

and [L] = [F S–1]

 F2S2 
  F. 2 2    Fa 2S2 
 Fa 

[Note: This result may be converted into dimensions in terms of M, L and T and compared with the known
dimensions of [G] in terms of M, L and T. This ‘checking’ can help in all such questions.]

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Difficult Writing dimensional formulae in terms of
a new set of (assumed) fundamental units

52. If mass, time, 0 (permittivity) and  0 (permeability) are taken as the ‘base’ units, the
dimensional formula, for electrical resistance, R would be:
1 1
(1)  R    M 0 2
 0 2 T  (Incorrect)

1 1
(2)  R    M 00 2
0 2 T 0  (Correct)

1 1
(3)  R    M 00 2
0 2 T 0  (Incorrect)

1 1
(4)  R    M –1 0 2
 0 2 T –1  (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:

We have,  0    M 1L3 T 4 I 2 

and  0    MLT –2 I2 


From these, we get
1
 L   0 0  2
.T 

88
1
1 3 
and  I   0 2 0 2 M 1T 1  2

Now  R    ML2 T 3 I 2 

 T2 
  MT 3

 00 
1
 3
. 0 2  0 2 M 1T  
 

1
  2 1 1
  0    M 0 0 2 0 2 T 0 
 0 

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Writing dimensional formulae in terms of
a new set of (assumed) fundamental units
53. It Planck’s constant (h), linear momentum (p) and angular velocity (  ), were taken as the
fundamental units, the dimensional formula, for surface tension (S) would be:

(1) S   h 2 p 1 (Incorrect)

(2) S   h –2 p (Incorrect)

(3) S   h –1p 2 (Correct)

(4) S   hp –2–1  (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (3)


Solution:
We have [h] (= energy × time) = [ML2T–1]
[p] = [MLT–1]
and (  ) = (T–1)

These give [T] =  1 

[L] = [hp–1]

89
and [M] = p.L–1T   ph –1p 1–1 

Now,

Force
 S    MT –2 
length

  h 1p 2 –12    h 1p 2 

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Difficult Writing dimensional formulae in terms
of a new of (assumed) ‘base’ units
54. If G (universal gravitational constant), h (Planck’s constant) and C (Velocity of light) were
taken as the fundamental units, the dimensional formula, for pressure (p), would be

(1)  p   h 2G 1C7  (Incorrect)

(2)  p    h 2GC –7  (Incorrect)

(3)  p    hG 2C –7  (Incorrect)

(4)  p   h –1G –2C7  (Correct)

Correct answer: (4)


Solution:
We have [G] = [M–1L3T–2]
[h] = [ML2T–1]
[C] = [LT–1]
From these, we get
[G h] = L5T–3
Also, [C5] = L5T–5

 Gh  1 1 5
  5   T 2 or  T   G 2 H 2 C 2
C 

90
1 1 3
  L    CT   G 2 H 2 C 2 

 M    hL2T 1   h  G 1h 1C3   G 


1 1 5
and 2
H2C 2

1 1 1
  h 2 G 2 C 2 

Now pressure, p = [ML–1T–2]

  p    h 1G 2 C 7 

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Writing dimensional formulae in terms
of a new of (assumed) ‘base’ units
55. If specific heat capacity (S), specific latent heat (L0), mass (M) and time (T), were taken as
the ‘base’ units, the dimensional formula for coefficient of thermal conductivity (  ), would
be:
1
(1)    MSL0 T 1  2
(Correct)

1 1
(2)    M 1S 2
L 0 2 T 2  (Incorrect)

1
(3)     MS1L0 T –2  2
(Incorrect)

1 1
(4)     M 1S 2
L 0 2 T –1  (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:
We have [S] = [M0L2T–2K–1]
[L0] = [M0L2T–2]
These give [K] = [L0/S]
and [L] = [ST2K]½
1
 L 
 ST 2 0    L0T 2  2
 S

91
Now, []   MLT 2 K 1 

 1  S 
 [ ]   M  L 0 T 2   T  2    
2

  L0 

1
  MSL0 2 T 1 

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Easy Relation between units of two systems
56. It is known, that the units of mass, length and time, in the SI units and FPS system, are
related as
1 kg  2.205 pound; 1 m  3.28 feet, 1s = 1s
The value of the surface tension of water is 7.3×10–2 N/m. Its value, in the FPS units, would
be
(1) 0.066 FPS units (Incorrect)
(2) 0.033 FPS units (Incorrect)
(3) 0.16 FPS units (Correct)
(4) 0.32 FPS units (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:
We have,

 Force   MLT 2 
[Surface tension] =  length    L 
   
= [MT–2]

Unit of surface tension in SI units



Unit of surface tension in FPSsystem

2
 kg   s  2.205 pound 2
    1
 pound   s  1poind

= 2.205
92
2
 7.3  102 Units in SI Units = 2.205  7.3  10 Units

 16.1 102 FPS units

 0.16 FPS Units

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Relation between units of two systems
57. The specific latent heat of fusion of water is known to be 80 cal/g. Given that 1 cal = 4.2J,
1 kg = 2.205 pound, 1 m = 3.28 feet, the value of this specific latent heat, in FPS units, is
(1) 1102 × 103 FPS units (Incorrect)
(2) 3615 × 103 FPS units (Correct)
(3) 102 × 103 FPS units (Incorrect)
(4) 31.2 × 103 FPS units (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
We have,

2 2
 Heat energy   ML T 
[Specific latent heat] =        L2 T 2 
 mass   M 

2 2
Unit of surface tension in SI units  m   1s 

Unit of surface tension in FPSsystem =    
 ft   1s 

2
 3.28feet 
  1  10.76
 1feet 

80 cal 80  4.2J

 Specific latent heat of water = g 103 kg 
 336 10 3 J / kg  336  103  m 2 s 2 

= (336 × 103 × 10.76) FPS Units


 3615 × 103 FPS Units

93
Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement
Average Relation between units of two systems
58. The Young’s modules of copper is known to have a value 1.3×1010 in CGS units. Given that
1 pound = 453.5 g, 1 foot  30.5 cm, the value of Young’s modulus of copper, in FPS units,
is:
(1) (8.7×108) FPS units (Correct)
(2) (8.7×1010) FPS units (Incorrect)
(3) (7.24×105) FPS units (Incorrect)
(4) (7.24×106) FPS units (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:

 Stress   MLT 2 
We have,  Y      2    ML1T 2 
 Strain   L 

1 2
Unit of Y in CGS units  g   cm   1s 
  
Unit of Y in FPS units  pound   ft   1s 

–1
 g   cm 
   1
 453.5 g   30.5 cm 

30.5
  0.067
453.5

 1.3 1010 CGS units  1.3  00.67 1010 FPS units

 0.087 1010 FPS units


= 8.7×108 FPS Units

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Relation between units of two systems
59. The specific heat capacity of water is known to be 1 cal/(g0C).
A system of units uses a unit of mass that equals 500g, a unit of length that equal 50cm and
a unit of time that equal 100s. It also uses to Fahrenheit scale of temperature in which

94
there are 180 divisons between the temperature of melting ice (00C) and that of (normal)
boiling point of water (= 1000C).
The value of the specific heat capacity of water, in this hypothetical system, would be:
(1) 9.3 × 107 units of the hypothetical system (Correct)
(2) 1.9 × 107 units of the hypothetical system (Incorrect)
(3) 1.9 × 10–1 units of the hypothetical system (Incorrect)
(4) 9.3 × 10–1 units of the hypothetical system (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:
We have,

Heat energy
[Specific heat capacity] = Mass  change in temperature

 ML2 T 2  2 2 1

MK    L T K 
 

Unit of specificheat capacityinSIunits



Unit of specificheatcapacityin thehypothetical system

2 2 1
 m   s   kelvin degree 
     
 50cm   100s   Fahrenheit degree 

Now 100 divisions on the celsius scale


(= 100 divisions on the kelvin scale)
= 180 divisions on the Fahrenheit scale

 1 division on the kelvin scale


= 1.8 divisions on the Fahrenheit scale

2 2 1
 100 cm   1   1.80 F 
 Above ratio =  50 cm   100   10 F 
     

95
1
 4  104 
1.8
= 2.22 × 104

1cal
Now specific heat capacity of water =  g 0 C 

4.25 4.2  103 J


= 103 kg(K)   4.2  103 SI Units
kg  K 

= 4.2  103   2.22  10 4  units in the hypothetical system

= 9.324×107 units in the hypothetical system


 9.3×107 units

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Difficult Relation between units of two systems
60. The gas constant, R, has a vlue of 8.32 J mole–1K–1 in SI units.
A hypothetial system uses a unit of mass that equals 2kg, a unit of length that equals 5m
and a unit of time that equals 1ms. The system also uses the Hahrenheit scale of temperature
in which there are 180 divisions between the temperature of melting ice and that of the
(normal) boiling point of water (=1000C).
The value of the gas constant, R, in this sytem would be (nearly):
(1) 30×10–8 (new energy unit) (mole–1) (0F)–1 (Incorrect)
(2) 9.2×10–8 (new energy unit) (mole–1) (0F)–1 (Correct)
(3) 15×10–8 (new energy unit) (mole–1) (0F)–1 (Incorrect)
(4) 4.6×10–8 (new energy unit) (mole–1) (0F)–1 (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
We first note that the 1 mole would still contain the same number of ‘entities’.
Also 1J = 1 kg (1m)2 (1s)–2

96
2 2
 1kg   1m   1s 
     new energy units
 2kg   5m   1ms 
= 2×10–8 new energy units
Also 100 divisions on the celsius scale = 100 divisions on the kelvin scale = 180 divisions on the Fahrenheit
scale.
 1K = 1.8 0F
(1K)–1 = (1.8)–1 (0F)–1
 R = 8.32 J (mole–1) (K)–1
= 8.32 (2×10–8 new energy units) (mole–1) [(1.8)–1 (0F)–1]

16.64
  108 (new energy unit) (mole)–1 (0F)–1
1.8
= 9.23×10–8 (new energy unit) (mole)–1 (0F)–1
 (9.2×10–8) (new energy unit) (mole)–1 (0F)–1

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Errors

61. A beam, made from a material of Young’s modulus Y, has a length  , a width b and a
thickness d. When it is placed symmetrically on two knife edges, at its ends, and loaded in
the middle by a mass M, it gets depressed by an amount  where

 Mg3 
  3 
 4bd Y 
The relative errors, in the determinations of  and d, have identical values of 1% each.
The error, in the determination of M is 0.5%, that in the determination of b is 0.2% and
that in the determinations of  is 0.1%. The value of ‘g’ is used from standard tables.
The relative error, in the determination of Y, on the basis of these measurements, would
be:
(1) 0.2% (Incorrect)
(2) 0.8% (Incorrect)
(3) 2.8% (Incorrect)
(4) 6.8% (Correct)

97
Correct answer: (4)
Solution:
We have,

Mg3
Y
4bd 3

Y M g  b d 
   3  3 
Y M g  b d 

= 0.5% + 0 + 3 ×1% + 0.2% + 3×1% + 0.1%


= 6.8%
The relative error, in the determinatino of Y is, therefore, 6.8%

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Errors

r 3
62. In the relation t  k ,

The quantities t,  , r and  refer to the time of oscillation, density, radius and surface
tension, respetively. The relative error, in the determination of  , is calculated on the
basis of the relative errors, of 0.5%, 0.1% and 0.2% in the measurement of  , r and t,
respectively. This relative error would equal:
(1) 1.2% (Correct)
(2) 0.8% (Incorrect)
(3) 0.6% (Incorrect)
(4) 0.4% (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:
We have,

r 3
tk

98
r 3 2
 k 2
t

  r t
  3 2
  r t

= 0.5% + 3 (0.1%) + 2 (0.2%)


= 1.2%

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Errors
63. The modules, of rigidity,  , the material of a wire, is calculated from the relation

r 4
  k.
2
where  = torsional constant (torque per unit twist), r = radius and  = length.
The relative error, in the determination of  , is calculated to be 0.9%. The relative erros,
in the determination of  and  are found to be 0.5% and 0.2%, respectively. The ratio of
the least count of the instrument, used to measure r, to the measured (average) value of r,
would then equal:
(1) 0.001 (Incorrect)
(2) 0.0005 (Correct)
(3) 0.002 (Incorrect)
(4) 0.0001 (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
We have,

r 4
  k.
2

2 
 
k r4

99
   r
   4
   r

 r 
 0.9% = 0.2% + 0.5% + 4 (x) x 
 r 

 r 
This given x    = 0.05% = 0.0005
 r 

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Errors
64. The frequency (n), of a tuning fork, depends upon the length (  ) of its proungs and the
density (d) and Young’s modules (Y) of its material, through the relation

k Y
n
 d

If the relative percentage errors, in the determination of n,  and d are 0.1%, 0.5% and
1%, respectively, the relative percentage error, in the determination of Y, would be:
(1) 2.2% (Correct)
(2) 1.6% (Incorrect)
(3) 1.1% (Incorrect)
(4) 0.95% (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:
We have,

k Y
n
 d

n 2 2 d
 Y
k2

Y n  d
 2 2 
Y n  d

100
= 2 (0.1%) + 2(0.5%) + (1%)
= 2.2 %

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Errors
65. The mass m, of a stone, that can be moved by flowing stream of water, depends on the
velocity (v), of the flowing water, the density (  ) of water and the acceleration due to
gravity (g). The relation, between the different quantities, is expressed as
m  kv n  g  3
The relative percentage errors, in the determination of v,  and g are 1%, 0.7% and 0.1%,
respectively. The value of n, in the above relation, and the relative percentage error, in the
determination of m, are equal, respectively, to:
(1) 5; 6% (Incorrect)
(2) 6; 5% (Incorrect)
(3) 7; 6% (Incorrect)
(4) 6; 7% (Correct)
Correct answer: (4)
Solution:
Using the principle of dimensional homogenity, in the relation,

m  kv n g 3 , we get
[M] = [LT–1]n [ML–3] [LT–2]–3
We get – n + 6 = 0 or n = 6
This value is also consistent with n + (–3) + (–3) = 0

 m  k v 6  g 3

m v  g
 6  3
m v  g

= 6 (1%) + (0.7%) + 3(0.1%)


= 7%

101
Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement
Difficult Dimensional Compatibility
66. It is given that the time period (T) of oscillation, of a gas bubble, formed under water,
depends upon pressure (P), density (d) and energy (E), as

T  k a d b E c

The value of a, b and c, are:

(1) (–5/6), (1/2) and (1/3) (Correct)

(2) (–5/6), (1/3) and (1/2) (Incorrect)

(3) (5/6), (1/3) and (1/2) (Incorrect)


(4) (5/6), (1/2) and (1/3) (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:
Putting dimensions, of all the terms, in the relation.

T  k a d b E c , we get

[T] = [ML–1T–2]a [ML–3]b [ML2T–2]c

 a+b+c=0
– a – 3b + 2c = 0
–2a – 2c = 1
These equations give,
a = –5/6, b = 1/2, c = 1/3

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Dimensional Compatibility

67. In the relation T  kh 12 G 12 Cn

(T = Time period; h = Planck’s constant, G = Universal gravitational constant, C = velocity


of light), the value of n should be

102
 3
(1) n    (Incorrect)
 2

 5
(2) n  –  (Correct)
 2

1
(3) n   (Incorrect)
2

 3
(4) n    (Incorrect)
 2

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:
We have,
1 1
T  kh 2 G 2 Cn
 Putting dimensions, we get
1 1 n
 T    ML2 T 1   M 1L3T 2   LT 1 
2 2

3
 1 n 0
2

1
and   1  n  1
2

5
From either of these, we get n = 
2

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Change of fundamenal units

68. The dimensions, of the term, Z  h a CG 1


(h = Planck’s constant, C = velocity of light, G = universal gravitational constant) equal M2.
The value of a, in this term, equals

103
(1) (4) (Incorrect)
(2) (3) (Incorrect)
(3) (2) (Incorrect)
(4) (1) (Correct)
Correct answer: (4)
Solution:
We have,

 h    energy  time   ML2T 1 

 Force  distance2 
G   2
1 3 2
   M L T 
 mass 

 C   Velocity   LT 1 
 From the given relation, we get
a 1
 M 2    ML2 T 1   LT 1   M 1L3T 2 

These give,
a+1 = 2; 2a+1–3 = 0; –a–1+2 = 0
The value of, a, consistent with all these relations, is a = +1

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Error
69. The length (  ) and breadth (b), of a rectangle, are measured to be

 = (10.0  0.1) cm, b = (5.10  0.05) cm


The perimeter (p), and the area (A), of this rectangle, should be expressed as:
(1) p = (30.2  0.15) cm, A = (51  1) cm2 (Incorrect)
(2) p = (30.2  0.15) cm, A = (51.0  0.5) cm2 (Correct)
(3) p = (30.20  0.05) cm, A = (51.0  0.5) cm2 (Incorrect)
(4) p = (30.20  0.05) cm, A = (51  1) cm2 (Incorrect)

104
Correct answer: (2)

Solution:

We have p = 2 (  +b) = 2(10.0+5.10) = 30.20 cm

The error, in the sum of  and b, would be the sum of their individual errors. Thus

p    b   0.1  0.05  cm

= 0.15 cm

We would, therefore, write the perimeter, p, as

p = (30.2  0.15) m

Also, area A =  b = 10.0 × 5.1 = 51.0 cm2

A  b 0.1 0.05
Now,    
A  b 10.0 5.1

= 0.01 + 0.0098 = 0.0198

 A = (0.0198×51.0)2 = 0.52 cm2

We would, therefore, write the area, A, as

A = (51.0  0.5) cm2

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Error

70. The side, a, of a cube, has been measured as a = (2.5  0.1) cm

The total surface area (S), and the volume (V), of the cube, would be expressed as:

(1) S = (38  3) cm2 V = (15.625  1.875) cm3 (Incorrect)

(2) S = (37.5  3) cm2 V = (15.63  1.88) cm3 (Incorrect)

(3) S = (37.5  3) cm2 V = (15.6  1.9) cm3 (Incorrect)

(4) S = (38  3) cm2 V = (16  2) cm3 (Correct)

Correct answer: (4)

105
Solution:
We have,
Total surface area, S = 6 (a2)
= 6 (2.5)2 cm2 = 37.5 cm2

S a 2  0.1
Also, 2   0.08
S a 2.5

 S   0.08  37.5  cm 2  3cm 2

We should, therefore, express S as,

S   38  3 cm 2

Also volume V = a3 = (2.5)3 cm3 = 15.625 cm3

V a 3  0.1
 3   0.12
V a 2.5

 V  0.12  15.625 cm 3  1.875 cm 3  2 cm3


We, should, therefore, express V as

V  16  2  cm3

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Easy Error
71. The voltage (V), across a wire, and the current (I), through it, have been measured as
V = (3.4  0.2) volt, I = (0.085  0.005) ampere.
The resistance, R, of the wire, as per these measurements, is:
(1) R = (40  5)  (Correct)
(2) R = (40.0  4.7)  (Incorrect)
(3) R = (40.00  4.72)  (Incorrect)
(4) R = (40  0)  (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (1)

106
Solution:
We have, as per Ohm’s law,

V 3.4
R    40 
I 0.085

R V I
Also,  
R V I

0.2 0.005
 
3.4 0.085
= 0.059  0.059 = 0.118

 R   0.118  40    4.72 

5

 R   40  5 

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Error
72. The resistance, R, of a wire has been measured as (40.0  0.02)  . Its length, and radius,
have been measured as

 = (120.0  0.1) cm and r = (2.00  0.01) mm.

 R 
The relative percentage error in the resistivity,     2  , of the material of this wire,
e,
 r 
would be:
(1) 6.08% (Incorrect)
(2) 1.6% (Correct)
(3) 1.08% (Incorrect)
(4) 0.6% (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)

107
Solution:

R
We have,  
r 2

 R  r
   2
 R  r

0.2 0.1 0.01


   2
40.0 120.0 2.00
= 0.005 + 0.008 + 0.01
= 0.0158
 Relative percentage error
 1.6%

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Difficult Writing dimensions in terms of new fundamental units

73. If mass (M), permittivity   0  , permeability  0  and Planck’s constant (h), are taken as
the fundamental units, the dimensions of length (L), would be:
1 1
(1)  L  M 1h 0 2
0 2  (Correct)

1 1
(2)  L  Mh 1  0 2
0 2  (Incorrect)

1 1
(3)  L  Mh0 2
0 2  (Incorrect)

1 1
(4)  L   M –1h –1 0 2
0 2  (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:
We have

 0    M 1L3T 4 I2 

108
0    MLT 2 I 2 

 h    ML2T 1 

   0  0    L2 T 2 

Also,  h    ML2 T 1 

 h 2  M 2 L4 T 2

  0 0  h 2  M 2 L2

1
   h2 
2

  L    0 02 
 M 

1 1
  0 2 0 2 h M 1 

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Errors
74. The rate of flow of heat (Q), through a conductor, depends on the coefficient of thermal
conductivity (  ), area of cross section (A), temperature difference across the two ends of
the rod    , and the length    of the conductor. The relevant formula


Q  A

is used to determine  experimentally. The relative percentage errors, in the measurement
of different quantities, are as follow:
Flowing heat energy = 2%
Time for which heat flows = 0.2%
Temperature difference = 2%
Length of the rod = 0.5%
Area of cross section of the rod = 0.5%

109
The relative percentage error, in the determination of  , would be
(1) 0.2% (Incorrect)
(2) 5.2% (Correct)
(3) 0.4% (Incorrect)
(4) 2.6% (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
The relation


Q  A

can be rewritten as

 H    H 
  .  Q  t 
   A     

 H t         A
     
 H t       A
= 2% + 0.2% + 0.5% + 2% + 0.5%
= 5.2%

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Errors
75. A dimensionless number (NR), called Reynold’s number, can be made from a suitable
combination of r (radius of the tube),  (density of the liquid), v (velocity of the fluid) and 
(the coefficient of viscosity of the liquid). The relative percentage errors, in the measurement
of r,  , v and  are found to be 0.4%, 1.5%, 2% and 2.5% respectively..
The formula, for NR, and the relative percentage error in its calculated value, are equal,
respectively, to:

rv NR
(1) NR  ;  6.4% (Correct)
 NR

110
NR
(2) NR  rv;  1.4% (Incorrect)
NR

rv NR
(3) NR  ;  1.4% (Incorrect)
 NR

NR
(4) NR  rv;  6.4% (Incorrect)
NR

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:

We know that  r    L  ;     ML3 

 v    LT 1  ;    ML1T 1 

 rv 
These give   as a dimensionaless combination.
  

rv
Thus N R 

N R r  v 
    
NR r  v 

= 0.4% + 1.5% + 2% + 2.5% = 6.4%

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Difficult Change of ‘base units
76. Stefan’s law, E =  T4 (E = energy radiated per unit area per unit time; T = temperature of
black body), and Wien’s displacement law  m T  b (  m = wavelength of maximum emission,
T = temperature) are used to define the Stefan’s constant ,  , and the Wien’s constant, b.
If  , b, along with mass and time, are taken as the ‘base units’ the dimensions of the
‘thermal capacity’ (Cm) of a body, would be:
1
(1)  b 2 MT 3 5  (Incorrect)
 

111
1 1
(2)  b 2  2 M 1T 2  (Incorrect)
 
3 1 7
(3) M 2b  2T 2  (Correct)
 
3 1 5
(4)  M 2 b 2 T 2  (Incorrect)
 
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:
We have

E
  ML2T 2  4 
   4    2  K 
T    L T  

1
  MT 3 K 4   K   M 1T 3 
4

and  b   m T    LK 
  L    bK 1 

 Heat energy 
Now thermal capacity =  C m    Change in Temperature 
 

 ML2 T 2  2
   M  bK 1  T 2  K 1 
 K 
1

 MbT 2  M 1T 3 
2

1 1 7
=  M 2 b  2T 2 

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Change of ‘base units
77. If the velocity of light (C), the charge of the electron (e), time (T), and the universal
gravitational constant (G) were taken as the ‘base ‘units’, the dimensions of ‘moment of

112
inertia’ and electrical potential (V) would be:

(1)  GC 5 T 3  and G 1C 5 Te  , respectively (Incorrect)

(2)  G 1C5 T 3  and  G 1C5 Te 1  , respectively (Correct)

(3)  GC 5 T 3  and GC 5 Te  , respectively (Incorrect)

(4)  G 1C 5 T 3  and GC5 T 1e  , respectively (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:

We have,

 C    LT 1 

 e   IT 

 G    M 1L3T 2 

  T    eT 1 

 L  CT 

and  M    G –1L3T 2 

  Moment of inertia    ML2 

 G 1L3T 2 L2    G 1L5 T 2 

  G 1C5 T 5 T 2    G 1C5 T 3 

 Work 
and  Electrical potential   V    
 Charge 

113
 ML2T 2    G C T T  C T  T 
1 3 3 2 2 2 2

  
 IT   e 

 G 1C5Te 1 

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Difficult Errors
78. To find the density of a given material, a solid cuboid of the material was taken and its
dimensions as well as its mass were measured. The result of the measurement were:

 = (5.10  0.05) cm
b = (3.25  0.05) cm
h = (1.40  0.01) cm
m = (185.450  0.002) g
The volume (V), of the cuboid, and the density  , of the material equal, respectively..
(1) (32.2  0.74) cm3 and (7.99  0.24) g/cm3 (Incorrect)
(2) (23.21  0.74) cm3 and (8.0  0.2) g/cm3 (Incorrect)
(3) (23.21  0.74) cm3 and (7.99  0.24) g/cm3 (Incorrect)
(4) (23.2  0.7) cm3 and (8.0  0.2) g/cm3 (Correct)
Correct answer: (4)
Solution:
We have, V =  b h
= (5.10×3.25×1.40) cm3 = 23.205 cm3

V  b h
Also,   
V  b h

0.05 0.05 0.01


=  
5.10 3.25 1.40
= 0.0098 + 0.0154 +0.0071  0.032

114
 V  0.302  23.205 cm3  0.74 cm 3

We, therefore, write

V = (23.2  0.7) cm3

Now density,

mass 185.45
d  g / cm 3
volume 23.2

= 7.99 g/cm3

  d  m V
Also,  
d m V

0.002 0.7
 
185.450 23.2

= 0.00001 + 0.03  0.03

 d  0.03  7.99 g / cm3  0.24 g / cm 3

We, therefore, write

d   8.0  0.2  g / cm3

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Average Errors
79. The moment of inertia I (= mass × (radius)2) of a hollow spherical ball of mass M (= (500  1)g),
has been calculated out to be ((8000  56)g–cm2). The reported value of I, and the least
count of the instrument used for measuring the radius (r), should then be:
(1) (8000  56) g–cm2 and 0.01 cm, respectively (Correct)
(2) (8000  56) g–cm2 and 0.02 cm, respectively (Incorrect)
(3) (8000  60) g–cm2 and 0.02 cm, respectively (Incorrect)
(4) (8000  50) g–cm2 and 0.01 cm, respectively (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (1)

115
Solution:
We have, I = M r2

8000 2
 r2  cm  16 cm 2  r  4 cm
500

I M r
Also,  2
I M r

 56   1 r 
  2 
 8000   500 r 

r 1 1
This gives   0.007  0.002   0.005
r 2 2

1 
 r    .005  4  0.01cm
2 
The least count of the instrument, used for measuring the radius, is, therefore, 0.01 cm.

Unit–1 : Physics + Measurement


Difficult Calculating dimensions
80. The dimensional formula, of the term

 e4v 
Z 2
  m m 2 c3G  ,
 0 p e 

(where e = charge of electron, v = frequency, 0 = permittivity, mp = mass of proton,


me = mass of electron, C = velocity of light, G = universal gravitationl constant) and the
ratio, of its values, is the SI and CGS units, are:
(1) [Z] = [M–2LT0I0] and 10½ , respectively (Incorrect)
(2) [Z] = [M–1L2TI0] and 10 , respectively (Incorrect)
(3) [Z] = [M–1LT3I0] and 10–1 , respectively (Incorrect)
(4) [Z] = [M0L0T0I0] and 100 , respectively (Correct)
Correct answer: (4)

116
Solution:
We have,

 e   IT  ; v    T 1 

 0    M 1L3T 4 I2  ;  m p    M  ;  m e    M 

 C   LT 1  ; G    M 1L3T 2 

 I4 T 4  T 1 
  Z  2
 M 1L3T 4 I 2   M 3   L3 T 3   M 1L3 T 2 

  M 0 L0 T 0 I 0 

This Z is a dimensionless term.


 The ratio of its values, in the SI and CGS units, is 1 or 100.

117
UNIT–2 : KINEMATICS

Learning Objectives
After going through unit, you would be able to understand, appreciate and apply the following concepts:
 Kinematics of motion.
 Description of motion - idea of frame of reference.
 Rest and motion.
 Concept of “absolute rest”.
 All motion is relative.
 Distance and displacement of a body in motion.
 One, two and three dimensional motion.
 Detailed study of motion in one dimension.
 Concept of average and instantaneous speed and velocity.
 Uniform motion. Graphical representation.
 Non-uniform motion - concept of acceleration.
 Uniform and non-uniform acceleration.
 Equations of uniformly accelerated motion.
 Graphical representation of uniformly accelerated motion.
 Motion under gravity as uniformly accelerated motion.
 Problem solving using equations of motion, graphs etc.
 Motion in two dimensions.
 Scalar and vector quantities - definition, graphical representation and examples.
 Triangle law of vector addition and its applications.
 Parallelogramms and polygon law of vector addition.
 Unit vector.
 Components of a vector. Rectangular components.
 Representation of vectors in terms of unit vectors and rectangular components in Cartesian
co-ordinates.
 Substraction of vectors.
 Relative velocity and use of vector substraction.

118
 Scalar product, expression in terms of Cartesian components of vectors. Applications of scalar
product.
 Vector product, Right hand-srew rule.
 Expression for vector product in terms of Cartesian components of vectors.
 Motion of a projectile.
 Projectile motion resolved as
(i) Uniform motion
(ii) Uniformly accelerated motion
 Equations of projectile motion
(a) Equation of trajectory
(b) Time of flight
(c) Maximum vertical height
(d) Horizontal range
 Graphs of projectile motion.
 Applications of projectile motion.
 Circular motion - definition of basic term like angular displacement, angular velocity etc.
 Similarity between one dimensional motion and uniform circular motion.
 Kinematical equation of uniformally accelerated circular motion.
 Linear acceleration in uniform circular motion. Centeripetal acceleration.
 Relation between linear velocity and angular speed; linear acceleration and angular acceleration.
 Examples and applications.

119
120
KINEMATICS
Mechanics in one of oldest of physical sciences. It is the study of objects in motion. Kinematics is a branch
of mechanics in which we study motion without inquiring about the cause of motion. A particle is an
infintesimally small part of matter. It has a neglibile size but a definite position. A body is a finite amount of
matter having a finite size, shape occupying definite space.

Basic Definitions
1. Frame of reference
A frame of reference is a conveniently chosen co-ordinate system. The position of particle is described
in the frame of reference chosen.
2. Rest and motion
A body is at rest in a chosen frame of reference if its position does not change with time. On the other
hand, if position of particle or body changes with time the particle or body is in motion. Rest and
motion are relative. A body at rest in one frame, can be in motion in another frame of reference.
There is nothing like abolute rest.
3. Position Vector
It describes the instantaneous position of a partile in a frame of reference. It is a vector joining the
origin of co-ordinates to the instantaneous position of particle. For a particle at rest; position vector
is same at all times. For a particle in motion, the position vector changes with time.
4. Distance and Displacement
The actual path along which a particle moves is known as the
trajectory. The distance travelled by a particle equals the actual
length of the path discribed. It is a scalar quantity. It is a positive
number which does not decreases with time and can never be
zero for a particle in motion.
The displacement is a vector joining the intial and the final position of
the particle. In Fig. 1 a particle moves along curved path, from a point
A to B. AB is a straight line joining initial portion A and final position
B. AB=S Displacement. The magnitude of the displacement is less
than or equal to the distance travelled. if a particle comes back to its
initial position the displacement is zero but distance travlelled finite. Fig. 1
Example–1 :
A particle moves along a circle of radius r. What is distance travelled and displacement, when particle
describes.

3
(a) One quadrant (b) th of circle.
4

121
Solution :
(a) From Fig. 2(a); we have

2r r
distance travelled = 
4 2
Magnitude of displacement

= Length of chord AB  2 r
(b) From Fig. 2(b), we have

3 3r Fig. 2
Distance travelled =  2r  
4 2

Magnitude of displacement = Length of chord AB  2 r

Motion in One, Two and Three Dimensions


(a) One dimensional motion of a particle :
is that motion in which only ONE of the three co-ordinates is used to describe its position changes.
In one dimensional motion the object moves along a straight line path. This is also known as linear or
rectilinear motion.
(b) Two dimensional motion :
is that motion in which two out of three co-ordinates specifying the position of the particle change.
The object moves in one plane. For example:
(1) an insect crawling on a floor.
(2) a billard ball moving on billard table.
(c) Three dimensional motion :
is that motion in which all the three co-orodinates discribing the position change with time. The
object moves in space. A kite flying on a windy day; a leaf falling off a tree branch are examples of
motion in three dimensions.

Speed
The speed of a particle relates the distance travelled by the body and the time taken. The average speed,
Vav, is the ratio of the total distance travelled to the total time taken. It is the distance travelled per unit time.
Speed is a scalar quantity.

122
Total distance travelled S
Averagespeed  
Total time taken T

Its SI unit is ms–1, and its dimensions are LT–1.


The instantaneous speed, v, is defined as

 s  ds
v  Lt   
t 0 t
  dt

where s is a small distance travelled by the body in the interval t and t  t


For a particle having a one dimensional motion, say along x–axis; the instantaneous speed is slope of
tangent of x vs t graph at the moment of time considered.

Velocity
The speed of a moving body does not give us any information regarding the direction of motion. The
velocity of a particle at a given time is a quantity giving the speed and direction of motion at that time.

The average velocity ν av , is in the direction of the displacement vector s. Its magnitude is ratio of the
magnitude of displacement and the total time taken, i.e.

Displacement s
ν av = Average velocity = 
Timetaken t

The instantaneous velocity, v, is defined as

 Δs  ds
ν  Lt    
  dt
t 0  t

where Δs is infintesinally small displacement in time interval t and t +  t.

Example–2 :
A particle moves along a right angled issoceles triangle ABC. It moves from vertex A to C along path
A  B  C in time t as shown in Fig. 3. What is the
(a) Average speed.
(b) Magnitude of the average velocity of the particle.
Solution :
(a) The total distance travelled = s. Obviously

123
s = AB + BC = 2a

s 2a
Average speed = vav   ..... (1)
t t
(b) The net displacement = s = AB
Magnitude of net displacement = s = AC = 2 a

2a
The magnitude of the average velocity = vav 
t
Fig. 3
Example–3 :
A particle moves along x–axis. It travels distances S1, S2, ...... with constant speed V1, V2, ....., respectively.
What is the average speed?
Solution :
n

The total distance travelled = S = S1 + S2 + ........   Si


i 1

The total time taken = T = t1 + t2 + ........   t i


i 1

n
S1 S2 S3 S 
or T =   .......    i 
V1 V2 V3 i 1  Vi 

The avarages speed, vav is

S S i 1
i
Vav   n
T  St 
 V 
i 1  i 

Let S1 = S2 = S. The body covers two equal distances with different speeds V1 and V2. Then

2S 2V1V2
Vav  
S S  V1  V2
  
 V1 V2 

The average speed equal the harmonic mean of individual speeds.

124
Example–4 :
A particle travels for n equal time intervals, each equal to t, with speed V1, V2, ..... VN. Show that the
average speed equals the arithematic mean of individual speeds.
Solution :
Let S1, S2, ...... Sn be distances travelled in 1st, 2nd ...... nth time interval, each equal to t. Obvisouly
S1 = V1t; S2 = V2t, ...... Sn = Vnt
The total distance travelled S = S1+S2 + ...... + Sn
= (V1 + V2 + ..... Vn)t
The total time taken = T = nt

S V  V2  .....VN
 Average speed = = 1
T n
= Arithematic mean of the individual speeds.

Uniform Motion in a Straight Line


A body has a uniform motion if its velocity is same at all moments of time. For a particle having uniform, one
dimensional motion, say along x-axis; the particle has equal displacement in equal time intervals howsoever
small the interval be.

Fig. 4
In Fig. 4, particle starts moving from origin O at t = 0 along the x–axis with uniform velocity. A,B, C
denotes its position at t = 1s, 2s and 3s respectively. Then OA = AB = BC. The position (x) vs time (t)
graph of uniform motion along +ve x–axis is shown in Fig 5(a). Fig 5(b) shows velocity (v) vs time (t). The
slope of x vs t graph equals the velocity of the particle.

Fig. 5

125
Non-Uniform Motion
An object undergoing unequal displacement in equal time intervals, has a non-uniform motion. In non-
uniform motion velocity varies with time. The motion is also refered to as accelerated motion. The average
acceleration over a finite time interval is ratio of change in velocity and time taken. Expressed mathematically

v2  v1 Δv
aav  
t 2  t1 t

where v1 and v 2 denote instantaneous velocity at t = t1 and t = t2 respectively..

The instantaneous acceleration a is

 Δv  dv
a  Lt   
t 0 t
  dt
The instantaneous acceleration is slope of tangent to velocity vs time graph at the moment of time considered.
Acceleration of a body can be either a positive or a negative member. It velocity of body increases as time
increases, acceleration is a positive number. If velocity of body decreases as time increases;acceleration is
a negative number. Negative acceleration is also known as retardation.
For a body having same accleration at all times; we say motion is uniformaly accelerated. However if
acceleration is not same at all times, we have non-uniformly accelerated motion.

Graphical Interpretation of Velocity and Acceleration


The average velocity in time interval between t = t1 and t = t2 equals the slope of the chord joining the two
points considered on displacement vs time graph.

Fig. 6

126
Fig. 6

In Fig. 6(a) the slope of chord AB is the average velocity in time interval t  t 2  t1 . The instantaneous
velocity at time t, is the slope of tangent to x vs t graph at the point P considered. This is shown in Fig. 6(b).
The instantaneous velocity can be positive, zero or negative as shown in Fig. 6(c) Fig. 7(a) and 7(b) given
below shows x vs t and v vs t graph of a body having uniform motion.

Fig. 7
Uniform Motion
The acceleration of a body in motion in obtained from velocity (v) vs time (t) graph. The average acceleration
is the slope of chord joinning the two points considered on v vs t graph. In Fig. 8(a) slope of chord PQ is
the average acceleration in time interval (t2–t1). The instantaneous acceleration is slope of tangent to v vs t
graph at the point considered as shown in Fig. 8(b) Fig. 8(c) shows positive, zero and negative acceleration.

Fig. 8

127
Fig. 8

Distance and Displacement from Velocity vs Time


Graph
The total area; without assigning negative sign to any part of area; under
velocity vs time graph equals total distance travelled.
The algebraic sum of areas under velocity vs time graph gives the magnitude
of the displacement. In Fig. 9; area PQRS equals total distance travelled
in the interval (t2 – t1). The area can be calculated graphically or using
Fig. 9 integration.
Example–5 :
A particle moves along x–axis. The position (x) vs time (t) graph is
as shown in Fig. 10.
(a) What is the instantaneous speed at (i) t = 2s, (ii) t = 5s,
(iii) t = 10s?
(b) What is average speed over time interval 0 – 12s?
(c) Plot velocity (v) vs time (t) graph.
Solution :
(a) (i) v = slope of x vs t graph at t = 2s
Fig. 10
82
=  1.5 ms 1
40
(ii) v (at t = 5s) = Zero

8  8
(iii) v (at = 10s) =  4ms 1
12  8

128
(b) The total distance travelled in time interval 0–12s
= 6+8+8 = 22 m

Total distance travelled 22


Vav    1.83ms 1
Total time taken 12

(c) For time interval

(i) 0  t  4s; v  1.5 ms –1

(ii) 4  t  8s; v0

(ii) 8  t  12s; v  –4 ms –1
v vs t graph for motion is shown in Fig. 11 Fig. 11
Example–6 :

Fig. 12

v vs t graph of a particle moving along z–axis is shown in Fig. 12. What is


(a) average speed, (b) average velocity from 0 to 10s?
Solution :
(a) S = the total distance travelled in 10s

1  1 
=   4  6    2 6    2  6   6  2
2  2 
= 12+12+6+12 = 42 m

129
T = Total time taken = 10s

S 42
 Average speed = Vav    4.2 ms 1
T 10
[Note: In calculating S we have NOT assigned negative sign to area in time interval 8 to 10s.]

(b) The magnitude of total displacement = s


= 12 + 12 + 6 + (–12) = 18 m
[Note: Negative sign assigned to area under v vs t graph in time interval 8 to 10s.]

18
The magnitude of average velocity =  1.8 ms –1
10
Example–7 :
For a particle moving along x–axis; the instantaneous position x is given by
x = 4t–2t2 + t3
where x is in meter and t in second. What is instantaneous (i) velocity and (ii) acceleration at t = 1s? Is
motion uniformly accelerated?
Solution :
By define the instantaneous velocity v is

dx
v  4  4t  3t 2 .....(i)
dt
and instantaneous acceleration, a, is

dv
a   4  6t .....(ii)
dt
At t = 1s;
v (t = 1s) = 4 – 4 + 3 = 3ms–1,
a (t = 1s) = –4 + 6 = 2ms–2
Since acceleration varies with time, motion is NOT uniformly accelerated.
Example–8 :
The instanteous velocity v of a particle moving along a straight line is
v = (t2 – 4) ms–1

130
What is:
(a) instantaneous acceleration at t = 2s.
(b) displacement in time interval 0–4s
(c) distance travelled in time interval 0–4s?
Solution :
(a) Given v = t2 – 4

dv
 a  2t
dt
a (t = 2s) = 4 ms–2
(b) Let particle move along x–axis. Then

dx 2
v  t 4
dt
4
Displacement =  dx   t 2  4 dt
0
 
4
t3 4
= 4 t 0
30

64 16
=  16  m
3 3
(c) Note v is negative in time interval 0  t  2s and positive in time interval 2  t  4s . Distance
travelled S is

2 4
 t  4  dt   t 2  4 dt
2
S
0 2

16 16 32
   m
3 3 3

Equations of Uniformly Accelerated Motion


Consider one dimensional motion of a particle having uniform acceleration. Let
v0 = initial speed of particle, at t = 0

131
v = instantaneous speed of particle at t = t
a = uniform acceleration
S = total distance travelled by the particle in time t
sn = distance travelled in nth second of motion.

The equations of motion are:


v = v0 + at ...... (1)

1 2
S = v0t + at ...... (2)
2

v 2  v02  2as ...... (3)

a
s n  v0   2n – 1 ...... (4)
2
Eqn (1) and (2) are represented by graphs shown in Fig. 13(a) and 13(b) respectively.

Fig.13

Example–9 :
A car has an intial speed of 108 kmhr–1. Brakes are applied producing uniform retardation. The speed of
car is reduced to 36kmhr–1 in travelling a distance of 200 m. What is
(a) retardation, (b) time taken?
Solution :
Given,

5
(a) v0  108 kmhr 1  108  ms 1  30ms 1
18

132
5
v  36 kmhr 1  36  ms 1  10ms 2
18

S = 200 m; a = ?

From, v2  v02  2aS , we have

(10)2 – (30)2 = 2a×200

 a = –2ms–2
Negative sign of a indicates retardation

(b) Let t be the time taken.Using v = v0 + at, we have

10 = 30 + (–2) t, or t = 10s

Example–10 :

A particle starts from rest and has a uniform acceleration of 2 ms–2 for 5s. The subsequent motion is
retarded and particle comes to rest in next 2s. What is the
(1) retardation, (2) total distance travelled?

Solution :
Given,
(1) v0 = 0; a = +2ms–2; t1 = 5s

 v1 = 0+2×5 = 10 ms–1

1
S1 = 0+ ×2×(5)2 = 25 m
2

The particle is brought to rest in 2s having an initial speed of 10ms–1. The retardation a2 is
0 = 10+a2×2 ,  a2 = –5 ms–2
S2 = distance travelled in time interval t = 5s to t = 7s

1
= 10×2+ (–5)(2)2 = 10 m
2

S = The total distance travelled = S1+S2 = 25+10 = 35m

133
(2) For time interval 0  t  5s; the instantaneous
speed is

v  0  2  t  2t
For time interval 5  t  7s ; the instantaneous
speed is
v = 10 + (–5)t = 10–5t
Taking these factors into account v vs t graph is
as shown in Fig. 14.
Let x be the instantaneous position co-ordinate
of particle starting from origin at t = 0. For time Fig. 14
interval 0  t  5s .

1 2 2
x= at = t ...... (1)
2
x (at t = 5s) = 25 m. For time interval
5  t  7s ; the instantaneous position co-
ordinate is

1
x = 25 + 10 (t–5) + (–5) (t–5)2
2
= 25 + 10 (t–5) – 2.5 (t–5)2 .....(2)
x (t = 7s) = 25 + 10(7–5) – 2.5 (7–5)2
= 25 + 20 – 10 = 35 m
These characterstics are shown in x vs t
graph in Fig. 15. Fig. 15

Example–11 :
A car is moving with an initial speed v0. It is uniformly accelerated. The distance travelled by car in 7th and
9th second of motion is 17 m and 21 m respectively. What is v0 and a?
(b) What is speed of car and total disance travelled in 10s?
Solution :
We know, the distance sn; travelled in nth second is

a
sn = v0 + [2n–1]
2

134
Given s7 = 17m and s9 = 21m. Therefore

a 13
17  v0   2x7  1 = v0  a ..... (1)
2 2

a 17
and 21  v0   2x9  1 = v0  a ..... (2)
2 2
From equations (1) and (2)
a = 2 ms–1 and v0 = 4ms–1
Let v10 be the speed aquired by car at t = 10s
v0 = v0 + a × 10
= 4 + 2 × 10 = 24 ms–1
Let S be the total distance travelled in t = 10s. We have

1
S = 4×10 + × 2 × (10)2 = 140 m
2
Example–12 :
A particle starts moving from origin along x–axis in the positive direction of x–axis. x is instantaneous
position co-ordinate and v the instantaneous velocity. Given v = k x , where k is a constant. Prove that v
is directly proportional to t.
Solution :
Given,

dx 1 dx
v  kx 2 or 1 2  kdt
dt x

Integrate

x t  k2 
1
x dx  k  dt x    t2
 0
2

0
or 1
2 x 2  kt or
 4 

The instantaneous velocity, v, is

dx  k2  k2
v  2  t  t
dt  4  2

Obviously v is directly proportional to t.

135
Motion Under Gravity – Free Fall
A particle is released from a point at a height h
above ground. R = 6400 km is radius of earth.
If h << R. and air resistance is neglible; the
particle falls towards earth with a constant
acceleration, g = 9.8 ms–2. This is called free
fall of body (undergravity). Equations of
uniformly accelerated motion are used to
described this motion.

A very convenient way of describing motion is


choosing an appropriate; conveninent co-
ordinate system and describe (i) position (ii) Fig. 16
velocity and (iii) accleration of the body in
motion using appropriate positive and negative signs. To understand +ve and –ve sign consider a particle
projected vertically upwards from O with nitial velocity v0. Choosing O as origin of co-ordinates and
vertically upward direction as direction of positive Z-axis; during the upward motion; if the particle is at
point P position co-ordinate z is +ve; instantaneous velocity v is +ve and acceleration due to gravity is
negative. This is shown in Fig. 16(a). Particle accquires maximum height at A and starts moving down. For
downward motion; P ' is instantaneous position of particle as shown in Fig. 16(b). Now position co-
ordinate z is a +ve number; instantaneous velocity v is negative and acceleration due to gravity is negative.
The equation giving instantaneous, velocity, v, and instantaneous position z are:

v = v0 + (–g) t

1
z = v0t + (–g)t2
2

From these two equations every information regarding motion of particle can be easily obtained. The +ve
or –ve sign of v, z, etc. are to be initerpretted properly. This is illustrated in examples discussed.

Example–12 :

A ball is projected vertically upwards from ground with an initial speed of 20ms–1.
(a) What is maximum height of the ball from ground? How long after projection the ball is at maximum
height from ground?
(b) What is instantaneous velocity and position of particle at (i) t = 1.5s and (ii) t = 3s? g = 10 ms–2

136
Solution :

Fig. 17

Choose point of projfection O as origin and vertically upward direction as positive z–axis. as shown in
Fig. 17. Given
v0 = 20 ms–1, a = –10 ms–2, z0 = 0
Note carefully + and –ve sign of v0 and a. Let v and z be the instantaneous velocity and position co-
ordinate of ball. Then
v = v0 + at = 20–10t ..... (i)

1 2
z = v0 + at = 20t–5t2 ..... (ii)
2
(a) Let particle attain maximum height from ground at t = t1. This is shown as point A in Fig. 17(a). At
maximum height instantaneous velocity is zero. For point A; vA = 0; t = t1. From Eqn. (i)
0 = 20–10t1  t1 = 2s
The position co-ordinate zA of point A gives maximum height of ball. From Eqn. (ii)
H = 20×2 – 5(2)2 = 20 m
(b) (i) At t = 1.5s; from Eqn. (i) and (ii) we have
v (t = 1.5s) = 20 – 15 = 5 ms–1
z (t = 1.5s) = 20×1.5 – 5 × (1.5)2 = 18.75 m
The +ve sign of v shows that ball is moving vertically upwards. The +ve sign of z means ball at this
moment is above ground at a height of 18.75 m. This is shown in Fig. 17(b).

137
(ii) At t = 3s; from Eqn. (i) and (ii) we have
v (t = 3s) = 20 – 30 = –10 ms–1
z (t = 3s) = 20×3 – 5 (3)2 = 15 m
The negative sign of v indicates the ball is moving vertically downwards. The +ve sign of z indicates
ball in above ground at a height of 15m. This is shown in Fig. 17(c).
Example–13 :
A vertical tower is 100m high. From the top of tower, a ball A is dropped. Simultaneously a second ball B
is projected vertically upwards from ground with a speed of 40 ms–1. Where and when the two balls cross
one another? What is instanteous velocitiy of the each ball at this moment of time? g = 10ms–2

Fig. 18
Solution :
In Fig. 18(a) O is point an ground and O1 is the top of tower. Choose O as origin and vertically upward
direction as positive z–axis.
For ball A;
vAO1 = 0; aA = – 10 ms–2; zAO = + 100m
 v A  10t

z A  100   5t 2  .....(i)


For ball B,
vB = + 40 ms–1, aB = –10 ms–2, zBO = 0
 v B  40  10t

z B  40t – st 2 .....(ii)

138
When the two balls cross one another, their instantaneous position co-ordinate is same, i.e. zA= zB. From
Eqns. (i) and (ii)
100 – 5t2 = 40t–5t2
or t = 2.5s
The two balls cross one another 2.5s after projection. The instantaneous position co-ordinate of a from
Eqn. (i) is
zA = 100–5 (2.5)2 = 68.75 m
The two balls cross one another at a point 68.75m above ground. Let vA and vB be their instantaneous
velocity. Obviously
vA = – 10×2.5 = – 25 ms–1
vB = 40 – 20×2.5 = +15 ms–1
Negative sign of vA indicates that ball A is moving vertically downwards. The positive sign of vB indicates
that ball B is moving vertically upwards. This is shown in Fig. 18(b).
Example–14 :
A helicopter is ascending vertically upwards with a constant speed of 1080 kmhr–1. When the helicopter is
2km above ground a small packet is dropped from it.
(a) What is maximum height of packet above ground?
(b) How long after being dropped, the packet hits ground? What is its velocity just before hitting ground?
(g = 10 ms–2)

Solution:

Fig. 19

139
In Fig. 19(a). O is point on ground and A is the position of helicopter at t = 0 when packet is dropped.
Choose O is origin and vertically upward direction as +z–axis.

v0 = The initial velocity of packet = Velocity of helicopter at this moment of time

8
= 1080  ms–1 = 300 ms–1
18

a = acceleration of packet = –10ms–2; z0 = 2000 m

Let v and z denote the instantaneous velocity and position co-ordinate of packet. We have

v = 300–10t .....(1)

z = 2000 + (300t – 5t2) .....(2)

Let packet attain maximum height from ground at t = t1. In Fig. 19(b); P is instantaneous position of
packet. The instantaneous velocity of packet at P is zero. From Eqn. (1)

0 = 300 – 10t1  t1 = 30s

z (at t1 = 30s) = H = maximum height of packet above ground. From Eqn. (2)

H = 2000 + 300 × 30 – 5 × (30)2 = 6500 m = 6.5 km


(b) Let the packet hit ground at t = t2 and after being dropped. The instantaneous z–co-ordinate of
packet is zero. From Eqn. (2) we have

0 = 2000 + 300t2 – 5t 22

or t 22 – 60t2 – 400 = 0

60  3600  1600
 t2 
2

60  72.1
  66.5s [Negative value to t2 is not possible.]
2

The packet hits ground 66.5s after being dropped. The instantaneous velocity of packet is
v = 300 – 660.5 = – 360.5 ms–1

Negative sign of v indicates packet is moving vertically downwards.

140
VECTORS
Scalars and Vectors
Many physical quantities that we study can be broadly divided into two categories, known as (i) scalars
and (ii) vectors.
(i) Scalars are those physical quantities which have only a magnitude. They add according to law of
oridinary algebra. Mass, volume,work are some example of scalar quantities.
(ii) Vectors are physical quantities having both a magnitude and a direction. Vectors add according to
triangle law of vectors and satisfy commutative property of vector addition. Velocity, acceleration,
force, linear momentum are some examples of vectors.
In print; a vector represented by a bold face letter A is vector. A vector is
represented by a straight line with a arrow head on it an shown in Fig. 20
is the tail and P is the head of A shown in Fig. 20. The magnitude of vector
is known as the modulous of vector. In Fig. 20 length OP, on the chosen
Fig. 20
scale; is the magnitude of A.
Two equal vectors have same magnitude and direction. The negative of a vector A, written as – A, has
same magnitude as A but –A has a direction opposite to that of A as shown in Fig. 21(b).

Fig. 21
Vectors having equal or unequal magnitudes but acting along same or parallel lines are colinear vectors.
Vectors acting in same plane are known as coplaner vectors.
The angle  between A and B is the angle between the two arrowed lines representing the vectors when
their tails coincide as shown in Fig. 22(a)

(a)
Fig. 22

141
Fig. 22

Zero or Null Vector


It is a vector haivng zero magnitude in arbitrary direction. When the magnitude of a vector is added to itself
we get zero vector. For example.
(1) The velocity vector of a particle at rest is a zero vector.
(2) The position vector of origin of co-ordinates is a zero vector.
The multiplication of any vector with zero produces a zero vector.

Addtion of Vectors
(1) Triangle Law of Vectors
The two sides LM and MN of triangle LMN, taken in order; represents A and B (i.e. the two vectors to
be added) in magnitude and direction. The third side LN taken in opposite order is resultan R of A and B.

Fig. 23

R  AB

R  A 2  B2  2AB cos 

Let the resultant R make an angle  with A. Then

Bsin 
tan  =
A  B cos 

142
(2) Parallelogram Law of Vectors
Let the two adjacent sides of a parallelogram represent in magnitude and direction the two vectors A and
B to be added. The resultant R is represented in magnitude and direction by the diagonal of parallelogram
such that tail of A, B and R is at same point. This is shown in Fig. 24. It is obvious from Fig. 24 that
A+ B = B + A
This is known as commutative property of vector addition.

Fig. 24

(3) Polygon Law of Vectors


Polygon law of vectors is useful in adding more than two vectors,
graphically. Let A, B, C, D and E be the vectors to be added.
R=A+B+C+D+E
Draw a polygon with consecutive sides taken in cyclic order,
representing in magnitude and direction the vectors to be added. The
resultant R, is represented by the closing side of the polygon taken in
opposite order. This is shown in Fig. 25.
When vectors to be added form a closed polygon; the resultant is
zero. Fig. 25

Note the important properties of vector addition.


(1) Vector addition is commutative, i.e.
A+B=B+A
(2) Vector addition is associative, i.e.
A + (B + C) = B + (C + A) = C + (A +B)

143
(3) Vector addition in distributive, i.e.
m(A + B) = mA + mB

Components of a Vector
Any two vectors say P and Q whose resultant equals R are known as components of vector R. This is
shown in Fig. 26(a). There are any infinite number of ways in which given vector R can be resolved into
components. Fig. 26(b) shown a few different sets of components of R.

Fig. 26

The components of a vector in two mutually perpendicular directions are the rectangular components of
vector. In Fig. 27. OA and OB are rectangular components of OC=R. Let R make an angle  with x–axis.

OA = Rx = X – Components of R = R cos 

OB = Ry = Y – Components of R = R cos 

Unit Vector
Consider a vector A, the unit vector A is a vector having a magnitude
of unity and same direction as given vector i.e. A. We can write

A
A or 
A A A
A

For a Cartesian co-ordinate system shown in Fig. 27 i, j and k


are unit vector along x, y and z–axis. P is a point having co-ordinates
(x, y, z). OP= r = position vector of P in terms of i, j and k ;
Fig. 27

r  xi  yj  zk

144
r  r = Magnitude of position vector = x 2  y 2  z 2

Let ,  and  be angle OP makes with x, y and z–axis


respectively. Then

x y z
cos   ; cos   and cos  
r r r

cos 2   cos 2   cos 2   1

cos  , cos  and cos  are known as direction cosines of r.


Fig. 28
Substraction of Vectors
Let A and B be two given vector. Let us substract B from A and write this as

C  A B
 A B'
where B'  B . To substract B from A; we add B' which is negative of B; to A using triangle law this is
shown in Fig. 29.

Fig. 29

Obviously from Fig. 29(b)

C  A 2  B2  2ABcos     

Bsin     
and tan  
A  B cos     

Note; vector substraction is NOT communicative, i.e. A  B  B  A

Vector substraction is also not associative, i.e. A   B  C  C   A  C

145
Relative Position or Relative Velocity Vector

Fig. 30

Fig. 30(a) shows two points A and B having position vector rA and rB respectively..

rAB  BA = Position vector of A relative to B.

From triangle law of vectors.

rA  rB + rAB

or rAB  rA  rB

In Fig. 30(b), v A and vB are two velocity vectors.

vBA = Relative velocity of B w.r.t A. Obviously

vBA  vB  vA
Example–15 :
The maximum and minimum resultant of two vectors is 14 and 6 respectively. What is angle betwen the
two vectors if their resultant is 12.5?
Solution :
Let A and B be the magnitude of the two given vectors (A > B). C is the magnitude of their resultant. Given

Cmax  A  B  14 and C min  A  B  6

 A = 10 and B = 4

146
Let  be angle between A and B, so that the magnitude of their resultant, C, is 12.5. From triangle law

(12.5)2 = (10)2 + (4)2 + 2 × 4 × 10 cos 

or cos   0.867   = 600


Example–16 :
A man can swim at a speed of 4kmhr–1 in a still river. The river is flowing at a speed of 2kmhr–1.
(a) In which direction a man must swim to reach a point on the other side of river directly opposite his
starting point? If width of river is 4km; what is time taken?
(b) What is the direction in which man swims if he wants to cross the river in minimum time? What is tmin?
Solution :

Fig. 31

Fig. 31(a) shows river flowing at velocity v R . The man is at point A and wants to swim to point B. If man
aims towards point B the flow of river will make him reach opposite end at a point to right of B. Let man
swim in a direction making an angle  with line AB in such a manner that his resultant velocity is directed
along AB . This is shown in Fig. 31(b). Obvisouly..

vR 2
sin     0.5    300
vM 4

The magnitude, v, of the resultant velocity is

2 2
v  v 2M  v 2R   4   2  2 3 kmhr 1

t = The time taken by man to move from A to B

4 km 2
 1
 hr
2 3 kmhr 3

147
(b) When man swims in a direction making an angle  with the direction of flow of river, his resultant
velocity v, has a magnitude;

v  vM2  vR2  2vmvR cos 

The man swims across river in minium time if v is maximum. Obviously v is maximum if   00 . Therefore
The direction of v max is shown in Fig. 31. Let t be the time taken. Obviously

Fig. 32
4
4  v m t or t   1hour
4
The man will reach opposite end at point C, such that

BC  v R t  2  1  2 km

Example–17 :
A river is flowing at a constant speed of 3 kmhr–1. Two men A and B can swim at same speed of 5 kmhr–1.
Man A moves down stream a distance of 4 km and comes back to starting point swimming up the stream.
Man B also moves between two points 4 km apart in a direction perpendicular to direction of flow of river.
Man B aims himself during forward and backward journey in such a manner that he moves in a direction
perpendicular to stream. What is ratio of time taken by A and B in their respective journey?
Solution :
(1) For Man A

Fig. 33

148
Fig. 33(a) and (b) show the velocity v M of man and river v R during forward and backward journey. The
resultant v1 and v ' in the two cases have magnitude of
2

v1  v M  v R  5  3  8 kmhr 1

v '1  v M  v R  2 kmhr  1

4 4
TA = The total time taken by man A    2.5 hr
8 2
(2) For Man B

Fig. 34

Fig. 34(a) and 34(b) show v M and v R during forward and backward journey. The resultant velocity v 2
and v ' have same magnitude and it is:
2

2 2
v2   5    3  4 kmhr 1

 4
TB = Total time taken by man B  2    2h
 4

TA 2.5
   1.25
TB 2

Example–18 :
Two cars A and B are 10 km apart at t = 0 as shown in Fig. 35. Both cars start moving simultaneously. Car
A moves with a speed of 20 kmhr–1 from east to west. Car B moves with same speed as A from south to
north. What is their distance of closest approach and what is time taken to attain the position of closest
approach?

149
Fig. 35

Solution :

Fig. 36

Choosing x–y axis as show in Fig. 36(a); A and B represent position of two cars at t = 0. Given
AB = 10 km.

Also, v BA  20 i ; v B  20 j

The relative velocity of B with respect to A.

v BA  v B  v A  20 i  j ;kmhr 1
 
v BA is shown in Fig. 36(b). To driver of car A, car B appears to move along v BA . The minimum distance
between to cars is AC; as shown in Fig. 36(c). Obviously

150
10
AC  ABsin 450  km  7.07 km
2

T = Time taken to accquire minimum distance

10
BC 1
  2  hr  15 mintue
v BA 20 2 4

Example–19 :
A man walks from to west to east at a speed of 5ms–1. To the man wind appears to be blowing from north
to westwards. The man doubles his speed and wind appears to be blowing in north-east direction. What
is actual velocity of wind?
Solution :

Fig. 37

Choose a Cartesian co-ordinate system as shown in Fig. 37(a). Let the velocity of wind be

v W  v x i  v y j; ms 1

vx and vy are the x – and y – components of velocity of wind.


Case I: Given

v M  5i ; ms 1 , v WM  vRM j


  .....(i)

151
We know,

v WM  v W  v m   v x  5  i  v y j .....(ii)

From Eqns. (i) and (ii)


vx – 5 = 0 or vx = 5 ms–1 .....(iv)
Case II:

 v '  v  1 i  1 j


v 'M  10i, WM WM 
 2 2 
  .....(v)

Also, v M '   5  10  i  v y j .....(vi)

From Eqns (v) and (vi); we have

v y  5  10 or v y  5ms 1

The velocity of wind, v w ; is

v w  5i  5j ms 1
 
The speed of wind is 5 2 ms 1 ; and it is blowing in south-east direction.

Scalar or Dot Product of Vectors

Consider two vectors A and B making an angle  with one another. The dot product A B by difinition is
AB  abcos 
It is a scalar quantity. In words, dot product of A and B is product of magnitude of A and component of B
in the direction of A or vice-versa. The dot product of two non zero vectors, i.e. A  0, B  0 can be a
positive or –ve number depending on  whether is an acute or obtuse angle. If A  0, B  0, but

AB = 0; cos  = 0 or   . Dot product of perpendicular vectors is zero. Dot product is commutative,
2
i.e. A B  B  A . Dot product is also distributive i.e.

A(B + C) = AB + AC


Scalar product of a vector with itself equals square of magnitude of vector. i.e. A  A = A2

Let i, j and k be unit vectors along x–, y– and z–axis of a Cartesian co-ordinate system. Then

152
i j  j k  k i  0 ; i i  j j  k k  1

In a Cartesian co-ordinate system; let

A  A x i  A y j  A z k and B  B x i  B y j  Bz k

Then, AB  Ax Bx  Ay By  Az Bz

Example–20 :

A  2i  4j  k

B  3i  j  k

What is angle between A and B?


Solution :

2 2 2 2 2 2
A A   2    4    1  21 , B  B   3  1  1  11

AB  2   3  4 1   –1 1 = –3

Also, AB  ABcos  , therefore

3  21  11 cos 

 3   3 
or cos         15.1   0.2   cos1  0.2  101.50
 231   

Example–21 :

A  3i  2j

What is component of A in the direction of i  j ?

Solution :

Let B  i  j

2 2 2 2
A A  3   2   13 , B  B  1  1  2

153
AB  31 21  5
= (Components of A along B) × B

  5  
 
 Magnitude of component of A along i  j 
2
  B  i j
. Also, B
B 2

In terms of i and j ; component of A along i  j is


 
5  5  
2 2
 
B  i j

Vector or Cross Product of Vectors


Let C = A × B , C is the cross or vector product of A and B. By definition

C   AB sin   n

where n is a unit vector whose direction is given by the Right-hand-screw rule. According to right-hand-
screw rule; place a right handed screw perpendicular to plane containing A and B. Rotate screw so that A
goes and coincides with B. The direction in which screw advances is direction of n . This is shown in
Fig. 38(a).

Fig. 38
C is perpendicular to both A and B. Vector or cross product is NOT commutative, i.e.

A  B  B A
Vector product is distributive, i.e.

A B  C  AB  AC

154
Vector product of two parallel vectors i.e.   00 , is zero. Vector product has maximum magnitude if

vectors are perpendicular to one another. i.e.   . For a Cartesian co-ordinate system:
2

i  i  j  j  k  k  0 ; and i  j  k;
 j  k  i; k  i  j

In Cartesian co-ordinates; for two vector

A  A x i  A y j  A z k

and B  B x i  By j  Bz k,

i j k
C  A  B  Ax Ay Az
Bx By Bz

  A y Bz  A z By  i   A x Bz  A z Bx  j   A x Bz  A z B x  k

Example–22 :

A  2i  3j  k;
 B  6i  9j  3k

Show A and B are parallel vectors.


Solution :
We know vector product of two parallel vector is zero. Now

i j k
A  B  2 3 1
6 9 3

 i  9  9   j  6  6   k 18  18   zero

Hence A and B are parallel vectors.


Example–23 :

A  2i  j  k , B  i  j  2k
Obtain a unit vector perpendicular to both A and B.

155
Solution:

Let C  AB . We know C is perpendicular to both A and B. Therefore c is a unit vector perpendicular
to both A and B. Now

i j k
C 2 1 1
1 1 2

 i  2  1  j(1  4)  k  2  1  3i  3j  3k

2 2 2
Also, C   3   3   3 3 3

C 1    
 c   i  j k
C 3 

PROJECTILE MOTION
What is a Projectile?
Consider a particle moving in uniform gravitational field of earth in a vertical plane. Let the particle be
projected with an initial speed v0 at an angle  with the horizontal direction. The particle projected is
known as a projectile. In general it moves along a curved path known as its trajectory.
Basic Results of Motion of a Projectile

Fig. 39

156
Fig. 39 shows a projectile projected in vertical X–Y plane from origin O with initial speed v0 at an angle 
with horzontal. The initial position vector r0  0 and initial velocity v 0 is:

v 0   v 0 cos   i   v 0 sin   j .....(i)

v xo  v0 cos   x – component of initial velocity, v yo  v0 sin   y – component of initial velocity..

The acceleration due to gravity acts in vertically downward direction. There is no acceleration along the
horizontal direction i.e. x–axis. Expressed mathematically.
ax = 0, ay = –g .....(ii)
The motion of projectile is easily analysed by describing motion in two parts i.e. along x–axis and along
y–axis. P(x, y) is the instantaneous position of projectile. The instantaneous position vector r is:

r  x i  yj
and the instantaneous velocity is

v  v x i  v y j

Motion along x–axis:


Since ax = 0; motion along x–axis is uniform motion. Also,

v x  v x 0  v0 cos  .....(iii)

1
x   v x 0  t  a x t 2   v 0 cos   t .....(iv)
2
Motion along y–axis:
We have ay = –g. The motion along y–axis is uniformly accelerated. Also

vy = v0y+ ayt = v 0 sin   gt .....(v)

1 1
y   v yo  t  a y t 2   v0 sin   t  gt 2 .....(vi)
2 2
Eqns (iii), (iv), (v) and (vi) give complete information regarding motion of projectile. Some important
results are discussed in what follows.
1. Equation of Trajectory
The equation of trajectory is relation between x and y. Elminating t from Eqns (iv) and (vi) we easily get

157
gx 2
y   tan   x  .....(vii)
2v02 cos 2 

This is equation of a parabola. In other words; in general, the trajectory of a projectile is a parabolic curve.

2. Time of Fight (T)


The time taken by the projectile to move from O to B (refer to Fig. 39) is known as time of flight. For point
B; yB = 0 at t = T. From Eqn. (vi); we have

1
0   v0 sin   T  gT 2
2
 1 
 T   v 0 sin    gT 
 2 
1
Since T  0; v 0 sin   gT  0
2
2v 0 sin 
or T .....(viii)
g

3. Maximum Vertical Height (H)


In Fig. 39, A is position of projectile when it has accquired
maximum vertical height H. At point A; the instantaneous vertical
component of velocity is zero, i.e.  v y A  0; t  t A . From

Eqn. (v), we have

v0 sin  T
tA  
g 2

The maximum vertical height H, equals y–co-ordinate of point Fig. 40

A; i.e. yA = H at t = tA. From Eqn. (vi), we get

v02 sin 2 
H .....(ix)
2g
 v 20
For same value of v0; Fig. 40 shows H vs  graph. Note H is maxm when   and H max  .
2 2g

158
4. Horizontal Range (R)

In Fig. 39, OB = R = Horizontal range of projectile. Obviously xB = R; at t = T

From Eqn (iv), we have

R
 v 0 cos   2v 0 sin   v 20 sin 2
 .....(x)
g g

 
For a particular value of v0; R is maximum if sin 2  = 1 or 2  ,    . For a particular speed of
2 4
projection v0 the horizontal range is maximum if  = 450.

For same value of R; there are two directions of projection 1 and 2 . Obviously..

v 20 sin 2 1 v02 sin 2 2


R 
g g

or sin 21  sin 22 or 22    21


 1  2  .....(xi)
2

Let T1 and T2 be time of flight for   1 and   2 having same horizontal range; It can be shown that

2R R2
T1T2  and H1H 2 
g 16

Fig. 41

159
5. Instantaneous Velocity
The instantaneous velocity v; of the projectile is

v   v 0 cos   i   v 0 sin   gt  j

The instantaneous speed v is

2 2
v  v 2x  v 2y   v0 cos     v0 sin   gt 
Let  be the angle the instantaneous velocity makes with x–axis i.e. horizontal direction, then

vy v 0 sin   gt
tan   
vx v0 cos 

When projectile is at position of maximum vertical height i.e. at point A; vy = 0. The speed of particle is
miniumum but not zero. Also  = 0. The instantaneous velocity is horizontal at position of maximum
vertical height. Note x-component of v remains same at all timest during motion. These characterstics all
shown in Fig. 42.

Fig. 42
Projectile Motion on an inclined plane

Fig. 43

160
In Fig. 43, OAB is a fixed inclined plane of inclincation  . From the foot O of the inclined plane, a
projectile is projected with a speed v 0 at an angle       with the horizontal. A very convenient way of
describing motion is choosing x and y–axis as shown in Fig. 43. Resolving initial velocity v 0 and acceleration
g into component along x and y–axis we have.

v x 0  v 0 cos      ; v yo  v 0 sin     

a x   g sin  a y  g cos 

The instantaneous position co-ordinate (x, y) and the instantaneous x – and y – components of velocity are
given by

v x  v x 0  a x t  v 0 cos        g sin   t .....(i)

1
x   v 0 cos       t   g sin   t 2 .....(ii)
2

and v y  v y0  a y t  v 0 sin        g cos   t .....(iii)

1
y   v0 sin       t   g cos   t 2 .....(iv)
2
Eqns (i), (ii), (iii) and (iv) vive complete information regarding motion of projectile. In Fig. 43 projectile hits
inclined plane at point P. Time taken to move from O to P is time of flight T. Obviously for point P
yP = 0; t = T. From Eqn (iv)

2v 0 sin     
T .....(v)
g cos 

The distance OP = R = Range of projectile along the inclined plane. Obviously for point P;
x = R, at t = T.
Using Eqn (ii); we get

2v 0 sin  2    cos 
T .....(vi)
g cos 2 

R is maximum, for a fixed value of v0 and  ; if

sin  2     1

161
 
or   
4 2

v 20 1  sin  
and R max 
g cos 2 

Example–24 :
A particle is projected in a vertical plane with a speed of 100ms–1 at an angle of 300 with horizontal. What
is:
(a) time of flight
(b) horizontal range and
(c) instantaneous velocity 2s after projection? g = 10ms–2
Solution :
Given v0 = 100 ms–1,  = 300, g = 10ms–2
(a) The time of flight, T, is

2v 0 sin  2 100  sin 30


T   10s
g 10

(b) The horizontal range, R, is

2
v 2 sin 2 100   sin 60
R 0  m  867 m
g 10

(c) Let vx and vy be the instantaneous x– and y–component of velocity at t = 2s. Obviously
vx = vx0 = 100 cos 30 = 86.7 ms–1
vy = vyo – gt = (100 sin 300) – 10×2
= 50 – 20 = 30 ms–1
v = The instantaneous speed of projectile.

2 2
 v 2x  y 2y   86.7    30   91.6 ms –1

Let  be the angle the instantaneous velocity v makes with horizontal direction. We know

vy 30
tan     0.346 ; or   tan 1  0.346   10.90
vx 86.7

162
Example–25 :
A ball is projected with an initial speed v0 at an angle 600 with
horizontal. The ball just grazes past the edge of a vertical wall at a
horizontal distance of 3m from point of projection 0.2s after
projection. What is v0? What is height of wall? What is maximum
vertical height attained by the ball? g = 10ms–2
Solution :
In Fig. 44, O is point of projection of ball and AB is the vertical
wall. Choose x– and y–axis at shown in Fig. 44. Obvisouly
Fig. 44
v0
v x 0  v0 cos 60  and v y0  v 0 sin 60  0.867v 0
2
The co-ordinates of point A of wall are:
xA = 3m; yA = 3 tan 600 = 4.96 m
Let the ball graze past point A at t = 0.2s. Obviously

v0
xA  3m   0.2 , or v 0  30 ms –1
2
The vertical height, h, of wall equals y co-ordinate of projectile at 5 = 0.2 s. Therefore,

h   v0 sin 60   0.2 – 5(0.2) 2

= 30 × 0.867 × 0.2 – 0.2


= 5.2 – 0.2  5 m
The maximum vertical height attained by the ball, H, is

2 2
v 2 sin 2  (30)   0.857 
H 0  m  33.8 m
2g 2 10

Example–26 :
A stone is projected vertically upwards with a speed of 40ms–1 at an angle of 300 with horizontal. How
long after after projection is it at a height of 15m? What is horizontal distance of stone from the point of
projection at this moment of time? g = 10 ms–2.
Solution :
vx0 = 40 cos 300 = 34.7 ms–1 and vyo = 40 sin 300 = 20ms–1

163
The instantaneous y co-ordinate of stone, y, is

1
y   v0 sin   t  gt 2 = 20t – 5t2
2
Given y = 15m. Therefore,
15 = 20t – 5t2 or t2 – 4t + 3 = 0

4  16  12 4  2
 t   18 or 3s
2 2
The particle attains given vertical height at t = 1s, while going up towards position of maximum vertical
height and at t = 3s while moving downwards. Let x1 and x2 be the horizontal co-ordinates of particle at
t = 1s and t = 3s respectively. Obvisouly.
x1 = vx0 × 1 = 34.7m and x2 = 34.7 × 3 = 104.1 m
Example–27 :
A table has a vertical height of 2.5m. From the edge of the table a ball is pushed horizontally with an initial
speed of 10ms–1.
(1) Write equation of trajectory of ball.
(2) How long after projection, the ball hits ground? What is horizontal distance of the point where ball
hits ground from the foot of the table?
(3) What is the velocity of ball as it hits ground? g = 10ms–2
Solution :
In Fig. 45, O is the position of particle on edge of table. Choose a co-ordinate system as shown in Fig. 45.
For the ball

Fig. 45

164
vx0 = v0 = 10ms–1, vyo = 0; and ay = +10ms–1 Therefore;
vx = vx0 = 10 ms–1 at all times
vy = gt = 10t ms–1 .....(i)

1
x = vx0 × t = 10t, and y =  10t 2  5t 2 .....(ii)
2
From Eqns (ii) we have

2
 x 
y  5    0.05 x 2 .....(iii)
 10 

This is equation of trajectory of ball. Let ball hit ground at point P, at t = t. For point P; y = +2.5 m

1
 2.5  5t 2 or t  0.7s
2

O1P = Horizontal distance of P from the foot O1 of table.

 v x 0  t  10  0.7  7m

Let vx and vy be the x– and y–components of velocity of ball as it hits ground. Obvisouly

v x  v x 0  10 ms 1; v y  10x0.7 ms –1  7 ms1

 v  v2x  v2y  149 ms –1  12.21 ms 1

Let  be the angle the instantaneous velocity makes with horizontal direction. Then:

vy
tan    0.7 or   tan 1  0.7   350
vx

Example–28 :
A batsman hits a ball at a height of 1.22 m above ground. The ball leaves bat in a direction at 450 with the
horizontal. There is a wall of height 7.3 m at a horizontal distance of 97.5 m from the position of batsman
and has a height of 7.31 m. Had there been no wall the ball would be at a distance of 106.7 m when it is
again at a vertical height of 1.22 m. Will the ball able to clear the wall? g = 10ms–2
Solution :
In Fig. 46, A is position of point where the ball hits bat. Choose co-ordinate axis as shown in Fig. 46.
Given,

165
v02 sin 900
AB  R  106.7 
g

 v 0  1067ms1 = 32 ms–1

Fig. 46

The quation of trajectory of ball is

10 x 2
y  1.22   tan 45  x – 2
2  v 0 cos 45 

 
 10 x 2 
 1.2 2  x   
 2   1067 
  
 2 

 10 x 2 
 1.22  x    .....(i)
1067 

When ball is at x = 97.5 m; its y– co-ordinate is


2
10  97.5
y = 1.22 + 97.5 – = 9.58 m.
106.7
The height of wall at x = 97.5 m is 7.3 m. Since y > 7.3 m; the ball will clear the wall.

166
Motion Along a Circle
A circular motion is an example of motion in two dimensions. In a circular motion the particle moves along
a circle. For example:
(1) motion of hands of a clock.
(2) motion of earth around its own axis.
(3) motion of earth around Sun is approximatly along a
circular path.
(4) motion of electron around proton in a hydrogen atom.
Consider a particle moving in a circle of radius R. Choosing
centre of circle as origin O and plane of motion as x–y–plane;
the equation of the trajectory is x2+y2 = R.
The z–axis i.e. line through center and perpendicular to plane
of motion is known as axis around which motion takes place.
In Fig. 47, z–axis is the axis of motion. The particle can move
in a circle either in clockwise or anticlockwse direction. Fig. 47
(1) Terminology used in Circular Motion
Fig. 48 shows a particle moving in a circle of radius R in x–y
plane in anti clockwise direction. P is instantaneous position of
particle on the circle. Let x, y be the instantaneous co-ordiantes
of P. Obvoisly x = OA = R cos  and y = OB = R sin  .
Another very convenient way of describing P is using polar
co-ordinates (r,  ). In Fig. 48.

r = R and XOP  

For a particle moving in a circle of constant radius, the


instantaneous position is described by one co-ordinate i.e. 
Fig. 48 only.

Let 1 and 2 be the instantaneous angular position of particle


at t = t1, and t = t2. Then   2 – 1 is angular displacement in the interval t  t 2 – t1

(2) Average and Instantaneous Angular Speed


The average angular speed av is the ratio of angular displacement  and time taken t ; i.e.


av 
t
167
SI unit of angular speed is radian per second.
The instantaneous angular speed,  , is

   d
  Lt   
t  0  t
  dt
The angular speed,  , is also expressed in terms of revolutions per second i.e. r.p.s. For a particle making
v r.p.s., angular speed   2v .

The angular velocity  of a particle is ω  n . The direction n of angular velocity is always perpendicular
to plane of motion. The sense of n is given by the right-hand-screw rule.

(3) Linear Speed and Linear Velocity of Particle

Fig. 49

Fig. 49(a) shows a particle moving in a circle of constant radius R. P and Q are the instantaneous position
of particle at t = t1 and t = t2. The linear distance s travelled by the particle in the interval t is length of
arc PQ = R. 

where   2  1 . The average linear speed, v av , is

s   
v av   R   Rav .....(i)
t  t 
The average velocity is

Δs
vav 
t

where Δs  PQ. Magnitude of Δs equals chord PQ. The direction of v av is same as direction of chord PQ.

168
The instantaneous speed, v is :

 s   R    
v  Lt    Lt    R Lt    R
t 0 t
  t  0  t  t  0 t
 

The magnitude of instantaneous velocity equals instantaneous speed. The direction of v is in the direction of
tangent to circle at the point P considered. This is shown in Fig. 49(b).
(4) Angular and Linear Acceleration
For a particle moving in a circle of constant radius R its angular speed changes with time we have angular
acceleration  . Let   2 – 1 be change in angular speed in time interval t  t 2 – t1 .

The average angular acceleration;  av ; is

Change in angular speed 


 av  
Time taken t

The instantaneous angular acceleration;  ; is

   d
  Lt  
t  0 t 
  dt
Let a be the magnitude of instantaneous linear acceleration. Then

d d d
a  v    R  R    R
dt dt  dt 
(5) Equations of Uniformly Accelerated Circular Motion
Let the angular acceleration  be a constant; i.e. angular speed changes by equal amounts in equal time
intervals. This is known as uniformly accelerated circular motion. Let

0 = Initial angular speed i.e. at t = 0

 = Uniform angular acceleration


 = Instantaneous angular speed i.e. t = t
 = Total angle discribed in time t = t
The equations of uniformly accelerated circular motion are

  0  t

169
1
  0 t   t 2 .....(i)
2

2  02  2

Example–29 :
A particle starts from rest and moves in a circle of radius 20 cm. It accquires a speed of 120 rpm in
 second. The motion is uniformly accelerated.
(1) What is angular and linear acceleration?
(2) What is angular displacement and the number of circles completed? What is linear distance travelled?
Solution:

120
(1) Given 0  0;   120 rpm  rps  2  2 rad s –1 t  ,s;   ?
60

Using equation 0  0 t, we have

4  . or   4rad s –2
a = The magnitude of linear acceleration

 R  0.2  4 ms 2  0.8ms 2
(2) The total angle described  , is

1 1 2
  0 t  t 2  0   4      2 2 radian
2 2

 2 2
Number of revolution completed = = 
2 2
The linear distance travelled, S; is

S  R  0.2  22  4m  2  10

Uniform Circular Motion


Consider a particle moving in a circle of constant radius R with uniform angular speed  . The linear speed,
v = R is also a constant. However linear velocity v is not constant. Though magnitude of v is constant,
the direction of v changes as particle moves. Fig. 50 shows instantaneous direction of v at three points P,
Q and R. Note v P  v Q  v R ; but vP  vQ  vR  v .

170
The motion is with uniform speed but variable velocity.
Since v is not constant; we have linear acceleration a. By definition.

 Δv  dv
a  Lt  
t  0  t 
  dt

Fig. 50

Fig. 50(b) shows position P and Q of particle at t = t and t = t +  t. The change in velocity Δv is

Δv  v Q  v P  MN

It can be shown that

a  a  The magnitude of linear acceleration

v2
  R
R
The instantaneous direction of a is along the instantaneous radius directed
towards centre of circle. This is known as centeripetal acceleration. Note
for motion in a circle of constant radius:
(1) The instantaneous velocity is purely tangential and
(2) The instantaneous acceleration is purely radial.
This is shown in Fig. 52. Since v and a are always perpendicular;

v a  0 Fig. 51

171
Non-Uniform Circular Motion
For a particle having non-uniform circular motion; the speed also changes as particle moves along its
circular path. The acceleration a has: (1) radial component, ar; and (2) tangential component, an.
The radial component of linear acceleration

v2
 ar   R2
R
v is instantaneous linear speed and  is instantaneous angular speed. The tangential component of
acceleration

v2
 at  an 
R
The magnitude of net linear acceleration, a, is

a  a 2r  a t2

Example–30 :
The second’s hand of a clock is 20 cm long. The second hand of clock moves for t second from position
A to position B. The magnitude of change in linear velocity of the tip of second’s hand is 0.67 cms –1 .
What is t?
Solution :
 = Angular speed of second’s hand of clock

2 
 rad s –1  rad s –1
60 30
v = The linear speed of tip of second’s hand of clock


 ;  0.2  ms 1 [Given,  = 20 cm = 0.2m]
30
Let the seconds hand of clock rotate through an angle  in time t. We have   t . In Fig. 52(a) A and B
denote initial and final position of tip of second’s hand. v A and vB is the linear velocity of tip of hand in
position A and B.

Δv = The change in linear velocity = v B  v A

172
Fig. 52


From Fig. 52(b); Δv  MN  2v sin   . Therefore
2

 
0.67  102  0.2x sin   , or sin     1
30 2 2 2


   600  radian
3

  30
Now, t    10 s
 3 
Example–31 :
A particle of mass 500 g is tied to one end of a string of length 1.5 m. The particle is whirld into a horizontal
circle by holding the other end of string in hand. The breaking strength of string is 1.2 kgf. What is maximum
number of revolutions per minute so that string does not break? g = 10ms–2
Solution :
Let vmax be the maximum linear speed of particle so that string does not break. The tension in string equals
to breaking strength of string. The tension in string provides necessary centeripetal force on particle.
Therefore

mv 2max
Tmax 

Given, Tmax  1.2 kgf  12N;   1.5m; m  0.5 kg

Tmax . 12 1.5
 v max    6 ms –1
m 0.5

173
v max 6
max = The maximum angular speed of particle    4 rad / s
 1.5

max 4 4  60
 n max = The maximum number of revolutions   rps  rpm
2 2 2

120
 rpm

Example–32 :

A particle moves in a circle of radius R. The instantaneous angular position,  of particle is   kt 2 where
k is a constant.What is instantaneous linear acceleration of particle?
Solution :
 = The instantaneous angular speed of particle

d
  2kt .....(1)
dt
As  varies with time; the particle has a non-uniform circular motion. The instantaneous linear acceleration,
a; has a radial component, ar; and tangential component at. We know

 d 
a r  R 2  4k 2 Rt 2 , and a t  R  R    2kR
 dt 
The magnitude of instantaneous linear acceleration, a, is

2 2 2
a  a 2r  a 2t =  4k Rt    2kR 
2

 2kR 1  4k 2 t 2

PROBLEMS FOR PRACTICE


1. A particle moves along x–axis. It covers a distance x1 with constant speed v1 and a distance x2 with
a constant speed v2. What is the average speed of the particle?

  x1  x2  v1v 2 
 Ans. 
 x1v 2  x2 v1 

2. A car covers half of the total distance of its journey with a constant speed v1. The other half of the
distance is covered as described. For half of the remaining time of journey car moves with a constant

174
speed v2 and the other half time witha constant speed v3. What is the average speed of car?

 2v1  v2  v3  
 Ans. 
  2v1  v 2  v3  
3. A particle has a one dimensinoal motion along z–axis. The instantaneous position z of particle is given
by t  z  3
z is the meter and t in second. Show that the displacement of particle is zero when its instantaneous
velocity is zero.
4. A particle having uniformly accelerated motion travels a distance of 2m in first 2s. In next 4s; the
particle travels a distance of 2.2m. What is (1) initial velocity and (2) acceleration of particle?
[ Ans: I nitial velocity = 1.15 ms–1, acceleration = –0.15 ms–2]
5. A ball starts from rest and accelerates uniformly for t1 at 0.1 ms–2. It covers some distance with the
speed it has accquired at end of t1 second. Then car then retardes uniformly at 0.2ms–2 and comes to
rest. The maximum speed acquired by car is 72 kmh–1 and the total distance covered is 5km. What
is least time in which car can complete the journey?
[Ans: 400 s]
6. A train starts from rest and is again at rest at a station 3 km away. The train accelerates uniformly for
2
rd of the journey and retards uniformly for the remaining journey. The total time taken is 3 minute.
3
What is:
(i) acceleration, (ii) retardation, (iii) maximum speed acquired?

 5 2 5 2 100 1 
 Ans. (i) 18 ms , (ii) ms , (iii) 3 ms 
9
7. Fig. 53 shows v is t graph of particle. What is

Fig. 53

175
(i) total distance travelled, (ii) total displacement and (iii), the average velocity for time interval t = 0
to t = 40s?
[Ans: (i) 100, (ii) zero, (iii) zero]
8. A particle having one dimensional motion has an instantaneous acceleration, a; given by
a = –2t+r ms–2
The particle is initially at origin of co-ordinates (say x–axis) and has an initial speed of –3ms–1. Draw
(i) v vs t and, (ii) x vs t graph for the motion of particle.
[Ans:
(i) (ii)

9. A ball is projected vertically upwards from top of a tower. Take vartically upward direction as
direction of positive z–axis and top of tower as origin of co-ordinates. When the position co-ordinate
of ball is +z1 its speed is half of what its speed is when its position is –z1. Show that maximum height
5z1
attained by the ball from the top of tower is .
3
10. A particle A, thrown vertically upwards just reaches the top of a tower 100 m high. When A is
thrown upwards from ground a second particle B is dropped from the top of the tower. Where and
when A and B cross one another?
[Ans: 75m above ground; 2.268 after projection.]
11. A particle undergoes three consecutive displacements. The net displacement is zero. The first
displacement is 8m westward and the second is 13m northwards. What is the third displacement?
[Ans: 15.25m; 58.50 South of East]
12. The resultant of two forces F1 and F2 making an angle of 600 with one other is 20N. F1 : F2 : : 3 : 5.
What is F1 and F2?
[Ans: F1 = 12N; F2 = 20N]

176
13. A boy standing at rest on ground hold umbrella at 600 with vertical so that he does not become wet.
The boy throws away umbrella and starts running on road from west to east at 20ms–1. The rain
appears to strike vertically the head of boy. What is:
(i) actual velocity of rain, (ii) velocity of rain wrt to boy?
[Ans: (i)  23 kmh–1, (ii)  11.55 kmh–1]
14. A stream is moving with a speed of 3ms–1. A motor-boat moves with a speed of 7ms–1 in still water.
The motor-boat starts moving up the stream and drops a packet in stream. The boat travels 4.2 km
up-stream; turns back and picks up to packet dropped. What is total time taken in picking up the
packet?
[Ans: 35 minute]
15. Two boats A and B start from same point O in the middle of a river. A moves along the stream and
B across the stream. They cover equal distances and turn back returning to point O. What is ratio of
the total time taken by A and B? Given speed of each boat is twice the speed of the river.
[Ans: 1.155]
16. A ball is projected vertically upwards with initial speed v0 at an angle  with horizontal. When ball is
at a vertical height of 10m; its instantaneous velocity is

v  8i  5j;
 ms–1

(i) What is v0 and  ?, (ii) What is maximum vertical height attained by the ball?

[Ans: v0 = 17 ms–1;  = 61.90, H = 11.2m]


17. A “basket” in basket-ball game is at a vertical height of 3.5m above ground. A boy at a horizontal
distance of 10m jumps up to a height of 2.5m above ground and throws ball with a speed v0 at an
angle of 600 with the vertical in such a manner that the ball enters the basket. What is v 0?
(g = 9.8ms–1)
[Ans: 11.7 ms–1]
18. A tower is 100 m high. From the top of tower a ball is projected upwards with a speed of 40ms–1 at
an angle of 450 with the vertical.
(a) At what distance from the foot of the tower the ball hits ground? What is its velocity at this
moment?
(b) What is the time of flight of ball? (g = 10ms–2)
[Ans: (a) 229.65 m; 59.9 ms–1 at 64.30 with the horizontal, (b) 8.12 s]
19. A gun fires two cannons each with a speed of 250ms–1. The first cannon is fired at an angle of 600
and the second at an angle of 450 with the horizontal. How long after firing the two cannons hit one

177
another g = 9.8 ms–2.
[Ans: 11 s]
20. An aeroplane dives towards grouned along a straight line path at 370 with the horizontal. When it is
at a height of 720m above ground and is moving at a speed of 540 kmhr–1; it drops a packet. X is a
point on ground along the line of sight of aeroplane. What is distance of packet from X as it hits
ground? (g = 10ms–2)
[Ans: 240 m]
21. An aircraft executes a horizontal loop of radius 1 km moving with a speed of 900 kmhr–1. Express
centeripetal acceleration as a fraction of acceleration due to gravity. g = 9.8ms–2
[Ans: 0.064]
22. An open umbrella of radius 0.5m and height 1.4m is held in a vertical position on ground. It revolves
about it handel as axis at a speed of 20 rpm. A water drop on rim of umbralla spins off the umbrella
and hits ground. What is distance of the point where water drop hits ground from the foot of the
handel of umbrella? (g = 10ms–2)
[Ans: 2.054 m]
23. A cyclist is moving with a speed of 27 kmhr–1. The cyclist moves along a circular road of radius
80 m. He applies brakes and reduces his speed at a constant rate of 0.5 ms–1. What is magnitude
and direction of the net acceleration of cyclist?
[Ans 0.86 ms–2, 35.40 with the inward radius]
24. A particle moves in a circle of radius b in such a manner that instantaneous radial and tangential
acceleration are equal in magnitude. The initial (i.e. t = 0) linear and angular speed of particle is
v and  .

  
(i) Show that instantaneous angular speed is  .
 1  t 

b
(ii) Time taken to complete first revolutions 1  e2  
v

178
ADDITIONAL EXAMPLES
1. From a tower of height H, a particle is thrown vertically upwards with a speed u. The time taken by
the particle, to hit the ground, is n times that taken by it to reach the highest point of its path. The
relation between H, u and n is:
(a) 2gH = nu2 (n–2) (b) gH = (n–2)u2
(c) 2gH = n2u2 (d) gH = (n–2)2u2
Correct option is (1) (IIT 2014)
Solution:

 u
We know that the particle will take a time t1    to reach the highest point (for which v = 0). Let
 g
t2 be the time taken by the particle to hit the ground. Then

1
 H  ut 2   g  t 22
2
We are given that t2 = nt1. This gives
2gH = nu2(n–2)

2. A projectile is given an initial velocity of i  2j m/s, where i is along the ground and j is along the
 
vertical. If g = 10 m/s2, the equation of its trajectory is:
(a) y = 2x – 5x2 (b) 4y = 2x – 5x2
(c) 4y = 2x – 25x2 (d) y = x – 5x2
Correct option is (1) (IIT 2016)
Solution:
There is no acceleration along the horizontal direction. Therefore

x  v ox t  1  t  t

1
Also, y  voy t   g  t 2  2t  5t 2
2
Elimintating t we get
y = 2x – 5x2
This is the equation of the trajectory.

179
3. Two stones are thrown up simultaneously from the edge of a cliff 240 m high with initial speed of
10 m/s and 40 m/s respectively. Which of the following graph best represents the time variation of
relative position of the second stone with respect of the first?
(Assume stones do not rebound after hitting the ground and neglect air resistance. (Take g = 10 m/s2)
(The figure are schematic and not drawn to scale)

Correct option is (1) (IIT 2015)


Solution:
For the first object, we have

1
y1  10t   10  t 2
2
If it takes a time t1 to reach the ground, we have

240  10t1  5t12 or t1 = 8 s

For the second object,


y2 = 40 t –5t2
Time t2, taken by it to reach the ground, comes out to be 12s. The relative displacement of the
second object, with respect to the first, is

180
y 21  y2  y1  30t for (0 < t < 8)

This is equation of a straight line.


For 8 < t < 12, we would have
y21 = 40t – 5t2
This is equation of a parabola. The graph would have the shape shown in (1).

181
QUESTION BANK

182
Key Learning Points
1. A body is in motion when its position changes with time in a conventiently chosen frame of reference
(a conveniently chosen co-ordinate system).
2. In kinematics we study motion without bothering about cause of motion.
3. Rest and motion are realtive. A object may be at rest in one frame of reference and in motion in
another frame of reference. There is no absolute rest.
4. For a body in motion the actual length of path described is distance travelled. It is a scalar quantity.
The line joining the initial position and the final position having an arrow head at the final position is
known as displacement. It is a vector quantity.

5. The average speed  vav  is ratio of total distance travelled and the total time taken.


 
The average velocity v av is the ratio of the displacement and the time taken.

6. The instantaneous speed, v, is

s ds
v  Lt 
t 0 t dt

where s is infitesimally small distance travelled in time interval t, t  t . It equals slope of tangent
to distance travelled (s) vs time (t) graph at the point considered.
7. For one dimensional motion say along x–axis; we have uniform motion; if speed is same at all time.
i.e. v = instantaneous speed = constant.
8. For a body having different velocity at different times, we have non-uniform motion. If v increases
with time motion is accelerated. If, however, v decreases as time increases motion is retarded.
The average and instantaneous acceleration are:

u 2  v1 v v dv
a av   a  Lt 
t 2  t1 t , t  0  t dt

9. The instantaneous acceleration is numerically equal to slope of tangent to v vs t graph at the moment
of time considered.
10. For a body having non-uniform motion the total distance travelled equals area under v vs t graph.
11. A body having same acceleration at all times; motion is uniformly accelerated. Consider uniformly
accelerated motion; accelerations = a; of a body having initial (i.e. t = 0), speed v0; the instantaneous
(i.e. t = t); velocity, v, is

183
v = v0 + at
The total distance s; travelled in time t; is

1
s  v 0 t  at 2 ; Also, v 2  v 20  2as
2
The distance travelled in the nth second of motion; sn; is

a
sn  v0   2n  1
2
These are equations of uniformly accelerated motion. Graphical representation are shown below.

12. A body moving freely under gravity of earth has a uniform acceleration = g = 9.8 ms–2, if distances
involved are very small as compared to radius of earh (= 6400 Km)
13. Vector are physical quantities having a magnitude and direction. They add up according to triangle
law of vector addition. Vector addition is commutative.
14. Fig. 54 shows two vectors P and Q.  is angle between them. Draw two vectors so that their tails
coincide. The angle they make with one another is  .

184
Fig. 54
Let R = P + Q, R is known as resultant of P and Q. Fig. 54(b) shows triangle law of vetors. Also,

Q sin 
R2 = P2 + Q2 + ZPQ cos  , and tan  
P  Q cos 

15. For adding more than two vectors the polygon law of vectors is used. According to this law; draw a
polygon whose different sides taken in order represent the vector to be added. The resultant is the
side that completes the polygon; taken in opposite order. For vectors forming a closed polygon; the
resultant is zero.
16. The rectangular component of a vector P, are two mutually perpendicular vectors whose resultant
equals P.

17. The unit vector A  A


 is a vector having same direction as A, but a magnitude of unity A
A

18. i, j and  are unit vectors along x– y– and z–axis of a Cartesian co-ordinate system.
k
r = Position vector of point having co-ordinates (x, y, z) is
1

r  x i  y j  z k ; and r  r   x2  y2  z2 
2

19. Any vector P, can be represented in terms of its x, y and z components as

P  Px i  Py j  Pz k

Px, Py and Pz are x, y and z–components of P.


20. Let R = P – Q; i.e. we substract Q from P. We obtain R by, using triangle law of vectors, by adding
Q to P where Q' = –Q. Vector substraction is not commutative, i.e.

P–Q  Q–P

185
21. Let rA and rB be the position vector of two points A and B. rAB = rA– rB is the relative position vector
of A w.r.t. B. Similarly for two particles A and B having velocity vA and vB; respectively,

v AB = Relative velocity of A w.r.t B  v A  v B

1 1

 v AB   v 2A  v 2B  2v A vB cos         v 2A  v 2B  2v A v B cos  
2 2

22. The scalar or dot products of two vectors A and B; by definition, is

AB  ABcos 

where  is angle between A and B. It is equal to magnitude of one vector (say A) and the component
of the other vector (i.e. B) in the direction of A  A  B = B  A. For parallel vectors; A  B is
maximum. The dot product of perpendicular vectors is zero; i.e.


A  0, B  0; AB  0 if cos   0 or  
2

23. For unit vectors i, j & k in a Cartesian co-ordinate;

i.i  j. j  k .k  1 , and i. j  j.k  k .i  1

24. Expressing A and B in terms of their Cartesian components as:

A  A x i  A y j  A z k

B  B x i  B y j  Bz k

We have,

A  B  A x Bx  A yBy  Az Bz

25. The cross or vector product C; of two vector A and B is defined as

C  A  B  AB sin 

The direction, n ; of C is given by “Right-hand Screw” rule. Place a right handed screw perpendicular
to the plane containing A and B. Rotate screw so that A goes and coincides with B. The direction in
which screw advances is direction of C or n .

186
The cross-product of parallel vectors or antiparallel vector is zero.

26. In terms of i, j and k ; in a Cartesian co-ordinate system.

i  i  j  j  k  k  0 , i  j  k;
 j  k  i; k  i  j

27. For A  A x i  A y j  A z k;
 B  Bx i  B y j  Bz k

i j k
C  A  B  Ax Ay Az
Bx By Bz

 i  A y Bz  A z By   j  A z B x  A x Bz   k A x By  A y B x 

28. A body, moving in a vertical plane, in the gravity of earth, having some initial speed v0 at an angle 
with the horizontal direction; is known as a projectil.e
29. To analyse motion of projectile we resolve the motion in two retangular components. Choosing
horizontal direction as x–axis and vertically upward direction as direction of positive y–axis; and the
initial position as origin of co-ordinates we have,
a) Motion along x–axis

vx0 = Initial velocity along x–axis = v 0 cos  ; ax = 0. These is uniform motion in the horizontal
direction. Let vx be the x-component of instantaneous velocity and x be the instantaneous x–
co-ordinate of projectile. Then
vx = vx0 = v0cos  .....(i)

x = vx0 × t =  v 0 cos   t .....(ii)

187
b) Motion along y–axis

v yo = Initial velocity along y–axis, a y = –g. We have uniformly accelerated motion along y–
axis. Obvisouly.
vy = The instantaneous y–component of velocity

= v 0 sin    g  t .....(iii)

y = The instantaneous y–co-ordinate of projectile

1
=  v 0 sin   t   g  t 2 .....(iv)
2
30. From above four equations every information regarding projectile can be worked.
Some important results of projectile motion are summarised below.
a) Equations of trajectory.

gx 2
y   tan   x 
2v 20 cos 2 

This is equation of a parabola.


b) Time of flight (T)

2v0 sin 
T
g

c) Maximum vertical height (H)

v02 sin 2 
H
2g

d) Horizontal range (R)

v 20 sin 2 
R
g

v02
R
For a given value of v0 range is maximum for   45 . max  0 . For a constant value of v0
g
there are two direction of projection, 1 and 2 for same horizontal range. 1  2  900.

e) The instantaneous velocity v of projectile is

188
v   v 0 cos   i   v 0 sin   gt  j

2 2 2
1 v0 cos   gt
v  v   v0 cos     v 0 cos   gt   , tan   v 0 cos 
 

where  is angle v makes with horizontal direction.


f) At maximum vertical height.

v   v 0 cos   i

and av  0, where a is acceleration vector..

31. A particle moving in a cirlcle of radius R has circular motion. A line through center of circle and
perpendicular to plane of circle is known as axis of rotation.
32. The instantaneous angular position,  , is angle instantaneous radius joining the position P of particle
with centre of circle 0, makes with a convenently chosen reference line.
33 In circular motion

Total angle described


av = The average angular speed = Total time taken

2  1 
 
t 2  t1  t

 = The instantaneous angular speed

   d
 Lt  
t 0 t
  dt

a av = The average angular acceleration

Total changein angular speed 2  1 


=  
Total time taken t 2  t1 t

 = The instantaneous angular acceleration

   d
 Lt  
t  0
 t  dt

189
34. The linear speed, v, is v = R

R = radius of circular path. Also, a = The linear acceleration = R


35. For a particle moving in a horizontal circle of constant radius R; with a uniform speed (i.e.  = const.
or v = const.) the linear velocity v is not a constant. The direction of v changes continuously. The
instantaneous linear velocity v is in the direction of tangent to the circle at the point P considered.
36. For a particle making in a horizontal circle of constant radius R with uniform speed v; there is linear
acceleration, a; due to charge in direction of v.

v2
a = The magnitude of linear acceleration = .
R
The acceleration is along the direction of the instantaneous radius vector directed towards the centre
of circle. It is known as centeripetal acceleration. The instantaneous linear velocity, v, the instantaneous
acceleration, a; are always mutually perpendicular. Therefore v  a = 0.
37. For circular motion with a variable speed; we have

v2
i) ac = The centeripetal component of acceleration =  v .
R

dv
ii) at = The tangential component of acceleration = .
dt

a   a c  r  a t t

r and t are unit vector in radially outward and tangential directions.

 a  a c2  a t2

190
Unit–2 : Kinematics
Easy Equations of Motion
1. Fig. shows v vs t graph of a particle moving along x–axis. For the time interval (t2–t1)

x  t 2   x  t1 
v av  .....(i)
t 2  t1

v  t 2   v  t1 
a av  .....(ii)
t 2  t1

1
x (t2) = x (t1) + vav (t2–t1) + a (t –t )2 .....(iii)
2 av 2 1
and x(t2) – x(t1) = area ABCD .....(iv)
Which of the above relation /(s) is/are incorrect?
(1) (i) and (ii) (Incorrect)
(2) (iii) (Correct)
(3) (iii) and (iv) (Incorrect)
(4) (i), (ii) and (iii) (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
In the time interval considered acceleration is not uniform. Eqn (iii) is equation of a uniformly accelerated
motion.

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Uniform Motion
2. A car covers 40% of the total distance of its journey with a constant speed v. It moves for
half of the total time of journey with a constant speed 2v. For the remaining time of journey
it moves with a constant speed 3v. The average speed of the car for the complete journey
is:
(1) 2v (Incorrect)
(2) 1.8 v (Incorrect)

191
 25 
(3)  v (Correct)
 18 

5
(4)  v (Incorrect)
 4
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:

25
Let S and T denote the total distance and the total time of journey. S1 = 0.4S = is the distance travelled
5
with constant speed v. The time taken, t1, is

2S
t1    .....(i)
5v

T
During the second part of the journey, the time taken = t 2 
2
The distance travelled S2 is

S2  2vt 2  vT .....(ii)
Let S3 be the distance travelled during the remaining journey and t3 be time taken. Obviously

 2S  3S
S3  S    vT    vT
5  5

S3 S T
and t3   
3v 5v 3

T
Now, T  t1   t3
2

T 2S  S T
or  t1  t 3    
2 5v  5v 3 

5T 3S
or 
6 5v
The average speed of the complete journey is

S  25 
v   v
T  15 
192
Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Relative Velocity
3. A motorboat moving at a constant speed meets a “raft” at some point P. The motor boat
moves for 30 minute and then it turns back. It now meets the same raft at a point Q. PQ =
4km. The speed of flow of river is:
(1) 4 kmhr–1 (Correct)
(2) 2 kmhr–1 (Incorrect)
(3) 1.6 kmhr–1 (Incorrect)
(4) 1.8 kmhr–1 (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:
Let V and VR denote speed of motor boat and river respectively. When motor boat moves down the
stream its resultant velocity is (V+VR) and when it moves up the stream resultant velocity is (V–VR). Let t
be time taken by motor boat, after it turns back to meet raft at Q. The total distance S travelled by boat is:

1
S = (V+VR) + (V–VR) t .....(i)
2
where V and VR are expressed in kmhr–1. Also
S = average speed of boat × total time taken

  V  VR    V  VR    1 
=    t
 2  2 

1 
= V  t  .....(ii)
2 
From Eqns (i) and (ii) we have

1 1 
 V  VR    V  VR  t  V   t 
2 2 

or VR  2  V  VR  t  2Vt

or VR 1  2t   0

193
1
 t
2
hr  VR  0

1 1
The total time taken by motor boat =   1hr . In this time – raft has travelled a distance = PQ
2 2
= 4 km. The raft moves with same speed as river. Hence

Total distance travelled


VR  Speed of river 
Total time taken

= 4 kmhr–1

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Easy Equations of Motion
4. A particle start from rest and has a uniformly accelerated motion.s is distance travelled in
time interval t = 4s to t = 5s. s1 is distance travelled in time interval t = n and t = n+1.
s1 15
 . n is
s 9
(1) 7 (Correct)
(2) 8 (Incorrect)
(3) 5 (Incorrect)
(4) 9 (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:
sn = distance travelled in nth second by a particle starting from rest having uniform acceleration a

a
  2n  1
2
Time interval t = 4s to t = 5s is 5th second of motion. Therefore

a 9a
s  2  5 – 1 
2 2
Similarly time interval t = n and t = n+1 is (n+1)th second of motion. Therefore

194
a a
s1   2  n  1  1   2n  1
2 2

s1 15 2n  1
Given,  
s 9 9

 15  2n  1 or n=7

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Motion Under Gravity
5. A ball projected vertically upwards from ground with an initial speed U returns to ground
after time T. The maximum height attained by the ball is H. The speed of projection of ball
is increased by n time its earlier value. The ratio of percentage change in H and T is:
(1) n (Incorrect)
(2) 2n–1 (Incorrect)
(3) 1+n (Incorrect)
(4) 1+2n (Correct)
Correct answer: (4)
Solution:
Let ‘g’ denote accelration due to gravity. We know,

2U U2
T and H 
g 2g

The new speed of projection U' is

U' = (1+n) U
2
2U '  U '  (1  n) 2 H
Therefore, T '   (1  n)T and H' 
g 2g

 H ' H  2
  100  1  n   1  100   n  2n   100
2
The percentage change in H =   
 H 

T ' T
The percentage change in T =    100  n 100
T

195
 n 1  2n 
Obviously   1  2n
 n

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Non-uniform Motion
6. A particle moves along positive z–axis starting from origin of co-ordinates at t = 0. The
instantaneous velocity of particle is

vk z
where k is a constant. The ratio of the instantaneous velocity when particle has covered
distance z, and the average velocity for this time of journey, is
(1) 1 (Incorrect)
(2) k (Incorrect)
(3) 1/k (Incorrect)
(4) 2 (Correct)
Correct answer: (4)
Solution:
Given,

dz 1
v  kz 2 .....(i)
dt

or z12 dz  kdt

Integrate,
z 1 t
 z 2 dz  k  dt
0 0

1
2z 2  kt

k 2t 2
or z  .....(ii)
4
t = The time taken to move from z = 0 to z = z

196
2
= z
k

z
v av = The average velocity =
t

1
= k z .....(iii)
2
v = The instantaneous velocity at z = z is given by Eqn (i). Therefore,

v k z
 2
v av 1 k z
2

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Motion
7. A par t icle moves along x–axis. v0 and v denote its initial and instantaneous velocity. Fig.
shows nv vs time (t) graph for the motion of particle. The instantaneous velocity at
1
t= s is
3

v
(1) (Incorrect)
3

(2) 3 nv 0 (Incorrect)

v0
(3) (Correct)
e
(4) ev0 (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (3)


Solution:
The equation of given straight line is

 n v   n  v0    tan1200  t

197
= n  v0   3 t

 v
or n     3 t
 v0 

 v  v 0e 3t
.....(i)

1 v0
At t s; v  v 0 e 1 
3 e

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Difficult Graphical Study of Motion
8. Particle 1 is at rest at origin of co-ordinates along x–axis. At t = 0 it has a uniform acceleration
of 2ms–2. A second particle 2 is at +2m from particle 1 and has a uniform motion with a
constant speed of 1ms–1. x = x1–x2 is relative position of particle 1 with respect to particle 2.
Which of the followings correctly describe variation of x with time (t)?

198
Correct answer: (4)
Solution:
The instantaneous position co-ordiante x1 and x2 of the two particles are

1
x1 =  2  t2   t2 .....(i)
2
x2 = 2 + 1 × t = 2 + t .....(ii)
Obviously,
x = x1–x2 = t2–2–t .....(iii)
x vs t graph is parabolic in nature. x is a negative number at t = 0. x is maximum when

dx
 0  2t  1
dt
or t = 0.5 s
x max = 0.25 – 2 – 0.5 = –2.25m
Also, x = 0 if
t2 – t – 2 = 0

1 1 8 1 3
or t   2s
2 2
For t > 2s; x is a + ve number and varies as a parabolic function of t. These characterstics are shown in (4).

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Motion Under Gravity
9. A ball A is thrown vertically upwards with an inital speed v. A second ball B is thrown
vertically upwards from same point at same speed n second later. The two meet one another
before returning back to the point of projection. The maximum value of n is
v
(1) (Incorrect)
g

2v
(2) (Correct)
g

199
v
(3) (Incorrect)
2g

3v
(4) (Incorrect)
2g

Correct answer: (2)

Solution:

Choosing the point of projection of balls as origin of co-ordinates and vertically upward direction as
direction of +z – axis the instantaneous position co-ordinates z1 and z2 of th two balls is

1 2
z1 = vt – gt
2

1 2
z2 = v (t–n)  g  t  n 
2

When the two balls meet one another z1 = z2

1 1 2
 vt  gt 2  v  t  n   g  t  n 
2 2

1
0   nv – g  n 2  2nt 
2

n v
or t  
2 g

2v 2v
The first ball will hit ground at t  . The maximum value of t is . Hence
g g

2v n max v
 
g 2 g

2v
 n max 
g

200
Unit–2 : Kinematics
Difficult Equation of Motion
10. A particle is dropped from a point O at a
vertical height H above ground. It falls freely
under gravity. The particle hits a rigidly fixed
planck in its path at a point P as shown is Fig.
After hitting the planck the velocity of particle
becomes horizontal. It hits ground t second
after it was dropped. Assuming that time taken
h
in impact of P is negligible, t is maximum if
H
is
(1) 1 (Incorrect)
(2) 0.5 (Correct)
(3) 0.25 (Incorrect)
(4) 2 (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:

Let t1 be time taken by the ball to move freely under gravity from O to P. Obviously

1 2
Hh  gt l
2

2H  h
 t1  ..... (i)
g

After impact at P, velocity of particle becomes horizontal, i.e. its vertical component is zero. Let it take a
time t2 to hit ground. Obviously

1
h  gt 2 2
2

2h
 t1  ..... (ii)
g

201
2H  h 2h
Now, t  t1  t 2   ..... (iii)
g g

dt
t is maximum if  0 . This gives
dh

h 1
  0.5
H 2

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Equation of Motion

11. A body starting from rest accelerates uniformly at a rate of  ms –2 for a time of  second.
The distance travelled by the body is S. The body travels with constant speed it has
accquired for t second and then comes to rest at a retardation of 2 . The total distance of
t
journey is 3S. Then is

1
(1) (Incorrect)
4
1
(2) (Incorrect)
2
3
(3) (Correct)
4
(4) 1 (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:

Since body has uniformly accelerated motion; starting from rest.

1 2
S  .....(i)
2


Let t' be time taken by body to come to rest due to retardation 2  . Obviously t' = . The distance
2

202
travelled S' , during this time is

2
 1 
S '        2    
2 2 2

2 2 2 S


    .....(ii)
2 4 4 2

Let S1, be the distance travelled with constant speed v   . Then S1     t . Given,

S
3S  S  S1  S'  S S1 
2

3
 S1  S
2

S1 3  S  3
 t    
 2    4

t 3
or 
 4

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Difficult Graphical Study of Motion
12. A particle at the origin of co-ordinates at t = 0, moves along positive x–axis. The
instantaneous velocity (v) vs time (t) graph of the particle is as shown in Fig.

203
The graph of instantaneous positive (x) vs time (t) is

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:

1. For time interval 0  t  1s ; the motion is uniformly accererated with an acceleration a1  2ms 2 .
The instantaneous positive co-ordinate x is

2
x  2 t2  t2 .....(1)
2
Eqn (1) is equation of parabola. A t t 1 = 1s; x = 1m.

204
2. For time interval 1  t  2 s ; the particle has uniform motion with speed v  v1  2ms 1 . The
instantaneous position co-ordinate x; in this time interval is given by:

x  x1  v1  t  1

= 1 + 2 (t–1) .....(2)
Eqn (2) is equation of a straight line. At t2 = 2s, x2 = 1+2 (2–1) = 3m.

3. For time interval 2  t  4 s ; the motion is uniformly retarded with retardation a 2  2ms 2 . The
instantaneous position co-ordinate of particle in this time interval is given by

 1 2
x  x2   2  t  2    2  t  2  
 2 
2
 3  2  t  2   t  2 .....(3)

Eqn (3) is equation of parabole. At t3 = 3 s, v3 = 0 and


x3 = 3 + 2 (3–2) – (3–2)2 = 4
At t4 = 4s; v4 = –2ms–1. The position co-ordinate x4 is
x4 = 3+2 (4–2) – (4–2)2 = 3 + 4–4 = 3m
The characteristics are correcly shown in (2).

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Difficult Graphical Study of Motion
13. The instantaneous velocity (v) vs instantaneous position (x) of a particle is shown in Fig.

205
The instantaneous acceleration (a) vs x graph is

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:

The equation representing given v vs x graph is

v 
v  v0   0  x


 x
 v 0 1   .....(1)
 

The instantaneous acceleration; a, is

206
dv  dv   dx   dv 
a      v 
dt  dx   dt   dx 

 x v 
 v 0 1     0 
    

 v 20   v 20 
  2 x .....(2)
    

v 20
Eqn (2) is equation of a straight line with positive slope equal to and a negative intercept on acceleration
2
v 20
axis. Also at x =  ; a  0 and at x  2; a  . These characterstics are shown in (2).

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Difficult Equation of Motion
14. Choose a co-ordinate system as shown in Fig. A
particle is projected vertically upwards from O with a
speed of 30ms–1. P is a point 25m above ground. Q
and R are two equidistant point from P as shown in
Fig. with PQ = PR = 15 m. t1 is time taken by particle
to move from P to Q during its upwards journey. t2 is
time taken by the particle to move from P to R during
t1
its downwards journey. t is nearly (g = 10ms–2)
2

(1) 1 (Incorrect)
2
(2) (Incorrect)
3
3
(3) (Correct)
2
1
(4) (Incorrect)
2

207
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:

For the co-ordinate system shown, let z be the instantaneous position co-ordinate of particle. Obviously.

z = 30t–5t2 .....(1)

Let the particle be at point P at t = tP. At this point z = zP = +25 m

 25  30 t P  5t P 2

or t 2P  6 t P  5  0

6  36  20 6  4
 tP    1or 5s
2 2

Let particle be at point Q at t = tQ. Then z = zQ = 40m.

 40  30t Q  5t Q2 or t Q2  6t Q  8  0

6  36  32 6  2
or tQ    2 or 5s
2 2

Similarly for point R; t = tR and z = zR = +10 m. Therefore

10  30t R  5t R2 or t R2  6t R  2  0

6  36  8 6  5.3
 tR    0.35 or 5.665s
2 2

Obviously during upward journey

t1 = tQ – tP = 2–1 = 1 s

and during downward journey

t2 = tR – tP

= 5.675 – 5 = 0.665 s

t1 1 3
  
t 2 0.665 2

208
Unit–2 : Kinematics
Difficult Equation of Motion
15. A particle is at the origin of x–axis at t = 0 having an initial speed v along positive x–axis.
The instantaneous acceleration (a) of particle is

 2a 20  2
a  a0    t ms
 v0 
The position co-ordinate of particle when it is momentarily at rest is:

5v 20
(1) (Correct)
6a 0

13v02
(2) (Incorrect)
6a 0

v 20
(3) (Incorrect)
2a 0

6a 0
(4) v 20 (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:
The instantaneous velocity v of particle is

 2a 2 
v  v0  at  v0   a 0  0  t ......(1)
 v0 

The instantaneous velocity v is zero when particle is momentarily at rest. From Eqn. (1) we get

2a 02 2
0  v0  a 0 t  t
v0

 2a 20  2
or   t – a 0 t  v0  0
 v0 

209
 2a 2 
a0  a 02  4  0  v 0
 v0  a  3a
 t 2
 0 2 0
4a 0  4a 0 
v0  
 v0 

4a 0 v0
t 2

or  4a 
0
a0
 
 v0 

To obtain the instantaneous position co-ordinate x of particle we have,

dx  2a 2 
v  v0  a 0 t   0  t 2
dt  v0 

t
x   2a02  2 
or dx
0 0  0 0  v0  t  dt
 v  a t 
 

t 2 2a 02 3
or x  v0 t  a 0  t ......(3)
2 3v0

v0
At t = a ; the instantaneous position co-ordinate is
0

2 3
 v  a  v  2a 2  v 
x  v0  0   0  0   0  0 
 a 0  2  a 0  3v0  a 0 

v 20 v 20 2v 20 5v 20
   
a 0 2a 0 3a 0 6a 0

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Relative Velocity
16. Two balls A and B are projected vertically upwards with speed 10ms–1 and 20ms–1
respectively from ground and top of a tower 60m high. U  U B  U A is relative velocity of
B with respect to A. Graph of U vs t is:

210
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:

211
Taking ground as origin of co-ordinates and vertically upward direction as direction of +z–axis Fig. (a)
shows position of two particles at t = 0.

U A0  10ms –1 ; U B   20 ms –1 ; a A  a B  10ms –2

U 0  U B0  U A0  10ms –1

The instantaneous velocity U A and U B of A and B, is given by

U A  10  10t and U B  20  10t

 U  U B  U A  10 ms 1

The above result is valid for time interval 0  t  2s . At t = 2s; particle A comes back to ground and
subsequently is at rest. At t = 2s; particle B is at its highest position B1 above B and its instantaneous
2

veloicty is zero. Also BB1 


 20 
 20 m. Now B starts falling freely under gravity and it hits ground at
2  10
t = t1. Now zB0 = +60 m and zB = 0 at t = t1. Therefore

0  60  20t 1 – 5t 12

or t12  4t1  12  0

4  16  48 4  8
 t1    6s
2 2
In time interval 2  t  6 s; the instantaneous speed of B is

U B  20  10 t

Since U A  0; U  U B  U A  20  10t. In time interval 2  t  6s U is a negative number. U vs t graph


is a straight line. At t = 6s; U = 20 – 10 × 6 = –40ms–1. For t > 6s; both A and B at rest, hence U = 0. These
characterstics are correcttly shown in (3).

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Difficult Motion Under Gravity
17. Two particles A and B; initially 75m apart are projected vertically upwards with initial
speed of 30ms–1 and 10ms–1 as shown in Fig. Take ground as origin of co-ordinates and
ver tically upwar d direction as dir ection of +ve z–axis. zA and zB denote instantaneous position
of A and B. Take z = zB – zA as the relative distance between B and A. As long as A and B are
in motion, z vs t graph is: (g = 10 ms–2)

212
213
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:

Let zA and zB be the instantanceous position co-ordinate of A and B. Obvisouly

zA = 30 t – 5t2 .....(i)

and zB = 75 + (10 t – 5t2) .....(ii)

 z = zB – zA = 75 – 20t .....(iii)
Let A and B hit ground at tA and tB after projection. Then for particle A, zA = 0, t = tA

 0  30t A  5t A2  5t A  6  t A  or t A  6s

For particle B; zB = 0; at t = tB. From Eqn. (ii) we have

0 = 75 + 10tB – 5tB2

or t 2B  2t B  15  0

2  4  60 2  8
or t B    5s
2 2

For time interval 0  t  5s; both A and B are in motion z is given by Eqn. (iii). z varies linearly with time t.
At t = 5 s.

zA = 75 – 20 × 5 = –25 m.
Since z = zB–zA and zB = 0; zA = 25 m. At this time Ais 25m above ground. However z is a negative number.
For time interval 5  t  6 s ; z = –zA [ zB = 0]. Therefore

z  30t  5t 2
In this time interval z is a parabolic function of t. These characterstics all shown correctly in (1).

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Difficult Equation of Motion
18. Two particles A and B are at rest at t = 0 in x–y plane at points having co-ordinates (  , 0)
and (0,  ). They start moving simultaneously towards origin along straight line joining

214
their initial position with origin O. a1 and a2 denote acceleration (uniform) of A and B. The
distance between A and B is minimum at

a1  a 2
(1) t (Incorrect)
a1  a 2

a1  a 2 
(2) t (Incorrect)
a12  a 22

2  a1  a 2 
(3) t (Incorrect)
 2  2

2  a1  a 2 
(4) t (Correct)
a 2
1  a 22 

Correct answer: (4)

Solution:

Particle A moves along x–axis and B along y–axis. The instantaneous position co-ordiantes of A and B are
(x, 0) and (0, y). Obvisouly

1 1
x    a1 t 2 and y    a2t2
2 2

The instantaneous distance and between the two particle is s  x 2  y 2 For s to be minimum

ds 1 1
2  dx dy 
 0 i.e.  x 2  y 2   2 x  2y   0
dt 2  dt dt 

This condition is satisfied if

dx dy
x y 0
dt dt

 1 2  1 2 
or    a1t  a1t     a 2 t  a 2 t  0
 2   2 

215
1 2
or a1  a 2 
2
 a1  a 22  t 2

2 a1 a2
 t
a12  a22

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Easy Vector Addition
19. Given,
P+Q+R+S=0
The magnitudes of vectors are denoted by p, q, r and s respectively. Which of the followings
is correct?
(1) p  q r s (Incorrect)

(2) p  qr s (Correct)

(3) p  q r s (Incorrect)

(4) p  q  2r  s (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:
Since the resultant of given vectors is zero, they form a closed
polygon ABCDA as shown in Fig. We know the sum of the two
sides of atriangle is always less than the third side. In triangle BCD.
BD < q + r
Similarly from triangle ABD
AB = p < BD + DA
or p<q+r+s

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Easy Vector Addition
20. Two forces F1 and F2 have a maximum and minimum resultant of 11 and SN respectively

216
each force is increased by 2N. These two forces F1' and F 2' act at right angles to one
another; The resultant force is:
'
(1) 5 5N at an angle of tan–1 (0.5) with F1 (Correct)

'
(2) 5 5N at an angle of tan–1 (0.5) with F 2 (Incorrect)

(3) 15N at 450 with F1' (Incorrect)

(4) 5N along direction F1' (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:

Let F1 and F2 be the magnitude of the two forces. Given,

Fmax = F1 + F2 = 11 and Fmin = F1–F2 = 5

 F1 = 8N and F2 = 3N
When the forces are increased by 2N each; the magnitude
F1' and F 2' of the two forces is

F1' = 10N and F ' = 5N2

Now F1' and F2' act at right angles to one another as shown in Fig. Their resultant

2 2
F'  10    5  125 = 5 5 N

F2'
tan   '  0.5 or   tan 1  0.5
F1

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Vector Addition
21. n+2 vectors each of magnitude F are so oriented that angle between any two consecutive
2
vectors is . The sum of vectors is
n

217

(1) 2Fsin   ; along the direction of 1st vector (Incorrect)
n

 2  
(2) 2Fsin   ; at angle of with the 1st vector (Incorrect)
 n  n

 
(3) 2F cos   ; at an angle of with the 1st vector (Correct)
n n

 2  2
(4) 2F cos   ; at an angle of with the 1st vector (Incorrect)
 n  n

Correct answer: (3)

Solution:

Number of given vectors form a closed polygon because total angle


between them is 2 . Their resultant is zero. Therefore sum of all (n+2)
vectors is sum of two vectors of same magnitude F making an angle
2
with one other. The resultant R is shown in Fig. Obviously
n

2 
R = 2F cos  ; and 2     
n n


or R = 2F cos  
n


R makes an angle   with the first vector..
n

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Vector Addition
22. A vector, P, makes an angle  in anticlockwise direction with positive x–axis in x–y plane.
The x–component of vector is Px. The vector is, rotated by 300 in clockwise direction. Px' is

218
Px'
x–component of vector now. P  3 . Another vector Q; having same magnitude as P is
x

directed along +ve y–axis. Q is added to P. The ratio of the resultant magnitude of P is

(1) 2  3 (Correct)

(2) 2 (Incorrect)

(3) 1 3 (Incorrect)

1

(4) 2  3 2
(Incorrect)

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:
Obviously,

Px p cos  1
'
 
Px p cos    30  3

or 3 cos   cos    30     600

Now P and Q have same magnitude and angle between them is also 300. The magnitude of the resultant R
is

R  p 2  p 2  2p 2 cos300  p 2  3
R 1


P

 2 3  2

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Vector Addition
23. An insect moves on a horizontal floor. It covers a distance of 5m from west to east, 2m from
north to south and 2 2 m in west-south direction. The displacement of insect from starting
point is (nearly).
(1) 9.8 km in west-south direction (Incorrect)

219
(2) 5 m in north-west direction (Incorrect)

 1  4  
(3) 5 m at angle of   tan    east of south (Correct)
2  3 

1  4 
(4) 5 m at angle of tan   north of east (Incorrect)
3

Correct answer: (3)


Solution:

Choose a co-ordinate system on the floor with intial position of insect as origin of co-ordinates. The three
displacement vectors s1, s2 and s3 are as shown in Fig. (a). Expressing the vectors in terms of their
rectangular components we have

 s  2 j;
s1  5i; 2

s3  2 2 cos 45 i  2 2 sin 450 j  2i  2j


    
The resultant displacement s is

s  s1  s 2  s 3  3i  4j

This is shown in Fig. (b). Magnitude of s is

2 2 4 4
s  3   4  5m; and tan     tan 1  
3 3

220
Unit–2 : Kinematics
Easy Relative Velocity
24. A car A moves with a uniform speed of 30 kmhr–1 in a direction 300 east of north. The
relative velocity of A as observed by the driver of another moving car B is 41 kmhr–1 along
south-north direction. The veocity of car B s:
(1) 15 kmhr–1, in north-east direction (Incorrect)
–1
(2) 15 2 kmhr , in north-east direction (Correct)
–1
(3) 15 2 kmhr , in south-east direction (Incorrect)

(4) 15 kmhr–1, along north-south direction (Incorrect)


Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
Choose a co-ordinate system as shown in Fig. Given,

vA   30cos60 i   30sin60 j  15i  26j

v AB  41j

Let velocity of car B be

v B  x i  yj

We know,

v AB  v A  v B

= 15  x  i   26  y  j  41j

 x = 15 and y = 15
We have,

v B  15i  15 j kmhr –1
 
Obviously v B  15 2 kmhr –1 in north-east direction.

221
Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Relative Velocity
25. Three cars A, B and C are moving on a level road. Car C moves with a velocity of 60 kmhr–1 in
a direction 600 north-east. The relative velocity of C wrt A is 15 3 kmhr–1 along south-north
direction. The relative velocity of C wrt B is 20 kmhr–1 from west to east. Taking a
co-ordinate system with west-east direction as positive x–axis, we have

(1) v A  30 i  15 3 j (Correct)

v B  10 i  30 3 j

(2) v A   30 i  15 3 j (Incorrect)

v B  10 i  30 3 j

(3) v A  30 i  15 3 j (Incorrect)

v B   10 i  30 3 j

(4) v A  30 i  15 3 j (Incorrect)

v B   10 i  15 3 j

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:

Choosing the co-ordinate system as shown in Fig. let v A  x1 i  y1 j; kmhr–1 and v B  x2 i  y 2 j; kmhr–1

Given, v C  30 i  30 3 j . Also, v CA  30 3 j

Therefore,

vCA  vC  v A or 15 3 j   30  x1  i  30 3  y1 j
 
Comparing coefficents of i and j , we get

30  x1  0 or x1  30 and 15 3  30 3  y1 or y1  15 3

 v A  30 i  15 3 j; kmhr –1

222
Similarly,

v CB  20 i  v C  v B

or 20i   30  x2  i  30 3  y 2 j
 
Comparing coefficients of i and j

20 = 30 – x 2 or x 2 = 10; and
30 3  y 2  0 or y 2  30 3

 v B  10 i  30 3 j

These are expression for v A and v B in (1)

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Relative Velocity
26. Fig. shows a stream flowing with a constant speed of 4 kmhr–1 from left to right. Points P
and Q are directly opposite one another on the river banks. Two swimmers are at point P
each swimming with same speed of 5 kmhr–1. Both start together from point P. Swimmer 1
swims in such a direction as to reach end Q. Swimmer 2 swims in a direction at right angles
to direction of flow of river and then walks back from R to Q with a speed v in such a
manner that both swimmers reach point Q simultaneously. v is

(1) 4.5 kmhr–1 (Incorrect)


(2) 3 kmhr–1 (Incorrect)
–1
(3) 41 kmhr (Incorrect)

(4) 6 kmhr–1 (Correct)


Correct answer: (4)

223
Solution:
Let swimmer 1 swim in a direction to left
of point Q in such a manner that his
resultant velocity is along PQ. This is
shown in Fig. (a). The resultant speed v1
of swimmer 1 is

2 2
v1  vS2  v R2   5   4   3kmhr 1

Let  be width of stream in kilometer..


t1 = Time taken by swimmer 1 to move from P to Q

 
  hr .....(1)
v1 3

For swimmer 2; the velocity vectors are as shown in Fig. (b). Let t2 be the total time taken by swimmer 2
to reach Q. Obviously

t 2  t '2  t '2

PQ   QR V t'
t '2    ; and t '2   R 2
VS VS 5 V V

 4  
or t2    
5 V 5
Given, t1 = t2; therefore
  4 1 1 4
  or  
3 5 5V 3 5 5V

 V  6 kmhr 1

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Easy Product of Vectors

27. Given, A  a i  b j and B  ci  2b j . Also a 2  c2  nb2 .  A  B is perpendicular to

 AB ; n is
(1) 2 (Incorrect)

224
(2) 3 (Correct)
(3) –3 (Incorrect)
(4) 1 (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:

A  B   a  c  i  3bj ; A  B   a  c  i  bj

The vectors  A  B  and  A  B  are perpendicular to one another; therefore

 A  B  .  A  B  0
a 2
 c 2   3b 2  0 or c 2
 nb 2   c 2  3b 2  0

 n3

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Easy Product of Velocity

28. A  10i  2.5j;


 B  3i  4j. The component of A in the direction of B is

(1) 2.4i  3.2 j (Correct)

(2) 2i  0.5 j (Incorrect)

(3) 2.4i  3.2 j (Incorrect)

(4) 2.4i  3.2 j (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:

A B
A11 = Component of A along B has a magnitude of B .

Now AB = 10×3 – 2.5×4 = 20

2 2
and B   3   4  5

225
20
 A11  4
5
In terms of vectors

3i  4 j

A11  4B  4  
5

 2.4i  3.2 j

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Easy Product of Velocity

29. A particle having charge q is moving with a velocity. v  v1 i  v 2 j in a space having a

uniform magnetic field B  B k . The charge experiences a force F given by F  q  V  B 


P is a vector perpendicular to instantanenous force F on charged particle. Writting
P  x i  y j  zk,
 we have

x v1
(1)  ; z can have any value (Correct)
y v2

x v2
(2)  ; z = v1v2 (Incorrect)
y v1

x v
(3)  1; z  v12 v 2 (Incorrect)
y v2

x v
(4)  v1v 2 ; z  1 (Incorrect)
y v2

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:
F the instantaneous force on charged particle is

F  q  v  B  q  v1 i  v 2 j  Bk 
 

226
 Bqv1 j  Bqv 2 i
  
Let P  x i  yj  zk.
 Since P is perpendicular to F, P  F = 0

  x i  yj  zk  . Bq  v i  v j  0


2 1

x v1
or Bqv 2 x - Bqv1 y = 0 or  ......(i)
y v2

P  F is zero if x and y satisfy Eqn (i); irrespective of value of z.

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Easy Product of Vectors
30. The position vector r A and rB of two points A and B are:
e:

rA  2i  3j  k , rB  5i  2j  3k


The linear momentum, P; of a particle at point B is

P  3i  2j  4k


The angular momentum of particle at B about A is

(1) 5i  9j  5k (Incorrect)

(2) 4i  11j  4k (Incorrect)

(3) 12i  9j (Incorrect)

(4) 12i  9j (Correct)


Correct answer: (4)
Solution:
The position vector of particle at B with respect to point A is

rBA  rB  rA  5i  2j  3k  2i  3j  k


   
 3i  j  4 k

 BA ; the angular momentum of particle at B about point A is

227
 BA  rBA  P

i j k
 3 1 4  i  4  8  j12  12   k  6  3
3 2 4

 12i  9 k

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Product of Vectors
31. A particle moves in x–y plane in a circular path of radius R with a constant angular velocity
 . At t = t, the radius vector joining particle with centre of circle makes an angle  with
x–axis. The instantaneous linear velocity v is

(1)  R  i   R j (Incorrect)

(2)   R sin   i   R cos   j (Correct)

(3)  R sin   i   R cos   j (Incorrect)

(4)   R cos   i   R sin   j (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:
Let (x, y) be the Carteisan co-ordiantes of instantaneous position P of particle. The instantaneous position
vector is:

r   R cos   i   R sin   j

The angular velocity ω is

ω   k

The instantaneous linear velocity v is

v  ωr

228
 k   R cos   i   R sin   j
   

   R cos   j    R sin   i

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Projectile Motion
32. A particle is projected vertically upwards from the foot O of an inclined plane OAB of
inclincation 300. The particle hits the inclined plane at P in a direction perpendicular to slant
side of the inclined plane.  is

 3
(1) 300  tan 1   (Correct)
 2 

 2 
(2) 300  tan 1   (Inorrect)
 3

 3
(3) 300  cot 1   (Incorrect)
 2 

 2 
(4) 300  cot 1   (Incorrect)
 3

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:

Choosing x ' and y' axis as shown in Fig.

229
v '0x  u cos    30 

v '0 y  u sin    30 

Resolving acceleration due to gravity into its


components along x ' and y' axis,

g
a 'x  g sin 30     ;
 2

 3 
a 'y  g cos 30    g 
 2 

Let v 'x and v 'y be the x ' and y' component of instantaneous velocity of particle at P..

g
v'x  v'ox  a 'x t  u cos    30   t
2

3
v'y  v'oy  a 'y t  u sin    30   gt
2

As v´x  0 ; when particle hits x ' – axis (i.e. the inclined plane)

2u cos    30
 t ......(1)
g

Also for piont P, y' = 0. Therefore

3 2
0  u sin    30  t  gt
4

4u sin    30 
or t  ......(2)
3g
From Eqns (1) and (2) we have

2u cos    30  4u sin    30  3
 or tan    300  
g 3g 2

 3
   300  tan 1  
 2 
230
Unit–2 : Kinematics
Difficult Projectile Motion

33. Two particles A and B are projected from point O with same speed u at angle 1 and 2
with horizontal. Both particles pass through a point P at a distance r from O. Line OP
makes an angle  with the horizontal. tA and tB is time taken by A and B; then tAtB is
proportional to:

1
(1) (Incorrect)
r

1
(2) (Inorrect)
r2
(3) r (Correct)
(4) r2 (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:
Fig. shows a particle projected at an angle  with horizontal. The particle passes through point P, t second
after projection. Co-ordinates of P are

x  r cos , y  r sin ,

Therefore,

x   u cos   t  r cos 

r cos 
or t  .....(1)
u cos 

1
y   u sin   t  gt 2
2

 r cos   1 2
or r sin   u sin     gt
 u cos   2

1 2  sin  cos  
or gt  r   sin  
2  cos  

231
 sin  cos   cos  sin  
 r 
 cos  

2r sin    
 t2  .....(2)
gcos 

From Enq (2) t is directly proportional to r , therefore

tAtB is directly proportional to  


r. r  r

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Difficult Projectile Motion

x2
34. The equation of trajectory of projectile is y  2 x  , x and y are in meter. Which of the
5
following st at ement s is incor r ect ? (g = 10ms–2)

5 5 1
(1) Speed of projection = ms (Incorrect)
2

2
(2) Angle of projection,  = sin–1   (Incorrect)
5
(3) Maximum vertical height = H = 5m. (Incorrect)
(4) Time of flight = T = 1s (Correct)
Correct answer: (4)
Solution:
The equation of trajectory of a projectile is:

gx2
y   tan  x – .....(1)
2v20 sin2 

Comaparing given equation of trajectory with Eqn. (1) we have, tan   2 .

tan  2 2
 sin    or   sin 1
1  tan 2  5 5

232
Also,

g 1 10  5
2
2
 or v 20 sin 2    25
2v sin  5
0 2

5 5 1
 v 0 sin   5 or v0  ms
2

2v 20 sin 2 2   5 2
H = The maximum vertical height =   5m
g 10

2v0 sin  2  5
T = The time of flight =   1s
g 10

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Difficult Projectile Motion
35. From the top of a tower of vertical height ‘h’, a ball A is projected vertically upwards with
speed v0 at an angle of 600 with the horizontal. n second later a second ball B is projected
horizontally with same speed v0. The two balls colloide with one another. n is

v0
(1) (Incorrect)
g

2v0
(2) (Correct)
3g

2v0
(3) (Incorrect)
g

v0
(4) (Incorrect)
3g

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:
In Fig. O is top of tower. Choosing co-ordinate axis as shown in Fig.and t = 0 when ball A is projected; the
instantaneous co-ordinates ( x1, y1) of ball A are:

233
v0
x1   v0 cos 60  t  t .....(1)
2

1
y1   v 0 sin 60  t  gt 2
2

3v 0 1
 t  gt 2 .....(2)
2 2
The instantaneous co-ordinates (x2, y2) at t = t
(t > n) of ball B are

x2  v 0  t  n  .....(3)

1 2
y2   g  t  n  .....(4)
2
Let P be the point where the two balls colloide with one another. Co-ordinates of ball A and B are same at
this moment of time. From Eqns. (1) and (3).

v0
t  v0  t  n 
2

t
 n .....(5)
2
From Eqns (2) and (4); we have,

3 1 1 2
v 0 t  gt 2   g  t  n 
2 2 2

gt 2
or 3v0 t  gt 2  
4

4v0
or t .....(6)
3g

Obvisouly, from Eqns. (5) and (6) we have

t 2v 0
n 
2 3g

234
Unit–2 : Kinematics
Difficult Projectile Motion
36.

OAB is a right angled wedge fixed to ground as shown in Fig. A ball is projected with a
speed v0 at an angle of 600 with horizontal from O. The ball hits wedge at point P. Then OP
is

v 20
(1) (Incorrect)
2g

2v02
(2) (Incorrect)
g

2v02
(3) (Correct)
3g

2v 20
(4) (Incorrect)
3 3g

Correct answer: (3)


Solution:
Choossing x and y–axis as shown in Fig., the instantaneous x and y co-ordinates of ball projected from
O are

235
v 
x   v 0 cos 60  t   0  t . ....(i)
 2 

1 3 1
y   v0 cos 60  t  gt 2  v 0 t  gt 2 ....(ii)
2 2 2
The equation of straight line OB, giving slant side of wedge is

x
y    tan 30  x   ....(iii)
3
Let ball hit wedge at P, t second after projection. Point P satisfies Eqns (i) and (ii) as well as Eqn (iii).
Therefore,

 1   v0  3 1 2
   2 t   2 v 0 t  2 gt
 3  

2v 0
 t ....(iv)
3g

2 x0
Obvisouly QP = x – co-ordinate of ball at t  . Therefore
3g

 v  2v 0 v2
QP   0   0
 2  3g 3g

QP
From right angled OPQ  cos 30 , therefore
OP

QP 2 v 20 2v02
OP    
cos 30 3 3g 3g

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Difficult Projectile Motion
37. A bird sits on top of a pole of vertical height h at a horizontal distance  from a point O. A
projectile fired from O is so poised as to hit the bird and attain a maximum vertical height
2h. The moment the projectile is fired the bird starts flying horizontally with a constant
speed v in such a manner that the projectile still hits the bird. The ratio of v and horizontal
component of initial velocity of the projectile is

236
1
(1) (Incorrect)
2 1

1
(2)  1  (Incorrect)
1  
 2

2
(3)  1  (Correct)
1  
 2

2
(4) (Incorrect)
1 2

Correct answer: (3)


Solution:

In Fig. AB is pole of vertical height h. Given B is the position of bird. Given O C = 2h is the maximum
vertical height attained by projectile fired from O with speed v0 at an angle  with the horizontal. Obvisouly

v 20 sin 2 
2h 
2g

 v 0 sin   2 gh .....(1)

237
Let the projectile attain vertical height h at time t after projection. Then

1
h   v 0 sin   t  gt 2
2

or gt 2   2v0 sin   t  2h  0

2
2v 0 sin    2v0 sin    8gh
 t
2g


4 gh  16gh  8gh

2 2   gh
2g g

h

 2 2  g

h h

Let t1  2  2  g
and t 2  2  2   g
.

The bird gets hit at point B1 i.e. at t = t2 after projection. Therefore

h

BB1  vt 2  v 2  2  g

Also,

h
BB1   v 0 cos   t 2  t1    v0 cos   2 2
g

Clearly,

v 2 2 2
 
v 0 cos  2  2  1 
1  
 2

238
Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Projectile Motion
38. A staircase has identical steps each of width  and height h. A ball A is pushed horizontally
from t he t opmost st ep with a speed u 1. At the same time a second ball B lying on edge of nth
step below is also pushed horizontally with speed u2. Both balls just hit the edge of the Nth
u1
step from top simultaneously. The ratio u is
2

N
(1) (Incorrect)
n

Nn
(2) (Incorrect)
N

N
(3) (Correct)
Nn

Nn
(4) (Incorrect)
Nn

Correct answer: (3)


Solution:
For ball A
In hitting Nth step from top; the ball travels a horizontal distance of N and vertical distance Nh. Let the
ball hit Nth step t second after projection. Obviously

1 2
N  u1 t and Nh  gt
2
2
1  N  gN2
 Nh  g   or u12  .....(1)
2  u1  2h

For ball B
Ball B is n steps below the top most step. In hits step (N–n)th below its point of projection. Therefore

2 g  N  n  2
u 
2 .....(2)
2h

239
From Eqns. (1) and (2), we have
2
 u1  N
  
 u2  Nn

u1 N
 
u2 Nn

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Projectile Motion
39. A ball is projected from ground with a speed of 20ms–1 at an angle of 300 with horizontal. It
just grazes past the edge of a vertical wall of height 1.8 m. The ratio of the distance of point
of projection of ball from wall and the distance of point where it hits ground from the wall is
(g = 10ms–2)

1
(1) (Correct)
9

1
(2) (Incorrect)
10

9
(3) (Incorrect)
10

8
(4) (Incorrect)
9
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:
Let x be the horizontal distance of wall from point of projection. Let the ball just grazes past top of wall
t second after projection. At t = t; y = h = 1.8m. Therefore

1
1.8   20 sin 30  t   10t 2  10t  5t 2
2
or 5t 2  10t  1.8  0

10  100  36 10  8  2 s or 1.8s
t 
10 10

240
Obvisouly,

  
x   v 0 cos   t  10 3  0.2 or 10 3 1.8 
 2 3m or 18 3m

The distance of the point where ball hits ground from point of projection equals the horizontal range.
Therefore,

3
2 400 
v sin 
0 2  20 3
R 
g 10

x
The required ratio is . It is
Rx

2 3 1 18 3
 or  9.
18 3 9 2 3

The correct choice is (1)

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Easy Projectile Motion

R
40. On a horizontal road a car is at a distance ahead of point O where a gun is placed. The
4
barrel of gun is oriented at an angle  with horizontal. A bullet is fired from gun with a
speed v0. At the same moment of time the car starts moving with a constant speed V. The
bullet hits the car. The maximum vertical height attained by the bullet is:

(1) v 2 tan 2  (Incorrect)

9 2 2
(2) v cot  (Incorrect)
8g

8
(3) v tan  (Incorrect)
9g

8 2 2
(4) v tan  (Correct)
9g

241
Correct answer: (4)
Solution:
In Fig. O and C are position of gun and car at
t = 0. The bullet hits ground at point P. OP =
R = range of bullet. Let bullet hit ground at
point P. Let T be time of flight of bullet. The
car and bullet reach point P at same time.
Therefore OP  R   v0 cos   T .

3R
CP   VT
4

4 v0 cos  3v0 cos 


  or V .....(1)
3 V 4
The maximum vertical height H; attained by bullet is

v02 sin 2 
H
2g

2
 4V  2
  sin  8
3cos 
   V2 tan 2 
2g 9g

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Projectile Motion
41. A projectile is fired with a speed of 20ms–1 at an angle of 600 with vertical. It is at a vertical
height of 1.8m from the point of projection. Take point of projection as origin, the horizontal
and vertically upward direction as positive x and y–axis respectively; the instantaneous
position vector of the projectile is (g = 10ms–2)

(1) 2 3 i  1.8j (Incorrect)

(2) 18 3 i  1.8j (Incorrect)

(3) 25 3 i  1.8j or 18 3 i  1.8j (Correct)

(4) 5 3 i  1.8j or 18 3 i  1.8j (Incorrect)

242
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:

Let v 0 x and v oy denote the initial value of x and y–component of velocity of projectile. Given

v0 x  20cos300  10 3ms 1 ; and voy  20sin 300  10ms 1

The instantaneous x and y co-ordinates of projectile are

1
x  v 0 x t  10 3t and y  10t  10  t 2  10t  5t 2
2
The projectile is at a vertical height of 1.8m, (i.e. y = 1.8m) at t = t.

 1.8  10t  5t 2 or 5t 2  10t  1.8  0

10  100  36 10  8
t   0.28 or 1.8s
10 10
The projectile attains y = 1.8 m at two times t1 = 0.2s or 1.8s. The corresponding x–coordinates are

x  10 3  0.2  2 3 m or x  10 3  1.8  18 3 m
The position vector of projectile is

r  2 3 i  1.8 j or r  18 3 i  1.8 j

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Easy Projectile Motion
42. Choose point of projection as origin of co-ordinates; the horizontal and vertically upward
direction as direction of positive x and y–axis respectively. The initial velocity v0 of a
projectile is:

v0  10 3 i  30j ms 1
 
The ratio of change in linear momentum of projectile in the 1st and 2nd second of motion is
(mass of particle = 100 g; g = 10ms–2)
(1) 0.5 (Incorrect)
(2) 1 (Correct)
(3) 1.5 (Incorrect)

243
(4) 2 (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
Let v be the instantaneous velocity vector of projectile. Obviously

v  10 3 i   30  10t  j ms 1
 
 Δp 1 = Change in linear momentum in 1st second of motion i.e. time interval t = 0 to t = 1s.

 0.1  10 3 i  20j  10 3 i  30j 


     
 

 kgms1
 1j;

Similarly,

 Δp  2 = Change in linear momentum in 2nd second of motion i.e. time interval t = 1s to t = 2s.

 0.1  10 3 i  10j  10 3 i  20j   1j kgms 1


     
 

 Δp 1
 1
 Δp 2

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Easy Projectile Motion

43. A bullet is fired in a vertical plane in the gravity of earth with a speed of 20 2 ms 1 in a
direction so that its horizontal range is maximum. t second after firing the instantaneous
velocity vector of projectile makes an angle of 1200 with instantaneous acceleration of
particle; t is (g = 10ms–2)

(1) 2s (Incorrect)

(2) 2 3s (Incorrect)

(3) 2  
3 1 s (Correct)

244
(4) 2  
3 1 s (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (3)

Solution:

The initial direction of firing of bullet is at an angle of 450 with horizontal. The acceleration vector is always
in a vertically downward direction. Since angle between v and a is 1200, v makes an angle of 300 with the
horizontal. Obvisouly

vy
tan 30 
vx

where vx and vy denote the instantaneous x– and y–component of instantaneous velocity vector i.e. v. We
know v x = v 0 x  20ms 1 and v y  v 0y  gt  20  10t.

1 20  10t

3

20
or t2  
3 1

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Difficult Projectile Motion

44. A projectile has a mass m; horizontal range R and time of flight T. At the highest point of its
path; the projectile somehow on its own, breaks into two fragments having masses in the
ratio of 1:2. The heaviour fragment hits ground t1 second later at a point midway between
point of projection and where the original projectile would have hit the ground. The lighter
fragment hits graound t2 second later. The distance of the point where this fragment hits
t2
ground from point of projection and t is
1

3R
(1) ;2 (Incorrect)
2
(2) R;1 (Incorrect)
(3) 2R ; 1 (Correct)

3R
(4) ;1 (Incorrect)
2

Correct answer: (3)

245
Solution:

Fig. (a) shows the path of the projectile projected from point O. A is the highest point on its parabolic path
and OP = R = horizontal range of the projectile. The instantaneous speed of projectile at A is v 0 cos . At
m 2m
A the projectile breaks up into two fragements having mass m1  and m 2  (m is original mass of
3 3
projectile). The breakup of projectile occurs on its own, i.e. there is no external force, therefore, the linear
momentum is conserved. Given that fragment of mass m2 hits ground at point B. This fragment moves
vertically downward. The horizontal component of its velocity is zero. Let v1 be horizontal component of
velocity of fragment of mass m1. From law of conversation of linear momentum.

m1
mv 0 cos   v1 , v1  3v0 cos 
3
There is no vertical component of velocity of both fragments. In hitting ground they travel same vertical
distance H.

T t1
 t1  t 2  or t  1
2 2

Also for the fragment of mass m1

T 3R
BR   3v 0 cos   
2 2
Obviously,

R 3R
OR  OB  BR    2R
2 2

246
Unit–2 : Kinematics
Difficult Motion in a Circle
45. A particle of 10g is attached to one end of a rubber string of length 50cm. It is whirled into
a horizontal circle about the other end of string with a uniform angular speed of 300 r.p.m.
The rubber string has a force constant of 0.05 kgfcm–1, g = 10ms–2. The tension in string is
(1) 5N (Incorrect)
(2) 6.25 N (Correct)
(3) 9N (Incorrect)
(4) 12.5 N (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:

0.05  10
k = Force constant of rubber string = 0.05 kgf cm–1 = Nm 1  50 Nm 1
102

  300 r.p.m.  5 r.p.s.  10 rad s1


Let x be increase in length of rubber string when particle attached to it moves in a horizontal circle. The
radius of cirlce = r = (0.5+x)m. The tension in string = T = mr  2 = kx
 10–2 (0.5 + x) × (10  )2 = 50x

or 10–2 × 103 (0.5 + x) = 50x  2  10

5 + 10x = 50x

5
 x m  0.125 m
40
T = kx = 50 × 0.125 = 6.25 N

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Difficult Circular Motion
46. A particle moves in a horizontal circle of radius r. The angular velocity of particle veries at
a constant rate  . The acceleration of the particle is

v2
(1) (Incorrect)
r

247
(2) r (Incorrect)

v2
(3) r (Incorrect)
r

1
 v 2 2
9

2

(4)     r    (Correct)
 r  

Correct answer: (4)


Solution:
The acceleration has two components.

v2
(a) The radial component of acceleration is due to change direction of the velocity and equals .
r
(b) The tangential component is due to change in magnitude of v and equals r  .
The two component of acceleration are mutually perpendicuular. The net acceleration is
1
 v 2  2
2

2

a      r   
 r  

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Motion in a Circle
47. A stone of mass m, tied to one end of string , is moving in a horizontal circle. The length of
string is gradually reduced in such a manner that the instantaneous tension T in string is
k
T where k is a constant. For the motion, the quantity that remains constant is:
r3
(1) Kinetic energy (Incorrect)
(2) Linear momentum (Incorrect)
(3) Angular momentum (Correct)
(4) Speed (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (3)

248
Solution:
The instantaneous tension, T, in string is

mv 2 k
T  3
r r

1
or v or vr  const
r
The instantaneous angular momentum of particle is mvr. Obviously this is a constant.

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Motion in a Circle
48. A particle moving in a plane is acted upon by a force of constant magnitude. F and v denote
instantaneous force and velocity of particle. F.v is zero at every moment of time. The path
of particle is
(1) Straight line (Incorrect)
(2) Circle (Correct)
(3) Hyperbola (Incorrect)
(4) Ellipse (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
Since F  v = 0; the instantaneous velocity is always perpendicular to the instantaneous direction of force.
This condition is satisfied for a particle moving in a horizontal circle with uniform speed. The force acting on
particle provides the ncessary centeripetal force.

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Motion in a Circle
49. A particle of mass 100g attached to a string moves in a horizontal circle of radius 20cm.
The maximum speed of particle so that string does not break is 200 cm/s. Another string
has a breaking strenth 75% more and its length is doulbe that of the earlier string. What is
change in mass of particle attached to this string if breaking speed remains same?
(1) 0.35 kg (Incorrect)
(2) 0.25 kg (Correct)

249
(3) 0.5 kg (Incorrect)
(4) 0.4 kg (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
Let m, v, and r denote mass of particle; speed of particle and length of string. The breaking strenght, T; of
string is
2
mv 2 0.1  2 
T   2N
r 0.2

T ' = Breaking strength of second string = (1.75) T = 3.5 N

r ' = Length of second string = 2r = 0.4 m


Let m' be mass of particle attached to string. Given,

m ' v2
T '  3.5 
 r '

3.5  0.4
or m'  kg  0.35 kg
4
Change in mass of particle = m´– m = 0.25 kg

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Motion in a Circle
50. A particle moves in a horizontal circle of radius r with a uniform speed  in x–y plane as
shown in Fig.  is the instantaneous angle, the position vector of particle makes with
x–axis. The instantaneous velocity, v; and the instantaneous acceleration a are:

250
(1) v  r  cos   i   sin   j (Incorrect)
 

a  r2  cos   i   sin   j


 

(2) v  r   cos   i   sin   j (Correct)


 

a  r2  cos   i   sin   j


 

(3) v  r   cos   i   sin   j (Incorrect)


 

a  r2  cos   i   sin   j


 

(4) v  r  cos   i   sin   j (Incorrect)


 

a  r2   cos   i   sin   j


 
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:

In Fig. r and t are instantaneous unit vector along radially outward


and tangential direction. We know,

v   r t and a  r r . Resolve r and t into their


 
2

components along x and y–axis. Obvisouly

r   cos   i   sin   j

and t    cos   i   sin   j

Obviously (2) in the correct choice.

251
Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Motion in a Circle

51. The minutes hand of a clock is 30cm long. The magnitude of change in velocity of the tip of

minutes hand of clock is mms–1. The time interval is
6

(1) 10 s (Incorrect)

(2) 5 minute (Incorrect)

(3) 2 minute 30 second (Incorrect)

(4) 10 minute (Correct)

Correct answer: (4)

Solution:

The angular speed,  , of minutes hand of clock is

2
 rad / s
60  60

The linear speed v of the tip of the minute’s hands

0.3  2 
    ms 1  mms 1
60  60 6

Let  be the angle through which the minute’s hand of clock has turned in time intial t. The magnitude of
 
change in velocity of the tip of minute’s hand = 2vsin   . Therefore
2
 

      
 2   sin   or sin   
6  6 2  2 6


   600
3

60 1
The time interval = hr  hr = 10 minute
360 6

252
Unit–2 : Kinematics
Easy Motion in a Circle
52. In space, far off from any gravitating matter; two particles A and B move in horizontal and
vertical circles of radii in ratio of 1:2. The speed of the two particles are in ratio of 3:2.
Which of the following statement is correct?
(1) For both A and B motion is with uniform speed only (Correct)
(2) For both A and B motion is with uniform velocity (Incorrect)
(3) For A motion is with uniform velocity only and for B motion is with non-uniform speed and
velocity (Incorrect)
(4) For B motion is with uniform velocity only and for A, motion is with non-uniform speed and
velocity. (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:
Since there is no gravitating matter nearby; whether particle moves is a horizontal or vertical circle; situation
is same. In both cases speed can be constant but velocity is not constant. The direction of velocity changes.

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Easy Motion in a Circle
53. A particle A is moving in a horizontal circle of radius r. Another particle B moves in a
vertical circle, in gravity earth, of same radius r. For the motion in the two cases.
(p) Speed only is uniform
(q) Velocity only is uniform
(r) Both speed and velocity are uniform
(s) Neither speed nor velocity is uniform.
The correct statement of motion of A and B is:
(1) For both A and B (p) (Incorrect)
(2) For both A and B (r) (Incorrect)
(3) For A; (p); For B; (s) (Correct)
(4) For A; (r); For B (s) (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (3)

253
Solution:
For motion in horizontal circle speed is constant but velocity is not. The direction of velocity changes.
For motion in vertical circle neither speed nor velocity is constant. Speed decreases as particle moves from
lowest point of circular path to highest point and increases during the other half part of motion along vertical
circle.

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Projectile Motion
54. A bird is sitting on a tree. A shooter at a horizontal distance D fires a shot with speed v
aimed at the bird. The shooter misses hitting bird by a vertical distance y. Now shooter
again aims at bird but the moment bullet leaves gun bird starts moving vertically downwards
with constant speed v1 or v2 (v1>v2). In both cases shooter again misses hitting bird by
equal distance. The speed, v, of bullet is

gD
(1) (Correct)
 v1  v2 
gD
(2) (Incorrect)
 v1  v2 
gD
(3) 2  v1  v 2  (Incorrect)

gD
(4) 2  v1  v 2  (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:

D
Let t be time taken by bullet to travel horizontal distance D. Obviously t  . y = The vertical distance by
v
1 2
which bullet misses hitting bird = gt
2
Let bird fly with vertical speed v' when bullet leaves gun. The distance by which bullet misses hitting bird
is (v1t – y). Similarly the bullet misses hitting bird in 2nd case by distance (y – v2t). Given,
v1t – y = y – v2t

254
2y 1
or t  gt 2
v1  v 2  v1  v 2 

v1  v2 D v1  v2
t or 
g v g

gD
or v
 v1  v2 

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Projectile Motion
55. From a point two balls A and B are projected in opposite directions horizontally with speed
v1 and 2v1 simultaneously. At time t = t; the instantaneous velocity vectors of the two are
mutually perpendicular. t is

v1
(1) (Incorrect)
g

v 
(2) 2 1  (Correct)
g

v1
(3) (Incorrect)
2g

2v1
(4) (Incorrect)
g

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:

Fig. shows particles A and B profected from point O horizontally. Given v A  v1 , v B  2v1 . Let A1 and B1

be the position of two particles at t = t when their velocities are mutually perpendicular i.e. A1O1B1  .
2
Let 1 and 2 be the angle the instantaneous velocity vector of A and B make with horizontal. Obviously

255
v1 2v
tan 1  ; tan 2  1
gt gt


From A1OB1 ; 1  2 
2

 
 tan 2  tan   1   cot 1
2 

or tan 1. tan 2  1

2v12
 2 2 1
gt

v 
or t  2 1 
g

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Easy Vector

1
56. If A  B  3  AB , the value of
2
 2

2
A  B  A  B is:

(1) 2AB (Incorrect)


(2) 2(A2 + B2) (Incorrect)
(3) A2 + B2 (Incorrect)
(4) AB (Correct)
Correct answer: (4)
Solution:

Given A  B  3  AB 

 ABsin   3AB cos  or tan   3

   600

256
2 1  1
 cos60  2 
2 2 0
Now, A  B  A  B  2AB 
2

22 2 1
and A  B  A  B  2AB 
2
2 2
 A  B  A  B  2AB

1
or
2
 2 2
A  B  A  B  AB 
Correct answer (4)

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Difficult Motion Under Gravity
57. A particle is released from rest from the top of a tower of height 3h. The ratio of the
intervals of time to travel three equal falls of h each, from the top, is:

(1) 1: 2 : 3 (Incorrect)

(2) 1:  
2 1 : 3 2  (Correct)

(3) 1:  
2 1 : 32  (Incorrect)

(4) 1:  
2 1 : 3  2  (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:

1 2h
(i) h  0  gt12  t1 
2 g

1 2 2h
(ii) 2h  0  g  t1  t 2   t1  t 2   2
2 g

1 2 2h
(iii) 3h  0  g  t1  t 2  t 3   t1  t 2  t 3   3
2 g

257
From Eqns. (i), (ii) and (iii), we have

2h
t1 
g

 2h   2h  2h
t 2    2  – t1    2  
 g   g  g

2h 
 2  1
g 

t 3   t1  t 2  t 3    t 1  t 2 

2h 2h 2h 
  3  2  3  2 
g g g 

 t1 : t 2 : t 3  1:  2 1 :  3 2 
Correct answer (2)

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Difficult Uniform Motion
58. A man of 50 kg mass is standing in a gravity free space at a height of 10m above the floor.
He throws a stone of mass 0.5 kg downwards with a speed of 2ms–1. When the stone hits the
floor the distance of the man above the floor will be:
(1) 20 m (Incorrect)
(2) 9.9 m (Incorrect)
(3) 10.1 m (Correct)
(4) 10 m (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:
When the man throws the ball down, he will get a velocity v upwards, such that:
mv = MV (Law of conservation of linear momentum)

258
1
or 0.2 × 2 = 50 × V or V ms 1
50
Time taken by the ball to reach floor is

10
t  5s (The ball will not accelerate in the absence of gravity)
2
 Distance moved up by the man in this t = 5s is

1
d  Vt   5  0.1m ; upwards
50
Hence the distance of the man from the floor, when the stone hits the floor is

H  h  d  10  0.1  10.1m

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Difficult Resolution of Vectors
59. Two fixed frictionless inclined planes, making angles 300 and 600 with the vertical, are
shown in the figure. Two blocks A and B are placed on these planes. The relative vertical
acceleration of A with respect to B is:

(1) 9.8 ms–2 (Incorrect)


(2) 4.9 ms–2 (Correct)
(3) 2.45 ms–2 (Incorrect)
(4) zero (Incorrect)

259
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
Acceleration of A down the plane is g sin 60 = g cos 300 as shown in Fig.
Resolve acceleration into horizontal and vertical components as shown in Fig.
Obvisouly

3
The vertical acceleration of A =  g cos 30 0  cos 30 0 = g 
4

1
Similarly the vertical acceleration of B =  g cos 600  cos 600 = g 
4

3 1
 Relative vertical acceleration of A with respect to B = g   g 
4 4

2 g
 g   4.9 ms 2
4 2

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Circular Motion
60. A point P moves in counter clockwise sense, on a circular path, as shown in the figure. The
movement of the point is such that it sweeps out a length, s = t3 + 5, where s is in metre and
t is in seconds. The radius of the path is 20m. The acceleration of P at t = 2s is nearly:

(1) 14.5 ms–2 (Correct)


(2) 13.5 ms–2 (Incorrect)
(3) 12 ms–2 (Incorrect)
(4) 7.2 ms–2 (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (1)

260
Solution:
Given s = t3 + 5. Therefore the instantaneous velocity

ds
v  3t 2
dt

Since this velocity is not constant in magnitude, the point P will have a tangential acceleration,
dv
a1   3  2t  6t
dt

At t = 2s, a1 = 6 × 2 = 12 ms–2.
Now, P is moving in circular path therefore P will have centripetal acceleration.

2 2
v2  3t  9t 4
a2   
R R 20

9  2  2  2 2
At t  2s, a 2  7.2 ms 2
20

2
 a  a12  a 22  122   7.2  14.5ms2

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Uniformly Acceleration Motion

1 rd
61. A bullet, on entering a target, losses of its initial velocity, after penetrating through
3
20m. How far deep will it enter the target?

(1) 60 m (Incorrect)

(2) 40 m (Incorrect)

(3) 36 m (Correct)

(4) 16 m (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (3)

261
Solution:

u
Suppose the bullet loses of its initial velocity, after penetrating through distance s. So, final velocity, after
n
travelling distance s in target, is:

u u
vu   n  1
n n

If a is the deceleration, then :

v 2  u 2  2 as

2
u  2
or  n  n  1   u  2 as
 

1  2 u2 2 
 a  u  2  n  2n  1
2s  n 

1  2 2 u2 u2 
 u  u   2n 
2s  n2 n 2 

1  u2 
2 
  2n  1
2s  n 

If the bullet goes a further distance x, before coming to rest, then

v 2f  v 2  2ax

u2 2  1 u2 
2  
or 0= n  1  2    2  2n  1  x
n  2s n 

 x=
 n  1 s
 2n  1
Given, s = 3m, therefore

262
2

x
 3  1  20 
4
 20  16m
 2  3  1 5

Therefore, total penetration is

s  x  20  16  36
Alternatively:

v 2  u 2  2as .....(1)

1 2
Here, v  u  u  u and s  20 m
3 3

Since a is –ve, Eqn. (1) can be written as:

4 2
u  u 2 – 29  20
9

5
 2a  20  u 2
9

2
5u
or 2a    .....(2)
 9  20

Now, if ‘d’ is the total penetration, then

v 2f  u 2  2a  d (a = deceleration)

2
5u
O2  u 2     d
 9  20

5 u2  d
or u2  
9 20

180
d  36 m
5

263
Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Velocity - Time graph for Uniformly Accelerated Motion
62. A particle moving along y–axis is at y = 5 cm at t = 0 (where t is in second). This particle is
observed to trace the following velocity time graph.

The displacement y of this particle in terms of t can be written as:


(1) y = 5 – 2t + 8t2 (Incorrect)
(2) t = 2t2 – 8t + 5 (Correct)
(3) y = 8t2 –2t – 5 (Incorrect)
(4) y = 5 – 4t + 2t2 (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:

Given, y 0  5m . From the graph,

Velocity = –8 ms–1 at t = 0

 v 0   8 ms 1

Now, v – t graph is a straight line. Therefore acceleration is a constant a = slope of v vs t graph.

8
  4 ms –2
2
The final position at t = t can be written as:

264
1
y t   y 0   v 0 t  at 2
2

1
or y  5  8t   4t 2
2

or y  2t 2  8t  5

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Vector
63. A stationery body of mass 3 kg explodes in to three equal pieces. One of the pieces flies off
with a velocity of 3i ms1 and a second one goes with velocity of 4 jms 1 . If the time of
explosion is 10–4s, the magnitude of the average force experienced by the third piece is:
(1) 70 kilo newton (Incorrect)
(2) 50 kilo newton (Correct)
(3) 40 kilo newton (Incorrect)
(4) 30 kilo newton (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
The momentum imparted to the two pieces together is:

Δp  1 3i  4j N  s
   m  1kg 
As the body of 3 kg is initally at rest the change in momentum for the third piece should be equal and
opposite that for the first two taken together.

 Δp for 3rd piece =   3i  4j  N  s

Time taken for this change,  t  10 4 s

 Force on the third piece is

p 3i  4j
F3   N
t 104

265
F3   3i  4j 104 N
 
 F3  F3  32  4 2  10 4 N  5  104 N

 50  103 N = 50 Kilo newton

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Graphs in Kinematics
64. The position ‘x’ of a particle varies with time ‘t’ as : x = mt2–nt3. The acceleration time
graph of this particle is:

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:
Given : x = mt2 – nt3.

266
dx
 v= = 2mt – 3nt2 .....(i)
dt

dv
Hence, a = = 2m – 6nt .....(ii)
dt

or a = (–6n)t + 2m

Eqn. (ii) is of the form y = mx + c for the equation of a straight line, where m is slope and c is y intercept.

Hence a – t graph is a straight line with

(i) slope of –6m.

(ii) of-intercept = +2m and

2m m
(iii) a = 0 at t  
6n 3n

(i), (ii) and (iii) are true only for (1)

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Easy Relative Velocity

65. Two particles P and Q get 6m closer each second, while travelling is opposite directions.
They get 2.4 m closer every second while travelling in the same direction. The speeds of P
and Q are:
(1) 4.2 ms–1 and 2.4 ms–1 (Incorrect)

(2) 8.4 ms–1 and 3.6 ms–1 (Incorrect)

(3) 4.2 ms–1 and 1.8 ms–1 (Correct)

(4) 4.2 ms–1 and 3.6 ms–1 (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (3)

Solution:

Here, v1+v2 = 6 ms–1, and v1–v2 = 2.4 ms–1

 2v1 = 8.4 ms–1


or v1 = 4.2 ms–1, and v2 = 1.8 ms–1

267
Unit–2 : Kinematics
Easy v-t Graph
66 Figure gives the velocity-time graph of a moving particle. Total displacement of the particle
during its non-uniform motion is:

(1) 60 m (Incorrect)
(2) 50 m (Correct)
(3) 30 m (Incorrect)
(4) 40 m (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
The particle is in non-uniform motion from t = 20 s to t = 40 s. Total displacement in this interval is equal to
the area under the graph in this interval.

1 
 S  2   1  4   10  = 50 m
2 

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Different Equation of Motion
67. A man of height h walks in a straight path towards a lamp post of height H, with a uniform
velocity u. The velocity of the edge of his shadow on the ground will be

 H 
(1)  u (Incorrect)
Hh

268
 H 
(2)  u (Correct)
Hh 

Hh
(3)  u (Incorrect)
 H 

Hh
(4)  u (Incorrect)
Hh 
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
Suppose x is the length of the shadow. When the man is at d
distance from the pole, as shown in Fig. If he takes t seconds to
reach the pole, the edge of his shadow will also reach the pole in
h H
the same time t  and d = ut
x xd

 xH  hx + hd

or xH  h  h u t

hut
 x
Hh
The distance travelled by the edge of the shadow, in t seconds, is equal to x + d. The velocity of the edge,
v is

 hut 
xd   ut 
v Hh
t  
t

hu hHh
 u  u
H h  Hh 

 H 
 u
Hh

269
Unit–2 : Kinematics
Easy Equation of Motion
68. Two bodies of masses in the ratio 5:4 are dropped from heights of 16m and 25m respectively.
The ratio of the time taken by them to reach the ground and the ratio of their velocities at
the time of hitting the ground are, respectively
(1) 1 : 1 and 4 : 5 (Incorrect)
(2) 5 : 4 and 1 : 1 (Incorrect)
(3) 4 : 5 and 4 : 5 (Correct)
(4) 1 : 4 and 1 : 4 (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:
Mass does not influence the time and speed. Now, for a body dropped, u = 0

1
 S  ut  at 2 reduces to
2

1
S  0  gt 2
2

1 2 1
 S1  gt1 and S2  gt 22
2 2

So, t1 : t 2  S1 : S2 = 4 : 5

Now, v = u + at = 0 + gt

 v1  gt1 and v 2  gt 2

 v1 : v 2  t1 : t 2 = 4 : 5

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Difficult Differential Equation for Velocity
69. The upper and of a bar PQ of length '  ' leans against a smooth vertical wall. The other end
of the bar is touching the smooth floor. The end Q beings to move uniformly downwards
with speed vy the speed vx with which end P moves along the floor is

270
 y 
(1) vx  vy   (Correct)
  2  y 2 

 2  y2 
(2) vx  v y   (Incorrect)
 y 
 

 y2 
(3) vx  vy  2 2  (Incorrect)
 y 

 2  y2 
(4) vx  vy  2  (Incorrect)
 y 

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:
According to the diagram given:
x2 + y2 = 2 = constant
Differentiating with respect to time,

dx dy
2x  2y 0
dt dt

 xv x   yv y

271
 y
or v x  v y  
 x

 y 
vx  v y  
  y 
 2 2 

Correct answer (1)

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Equation of Motion
70. A body moving along x–axis is at x = –5 m at t = 0. It covers 10 m is the third second and
28 m in the sixth second. The position of this body at t = 8 s is
(1) 192 m (Incorrect)
(2) 152 m (Incorrect)
(3) 147 (Correct)
(4) 40 m (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:
Given,

x0   5m . The distance s3 travelled in third second is

a
s3  u   2  3  1
2

5
or 10  u  a .....(1)
2
Similarly the distance travelled in 6th second; s6, is

a
s6  u   2  6  1
2

11
or 28  u  a .....(2)
2
From Eqns. (1) and (2) we have

272
18 = 3a or a = 6 ms–2
From Eqn (1), we get

5
10  u   6 or u  5 ms 1
2
At t = 8 s, the position x8 of particle is

 1 
x8  x0   ut  at 2 
 2 

1
 5   5   8   6  82  45  192 = 147 m
2

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Motion Under Gravity
71. At time t = 0, a ball is dropped from a height is 180 m, towards a floor. On each collision, the
ball losses a tenth of its speed. The figure below gives the speed-time graph of the ball,
taking g = 10 ms–1

Then corresponding to the point D on the plot, t, is:


(1) 10.8 s (Incorrect)
(2) 11.4 s (Incorrect)
(3) 16.8 s (Correct)
(4) 18.0 s (Incorrect)

273
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:
Let tA be the time taken to fall through height h = 180 m, after the ball is dropped.

2h 2  180
 t 0A   6 s
g 10

Now, vA = u + at = 0 + gt
= 10 × 6 = 60 ms–1

 1 
vB = vA – 10% vA = 60    60 
 10 

= 60–6 = 54 ms–1
Let tBD be the time taken to bounce up from the floor, reach the maximum height and then come down to
hit the floor again.

2u 2  54
 t BD    10.8s
g 10

Hence the total time taken is

t OD  t OA  t BD = 16.8 s

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Speed-Time Graph
72. Between two stations, a train starts and accelerates uniformly at first, then moves with
constant speed and finally retards uniformly, to reach and stop, at the other station. If the
ratio of the time taken for these three parts of the motion is 1 : 8 : 1, and the greatest speed
is 60 k mh –1, the average speed of the train is

(1) 30 kmh–1 (Incorrect)


(2) 48 kmh–1 (Incorrect)
(3) 54 kmh–1 (Correct)
(4) 60 kmh–1 (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (3)

274
Solution:
The speed-time graph for the motion of the train
is shown in the figure. The total distance covered
is:

1  1 
S    t  60    60  8t    t  60  = 540 t
2  2 
Total time taken = t + 8t + t = 10t

540t
 Average speed   54 kmh 1
10t

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Difficult Uniformly Accelerated Motion
73. In a car race, car A takes a time t less than car B at the finish and passes the finishing point
with speed v more than that of car B. Assuming that both the cars start from rest and travel
with constant acceleration a1 and a2 repectively, the value of v interms of a1, a2 and t is

 a1a 2 
(1)  t (Incorrect)
 a1  a 2 

(2)  a1  a 2  t (Incorrect)

 a1  a 2 
(3)  t (Incorrect)
 2 

(4)  
a1a 2 t (Correct)

Correct answer: (4)


Solution:
Let A take t1 seconds to finish the race.Then, according to the data given, B will take (t1 + t) seconds to
finishe the race. Also, let v1 be the velocity of B at the finishing point. Then the velocity of A at the finishing
point will be (v1 + v). Therefore, for A,
v1 + v = 0 + a1t1 .....(1)
and for B, v1 = 0 + a2 (t1 + t) .....(2)

275
 v   a 1  a 2  t1  a 2 t .....(3)

1 2
Now, total distance travelled by both A and B is same. i.e. SA = SB. Using the formula, S  ut  at , we
2
get;

1 1 2
SA  0  a1 t12 and S B  0  a 2  t1  t 
2 2

or a1' t1  a 2'  t1  t 

 t1  a1  a 2  a 2 t 

t1 
 a2 t
or .....(4)
 a1  a 2 
Subsituting value of t1 from Eqn (4) in Enq (3) we have

a2 t
v   a1  a 2  .  a 2t
 a1  a 2 
 a1 a 2  a 2 a 2  a 2 a1  a 2 a 2 
  t
a1  a 2


a 1 a2  a 2 a1 t
a1  a 2

 a1a 2
 a1  a 2 t
 a1  a 2 
  a1a 2  t

276
Unit–2 : Kinematics
Difficult Motion Under Gravity
74. A particle is dropped from the top of a tower of height h and at the same moment of time a
second particle is projected upwards from the bottom of the tower. The two particles meet
when the first one has descended a distance of h/n. The velocities of these particles, when
they meet, are in the ratio

(1) v1 : v 2  2 :  n  2  (Correct)

(2) v1 : v 2   n  2  : n (Incorrect)

(3) v1 : v 2  2 :  n  2  (Incorrect)

(4) v1 : v 2  1:  n  1 (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:
When the two particles meet we have for the first particle,

h 1 2
 gt .....(1)
n 2
and for the second particle

h 1
h  u 2 t  gt 2 .....(2)
n 2
Adding Eqn, (1) and (2), we have

h
h  u 2 t or t  .....(3)
u2

Substituting value of t given by Eqn. (3) in Eqn. (1), we get

h 1 h2
 g
n 2 u 22

1
 u 22  ngh .....(4)
2

277
At time t, when the two particle meet for the first particle

h
v12  u12  2g  
n

2
 v12  gh  u1  0  .....(5)
h
For the second particle, we have,

 h
v 22  u 22  2g  h  
 n

1  2
 ngh  gh  2  
2  n

n 2
 gh   2  
2 n

 n 2  4n  4 
 gh  
 2n 

 gh
 n  2 .....(6)
2n
From Eqn s. (5) and (6), we have

2
2 gh  
v 1 n 4
 2 2 
v 2  n  2   n  2 2
gh
2n

v1 2
 
v2  n  2

or v1 : v 2  2 :  n  2 

278
Unit–2 : Kinematics
Difficult Motion Under Gravity
75. A particle is projected vertically upwards from a point x on the ground. It takes a time t1 to
reach a point A, at a height ‘h’ above the ground. The particle continues to move and takes
a time t2 to reach the ground. The value of h in terms of t1 and t2 is

 t1  t 2 
(1)   gt1 (Incorrect)
 2 

(2) g t1 t 2 (Incorrect)

(3) 2g t1t 2 (Incorrect)

1
(4) g t 1t 2 (Correct)
2
Correct answer: (4)
Solution:
Let ‘u’ be the velocity of projection of the particle at 0. The total time taken to reach the ground back is
t1+t2.

1 2
From S  ut  at , we have,
2

1 2
0  u  t1  t 2    g  t1  t 2 
2

g
u  t1  t 2  .....(1)
2
Now, for the first t, second of motion, we have,

1 g g
h  ut1  gt12   t1  t 2  t1  t12
2 2 2

g 2 1
  t1  t1t 2  t12   g t1t 2
2 2

279
Unit–2 : Kinematics
Difficult Uniformly Accelerated Motion
76. The two ends of a train, moving with a constant acceleration, pass a pole with velocities u
and v. The velocity with which the middle point of the train pass the pole is:

uv
(1) (Incorrect)
2

u 2  v2
(2) (Incorrect)
uv

(3) u 2  v2 (Incorrect)

u 2  v2
(4) (Correct)
2

Correct answer: (4)

Solution:

Let the total length of the train be 2x. Let the velocity of the middle point of the train passing the pole be vm.

Then, for the first half of the journey of train,

v 2m  u 2  2ax .....(1)

For the second half part of the journey, we have;

v 2  v 2m  2ax

or v 2m  v 2  2ax .....(2)

Adding Eqns. (1) and (2) we have

2v 2m  u 2  v 2

u 2  v2
 vm 
2

280
Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Uniformly Accelerated Motion

g
77. A balloon rises from rest on the ground with a constant acceleration of . A stone is dropped,
8
from the balloon when it has risen to a height of H. The time taken by the stone to reach the
ground is

H
(1) (Incorrect)
g

H
(2) 2 (Correct)
g

2H
(3) (Incorrect)
g

H
(4) (Incorrect)
2g

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:
Let v be the velocity of the balloon, when it has risen to the height H. Then,

g
v2  02  2   H
8

gH
or v .....(1)
2
This v will be the initial velocity of the stone when dropped from the balloon. If t is the time taken by the
stone to reach the ground, then:

1
H  v  t  gt 2
2

gH 1
or H   t  gt 2
2 2

281
or gt 2   
gH t  2H  0 .....(2)

gH  gH  8gH
 t
2g

gH  3 gH H
 2
2g g

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Difficult Relative Velocity
78. To a man walking at the rate of 3 kmh–1, rain drop appear to fall vertically. When he doubles
his speed, rain drops appear to strike him, from the front, at an angle of 450 with the
downward vertical. The actual speed and the direction of rain drops are
(1) 5 kmh–1, at 450, with the vertical, to the direction of his motion (Incorrect)
–1 0
(2) 3 2 kmh , at 45 , against the direction of his motion (Incorrect)

(3) 3 kmh–1, at 450, against the direction of his motion (Incorrect)


–1 0
(4) 3 2 kmh , at 45 , with the vertical, and to the direction of his motion (Correct)

Correct answer: (4)


Solution:
Let x–axis be taken along the horizontal and y–axis along the
vertical as show in Fig.
The actual velocity of the rain drops, is

v r  v x i  v y j .....(1)

For the man, v m  3i .....(2)

The relative velocity of the rain drop with respect to the man is:

vm  vr   vm 

 v x i  v y j  3i
 
282
  v x  3  i  v y j .....(3)

The relative velocity  vrm  makes an angle  with the velocity of the man. Therefore

vy
tan   .....(4)
vx  3

In the first case, drops appear to fall vertically.

1
 tan   2700 
0

1 vy
or 
0 vx  3

 v x  3kmh 1 .....(5)

From Eqn. (1), v r  3i  v y j .....(6)

In the second case,

vm  6i

Here, vrm  vr   -vm 

 3i  v y j  6i
   
 3i  v y j .....(7)

Since the rain drops now strike man at 450 from the front, here  = 2250.

vy
 tan 2250  , [ c f Eqn. (7)]
3

vy
or 1  v y  3kmh 1
3

283
Therefore, v r  3 i  3j kmh 1 .....(8)

or v r  3 2 kmh 1

3
Here, tan    1
3

or   2700  450  3150 , with i

Hence, the speed of rain drops is 3 2 kmh 1 and the direction is 450 with the vertical and in the direction
of man motion.

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Motion Under Gravity
79. A juggler throws balls is to air and catch them. He throws one all whenever the previous
ball is at its highest point. How high do the balls rise, if he throws n balls every second?
(Acceleration due to gravity is g).
g
(1) (Incorrect)
n2

g
(2) (Correct)
2n 2
2g
(3) (Incorrect)
n2
2g
(4) (Incorrect)
n
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
1
Number of balls thrown is 1 s = n, Time interval between two balls =
n
Now, he throws one when the previous one thrown reaches the maximum height.
 Time taken by one ball to reach the maximum height is
1
t .....(1)
n

284
Let u be the velocity with which the ball is thrown. Then the velocity at the highest point is zero, and so,
0 = u – gt

g
or u .....(2)
n

Now, v 2  u 2  2 as

or 0  u 2  2gh

g2
or 2gh 
n2

g
 h
2n 2

Unit–2 : Kinematics
Average Motion in a Plane
80. A particle moves in x–y plane such that x = k1t; y = k1t (1–k2t) where k1 and k2 are constant.
The magnitude of instantaneous velocity v and instantaneous acceleration, a; is

2
(1) v  k1 1  1  2k 2 t  a  2k1k 2 (Correct)

2k1
(2) v  k1 1  4k 22 a (Incorrect)
k2

k1
(3) v  k1  k 2 t a  (Incorrect)
k2

(4) v  k 1  k 2 t a  k 1k 2 (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:
Let vx and vy be the instantaneous x and y–component of velocity. Then

dx dy
vx   k1; v y   k1 1  k 2 t   k1 t   k 2   k 1 1  2k 2 t 
dt dt

285
1 1
2 2
 v  v 2x  v 2y   k 22  k12 1  2k 2 t    k1 1  1  2k 2 t  
2 2

   
The instantaneous x and y component of acceleration are

dv x dv
ax   0; a y  y  2k1k 2
dt dt

 a  a 2x  a 2y  2k1k 2

286
UNIT–3 : LAWS OF MOTION

Learning Objectives
After studying this unit, you would be able to understand, appreciate and apply the following concepts:
 Dynamics of motion analysing cause of motion.
 Concept of linear inertia.
 Mass as measure of linear inertia.
 Force, different types of forces.
 Quantity of linear motion – linear momentum.
 Statement of Newton’s first law of motion.
 Illustrative examples.
 Statement of Newton’s second law of motion.
 Writing Newton’s second law of motion as.
F=ma
 Use of Newton’s second law to have a quantitative measure of force.
 SI Unit of force. 1 Kg-wt as a unit of force.
 Impluse.
 Impluse as change in linear momentum.
 F vs x graph and impluse.
 Solving problems using Newton’s second law.
 Varying mass system.
 Motion of a rocket.
 Free-body diagrams and their use in problem solving.
 Solving problems involving strings and pulleys.
 Statement of Newton’s third law of motion and illustrative examples.
 Law of conservation of linear momentum and Newton’s third law of motion.
 Illustrative problems using law of conservation of linear momentum.
 Inertial and non-inertial frames of references.
 Pesudo or ficticious forces. Their application in problem solving.
 Circular motion.

287
 Basic concepts and definitions.
 Relation between linear speed and angular speed, linear acceleration and angular acceleration.
 Similarity between basic definition of linear and circular motion.
 Kinematics of uniformly accelerated circular motion.
 Uniform circular motion and centripetal acceleration.
 Solving problems involving centripetal force.
 Friction as a necessary evil.
 Cause of friction.
 Laws of friction, definition of coefficient of friction.
 Different types of friction.
(i) Static
(ii) Kinetic
(iii) Rolling
 Solving problems involving force of friction.

288
289
Introduction
In study of kinematics we do not discuss about cause of motion. The study of Newtonian mechanics
analysise in detail the cause of motion. This part of Physics is also known as dynamics. Newton’s laws of
motion, three in number, give logic to the study of motion of bodies.
1. Force : It is as external agency which charges or tries to charge the state of rest or motion of a body
or the direction of motion of the body. It is a vector quantity. It SI unit is newton (N). Dimensionally
F = [MLT –2].
Some important forces in nature are:
(a) Gravitational force
(b) Electrostatic force
(c) Electromagnetic force
(d) Interatomic or intermolecular forces
(5) Nuclear force
2. Inertia : It is the property of a body by which it continues to be in state of rest or uniform motion
along a straight path unless an external unbalanced force acts on the body. Intertia is of three types:
(a) Inertia of rest
(b) Inertia of motion
(c) Inertia of direction
Inertia to linear motion is measured by the mass of the body. Larger the mass; greater is the intertia of the
body i.e. it is more difficult to change the state of rest or uniform motion of the body.
In absence of friction between a passenger and the bus, the passenger will not move with the bus when it
starts. As a result, he will hit the back of the bus (Intertia of rest).
Likewise when the brakes are applied to the moving bus in above situation, the passenger will hit the front
of the bus (Intertia of motion).
If the bus takes a turn to left, the passenger will the thrown towards right (Intertia of direction). This is
becuase the directional inertia of the body of the passenger.
Linear Momentum : It is the quantity of motion present in a body. Mathematically, it is measured as
product of mass and velocity v of the body.
Momentum p = m v
It is a vector in the direction of velocity. Its SI unit is kg ms–1 or Ns. Dimensionally momentum is MLT–1.

290
Laws of Motion
1. Newton’s First Law of Motion
It states that every body continues to be in a state of rest or uniform motion along a straight line unless
an external unbalanced force is applied to change its state. The law gives qualitative definiton of
force.
Here the significance of the words external and unbalanced must be clearly understood. Internal
forces are forces exerted on one another by the bodies making the stystem. The external forces are
forces exerted on the system by everything else, except the stystem, known as surroundings. There
is no overall motion of a system due to internal forces. For example, it is not possible to move a car
by pushing it when we are sitting inside the car. The force is this case is internal force.
Similarly, an individual may not be able to move a loaded truck by pushing or pulling if. The force
applied in this case is balanced by an equal and opposite force (or friction) which is appearently not
visible.
2. Newton’s Second Law of Motion
According to second law the rate of change of linear momentum of a body is directly proportinoal to
the net external applied force. The change in momentum takes place in the direction of the force.
The law gives a relation between force and momentum. It also gives a quantitative definition or
measure of the force.
Mathematically,

dp d dv
F   m v  m (for a system with constant mass)
dt dt dt
 ma
dv
a = Instantaneous acceleration of body..
dt
Remember
1. For a constant mass and changing velocity.

dv
Fm
dt
2. For constant velocity and changing mass.

dm
Fv
dt

291
3. In terms of rectangular coponents of the force and momentum

dp x dp dp
Fx  ; Fy  y and Fz  z
dt dt dt
4. A force applied along X–direction does not affect the momenta of the body along Y and Z directions
and Fy does not affect px and pz. Similarly Fz does not produce any change in px and py.
3. Newton’s Third Law of Motion
It states: To very action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.

Mathematically, FBA  FAB

Where FBA is force on B due to A and FAB is force on A due to B. Therefore,

FAB  FBA  0

Remember
1. The forces of action and reaction do not cancel each other because they act on different bodies.
Units of Force : Absolute unit of force in SI system is newton. IN = 1 kg. m/s2
The gravitational unit of force in kg wt or kg f.
1 kg wt = 1 kg f = 9.8 kg m/s2 = 9.8N
Impulse of a Force : A large force acting for a small time interval is said to impart an impulse to the object.

The impulse of a force is numerically equal to the product of the force (F) applied and the time  t  for
which it acts, i.e. Impulse  F  t
The impulse of a force in equal to the change in momentum of the body.
 Impulse = Force × Time
= Change in momentum
The change in momenum of a body is large if a larger force in applied or if the force is applied for a larger
duration of time.
Impulse in a vector quantity in the direction of force.
Impulse J  F .t ; if force is constant

=  F.dt ; if the force in variable

292
 p 2  p1  m  v  u 

Impulse of a force can also be measured as the area under the force time graph.
A large force acting for a short duration is called impulsive force (See
figure). The shaded area gives the impulse of the force applied.
The SI Unit of impulse is N–s or kg ms–1.
Dimensionally impulse is MLT–1.
Note that impulse and momentum have same dimensional formula and
same units.
Sometimes it is simpler to use the impulse momentum relation in terms
of their components as under:

J x   Fx dt  Δp x  m  v x  u x 

J y   Fy dt  Δp y  m  v y  u y 

J z   Fz dt  Δp z  m  v z  u z 

Apparent Weight of a Body in a Lift


(i) In a lift at rest or in uniform motion (upwards or downwards) i.e. when a = 0; the weight of a body
is its true weight.
We have R = mg
(ii) When a lift moves upwards with uniform acceleration ‘Q’, apparent wieght of
a body in the lift increase.
We have R – mg = ma

 R = m (g + a) > mg
(iii) When a lift moves downwards with a uniform acceleration ‘a’; apparent weight
of a body is less than its actual weight.
From the figure:

F  Ffic  m a

mg – R = m a

293
 R  m  g  a  m g

(iv) In a lift falling freely, we have a = g

 R  m g  g  0

The body experience weightlessness.

Important : When a person of mass m climbs up a rope suspended from a rigid support with acceleration
‘a’; the tension in the rope in T = m (g + a)

When the person climbs down the rope with acceleration ‘a’; the tension in the rope is T = m (g – a).
If the rope supports the weight of the man (with man neither climbing up nor down); the tension in the rope
equals his weight i.e. T = m g

To solve problem, in a non-initial frame, using newton’s second law, we have,

F  Ffic  m a

Note that when lift accelerates upwards or downwards, the mass inside the lift experiences a force ma; in
addition to its weight. The direction of this force is always opposite to the direction of acceleration of the
lift. In other words, ma acts vertically downwards when lift accelerates upwards. The force ma is vertically
upwards if the lift accelerates downwards. This extra force is known as an inertial force or a ficticous force.
This force is purely due to acceleration of the frame of reference, i.e. the left.

Intertial and Non-interial Frames of Reference


A frame of reference either at rest or having a uniform motion is an INERTIAL frame of reference. The
external forces acting on a body in this frame are real or physical forces F. We use Newton’s second law
in the form F = ma; to solve problems.

Any frame having an accelerated motion is a non-intertial frame. In such a frame, the body experiences:
(i) Physical force (F) and

(ii) Pseudo or Ficticious force, Ffic  m  a *

where a* is acceleration of frame of reference. To solve problem, in a non-inertial frame; using Newton’s
second law, we have,

F  Ffic  ma

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Example–1 :
A heavy block is supported by a chord C from a rigid support and another chord D is
attached on the other side of the block as shown. If the free end of the chord D is given a
sudden pull; the chord D breaks. If the chord D is pulled steadily; chord C breaks. Why?
Solution :
The difference can be explained by law of intertia. When the free end of D is given a
sudden jerk; the block was at rest and continoues to remain at rest. So the chord D breaks.
If D is pulled streadily; the block comes in motion and due to inertia continues to be in
motion. Hence chord C breaks.
Example–2 :
An object in thrown vertically upwards with a certain velocity. At the instant, the object attains the maximum
height, the gravity is turned off. What will be the motion of the obejct thereafter?
Solution :
At the highest point, the object comes to rest. Normally it starts its downwards journey under gravity. In
this case, since there is no force acting on the object it will continue to be at rest.
Example–3 :
A 5000 kg rocket is set for vertical firing. The exhaust gases move at 800 ms–1 and give the rocket an
upward acceleration of 20 ms–2. The mass of gases rejected per second is
(1) 187.5 kg
(2) 185.5 kg
(3) 137.5 kg
(4) 127.5 kg
Solution :

dm
We have F  u ext
dt
In this case;
F – mg = ma
F = M (g + a)
= (5000) (10 + 20)
= 30 × 5000 N.

295
 dm 
Also, 30 × 5000 = 800 × x x  
 dt 

1500
 x  187.5 kg
8
Option (1) is correct.
Example–4 :
A 200 gm ball moving normal towards a wall at 20 m/s rebounds at 10 m/s. The change in momentum of
the ball during impact is
(1) 2000 kg m/s towards the wall
(2) 6000 kg m/s towards the wall
(3) 6 kg m/s towards the wall
(4) 6 kg m/s away from the wall
Solution :

1
We have m = 200 gm = kg
5
u = 20 m/s towards wall
v = 10 m/s away from the wall
 Change in momentum = m (v – u)

1
 10   20  
5
= 6 kg m/s away from the wall.
Example–5 :
A body of mass 2 kg in uniform circular motion at 10 m/s moves from a point A to a diamterically opposite
point B in its path. The magnitude of change in momentum is
(1) zero
(2) 40 kg m/s

(3) 20 2 kg m/s
(4) 20 kg m/s

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Solution :
Given m = 2 kg
uA = +10 m/s
vB = –10 m/s [The direction of velocity is reversed.]
 Change in momentum = mv – mu
= –10 – 10 = –20 kg m/s
 Magnitude of change in momentum = | –20 |
= 20 kg m/s
Important : Here we may note that the change in magnitude of momentum is zero.

pA  pB  p A   p B  0
But magnitude of change in momentum.

 p  p B  p A  0
Example–6 :
A body of mass 5 kg initially at rest is subjected to force varying with time as shown in F v/s t graph.
Calculate the velocity of the body after 4 second.

Solution :
Given m = 5 kg
u=0
v=?
We have impulse = Change in momentum
= m (v – u ) = mv
Also impulse = Area under force – time graph
= Ar OABCF

297
= Ar (OAH) + Ar (BCFG) + Ar (ABGH)

1 1
  2  4  1 1   4  1  1
2 2

5
 4  1  7.5 N  s
2

7.5
 mv  7.5  v   1.5ms 1
5
Example–7 :
A body of mass 2 kg initially moving at 10 m/s is subjected to a time dependent force F (t) = (2t + 3) N
where t is in seconds. Calculate the velocity of the body at the end of five seconds.
Solution :
Given m = 2 kg
u = 10 m/s
v=?
t=5s
We have change in momentum = impulse
5s
mv  u   F  t  dt
t 0

5s
   2t  3 dt
t 0

5
t2
 2.  3t
2 0

5
 t 2  3t  40 Ns
0

40
 vu   20 m / s
m

v   20  u    20  10  m / s

 30 m / s

298
Example–8 :
A body of mass M in being pulled by a string of mass m. A force F is applied at the free end of the string
to pull the mass. Calculate the force exerted by the string on the body.
Solution :
For the system; total mass = m + M
Force = F

F F
Acceleration a  Total mass  m  M

For the body; T = Ma

 F 
 M 
mM

FM
 Force on the block =
F m
Example–9 :
Two blocks of mass 12 kg and 2 kg are tied to the ends of a string. If the
table and the pulley are smooth and the string in light; calculate the acceleration
of 2 kg block and the tension in the string.
Solution :
For 12 kg object
T = 12 . a .....(1)
For 2 kg object T – 2×9.8 = 2.a .....(2)
 12a – 2a = 2 × 9.8
10a = 19.6
a = 1.96 m/s2
T =12 a = 12 × 1.96  23.5 N
Example–10 :
Three blocks A, B and C wth mass 1.5 kg, 2 kg and 1 kg respetively are placed on a rough surface
with coefficient of friction 0.2 with the blocks. Calculate the force F required to produce an acceleration of
3 m/s2 in the system. What is the force exerted by (i) A on B (ii) B on C?

299
Solution :
Let ‘a’ be the acceleration o the system towards the direction o the applied force. The frictional force
  m1  m 2  m 3  g acts towards left opposite to F.

 F    m1  m 2  m3  g   m1  m 2  m3  a

or F   m1  m2  m3  a  g 

= (1.5 + 2 + 1) (3 + 0.2 × 9.8)


= 4.5 × 4.96 = 22.3 N
The blocks B and C move due to force of A on B.
 Force on B = (mB + mC)a + (mB + mC)  g
= (3) (3 + 1.96)
= 3 × 4.96 = 14.88 N
Force on C = mC (a +  g)
= 1 (3 + 1.96) = 4.96 N
Example–11 :
Two bodies of mass 6 kg and 9 kg are connected with a light inextensile string passing over a smooth pulley
with one of the bodies on a smooth inclined plane    30 0  and the other hanging freely from the other
end. Show that the time taken by 9 kg to pull 6 kg up the entire length is half the time taken by 6 kg to pull
9 kg over the same plane.
Solution :
The two situation are shown in Fig. (a) and Fig. (b).

300
Case (1) Fig. (a) Let a1, be the acceleration of 6 kg object
Then 6 g – T = 6a1 .....(1)
T – 9g sin 30 = 9a1 .....(2)
(1) + (2) given 6g – 9g sin 30 = 15a1

g
1.5g = 15a1 or a1 =
10
To cover a distance '  ' ; time ‘t1’ is given by

1 2 2 2 20
a 1t 1   or t12   
2 a g 10 g

20
or t1  .....(3)
g

Case (2) Fig. (b) 9g – T = 9 a2 .....(4)


T – 6g sin 30 – 6a2 .....(5)
(4) + (5) give,
6g = 15 a2
 Time t2 for motion up the entire length '  ' of the in incline in given by

1 2
a2t2  
2

2 2 5
t2    .....(6)
a2 2 g
5 g

5
t2 g 1
  
t1 20
g 2

Example–12 :

Two masses m1 and m2 are attached to a spring balance S as shown.


Assuming the pulleys to be light and frictionless, calculate the reading
in the spring balance. (Take m1 > m2).

301
Solution :
The spring balance will read tension.
We have m1g – T = m1a .....(1)
T – m2g = m2a .....(2)
 (1) + (2) gives (m1– m2) g = (m1+ m2) a

 m  m2 
a  1 g
 m1  m 2 

 m1  m 2 
Using in (1) T = m1g – m1  m  m  g
 1 2 

 m  m2 
 m1g 1  1 
 m1  m 2 

m 1m 2
2 g
m1  m 2

is the reading in the balance.

Example–13 :

An elevator with a total mass of 4000 kg has an upward acceleration due to a 48000 N tension in the
supporting cable. Calculate the acceleration and the time it takes to cover 9.0 m. What will the reading in
a weighing machine in the elevator with a 60 kg man standing on the machine. [g = 10 m/s2]

Solution :

We have T – mg = ma
48000 – 4000 × 10 = ma

8000
a  2m / s 2
4000

302
1 2 2s 2 9
Again S  at  t    3second .
2 a 2

For the man on weighing machine


R – mg = ma

 R = m (g + a) = 60 (10 + 2)
= 60 × 12 N
= 6 × 12 kg wt = 72 kg wt

Law of Conservation of Linear Momentum


According to this Law:
The total linear momentum, of a given system, remains conserved if the net external force acting on this
sytem is zero.

 If Fext  0, We have,

p1  p2  .....  pn  a constant

or m1v1  m2 v2  .....  mn vn  a constant

For a system of two bodies, undergoing a collision, we have,

m1v1  m2 v2 = m1u1  m2u2

Let us apply this law to a bullet and the gun system. Here the system is at rest to start with.
Hence, when a bullet is fired from a gun we have,
Initial momentum = zero

 Final momentum of the bullet & gun system must again be zero.
 mv + MV = 0
 Recoil velocity of the gun.

mv
V
M

303
Rocket Propulsion / Body with Variable Mass
For a rocket moving in force free space; when a rocket is fired; the backward momentum of the ejected
gases imports an equal forward momentum to the rocket. As the fuel is burnt; the mass of the rocket
decreases and the acceleration keeps on increasing.
Consider a rocket of total mass (sum of mass of body of rocket and fuel gases inside) m0 starting from rest
dm
in a force free space. Let   = the constant rate of burning of fuel.
dt
u = The exhaust speed of ejected out gases with respect to rocket, u is constant.

dm
The thrust, F, on rocket due to fuel ejected is u  u . By applying law of conservation of linear
dt
momentum, it can be shown that the instantaneous speed, v, accquired by rocket is given by

m 
v  2.303u log  0 
 m 

where m  m0  t = The instantaneous mass of the rocket.

Concurrent Forces
The forces acting at the same point of a body are called concurrent forces.
Equilibrium of Concurrent Forces: For a number of concurrent forces acting on a body in equilibrium,
the forces can be represented by a closed polygon taken in order or the resultant force is zero.

F1  F2  F3  .....  Fn  0

Lami’s Theorem: For three forces acting on a particle to keep it in equilibrium,


we have,

F1 F F
 2  3
sin  sin  sin 

The theorem is very useful in solving problems related to three concurrent


forces in equilibrium.
We may also write

F1x  F2 x  F3 x  0 .....(1)

F1y  F2y  F3y  0 .....(2)

304
F1z  F2z  F3z  0 .....(3)

The above three equation in terms of the components have to be simultaneously satisfied for the system to
be in equilibrium.
Example–14 :
A neutron having a msss of 1.67 × 10–27 kg moving at 108 ms–1 collides with a deutron at rest and sticks to
it. If the mass of the deutron is 3.34 × 10–27 kg, find the speed of the combination.
Solution :
We have, mn = 1.67 × 10–27 kg
un = 108 m/s
md = 3.34 × 10–27 kg
ud = 0
Mass of the combination after collision.

 m n  m d  1.67  10 27  3.34  10 27  kg

 5.01 1027 kg
By principle of momentum conservation.
Momentum after collision = momentum before collision.
5.01×10–27V = 1.67×10–27×108
1
 V   108 m / s
3

Example–15 :
A disc of mass 50 g is kept floating horizontally by throwing 10 marbles per second against if from its
bottom. If mass of each marble is 20 gm, calculate the velocity with which each marble hits the disc to keep
it afloat. Assume the marbles hit the disc normally and rebound with equal speed.
Solution :
Mass of the disc = 50 gm = 5×10–2 kg
Mass of each marble = 20 gm = 20×10–3 kg
Number of marbles per sec = 10
Let velocity each marble the V m/s.

305
Then change in momentum of each marble.
= mV – (–mV) = 2 mV
2×20×10–3×V kg m/s
Total change in momentum of the mables per sec.
= 10×2×20×10–3 V
= 0.4 V
= Force (by II law)
To keep the disc afloat;
Force due to marbles = weight of the disc
or 0.4 V = mdisc g
= 5×10–2×10

50 102
 V  1.25 m / s
.4
Example–16 :
A bomb of mass 11 kg at rest at O expodes splitting into there pieces.
Two of the pieces fly as shown. Calculate the speed of third piece. In
which direction does it fly?
Solution :
Here initial momentum = zero
 Total final momentum = zero
Total momenta of the two pieces shown can be calculated by using law of vector addtion.

We have p1 = 10 kg m/s, p2 = 10 kg m/s;   1200

 p net  p12  p 22  2p1p 2 cos120  p1  10 kg m / s

By symmetry pnet acts in a direction bisecting the angle between p1 and p2.
Total final momentum = 0

 Momentum of the third piece = p3  p along OA

306
 10 kg m / along OB
Mass of third piece = (11 – 2 – 5) by = 4 kg

 4v  10 along OB
or v = 2.5 m/s at 1200 with p1 or p2 as shown.
Example–17 :
A ball of mass 2kg hangs in equilibrium from two strings OP and OQ as shown. Calculate the tension in OP
and OQ.
Solution :
Various forces acting at ponit ‘O’ are as shown in the figure.
As 20 N; T1 and T2 are in equilibrium; we have

T1 T2 20
  (Lami’s theorem)
sin150 sin120 sin 90

T1 T2
or   20 N
sin 30 sin 60

 T1  20 sin 30  10 N

T2  20sin 600  10 3 N

Example–18 :
A body of mass ‘m’ is suspended by means of strings OA and OB. Assuming
the strings to be light and inextensible, calculate T1 and T2.
Solution :
From the free body diagram shown, we have

T1 cos   T2 cos 

cos 
or T2  T1
cos 

T1 sin   T2 sin   mg

cos 
or T1 sin   T1 sin   mg
cos 

307
T1
sin  cos   cos  sin   mg
cos 

mg cos 
 T1 
sin     

mg cos 
Similarly, T2  sin     

The Free Body Diagrams


A diagram for each body in a system indicating all the forces exerted on the body by the remaining parts of
the system and the external agents is called free-body diagram.
In mechanics, we useually come across systems consisting of a number of bodies / particles under the
action of a number of forces due to their mutual interaction; gravitational forces, frictional force, force due
to strings, springs (called tension); supports etc.
Solution of such problems can be simplified by using the following steps:
1. Draw a diagram showing various parts of the system with links, supports etc.
2. Select any convenient part of the system.
3. Draw a separate diagram for the part selected above showing all the forces on it by the remaining
parts of the system and also by external agents. This diagram is called the free body diagram.
4. Remember to include the information about the magnitude and direction of forces which are given
and which you are sure of. The remaining forces are treated as unknown. Use Newton’s second law
of motion to get an equation of motion for the chosen part i.e. eqaute the net force acting in a
particular direction to the product of mass and acceleration of the body in that particular direction.
5. Follow the same procedure for any other part of the system to get more equations. You need as
many independent equations to solve the problem as the number of unknowns.
6. Solve the equations obtained for different parts of the system to obtain the values of the desired
unknowns or to get a desired equation.
Following points must be kept in mind while drawing the free body diagram (FBD)
 The reaction force (called normal reaction) always acts normal to the surface in contact or on
which the body is placed. (See diagram below)

308
 Tension in a string arises due to the restoring forces caused by intermolecular forces of
interaction. It is the force exerted by one part of the string on the other part. The tension in
each branch of the string must form action - reaction pair. It always acts towards the support
(Hand / pulley).

In the above system, tension on m1 is towards m2 and that on m2 is towards m1.


 A pulley is used to change the direction of force to a more convenient direction. For a light
(massless); frictionless pulley with on inextensible string passing over it without any kinks, the
tension on either side of the string is the same.
 In a FBD; take into account all the forces acting on the body.

Inter Connected Bodies


(i) Bodies in Contact
When three masses m1; m2 and m3 are placed in contact on a smoth
horizontal surface and pushed with a force F applied on m1 as shown,
we have acceleration.

F
a
m1  m 2  m3

Force on m1 = F1 = F.

F
We have acceleration a 
m1  m 2  m 3

The weights are balanced by the normal reaction on the bodies.


Force on m1 = F1 = (m1 + m2 + m3) a = F
Force on m2 = F2 = (m2 + m3) a


 m1  m 2  F
 m1  m 2  m3 
Force on m3 = F3 = m3a

m3F

m1  m 2  m3

309
(ii) Inter Connected Bodies suspended from a Rigid support
When two masses m1 and m2 are suspended vertically from a rigid, non-yielding support
using strings as shown and a pulling force F is applied to pull the mass m2 down, we have
T2 = F + m2g
and T1 = F + (m1 + m2) g
(iii) For two interconnected bodies with a rope passing over a smooth support or smooth
light pulley;

a
 m 2  m1  g
 m1  m 2 
2m1m 2 g
T
m1  m 2
Note that a < g for the system.
(iv) For two masses m1 and m2 attached to the ends of a string passing over a smooth pulley with mass
m2 on a smooth horizontal surface, we have.

m1g
a  g
m1  m 2

m1m 2
T g
m1  m 2

Equation of motion of m1 in m2g – T = m1a


Equation of motion of m2 is T = m2a
(v) For a body on a smooth inclined plane, acceleration down the plane is given by
a  g sin 

310
(vi)

For a system of three masses connected as shown; we have (surface and pulleys are assumed
frictionless).
m1g – T1 = m1a .....(1)
T1 – T2 = m2a .....(2)
T2 – m3g = m3a .....(3)
Adding (1), (2) and (3), we get
a (m1+m2+m3) = (m1–m3) g

 m1  m3 
 a  g
 m1  m 2  m3 

 From (1)

 m  m  m3  
T1   m1  1 1 g
 m1  m 2  m3 

m1  2m3  m 2 
 g
m1  m 2  m3

m3  2m1  m 2 
T2  g
m1  m 2  m3

(vii) In the interconnected bodies shown; if m2 slides down and m1 slides up the double smooth inclined
plane; the acceleration ‘a’ and the tension T in the string is given by

 m2 sin   m1 sin   g
a
m1  m2

m1m 2 g  sin   sin  


T
m1  m 2

311
Net tension at O = Reaction at O

 T 2  T 2  2T 2 sin 

 T 2 1  sin  

 2 T 1  sin 180     

 2 T 1  sin     

and m1 sin   m 2 sin  [For equilibrium or for a = 0]

Friction
Whenever a body moves or tends to move over the surface of another body, a force comes into play to
opposes their relative motion. This force is known as force of friction. It opposes motion and acts parallel
to the surface of contact of bodies.
Frictional force may sometimes act in the direction of motion of the body. The following examples illustrate
the situations where the force of friction ‘acts’ in the direction of motion of the objet.
 For a man walking due north, the frictional force also acts due north.
 In a bicycle; the driving forces are connected to the rear wheel. The direction of frictional force on
the rear wheel at point of contact with the ground is in the direction of motion whereas that on the
front wheel is opposite to the direction of motion.
Static Friction
The force of friction which comes into play between two bodies before one object actually begins to move
over the other is called static friction (fs). Static friction is a self adjusting force (both in magnitude as well
as direction). It is always equal and opposite to the applied force as long as there is no relative motion.
Limiting Friction
The maximum force of static friction which comes into play when a body just starts moving over the surface
of another body is called limiting friction or the maximum force of static friction  f smax  . The force of
friction never exceeds f smax .

Kinetic Friction
The force of friction which comes into play when a body is in motion over the surface of another body is
called kinetic or dynamic friction. It is denoted by f k and is less than limiting friction.

312
Laws of Limiting Friction
(1) The force of limiting friction depends on the nature of the two surfaces in contact and their state of
roughness.
(2) The force of limiting friction acts tangential to the surfaces in contact and in a direction opposite to
that of the applied force.
(3) The force of limiting friction between any two surfaces is independent of the shape and the area of
contact so long as the normal reaction remains unchanged.
(4) The force of limiting friction between two given surfaces is directly proportional to the normal reaction
between the surfaces.

f  N or f = s N where s is coefficient of limiting friction.

f smax Limiting Friction


So, s  
N Normal Reaction

fk
and coefficient of kinetic friction  k 
N

We have  k   s because fk is always less than f smax .

Let F be the external force applied on a body and f smax ; the limiting value of static friction. Then

(i) F  f smax , body does not move.

(ii) F  f smax , body starts moving.

If F  f smax , the force of friction which comes into play equals F..

Angle of Friction
It is the angle which the resultant of the force of limiting friction and the normal
reaction makes with the normal reaction.

fsmax
We have tan  
N

 s

313
Angle of Repose
It is the minimum angle that an inclined plane makes with the horizontal when a body placed on it just begins
to slide down the plane. Fig. shows forces acting on a body of mass m about to slide down the inclined
plane.

We have, f ms  mg sin 

N  mg cos 

f ms
   s  tan 
N

Motion of a Body on a Rough Inclined


(1) Motion – Down the Plane
Let m be the mass of the body moving down a rough inclined
plane of inclination  .

 k : Coefficient of kinetic friction.

The forces acting on the body are shown in Fig.

Normal reaction N = mg cos 

Frictional force f k   k N   k mg cos  up the plane.

Net force down the plane = mg sin   f k

 mg sin   k mg cos 

 mg  sin    k mg cos  

Acceleration down the plane  a  g  sin    k cos  

Note that the acceleration down the plane is independent of mass of the body.

Minimum force applied up the plane to prevent slipping = mg  sin    k cos  

If u = 0 and the body is let go from top of the incline.

Velocity at the bottom of the plane = v  2g  sin    k cos  

314
2
Time taken to slide down the plane = t  g sin    cos 
 k 

Work done against the force of friction =  k mg cos 

From work-energy theorem;


The net work done on the body = increase in KE

= mg  sin    k cos  

(2) Motion of a Body up an Inclined Plane


Fig. shows forces acting on a body; accelerating up the
plane with constant acceleration ‘a’. F is external applied
force up the plane.
When a = 0, i.e. when the body is just pulled up the inclined
plane, the force required equals

mg  sin      k cos   

When a body is pushed upwards along an inclined plane with initial speed v0 so that it just reaches
the top of the plane; they is not ext applied force F.

The acceleration of body is a = g  sin   k cos  

The time, t, taken to reach from bottom to top, is given by

0  v 0   a  t

v0 v0
 t 
a g  sin    k cos  

The force F required to move a body up an inclined with an acceleration ‘a’, is given by

F  mg  sin    k cos    ma

Motion of Two Bodies, One Resting on the other


Case–I : Force applied on A – Three possibilitiesa arise.
(a) No frictional force between surfaces in contact.

315
F
In this case a A 
m

aB  0

(b) There is friction between A and B only. The body A will begin to slide on B only

when F  fsmax or F  s  mg 

Both A and B will move together with a common acceleration;

F
aA  aB 
mM
if there is no slipping between A & B.

(c) When F  f smax ; the two bodies will move in the direction of the applied force. The acceleration
produced in the two will be different.
The FBD of A and B are shown in Fig. (a) & Fig. (b) respectively.

We have, f k  k mg

B moves due to f k

f k  k mg
 aB  
M M
For motion of A; we have,

F  fk  m a A

F  fk
aA 
m
Case–II : Force Fapplied on the Lower Object B; Three subcases arise:

F
(a) When there in no friction; a B 
M

aA  0 ( There is no pulling force)

A will have a relative backward motion and will fall off.


(b) When friction acts between A and B; the two bodies will move together i.e. there is no slipping

316
between A and B. The common acceleration is

 F 
a  
mM

 F 
Force on A  F'  ma  m  
 mM
The bodies A & B move together till

F'  f smax or F'   s mg

(c) If F  s  m  M  g; the acceleration in A and B will be different.

m a A  f k   k mg

a A  k g

F  fk
For B; F  f k  M a B or a B 
M

F   k mg
or aB 
M
Example–19 :
A block A of mass 8 kg is placed on another block B of mass 10 kg
with B resting on a smooth horizontal surface. To slide A on B, a
horizontal force of 24 N is required. Calculate the maximum horizontal
force that can be applied on B so that both A and B move together.
Calculate the acceleration produced by this force.
Solution :
Here m = 8 kg, M = 10 kg
Force applied on A = 24 N
This force has to be equal to kinetic friction.

 f k   k mg or 24  k  8  g

24 3
 k  
80 g

317
Let F be external applied force on B. The acceleration a of the system
(Block A and B move together) is

F
a .....(1)
 M  m

The FBD of block A is as shown in Fig. If Ffic  f A,max ; block A does not
move B.

However if Ffic  f A,max block A starts slipping on B.

For blocks to move together, a max is given by Ffic  f Amax ;

or ma max  mg or a max  g .....(2)

From (1) and (2)

Fmax   M  m a max    M  m g

3
 F   18   g  54N
g

Fmax 54
 a max    3ms2
 m  M  8  10
Example–20 :

Two block A and B have masses 10 kg and 5 kg respectively. What should be the miniumum mass of a
block C that should be placed on A so as the prevent A from slipping. Coefficient of static friction between
the table and the block A is 0.3

318
Solution :
To prevent the system from slipping; all three blocks have to be in equilibrium.

i.e. FA  FB  FC  zero [Net forces]

For A; N = (m + m1)g = (10 + m) g

and T  fs  N  0.3 10  m  g ... (1)

For B, T = m2g = 5g

 0.3 10  m  g  5g [Using (1)]

5 50
 10  m    16.7
0.3 3

m  6.7 kg

Example–21 :
A metal block of mass 1 kg when placed over an inclined plane of an angle of 300 slides down without
acceleration. If the inclination is increased by 150, what would be the acceleration of the block?
Solution :
In Fig (a); the block slides down without acceleration. So angle of repose is 300

1 3
  tan 300  
3 3

In Fig. (b);   300  150  450


If ‘a’ is the acceleration down the plane, we have,

Fnet  mg sin   f [Down the plane]

or ma  mg sin   mg cos 

319
or a  g  sin    cos  

 g sin 45   cos 45

 1 3 1 
 10   
 2 3 2

10  3  1  10  0.732
  
2  3  6

7.32
  3 m / s2
6
The acceleration does not change with mass.
Example–22 :
A truck tows a trailer of mass 3000 kg at 20 m/s on a level road. The tension in the coupling in 2500 N.
(i) What is the power expended on the trailer? (ii) What will be tension in the coupling if the truck hauls the
trailer up an incline rising 1 in 6? Assume the frictional forces on the incline to be the same as that on the
level road.
Solution :
On the level road; the motion being uniform; a = 0

 Fapplied  f friction  2500 N

Speed v = 20 m/s
 Power P = Fv = 2500 × 20 = 50 kW
Up an incline : The truck has to overcome friction f and also the component
of the weight down the plane.
 Tension in the coupling
T  mg sin   f

1
 3000 10    2500
6
= 7500 N

320
Circular Motion
A body is circular motion is always accelerated due to change in direction of velocity. The magnitude may
or may not very. The acceleration which changes the direction of motion so as to enable the body move
along a circular path is called centripetal acceleration. The force producing this acceleration is called
centripetal force.

2
mv 2  2 
We have, F   mr 2  mr  
r  T 

42 mr

T2
Body on Level Circular Road
The friction between the tyres and the road provides the centripetal force.

mv 2
We have,  mg
r

or v  rg

which gives maximum safe speed of a vehicle on road for negotiating a curve of radius ‘r’. (Without
skidding).
Banking of Roads (Tracks)
Curved roads and tracks are banked to reduce the role of friction for providing centripetal force on curves.
For a track / road of radius ‘r’ banked at an angle  ; the maximum safe speed at which a vehicle can
negotiate a curve is given by

v  gr tan 

The above max safe speed does not take into account the friction between the tyres and the road.
If the force of friction is also taken into account; we have,

   tan  
v  rg  
 1 tan  

Bending of a Cyclist
In order to negotiate a circular turn of radius ‘r’ at a speed v; a cyclist must bend at an angle  with the
vertical such that

321
v2
tan  
rg

Motion in a Vertical Circle


Consider a body of mass ‘m’ moving along a circle of radius ‘r’ in a vertical plane tied at one end of a
string.
Let vA be speed of particle at the lowest point A on the vertical cirlce. As particle moves along vertical
circle; speed and velocity both very. The motion is neither with uniform speed not uniform velocity. P is the
instantaneous position of particle on vertical circle; string OP makes an intantaneous angle  with vertical.
Let v be instananeous speed at P. From law of conservation of energy.

1 2 1 2
mv A  mv  mgh
2 2
Also from Fig;

AQ  h  OA  OQ  r  r cos   r 1  cos  

 v 2  v 2A  2gr 1  cos   .....(1)

Fig. shows forces on mass m at point P. The instantaneous tension


T is string is

mv 2
T  mg cos  
r
mv 2A
 mg cos    2mg 1  cos  
r
mv 2A
  2mg  3mg cos  .....(2)
r
(1) Particle at lowest point an vertical circle i.e.  = 0; From equation (2)

mv 2A
TA   mg .....(3)
r


(2) Particle in position B i.e. string is horizontal obviously   . From equations n (1) and (2)
2
mv 2A
v 2B  v 2A  2gr; TB   2mg .....(4)
r

322
(3) Particle at highest point on vertical circle i.e. at C. Obvisouly    from equations (1) and (2); we
have,

mv 2A
v 2C  v 2A  4gr; TC   5mg .....(5)
r

mv2A
From equation (5) TC is negative if  5mg .
r
This means string slackens and particle cannot complete motion along vertical circle,

 TC mm  0
  v A  mm  5 gr .....(6)

For v A   v A mm , vC is given by

v 2C  5gr  4 gr

v C  gr

Example–23 :
A pendulum suspended from the roof of a car by a string shifts through an angle  [tan  = 0.36] when the
car negotiates a curve of radius 200 m. Find the speed of the car.
Solution :
The forces acting on the pendulum bob are:
(i) Weight mg vertically downwards.
(ii) Tension T up the string.
(iii) Centripetal force.
Resolving the forces and applying equilibrium conditions along and
perpendicular to the string, we get

mv2
mg sin   cos 
r

v 2  rg tan 

v  rg tan 

323
 200  9.8  0.36

 26.6 m / s

Example–24 :
A train has to megotiate a curve of 400 m radius. If the distance between the rails is 1m, by how much
should the outer rail the raised w.r.t. the inner rail for a safe speed of 48 km / hr.
Solution :

40
We have v = 48 km / h = m/s
3
r = 400 m;   1m
Let ‘h’ be the required height of the outer rail.

h
We have sin   h

For small value of  ; sin   tan   h

v2
  tan   h
rg

v2 40 3  40 3
h 
rg 400 10

40 40 1
h   m
3 3 4000
= 0.444 m
Example–25 :

A circular race track of radius 300m is banked at 150. If   0.2; what is the optimum speed of a race car
to avoid wear and tear of the tyres. Also calculate the maximum permissible speed to prevent slipping.
Solution :

Optimum speed of the car  v  rg tan15  300 9.8 tan150

 28.1m / s

324
Maximum permissible speed of the race car using frictional force as well is

   tan   1
v max  rg  5   38.1ms
 1   5  tan  

Example–26 :
An aeroplane is flying at 360 km h–1 in a vertical circle of radius 200m. Calculate the force with which a 75
kg pilot presses his seat at the
(a) highest point
(b) lowest point
in the circle. [Use g = 10 m/s2]
Solution :
(a) At the highest point.
Ri + mg provide centripetal force.

mv 2
 R 1  mg 
r

mv 2
R1   mg
r

 v2 
 m   g
 r 

We have m = 75 kg; v = 360 km/h = 100 m/s, r = 20 m and g = 10 m/s2

100100 
 R1  75 10  75 40N
 200 

75  40
 kg wt  300 kg wt
10
(b) At the lowest point

mv 2
R 2  mg 
r

325
 v2 
R2  m   g
 r 

100  100 
 75   10   75  60 N
 200 

 75  6 kg wt
= 450 kg wt

Constrained Motion
It is a motion of a body subjected to certain restriction to its free motion. The constraints arise due to
contact between bodies or when the bodies are interconnected.
We can consider following examples of contrained motion.
(a) Body on a floor is constrained to move along x–direction alone.
We have y = 0
vy = 0, ay = 0
(b)

In all the cases shown in the diagram, if the string / rod connecting the bodies in
inexternsible; we use a contrain that the length of the string is fixed.
Distance xA = xB
 
Speed v A  v B
 
Acceleration a A  a B

It is important to note that the velocities and accelerations may be in different directions.

326
(c) In case of a moveable pulley shown
We have, F = 2T and T = M ablock

x
If the block moves a distance x; the pulley moves a distance
2
as the length of string remains constant.

1
We have, v pulley  vblock
2

a block
a pulley 
2

T F F
  2 
2m 2m 4m

(d) Ring on a smoth rod


For a ring of mass m connected through a string of length
‘L’ with a block of mass M;

We have, L  d 2  y 2  x (Constant)

dL 1 2y dy dx
We have, dt  0  2 d 2  y 2 . dt  dt

dy dx
As  v m and  vM
dt dt

y
and cos  
d 2  y2

v M  v m cos  .....(1)

Acceleration can be obtained by differentiating (1) w.r.t. time. Note that  also changes with time.
(e) For two blocks connected as shown; we have

327
Length of the string  L  OA  AB  x

 20A  x

 2 d 2  y 2  x  constant

dL 2  2y dy dx
 0 
dt 2  d 2  y 2  dt dt

or 2v m cos   v M  0

v M  2v m cos 

(f) Block sliding on a wedge


Consider a block sliding on a moving wedge. As the
block slides from O to D (through a distance x1) on
the wedge; the wedge moves through a distance OE.
We have y1 = DE = OE sin 

 x sin 
 
 v block  v wedge sin 

 
a block  a wedge sin 

ADDITIONAL EXAMPLES
1. A point particle of mass m, moves along the uniformly rough track PQR as shown in the figure. The
coefficient of friction, between the particle and the rough track equals  . The particle is released,
from rest, from the point P and it comes to rest at a point R. The energies, lost by the ball, over the
parts, PQ and QR, of the track, are equal to each other, and no energy is lost when particle changes
direction from PQ to QR. The values of the coefficient of friction  and the distance x (= QR), are,
respectively close to:

328
(a) 0.2 and 3.5m (b) 0.29 and 3.5m
(c) 0.29 and 6.5m (d) 0.2 and 6.5m
Correct option is (2) (IIT 2016)
Solution:
Work done, over the paths. PQ and QR, are, respectively,

2
W1  mg cos 
sin 

 2mg 3  
and W2  mg x

Since W1 = W2, we get

x  2 3 m  3.5 m
or loss in P.E. = (mg) × 2

 2mg  W1  W2  4mg 3 

2
This given    0.29
2 3
2. A mass ‘m’ is supported by a massless string wound around a uniform hollow
cylinder of mass m and radius R. If the string does not slip on the cylinder,
with what acceleration will the mass fall on release?

5g
(a) (b) g
6

2g g
(c) (d)
3 2
Correct option is (1) (IIT 2014)

329
Solution:
The equation of motion of mass m is
mg – T = ma
For the cylinder, we have

T.R  I

a
But   , (as the string does not slip)
R

and I  mR 2

 T  ma
We this get

g
a
2

PROBLEMS FOR PRACTICE


1. A stone thrown on a window pane smashes it but a bullet fired from a gun makes a clean hole in it.
Explain.
2. An athlete has to run through a certain distance after crossing the finishing line. Explain.
3. The students in a Physics class make the following statements.
(a) Linear momentum is the quantity of motion contained in the body.
(b) Impulse and acceleration make an angle of 1800 with change in momentum.
(c) Change in momentum is a measure of impulse.
(d) The linear momentum of a body remains constant when it is in circular motion with a constant
speed.
Which of the following is correct:
(1) All the above statements are correct.
(2) Only (a) and (c) are correct.
(3) Only (a) and (b) are corret.
(4) (b), (c) and (d) are correct.
4. Which of the following statements is correct?

330
The internal forces can change:
(1) Linear momentum but not kinetic energy.
(2) Kinetic energy but not linear momentum.
(3) Both kinetic energy and linear momentum.
(4) Niether kinetic energy nor linear momentum.
5. A truck starts from rest and moves down a hill with constant acceleration covering 400m in 20s.
Calculate the acceleration and the force on it, if its mass in 5 metric tonnes.
Ans: 2 m/s2; 10000 N

6. In an X–ray machine, an electron  m  9  10 31 kg  is subjected to a force of 10–23 N. Calculate


the time in which it covers 10 cm.
Ans: 1.33×10–4s
7. A balloon has 5 kg air in it. The air escaps at a uniform rate with a velocity of 5 m/s. If the entire air
escapes in 2s, find the average force on the balloon.
Ans: 12.5 N
8. A machine gun fires a bullet of mass 40 gm at 1200 ms–1. The person holding the machine gun can
support a maximum force of 144 N. Calculate the number of bullets that can be fired from the gun in
one second.
Ans: 3 bullets / sec.
9.

The above graph shows the force exerted on a ball struck by a bat. Using the graph determine.
(i) the impulse delivered to the ball.
(ii) the average force the ball.
(iii) the maximum force applied.
Ans:
(i) 1.2×104 kg m/s

331
(ii) 2000 N
(iii) 4000 N

g
10. A man weighing x kg can descend by means of a parachute with a minimum acceleration of .
4
Calculate x if the strings of the parachute can bear a maximum tension of 72 kg weight.
[Hint: Tmax = m(g–amin)]
Ans: 96 kg wt
11. A ball of mass 200 gm moving at 5 m/s collides with another ball of half its mass moving at 4 m/s in
opposite direction. The balls stick together and move with a common velocity v. Calculate v.
Ans: 2 m/s
12. A 60 kg boy running at 5 m/s jumps on a stationary trolley of mass 100 kg. Calculate the velocity
with which the trolley begins to move.

15
Ans: m/s
8
13. A balloon of mass m is rising up with an acceleration ‘a’. Show that the fraction of weight which must
 ma 
be removed from it so as to double its acceleration is   assuming the upward force to
 2a  g 
remain the same.
14.

Four identical blocks are connected by light inextensible strings and pulled by a force F on a smooth
horizontal surface. Show that T3 : T2 : T1 is 6 : 2 : 1.
15.

For the system of masses shown above, calculate the tension in the string between m2 and m3.
2m1m3g
Ans: m  m  m
1 2 3

332
16. A bullet of mass 20 gm is fired on an 8 kg wooden block at rest on a horizontal surafce. The bullet
gets embedded in the block and the combinations moves 20m before coming to rest. With what
speed did the bullet hit the block? Given  k = 0.25

Ans: 4010 m/s


17. A suitcase is gently dropped on a conveyor belt moving at 6 ms–1. If the coefficient of friction
between the belt and the suitcase is 0.5, how for will the suitcase move on the belt before coming to
rest?
Ans: 3.68 m
18. Two blocks of mass 2 kg and 5 kg connected by an ideal string passing over a smooth, light pulley
as shown. Calculate the acceleration of the system and the tension in the string. [Use g = 9.8 m/s2]

Ans: 4.87 m/s2; 24.65 N


19. A 100 gm ball in suspended by a 30 cm long light string. Keeping the string always taut, the ball
describes a horizontal circle of radius 15 m. Calculate angular speed.
Ans: 6.14 rad/s
20. A motor cyclist drives at 144 km h–1 on a 320m radius circular track. Calculate the angle through
which he should lean with the vertical to keep his balance. (g = 10 ms–2)


Ans:
4
21. The railway bridge over a canal is in the form of an arc of a circle of radius 20m. What is the minimum
speed with which a car can cross the bridge without leaving contact with the ground at the highest
point.
[Use g = 9.8 m/s2]
Ans: 14 ms–1

333
334
QUESTION BANK

335
Key Learning Points
1. Force is an external agent which changes or tries to change the state of rest or uniform motion of a
body along a straight path.
2. Intertia is the property of a body by virtue of which it opposes a change in its state of rest or uniform
motion along a straight path. Mass is a measure of inertia of the body.
3. The quantity of motion contained in a body is called momentum. It is measured as product of mass
and velocity of the body. Its SI unit is kg ms–1. Dimensionally momentum is MLT–1.
4. The three laws of motion are:
(a) Every object in the universe continuous in its state of rest or uniform motion along a straight
path unless an external unbalanced force changes its state. This law is also known as the law of
inertia.
(b) The rate of change of momentum of a body is directly proportional to the net external force
and the change in momentum takes place in the direction of the force.

dp dv
Mathematically F  m  ma
dt dt
(c) To every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. Action and reaction act on different
bodies and hence never cancel each other.
5. SI unit of force is newton N = 1 kg ms–2
6. The gravitational unit of force is kg wt or kg f.
1 kg wt = 1 kg f = 9.8 N = 9.8 kg ms–2
7. Impulse of a force is the product of force and the time for which it acts.
Mathematically, Impulse = J  F.t (for constant force)

  F .dt
(for variable force)
8. Impulse is related to change in momentum as J = Change in momentum

 Δp  pf  pi  m  v  u 
9. The total momentum of a system remains conserved if there is no net external force acting on the
system.
10. A rocket is a system of varying mass. The instantaneous speed ‘v’ acquired by a rocket in given by

m 
v  2.303  log  0 
 m 

336
where m  m 0  t  The instantaneous mass of rocket.

11. For a body in equilibrium under the action of three concurrent forces, we have.

F1 F F
 2  3
sin  sin  sin 

This is known as Lami’s theorem.


12. The free body diagram in a system indicates all the forces exerted on the body by the remaining parts
of the system and the external agents.
13. A frame of reference at rest or in uniform motion is an intertial frame. The laws of motion (F= ma) are
valid in such frame.
14. An accelerated frame of reference is a non-inertial frame. Fictitious forces have to the included
before applying the laws of motion.

337
Unit–3 : Laws of Motion
Average Laws of Motion
1. Two projectiles are simultaneously fired from a point ‘O’ with velocities u1 and u2 at angles
1 and  2 with the horizontal. The trajectory of the second projectile as observed from the
first will be:
(1) an irregular curve (Incorrect)
(2) a parabola (Incorrect)

u 2 sin  2  u1 sin 1
(3) a straight line with slope u cos   u cos  (Correct)
2 2 1 1

u 2 cos  2  u1 cos 1
(4) a straight line with slope u sin   u sin  (Incorrect)
2 2 1 1

Correct answer: (3)


Solution:
Choose co-ordinates X–Y as shown in Fig. Consider motion of each projectile in terms of components
along X and Y–axes.
For projectile 1

1
x1   u1 cos 1  t y1   u1 sin 1  t  gt 2
2
For projectile 2

1
x2   u 2 cos  2  t y 2   u 2 sin  2  t  gt 2
2

 y 2  y1   u 2 sin  2  u 2 sin 1  t

x2  x1   u 2 cos  2  u1 cos 1  t

y 2  y1 u 2 sin  2  u1 sin 1
 
x2  x1 u 2 cos  2  u1 cos 1

 u 2 sin  2  u1 sin 1 
 y2  y1    x2  x1   
 u 2 cos  2  u1 cos 1 

338
u 2 sin  2  u1 sin 1
The above is equation of a st. line with slope u cos   u cos 
2 2 1 1

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Easy Circular Motion

2. A partile is in uniform circular motion. If at ; ac and a respectively denote the average


values of the tengential, centripetal and net acceleration respectively, which of the following
statements is correct?

(1) a = ac  at (Correct)

(2) ac = a t  a (Incorrect)

(3) a > ac > at (Incorrect)

(4) a < ac < a t (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:

For uniform circular motion a t  0 and a  a 2c  a 2t

 Option (1) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Difficult Second Law of Motion
3. A train of mass 5500 kg is travelling on a level track with uniform velocity. The last carriage
of mass 500 kg gets detached from the train. The driver of the car notices the same after
travelling 1 km and switches off the engine. Assuming the resistance to motion as uniform
and proportional to mass and the engine to exert a constant hauling force, the distance
between the train and the carriage after both come to rest is

11
(1) km (Correct)
10

12
(2) km (Incorrect)
11

339
13
(3) km (Incorrect)
12

14
(4) km (Incorrect)
10
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:
Let M be the total intial mass.
Initial force of resistance = k M; K is a constant.
Since train moves with uniform velocity; net force on it is zero, therfore,
The hauling force of engine = kM
After the carriage is detatched from the train; hauling force remains unchanged (kM) and the resistance
reduces to k (M–m).

 Energy acquired by train in travelling a distance  = [kM – k (M–m)]   km


One switching off engine, the only force acting is resistive force of track. Let the additional distance
covered by train in coming to rest be  ' . The energy accquired by train is spent in doing work against
resistive force.

We have, k  M  m   '  km

 m  500 1
'       km
Mm 5000 10

 1  11
 Total distance  1   km  km
 10  10

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average Friction
4. Two masses m and nm are placed on surfaces AB and AC symmetrically inclined at A as
shown. The coefficients of friction for the surfaces are  and 2 respectively..

340
For the system to just slide down along AC; n should be

1 
(1) (Correct)
1  2

 1
(2) (Incorrect)
2  1

1  2
(3) (Incorrect)
1 

2  1
(4) (Incorrect)
 1

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:
Fig. (a) & (b) show free body diagram of mass m and nm respectively.

i) For mass m to be in equilibrium


T = mg sin 45 +  mg cos 450
(ii) For mass nm

n mg sin 45 = T + 2 n mg cos 450 or T = n mg sin 450 – 2 n mg cos 450

341
 n mg [sin 45 – 2 cos 450] = mg sin 45 +  mg cos 45

1 
n
1  2

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Difficult Momentum Conservations
5. A body of mass 6m is projected with a velocity v at 300 with the vertical. At the highest point
in the trajectory; the body splits up into three parts; A (mass m) moves vertically up with
velocity v1; B (mass 2m) moves vertically down with velocity v2 and the third part (mass
3m) moves with a velocity v3. Then after explosion, we have
(1) v2 = 2v1 ; v3 = 2v (Incorrect)

v
(2) v1 = 2v 2 ; v 3 = (Incorrect)
2

v1
(3) v2  ; v3  v (Correct)
2

v3
(4) v 2  v1  (Incorrect)
2
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:
At the highest point of trajectory; the body has only horizontal momentum.

 pi  6m  v sin 30   3m v  horizontal 

Applying law of conservation of linear momentum along horizontal direction.

3m v
 Final horizontal component of momentum = 3 mv = m c v f  v f  v
3m
Applying law of conservation of linear momentum in vertical direction.

p vertical  0  m B v 2  m A v1  2m v 2  m v1

v1
or v2 
v
 Option (3) is correct

342
Unit–3 : Laws of Motion
Average FBD
6. A block of mass M lying on a smooth inclined plane is being pulled up by applying a force
F to the free end of a string passing over a pulley as show. The other end of the string in
fixed to a rigid support on top of the incline. The minimum force F required to move the
block up the plane is

Mg 1  cos  
(1) (Incorrect)
sin 

Mg 1  sin  
(2) (Incorrect)
cos 

Mg
(3) tan  (Incorrect)
2F

Mg 1  cos  
(4) (Correct)
sin 
Correct answer: (4)
Solution:
Fig. shows F.B.D. of system. Resolve F into rectangular components as shown.
The body is on brink of moving up, if

F  Fcos   Mg sin 

sin 
 F  Mg
1  cos 

sin  1  cos   1  cos  


 Mg 2
 Mg
1  cos  sin 

 Option (4) is correct.

343
Unit–3 : Laws of Motion
Average Momentum Conservation
7. A body at rest explodes into three pieces. Two of the pieces carry momenta p1 and p2 equal

in magnitude along different directions, an angle apart. If p3 is the momentum of the
3
third piece, we have,
 
(1) p3  p1 (Correct)

 
(2) pB  p1 (Incorrect)

 
(3) p B  p1 (Incorrect)

 
(4) p B  2 p1 (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:
Total initial momentum = zero
 Total final momentum = zero.
     

i.e. p1  p 2  p3  0 or p3   p1  p 2 
  2
Also p1  p 2 and    1200
3
 
 Resultant of p1 and p 2 is given by

p3  p12  p 22  2p1p 2 cos1200

 1 
 p12  p12  2p12     p1
 2

 Option (1) is correct.

344
Unit–3 : Laws of Motion
Average Centripetal Force
8. A glass container of the shape shown is filled with water and mounted on a turn table. On
relating; the water level

(1) Moves down in A and B and rises in C (Incorrect)


(2) Moves up in A and down in B (Incorrect)
(3) Moves up in A and B and moves down in C (Correct)
(4) Remains unchanged in all the three tubes (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:
The rotation of the turn table results in an outward force away from the centre (C). So the water level in C
moves down and that in A and B moves up. Hence option (3) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average Second Law
9. A light inextensible; rope is fixed at one end to a clamp
C fixed in ground. The other end of the rope passes
over a pole AB assumed to be frictionless as shown in
Fig. (a). The clamp can be uprooted with a minimum
400 N force. In order the pull the clamp a 50 kg boy
hangs on the free end of the rope. In order to just pull
the clamp; the boy must have a minimum acceleration
of (Take g = 10 m/s2)
(1) 8 m/s2 upwards (Incorrect)
(2) 8 m/s2 downwards (Incorrect)
(3) 6 m/s2 upwards (Correct)
(4) 6 m/s2 downwards (Incorrect)

345
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:
Let T be the tension in the rope. Then at C; the components of T are:
T cos 30 horizontal
T sin 30 vertical
To just pull the clamp out
T sin 30 = 400 or T = 800 N
From F.B.D. of boy; as shown in Fig. (c)
T – mg = ma (As T acts upwards)
800 – 50×10 = 50a

300
or a   6 m / s 2 upwards
50

 Option (3) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average Second Law
10. The S – t graph for a body is as shown. The net force acting on the body in zero in the parts.

(1) C only (Incorrect)


(2) A; B and D (Correct)
(3) A and D but not in C and D (Incorrect)
(4) B only (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)

346
Solution:
The parts A; B and D of the S – t graph are linear and hence represent uniform motion. So accleration
a = 0 and hence no force acts on the body.
 Option (2) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average Impulse
11. Two balls with linear momenta p1 = pi and p2 = –pi and are subjected to a force F = xj + yk
for a short duration changing the momenta of the balls to p1' and p '2 .

If all the coefficients p, x, y, a1, b1, c1, a2, b2 and c2 are non-zero; which of the following
combinations is possible.

(1) p'2  a1i  a1j  a1k (Incorrect)

p'2  b2 j  c1k

(2) p1'  a1i  c1k (Incorrect)

p'2  a 2i  c2k

(3) p'1  b1j  c1k (Correct)

p'2  b2 j  c2k

(4) p1'  b1j  c2k (Incorrect)

p'2  a 2i  b2 j
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:
Initially; the total momentum in X–direction is zero. So final momentum in x should also be zero.
The force F applied on the system has no component along X–direction but has only Y and Z components.
So the system will have a net momentum in Y and Z direction but not in X–direction.

347
In option (1) and (4), the system has X–component of momentum. So these options are ruled out. In
option (2); the system does not have Y component. So the option is incorrect. Option (3) is correct as
X–component is zero and, we have momenta in Y and Z direction.
Option (3) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average Second Law

15
12. A m long plane with inclination 300 is placed in a lift. The motor of the lift produces an
4
upward acceleration of 5 m/s2. A body is released from the top of the incline (assumed
frictionless). The time taken by the body to slide down the plane is

1
(1) s (Incorrect)
2
(2) 1s (Correct)

1
(3) s (Incorrect)
2 2

3
(4) s (Incorrect)
2

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:
For the lift accelerated upward; effective weight of objects in the lift = m (g+a)

 Acceleration of the block down the plane = (g + a) sin 

 15sin 300

 7.5 m / s 2

1 15 1 15
 S  ut  at 2   0    t 2
2 4 2 2

or t  t s
Hence option (2) is correct.

348
Unit–3 : Laws of Motion
Difficult Friction
13. A body of mass m is placed on a horizontal surface. A force F has to be applied to move the
block in any direction. If  is coefficient of friction between the block and the surface; the
minimum force required to move the block is
(1)  mg (Incorrect)

 mg
(2) (Correct)
1  2

1  2
(3) mg (Incorrect)

 mg
(4) (Incorrect)
1  2

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:
Let the force F be applied at an angle  with the horizontal.

From the F.B.D. diagram Fsin   N  mg  N  mg  Fsin 


For the body to just slide; we have,

Force Fcos     mg  Fsin  

or F cos  sin    mg

 mg
or F
 cos    sin  

For minimum F;  cos    sin   should be maximum.

d  cos    sin  
or  0   sin    cos   0
d

or   tan 

349
 mg  1  2   mg
 F    mg 
1   1  2  1  2
  
2
1  1  2

Option (2) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average Friction
14. A block is moving on an inclined plane making an angle 450 with the horizontal. The coefficient
of friction is μ . The force required to just push the block up is three times the force required
to just prevent it from sliding down. If N = 10  ; then N is
(1) 10 (Incorrect)

1
(2) (Incorrect)
10
(3) 5 (Correct)

1
(4) (Incorrect)
5
Correct option: (3)
Solution:
Fig. (a) & (b) give the F.B.D. of block as it is on brink of moving up or down
the inclined plane.
In Fig. (a)

F1  mg sin 45  f fr  mg sin 45   mg cos 450

In Fig. (b)

F2  mg sin 45   mg cos 450

As F1 = 3F2; we have,

sin 45   cos 45  3  sin 45   cos 450 

350
1
1    3  3 or 4  2 or  
2

 N  10  5

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average F.B.D.
15. A system of two masses 5 kg and 20 kg is in equilibrium of rest. The spring is
elastic and has a force constant k.
The string between the masses is now cut. The acceleration of the masses 20
kg and 5 kg after the mass 5 kg is just let go are [Take g = 10 m/s2]

5
(1) m/s2 upwards; 10 m/s2 downwards (Correct)
2
(2) 2.5 m/s2 upwards, 5 m/s2 downwards (Incorrect)
(3) 10 m/s2 upwards, 40 m/s2 downwards (Incorrect)
(4) 20 m/s2 upwards, 10 m/s2 downwards (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:
After the string is cut to just let go 5 kg mass, we have
ma = mg (for 5 kg mass)

 a  g  10 m / s 2
From the equilibrium forces acting on M now downward force of 50 N is no longer there. There is a net
upward force of 50 N on M.
= Ma = 5×10 N
or 20a = 50

50 5
 a  m / s 2 upwards
20 2
Correct option is (1)

351
Unit–3 : Laws of Motion
Difficult Second Law
16. A particle moving in XOY plane is subjected to a force F and has a linear momentum.

p  t  =  25cos200π ti - 25sin200π t j kg m / s


 
The angle between the force and the momentum is
(1) 00 (Incorrect)
(2) 300 (Incorrect)
(3) 600 (Incorrect)
(4) 900 (Correct)
Correct answer: (4)
Solution:

Given p  t   25 cos 200 ti  25sin 200 t j

dp 
 Force F    25  200 isin  200t  i  25 200 jcos  200t  j 
  
dt  

 F . p  25  cos 200t  i   sin 200t  j .25  200    sin 200t  i   cos 200t  j
   

or Fp cos   625  200    cos  200 t  .sin  200 t   si  n 200 t  .cos 200t 

=0

 cos   0 or   900

Option (4) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Difficult Pulleys
17. Two fixed frictionless pulleys are suspended from a rigid support AB. A massless inextensible
string passing over the pulleys supports a body of mass ‘m’. The angle  is a function of
time as the mass is pulled up by means of the strings. If the free ends P and Q are pulled

352
with a uniform speed u; the instantaneous upward speed of the mass M is

(1) u cos  (Incorrect)

(2) 2u cos  (Incorrect)

2u
(3) (Incorrect)
cos 

u
(4) (Correct)
cos 
Correct answer: (4)
Solution:
From the diagram; ‘a’ is constant irrespective of position of M. The speed
along DA and DB is equal to ‘u’, the speed with which the free ends are
being pulled.

We have, a 2  y 2   2

 y2  2  a 2
Differentiating w.r.t. time t; we get

dy d
2y  2  0
dt dt

dy   d  1 d  1 
    u
dt y  dt  y  dt  cos  

dy u
 Upward speed of the mass = 
dt cos 
Option (4) is correct.

353
Unit–3 : Laws of Motion
Average Pulleys
18. A string of negligible mass passing over a smooth clamped 2kg pulley supports a 5 kg mass
as shown. The force on the pulley by the clamp is [Take g = 10 m/s2]

(1) 50 2 N (Incorrect)

(2) 10 74 N (Correct)

(3) 20 2 N (Incorrect)

(4) 290 N (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:
Let T be the tension in the string.
For 5 kg block to be in equilibrium, T–5 × g = 0
T = 50 N
For free body diagram of the pulley, the forces are
(i) 70 N vertically down
(ii) T = 50 N horizontal

 N = Net force on the clamp = 702  502

 4900  2500

 10 74 N

Hence the clamp exerts a force of equal magnitude on the pulley.


Option (2) is correct.

354
Unit–3 : Laws of Motion
Average ______________
19. A train is moving on a level straight track with a constant acceleration ‘a’. An observer in
the train throws a ball forward with a speed of 10 m/s at an angle of 600 with the horizontal.
The observer has to move 1.15 m forward to catch the ball back at the initial height. The
acceleration of the train is
(1) 10 m/s2 (Incorrect)
(2) 5 m/s2 (Correct)

10
(3) m / s2 (Incorrect)
3

(4) 5 3 m / s2 (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:
The train accelerates horizontally, there is no fictitious force in vertical direction but there is a ficticous force
horizontally in backward direction.

24sin 
Time of flight of the ball = T 
g

2  10  sin 60
  3s
10
The forward acceleration of the train gives a pseudo force on the boy i.e. produces a negative acceleration.

1
 S  uxt  axt2
2

1
1.15  5  t  at 2
2

1 2
5 3 a
2
 3
3
5 3 a
2

355
3 15
a  5  1.73  1.15  7.5 or a   5 m / s2
2 3
Option (2) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Difficult Friction
20. A block is released from rest at the top of a 450 smooth incline. It slides down a distance ‘d’.
If the time taken to slide down a rough incline through an equal distance in n times the time
taken on the smooth incline, the coefficient of friction between the block and the plane is
(1) n2 1 (Incorrect)

1
(2) 1 (Correct)
n2

 1 
(3)  2  1 (Incorrect)
n 

 1
(4) 1   (Incorrect)
 n

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:
(1) Motion on smooth plane
The free body diagram of the block is as shown in Fig. (a)

mg sin 450
As there is no friction; acceleration down the plane = a 
m

 g sin 450
Time taken to slide through a distance ‘d’ in given by

1 2 1
d at   g sin 45  t 2 .....(1)
2 2
(2) On a rough incline
The F.B.D is as shown in Fig. (b)

356
 Acceleration a '  g  sin 45   cos 45 

1 2 1
d at '  g  sin 45   cos 45  t '2 .....(2)
2 2
Equating the distances

1 1
g  sin 45   cos 45  t '2   g sin 45  t 2
2 2

t '2 sin 45
 2
  n2
t sin 45   cos 45

1
 n2
1 

1
or 1  
n2

1
or   1
n2
Option (2) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Easy Friction
21. In the adjoining figure, blocks A and B with masses M1 and M2
are connected by a light string passing over a smooth pulley. A
block C is placed on A to prevent it from sliding over the surface.
If s is coefficient of static friction between A and the surface in
contact, the minimum value of ‘m’ is

M2
(1)  M1 (Correct)
s

(2) s M1  M 2 (Incorrect)

(3) S2  M1  m   M 2 (Incorrect)

357
(4) M 2  S  M1  m  (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:
If the block ‘A’ does not slide; B is also in equilibrium.

 T  M2g

Considering free body diagram of A; we get

T  fS  s  M1  m  g

or M 2g  s  M1  m  g

M2
m  M1
s

Option (1) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Difficult Pulleys
22. A block of mass 5 kg on a frictionless horizontal table is connected to a block of mass 3 kg
by means of a system of light pulleys P1 and P2 and massless, iextensible strings as shown.
If a1 and a2 are the acceleration in the to masses and T1; T2 the tension as shown; we have

a1 T
(1)  2; 1  2 (Incorrect)
a2 T2

a1 T
(2)  2; 2  2 (Correct)
a2 T1

a2 T
(3)  2; 1  2 (Incorrect)
a1 T2

358
a2 T
(4)  2; 2  2 (Incorrect)
a1 T1

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:
As 3 kg mass and the moveable light pulley P1 are connected; they must have same acceleration a2 so as
to move together. If P1 moves a distance x, m1 must move a distance 2x (x each for upper and lower parts)
in a time ‘t’. So acceleration of m1 must be twice that of m2.

 a1  2a 2

This rules out option (3) and (4)

Again T2  2T1  Mass of P1  a   0   a  0

As the pulley P1 is massless

 T2  2T1

Hence option (2) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average Friction
23. A block of mass 10 kg is pushed against a wall by a force F making a angle of 450 with the
horizontal. Given   0.3 and g = 10m/s2. The minimum and maximum values of force F
that allow the block to remain stationary are

(1) 109 N; 202 N (Correct)


(2) 70 N; 130 N (Incorrect)
(3) 130 N; 160 N (Incorrect)
(4) 100 N; 130 N (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (1)

359
Solution:
(i) When the block is on brink of sliding down, F is minimum.
The free body diagram is as shown.

F
We have N  F cos 45 
2

Fsin 45  N  mg

Fsin 45  F cos 45  10  10  100

 1 0.3  100 2 1414


F     100  F    109N
 2 2 1.3 13

F = 109 N
(ii) F is maximum if block is on brink of moving upwards; the force of friction must act downwards. The
free body diagram in this case is as shown in Fig. (c)
Along horizontal N = F cos 450

Along vertical F sin 45 = mg  f 

 Mg  F cos 45

F  sin 45   cos 45   mg  100

 1 0.3 
F   100
 2 2 

100 2 100  1.414 1414


F  
0.7 .7 7
= 202 N
Option (1) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Difficult FBD
24. In the diagram shown; AC in a smooth inclined plane with mass m and 2m on it connected
by a massless string. Another mass M hangs vertically by means of another light string

360
passing over a frictionless light pulley.

If M is twice the mass required to keep the system in equilibrium; the tension T2 is
(1) 2 mg (Incorrect)

3
(2) mg (Correct)
2
(3) mg (Incorrect)

1
(4) mg (Incorrect)
2
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
The F.B.D. of different masses are shown in Fig. (2)

For system to be in equilibrium;


From Fig. 2(a), we have
T1 – Mg = 0 or T1 = Mg .....(1)
From Fig. 2(b), we have
T1= T2 + mg sin 30 .....(2)

361
From Fig. 2(c), we have
T2 = 2mg sin 30 .....(3)
From equations (2) and (3), we get

3
 T1  3mg sin 30  mg
2

3 3
 Mg  mg or M mg
2 2
If the mass is doubled; we have

3
M  2  m = 3m
2
The free body diagrams are as shown in Fig. (3)

Let ‘a’ be the acceleration of the system


From Fig. 3(a), we have
3mg – T1 = 3ma .....(4)
From Fig. 3(b), we have
T1 – T2 – mg sin 30 = ma .....(5)
From Fig. 3(c), we have
T2 – 2mg sin 30 = (2m) a .....(6)
Adding equation = n (4), (5) and (5), we get

3
3mg  mg  6 ma
2

362
3
6 ma  mg
2

g
or a
4
From equation (3) T2 = 2 ma + 2 mg sin 30

g 3
 2m    mg  mg
 4 2

Option (2) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average FBD
25. Two blocks of mass M1 and M2 are suspended from a rigid support at point ‘O’
by two inextensible wires of 1m each. The upper wire has negligible mass and
the lower one has a mass x kg/m. The whole system has an upward acceleration
‘a’ including the support. The tension T1 (at A) and T2 (at B); A & B are mid-
points of respective strings are given by

(1) T1  M 2  g  a  ;T2   M1  M 2  x  g  a  (Incorrect)

 x
(2) T1   M 2    g  a  ; T2   M1  M 2  g  a  (Incorrect)
 2

 x
(3) T1   M 2    g  a  ; T2   M1  M 2  x  g  a  (Correct)
 2

 x
(4) T1   M 2   g ;T2   M1  M 2  x  g (Incorrect)
 2

Correct answer: (3)


Solution:
The F.B.D. of point A is shown in Fig. (a)

363
 x  x
 T1   M2   g   M2   a
 2  2

 x
 T1   M 2    g  a 
 2

F.B.D. of point B is shown in Fig. (b)

T2   M1  M 2  x  g   M1  M 2  x  a

 T2   M1  M 2  x  g  a 

Option (3) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Easy Friction
26. A block of mass 10 kg rests on a rough inclined plane making an angle of 300 with the
horizontal. The coefficient of static friction between the block and the plane is 0.7. The
frictional force on the block is (g = 10 m/s2)
(1) 50 N (Correct)

(2) 0.7×50× 3 (Incorrect)

(3) 50 3 N (Incorrect)

(4) 70 N (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:
The F.B.D. of block is shown in Fig. obviously N = mg cos 300

As S  0.7

So maximum force of static friction.

3
ft  S N  0.7 100    50  .7  3
2

 60.6 N

364
Force down the plane on mass m = 100 sin 30
= 50 N

Since the force trying to move block is less than f t ; the block does not move. The friction coming into play
equals the force trying to move the block i.e. force of friction = 50 N.
Option (1) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Easy Circular Motion
27. A simple pendulum of length L and bob of mass M is oscillating in a vertical plane about a
vertical line within angular limits 0 to  0 . For an angular displacement     0  ; the
tension in the string is T and the velocity of bob is v. Which of the following statements is
incorrect?

Mv 2
(1) T  Mg cos   (Incorrect)
L

(2) a tangential  g sin  (Incorrect)

(3) T  Mg cos 0 , at   0 (Incorrect)

(4) a net  g (Correct)

Correct answer: (4)


Solution:
The motion of a pendulum bob in circular motion with radius ‘L’. The forces are resolved along the string
Mv 2
(radius) and  radius. Net force along radius should be .
R

Mv 2 Mv 2
We have, T  Mg cos   or T  Mg cos   .....(1)
L L

Ma T  Mg sin   a T  g sin 

a net  'g ' ( the tension also acts in addition to weight)

365
Unit–3 : Laws of Motion
Difficult Connected Bodies
28. A smooth pulley of mass M is lying on a smooth table. A light string passes round the pulley
and has masses m and m’ attached to its ends with the masses hanging vertically as shown.
The acceleration of the pulley is

4 mm 'g
(1) 4m   M  m '  (Incorrect)

2  m  m ' g
(2) (Incorrect)
 M  m  m '

 m  m '   M  g
(3) (Incorrect)
m  m ' M

4 mm 'g
(4) 4 mm ' M  m  m '  (Correct)

Correct answer: (4)


Solution:

Let 1 ,  2 and  3 denote the lengths of portion of the string as shown. If the pulley moves towards right
through x on the table m’ down by y and m moves up by z; then

366
 '1  1  x;  '2   2  y &  '3   3  z

As the length of the string is constant, we have

21   2   3  2  1  x    2  y   3  z

or 2x  y  z
Differentiating twice with respect to time; we get

d2 x d2 y d2z
2 2  2  2
dt dt dt

or 2a M  a1m  a m .....(1)

Using free body diagram shown in Fig., we get

2T  Ma M .....(2)

m 'g  T  m 'a 'm .....(3)

and T  mg  m a m .....(4)

Substituting for aM, am and a 'm from (2), (3) and (4) in (1), we get

2T  T  T 
2.  g    g
M  m'  m 

m m'
 2g  T
mm'

 m  m' 4 
or T    2g
 mm' M 

2Mm m 'g
 T
4m m ' M  m  m'

2 4m m 'g
and aM  T
M 4m m ' M  m  m '

Option (4) is correct.

367
Unit–3 : Laws of Motion
Average Friction
29. A ladder of mass m leaning against a smooth wall is in static equilibirium making an angle
θ with the horizontal floor. The coefficient of friction between the ladder and the floor is μ ,
then μ and θ are related as

1
(1)  (Correct)
2 tan 

2
(2)  (Incorrect)
tan 

1
(3)  tan  (Incorrect)
2

2sin 2 
(4)  (Incorrect)
cos 
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:
As the ladder is in equilibrium;

Fnet  0

τB  0

The F.B.D. diagram is as shown in Fig.

or N1  N 2 (Horizontal force = 0)

N 2  mg (Vertical force = 0)

368
Taking torque of forces about point B; we have

L
mg cos   N1L sin   B  0 
2

mg
or N1  cot 
2

N1 mg
 N2   cot   mg
 2

cot  1
or  
3 2 tan 
Option (1) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average Friction
30. During paddeling of a bicyble, the force of friction exerted by the ground on the two wheels
is such that it acts
(1) in the backward direction on both the front and the rear wheels (Incorrect)
(2) in the forward direction on both the front and the rear wheels (Incorrect)
(3) in the backward direction on the front wheel and in the forward direction of the rear wheel
(Correct)
(4) in the forward direction on the front wheel and in the backward direction in the rear weel
(Incorrect)
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:
We apply a force of a action on ground in background direction when the cycle is paddled. The reaction
force on backward wheel is due to friction between ground and wheel. It acts is forward direction. There
is no force of action on front wheel. It moves forward. The force of friction opposes this motion &
therefore acts in backward direction.
Option (3) is correct.

369
Unit–3 : Laws of Motion
Easy Circular Motion
31. A long horizontal rod has a bead which can slide along its length and is initially palced at a
distance L from one end A of the rod AB. The rod is set in angular motion about A with a
constant angular acceleration α . The coefficient of friction between the lead and the rod is
μ . Neglecting gravity, the time at which the lead starts slipping is
(1) Infinitesinally small (Incorrect)


(2) (Correct)


(3) (Incorrect)

1
(4) (Incorrect)


Correct answer: (2)


Solution:
The reaction of the rod on the bead provides tangential force Ft and the centripetal force (FC) is provided
by friction fr. The bead slides when fr equals limiting friction.

We have, F t  ma  m  L  N .....(1)

 f r max  N  m  L .....(2)

Also   0   t   t

At time ‘t’, FC  m L2  mL 2 t 2 .....(3)

From (2) and (3),


m L 2 t 2  m L  t 

Option (2) is correct.

370
Unit–3 : Laws of Motion
Difficult Circular Motion
32. In the given system, when the hall of mass m is released, from point A, it will swing along
the dotted arc. A nail is located at N; a distance 0.6  beow O, the point of suspension. The
tension in the string just before touching N and after touching N are

(1) mg and mg (Incorrect)


(2) mg and mg (Incorrect)
5
(3) 3 mg and 6 mg (Correct)
(4) 3 mg and 3 mg (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:
Just before touching the nail; the ball is moving along a circle of radius  .

mv 2
 T  mg 

1
Also v2 = 2g  [Using mg L  mv 2 ]
2

m
 T  mg  2g  3 mg

After touching nail, the ball moves along a circle of radius   0.6    0.4  

mv 2 m2g
 T '  mg   mg 
0.4 0.4

 mg  5mg  6 mg
Optino (3) is correct.

371
Unit–3 : Laws of Motion
Difficult Second Law
33. A 1 kg particle initially moving with a velocity of 5i m/s is subjected to forces F1 and F2
whose magnitude vary with time as shown in the graph. The velocity of the particle at t = 2s
(neglecting gravity) is

(1) 10 i 5j (Incorrect)

(2) 11 i 5j (Incorrect)

(3) i 5j (Correct)

(4) 5 i 5j (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (3)


Solution:
In 2 second; impulse of F1 = Area under F1 vs t graph.
= –6 Ns = –6 kg m/s
–ve because the force F1 is in –X direction

 m  v x  u x   6 or mv x  6  5  1

 v x  1 (As m = 1 kg)

 vx  i;ms1
Again impulse of kg F2 = Area under F2 vs t graph.

1
  2  5  5 kg m/sec
2
As the force F2 is in –y direction.

372
 m  v y  u y   5  v y  5 j

 v  i  5 j
Option (3) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Easy Impulse
34. A ball of mass 5 kg is moving on a smooth XOY plane at 0.6 m/s along +X diretion. It is
subject to a constant force of 2N in Y direction. After ‘t’ second the speed of the ball becomes
1 m/s. The value of ‘t’ (in second) is

(1) 1s (Incorrect)

(2) 2s (Correct)

(3) 3s (Incorrect)

(4) 4s (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:

Initial momentum along X–axis = p x  5  0.6  3 kg m / s

Suppose momentum inported by the applied force = py (  Force is in y–direction).

Given pf magnitude of final linear momentum = mv  5  1  5 kg m / s

Also pf2  p 2x  p 2y  p 2y  25  9  16

or p y  4 kg m / s

Momentum imported in Y direction = Fy . t


4 =2 (t)
or t = 2s
Option (2) is correct.

373
Unit–3 : Laws of Motion
Difficult Impulse

35. A block of mass m is on a rough inclined plane of angle θ with tan θ


exceeding μ, the coefficient of friction. The block is held stationary by
applying a force P parallel to the plane. The force P up the plane is taken
to be positive.

As P in varied from P1 = mg  sinθ – μcosθ  to P2 = mg  sinθ – μcosθ  ;


the variation of the frictional force of with P can be represented as
(1)

(Incorrect)

(2)

(Correct)

(3)

(Incorrect)

(4)

(Incorrect)

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:
For P < mg sin  , the block tends to slide down the inclined plane. Force of friction f coming into play, acts
upwards.

For equilibrium P  f  mg sin 

374
f  mg sin   P is positive (for P = P1) acting upwards

For P = mg sin 

P + f = mg sin 
or f=0
For P > mg sin  , the block tends to slide up the plane. Force of friction f coming into paly acts down the
plane.
Therefore for equilibrium; f + mg sin  = P

or f = P – mg sin  is negative. (for P = P2) (acting down the plane)


This variation in ‘f’ is represented in option (2).

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Difficult Momenum Conservation
36. A 10 gm bullet moving horizontally hits the centre of a 200 gm ball placed on top of a 5m
high pole. (See figure) The two move independently thereafter. The ball hits the ground 20
m away from the pole and the bullets hit 100 m away as shown. The initial velocity of the
bullet is (Take g = 10 m/s2)

(1) 250 m/s (Incorrect)


(2) 400 m/s (Incorrect)
(3) 500 m/s (Correct)
(4) 1000 m/s (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:
Consider vertical motion of bullet after collosion.
TIme taken by the ball tofall to the ground = ‘t’ is

375
1 2
h gt
2

25
or t  1s
1
Horizontal distance covered by the ball = 20 m
v1 = Horizontal velocity of bullet after collosion = 20 m/s
Similarly, final horizontal velocity of the bullet after collosion = 100 m/s
Let u be horizontal speed of bullet before collosion. Using principle of momentum conservation along
horizontal, we get.

mu  mv1  mv2

 10   10   200 
 u    100      20 
 1000   1000   1000 

10 u  50000 or u  500 m / s

Option (3) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Difficult Momentum Conservation

 4
37. A 0.20 kg projectile is fired from a point on a level ground at 50 m/s at an angle θ  = tan –1  .
 3
At the highest point of the trajectory, the projectile is hit at its centre by a bullet moving
horizontally at 500 m/s. The projectile and the bullet move independently thereafter. If the
projectile and the bullet cover a further horizontal distance of 160 m and 400 m respectively;
the mass of the bullet is
(1) 40 gm (Incorrect)
(2) 20 gm (Incorrect)
(3) 10 gm (Incorrect)
(4) 5 gm (Correct)
Correct answer: (4)

376
Solution:

4
We have tan  
3

4 3
 sin   ; cos  
5 5

u x  50 cos   30 m / s u y  50 sin   40 m / s

u 2 sin 2  4 4 1
H max   50  50     80 m
2g 5 5 2 10

Time taken by projectile to fall through a vertical distance of 80 m is given by

1 2 2h 2  80
gt  h or t   4s
2 g 10

Horizontal distance covered by projectile = 160 m

160
 Horizontal speed after being hit =
4

= 40 m/s

400
Final horizontal velocity of the bullet =
4

= 100 m/s
Applying principle of momentum conservation to horizontal motion, we get
mu + MU = mv + MV (m = Bullet, M = Ball)

m (500) + (0.2) (30) = m (100) + (0.2) (40)

400 m = 8 – 6 = 2

2 1
m=  kg  5 gm
400 200

Option (4) is correct.

377
Unit–3 : Laws of Motion
Difficult Comented Bodies
38. Two blocks with masses M1 and M2 are connected with a light spring of stiffness K Nm–1.
The blocks are placed on a smooth horizontal surface and pulled by forces F1 and F2 as
shown. When the blocks attain constant and equal acceleration; the extension in the spring
is

M1F1  M 2 F2
(1) (Correct)
 M1  M 2  K
M1F2  M 2 F1
(2) (Incorrect)
 M1  M 2  K
F1  F2
(3) (Incorrect)
K

F1  F2
(4) (Incorrect)
K
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:
Let T be the tension in the spring. The equations of motion of M2 and M1 are:
F1 – T = M2a .....(1)
T – F2 = M1a .....(2)
Adding (1) and (2), we get

F1  F2
 F1  F2   M1  M 2  a  a 
M1  M 2

 F F 
 T  F2  M1  1 2  [Using (2)]
 M1  M 2 

M1F2  M 2 F2  M1F1  M1F2



M1  M 2

378
M1F1  M 2 F2

M1  M 2

T M1F1  M 2 F2
Extension in the spring = x  K   M  M  K
1 2

Option (1) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Easy Second Law

39. The velocity of a 2 kg object initially moving at  –2i +3j – 5k m/s changes to  i + 3j+4k 
m/s after 3 s. The magnitude of force acting on the body is

(1) 2 3N (Incorrect)

(2) 2 10 N (Correct)

(3) 6 3N (Incorrect)

(4) 12 3 N (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:
Change in velocity of the body = v – u

 3 i  9 k
Change in momentum = m (v – u)

 6 i  18 k
Force = Rate of change of momentum

1
  6 i  18 k   2 i  6 k
3

F  22  62  40  2 10 N

Option (2) is correct.

379
Unit–3 : Laws of Motion
Average Second Law
40. A clock with 7 cm long light seconds hand carries a 100 gm mass at its free tip. The change
in momentum of the mass in 10 s is

11
(1)  103 Ns (Correct)
15

22
(2)  10 3 Ns (Incorrect)
15

11
(3)  105 Ns (Incorrect)
9

15
(4)  103 Ns (Incorrect)
11
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:

1
We have mass m = 10 gm = kg
100

v1  v

v2  v

360
Angle swept in 10 s   10  600
60

  600

v  v 2  v 2  2v.v cos 60

 2v 2 1  cos 60   2v 2 2 sin 2 30

2r 22 7
 2v sin 30  v   2 
T 7 100  60

380
11
 m/s
1500

100 11 11
p  m  Δv     Ns
1000 1500 15000
Option (1) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Difficult Law of Motion
41. A ball of mass m is projected vertically upwards from ground at 40 m/s and at the same time
another identical ball is thrown downwards at 10 m/s along the same vertical line from a
height of 100 m. The two balls collide and move together thereafter to finally fall on the
ground. The total time of flight of the balls is
(1) 8 sec (Incorrect)
(2) 6 sec (Incorrect)
(3) 5 sec (Correct)
(4) 4 sec (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:
For the ball moving up,

1
Distance S1  40t  gt 2 [Retarded motion]
2
For the ball moving downwards

1
S2  10t  gt 2 [Accelerated motion]
2
For the balls to collide at time ‘t’, we have

S1  S2  100m

or 50t  100m  t  2s
Upward velocity of first ball at t = 2s = v1 = u – gt
= 40 – 10(2)

381
= 20 m/s
Downward velocity of second ball at t = 2s = v2 = 10 + 10(2)
= 30 m/s
For velocity of the combination after collision
20 m (upwards) – 30 m (downwards) = 2 mv
 v = 5 m/s downwards
Height at which bodies collide
= Distance covered by the first ball in 2s

1 1
 ut  gt 2  40  2   10  4   60 m
2 2
For motion of the balls after collision
u = 5 m/s
S = 60 m
a = +10 m/s2

1 2
We have S  ut  at
2

1
60  5t  10  t 2
2
5t2 + 5t – 60 = 0
t2 + t – 12 = 0

 t  4  t  3  0  t  4s; t  3s
Neglect t = –4s (extraneous)
We get t = 3 sec.
 Total time of flight = 2 s (Before collision)
+ 3s (After collision)
=5s
Option (3) is correct.

382
Unit–3 : Laws of Motion
Average Law of Motion
42. The driver of a truck, driving at a certain speed, notices a wall ahead at a distance ‘d’. To
prevent a collision; he may turn the truck to safety by applying a turning force FT. He may
also prevent collision by a braking force FB. The forces are related as
(1) FT = 2FB (Correct)
(2) FB = 2FT (Incorrect)
(3) FT =  FB (Incorrect)
(4) FB =  FT (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:
If v is the initial speed of the truck; to stop it over a distance ‘d’; the braking force FB must produce an
acceleration ‘a’ given by
2ad = (0)2 – v2

v2
a
2d

mv 2
Breaking force FB  m a 
2d
To turn the truck to safely, he must take the truck along a circular path of radius ‘d’.
So turning force = FT = Centripetal force

mv 2

d

 FT  2FB

Option (1) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Easy Laws of Motion
43. A man standing on a weighing machine in a lift records his weight in the machine as under:
(i) w1 when the lift acceleration upwards at 5 m/s2

383
(ii) w2 when the lift acceleration downwards at 5 m/s2
(iii) w3 when the lift moves up at 5 m/s
(iv) w4 when the lift moves down at 5 m/s
Which of the following gives a correct relation between their relative values.
(1) w1 > w2 > w3 > w4 (Incorrect)
(2) w1 = w2 > w3 > w4 (Incorrect)
(3) w1 < w2 < w3 < w4 (Incorrect)
(4) w1 > w3 = w4 < w1 (Correct)
Correct answer: (4)
Solution:
When lift acceleration upwards ficticous force acts downwards and vice-versa. Therefore
w1 > w2
When left moves up or down with a constant speed, the weight of man equals his true weight. Therefore
w3 = w4
Option (4) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average Impulse
44. The given figure represents the position time graph for a body with a certain mass m.
Which of the following graphs correctly represents the impulse received by the body. Take
impulse along motion as positive and against the motion as negative.

384
(1) (Correct)

(2) (Incorrect)

(3) (Incorrect)

(4) (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:
At t = 2s; the velocity changes from u to –u. The impulse imparted equals change in linear momentum and
is opposite to the motion and hence negative. So the impulse is –2mu or 2mu in downward direction.
Similarly at t = 4s, velocity changes from –u to u. The impluse imparted is + 2mu. This process repeats
itself. These changes are shown in graph (A).
Option (1) is correct.

385
Unit–3 : Laws of Motion
Difficult Laws of Motion
45. A stone of mass m tied to a string of length ‘L’ is whirled in a vertical circle with the other
end of the string at the centre. At a certain instant of time, the stone is at its lowest position
and has a speed ‘u’. The magnitude of change in its linear momentum as it reaches a
position where the string in horizontal, is

(1) m 2 u 2  2mgL (Incorrect)

(2) 2m 2  gL (Incorrect)

(3) m 2 u 2  gL (Incorrect)

(4) m 2  u 2  gL  (Correct)

Correct answer: (4)


Solution:
As the body moves from intial position I to final positino F, we have change in velocity

v  v u
 v j ui

Δv  v2  u 2 .....(1)

1 1
Also mu 2  mv 2  2gL
2 2

u 2  v2  2gL .....(2)

 Δv  u 2  2gL  u 2  2  u 2  gL 


Change in momentum  v  m 2  u 2  gL 

Option (4) is correct.

386
Unit–3 : Laws of Motion
Average Laws of Motion

x3
46. A block of mass m is placed on a surface with a vertical cross-section given by y = . If
6
the coefficient of friction is 0.5; the maximum height above ground at which the block can
be placed without slipping is

1
(1) m (Incorrect)
2

1
(2) m (Incorrect)
3

1
(3) m (Correct)
6

2
(4) m (Incorrect)
3
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:

 x3 
We have y   
 6

With the block at height y as shown, we have

dy d  x3 
Slope tan   dx  dx  6 
 

1 x2

6
  2
3 x 2

At maximum height, the friction is maximum.

x2
We have   tan  or  0.5  x 2  1
2

or x  1

387
x3 1 1
 From y  ; we get y   m or y m
6 6 6
Hence the maximum possible height above the ground where we can place the block without slipping in
1
m.
6
Option (3) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average Tension in a Rope
47. A uniform rope of mass M and length L lying on a smooth horizontal surface is pulled from
one end by a constant force F. The tension in the rope at a distance '  ' from the end wheree
the force is applied is


(1) F (Incorrect)
L

 L
(2) F  (Correct)
 L 

 L 
(3) F  (Incorrect)
 L

2
(4) F 2 (Incorrect)
L
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:

The rope can be considered as made of two parts of length  and  L    as shown.

F
Acceleration in the rope  a  .....(1)
M
Let T be the tension at C.
Then equation of motion of length  is

388
M
F – T = mAC a =   a .....(2)
L

M
& for part CB; T  m BC a  L  a .....(3)
L

M F L 
  L     F   [Using (1)]
L M  L 
Option (2) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Difficult Laws of Motion
48. The barrel of a gun of mass M makes an angle α with the horizontal. It fires a shell of
mass m. The gun is mounted on a frictionless track. If the muzzle velocity of the shell
relative to the gun in ‘v’; the absolute muzzle speed in given by

m  m  2M 
(1) v 1 2
cos 2  (Correct)
m  M

m  m  2M 
(2) v 1 2
sin 2  (Incorrect)
m  M

(3) v
m  M cos  (Incorrect)
2M

mM
(4) v tan  (Incorrect)
2M

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:
As the recoil is frictionless, there is no horizontal force.
 Momentum along horizontal is conserved. If the shell is fired with a relative velocity v, then relative
horizontal velocity = v cos 

389
 v cos   vabs   V 

 v abs  v cos   V .....(1)

By conservation of linear momentum along horizontal, we get

m  v cos   V   MV  0

mv cos 
or V .....(2)
mM
V being the recoil velocity of the gun.

Vertical component of absolute velocity of the gun = v sin 

2 2
 vabs   v cos   V    vsin  

 v 2  V 2  2vV cos 

m2 v2 cos2   mvcos  
 v2  2
 2v   cos 
 m  M  mM 

m 2 cos 2  2m cos 2 
 v 1 2

m  M mM

m 2  2m  m  M 
 v 1 2
cos 2 
m  M

m 2  2mM
 v 1 2
cos 2 
 m  M

m  m  2M 
 v 1 2
cos 2 
m  M
 Option (1) is correct.

390
Unit–3 : Laws of Motion
Average Varying Acceleration

49. A uniform flexible chain of length ' ' with mass λ kgm–1 passes over a small, light and
smooth pulley. It is released from rest with a length x on one side. Assuming that the
chain accelerates downwards from this side; the acceleration of the chain as a function of
‘x’ is

 2x 
(1)  1   g (Incorrect)
  

 2x 
(2)   1 g (Correct)
  

 2x 
(3)   1  g (Incorrect)
  

 2x 
(4) 1   g (Incorrect)
  

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:
From the diagram,

Mass of chain on side x  x kg

Downward force =  mass  g  xg

Mass on side    x      x   kg

Weight     x  g kg

Net unbalanced force = xg     x    g

  2 x    g

Force 2 x  
 Acceleration of the chain   g
mass 

391
 2x 
   1 g
  
Option (2) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average F.B.D.
50. A and B are two blocks placed on frictionless inclined planes making angles of 300 and 600
respectively with the vertical. The relative vertical acceleration of ‘A’ with respect to B is
(1) 4.9 m/s2 upwards (Incorrect)
(2) 4.9 m/s2 (Correct)
(3) zero (Incorrect)
(4) 9.8 m/s2 downwards (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
Taking free body diagram of A; the acceleration down the plane in

mg cos 30
a1   g cos 300
m

Components of the acceleration a1 along horizontal and vertical are


a1cos 30 vertical = (g cos 30) cos 30
= g cos2 30 vertically downwards and a1 sin 300 along horizontal.
Similarly component of acceleration of a2 (for block B) is g cos2600 vertically downwards.

 Acceleration of A w.r.t. B along vertical


= g cos2 30 – g cos2 60

 3 2  1  2  g
2
 g         4.9 m / s downwards
 2   2   2
 

Option (2) is correct.

392
Unit–3 : Laws of Motion
Average Laws of Motion
51. A pendulum is suspended from the ceiling of a lift. The time period of the pendulum in the
lift moving upwards with an acceleration ‘a’ is measured to be half the period when it has an
equal downwards acceleration. The value of ‘a’ is (Take = g 10 m/s2)
(1) 10 m/s2 (Incorrect)
(2) 3 m/s2 (Incorrect)
(3) 4.5 m/s2 (Incorrect)
(4) 6 m/s2 (Correct)
Correct answer: (4)
Solution:
In lift accelerating downwards


T  2 .....(1) (Net acceleration = g – a)
g a

In lift accelerating upwards

 T
T '  2  .....(2) (Net acceleration = g + a)
ga 2

(1)  (2) gives

ga
2 
ga

or g + a = 4g – 4a

30
5a = 3g or a   6 m / s2
5
Option (4) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average Laws of Motion
52. A block of mass 2.5 kg is placed on a rough horizontal surface. The block requires a minimum
force of 15 N along horizontal to slide. It is further observed that the block slides through

393
the first 10 m after being gently pushed and set in motion with 15 N force.
Take g = 10 m/s2. The values of coefficient of static and kinetic friction are respetively.
(1) 0.6 ; 0.6 (Incorrect)
(2) 0.6 ; 0.52 (Correct)
(3) 0.52 ; 0.6 (Incorrect)
(4) 0.6 ; 0.26 (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
Given m = 2.5 kg, Flimiting = 15 N

F 15 15
As F  sR  smg ; we get S     0.6
mg 2.5  10 25

1
Using S  ut  at 2 .
2

2S 2  10
We get a  2
  0.8 ms 2 (As u = 0)
t 5 5

Friction in motion is  k R   k mg

 Fapplied  f fr  kinetic   ma

15   k  2.5 10    2.5  0.8 

13 52
k    0.52
25 100
Option (2) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average F.B.D.
53. A constant force of 20N is applied on a block of mass M (= 2 kg) connected to two blocks
of masses m1 and m2 as shown. The pulleys are light and frictionless. If m1 = 1kg and m2 =
2kg, then the magnitudes of acceleration a1 of m1; a2 of m2 and A of M are related as

394
[Take g = 10 m/s2]

(1) a = a2 = 10 m/s2, a1 = 5 m/s2 (Incorrect)


(2) a = a1 = a2 = 6 m/s2 (Correct)
(3) a = 2 m/s2 a1 = a2 = 4 m/s2 (Incorrect)
(4) a = a1 = a2 = 2 m/s2 (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:

From free body diagrams (a), (b) and (c)


F – T = Ma or 20 – T = 2a .....(1)
2T – m1g = or 2T – 10 = a1 .....(2)
M2g – T = m2a2 or 20 – T = 2a2 .....(3)
Again if M moves a distance x towards left and m2 moves down through x; then m2 moves upwards
through 2x
 a + a2 = 2a1 .....(4)
(1) + (2) + (3) gives 20 – 10 + 20 = 2 (a + a2) + a1
or 30 = 2 (2a1) + a1 = 5a1
 a1 = 6 m/s2

395
 From (2); (2T = 16 or T = 8 N)
Using T in (1) & (3), we get
a = a1 = a2 = 6 m/s2
Option (2) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Easy F.B.D.
54. A balloon of mass M is descending with an acceleration a (<g). A mass m is removed from
'a'
the balloon and it begin to rise wth an acceleration . The mass removed is
2

Ma
(1) (Incorrect)
ga

Ma
(2) (Incorrect)
ga

3Ma
(3) (Incorrect)
g  a 
3Ma
(4) (Correct)
 2g  a 
Correct answer: (4)
Solution:

Fig. (a) shows force acting on balloon descending down with acceleration a. F is bouyant force of balloon.

396
Equation of motion is
Mg – F = Ma .....(1)
a
Fig. (b) shows forces acting when ballon ascends upwards with acceleration .
2
The equation of motion is
a
F   M  m  g  M  m  .....(2)
2
Adding (1) & (2);
a
Mg   M  m  g   3M  m 
2
a
or mg   3M  m 
2

 a  3Ma
or mg   
 2 2

3Ma
or m
2g  a
Option (4) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average F.B.D.
55. A chord conncts two bodies of mass m1 and m2 placed on an inclined plane. The coefficient
of friction between the inclined plane and m1 is μ1 and that with m2 is μ 2 . When the motion
of blocks is about to take place downwards; the inlination α will be

  m  2 m 2 
(1) tan 1  1 1  (Correct)
 m1  m 2 

397
  m   2 m1 
(2) tan 1  1 2  (Incorrect)
 m1  m 2 

  mm 
(3) tan 1  1 2 1 2  (Incorrect)
 1m1  2 m 2 

 m  m 2  1 2 
(4) tan 1  1   (Incorrect)
 m1  m 2  1   2 

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:
Fig. shows the forces acting on the system. The system is in equilibrium, therefore
for m1; we have

m1g sin   T  1m1g cos  .....(1)

For m2; we have

m 2 g sin   T   2 m 2g cos  .....(2)

Equating T from (1) and (2) we get

m1g sin   1m1g cos    2 m 2g cos   m 2 g sin 

g sin   m1  m 2   g cos   1m1   2 m 2 

  m  2m2 
tan    1 1 
 m1  m 2 

Option (1) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average Laws of Motion
56. A smooth inclined plane has two parallel and similar tracks provided on it. A particle P,
released from rest, from the top of the plane, of length L (on one of the tracks), slides down
the plane and reaches its bottom in 2n seconds.
A second particle, Q, projected (simultaneously) from the bottom of the plane (on the other

398
track), with a speed v, goes up the plane a distance  , comes to rest there, and when it
reaches the bottom of the plane again, the total time of its complete journey is also 2n

seconds. The ratio   equals
L

1
(1)   (Correct)
4

1
(2)   (Incorrect)
2

2
(3)   (Incorrect)
3

3
(4)   (Incorrect)
4

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:
For the particle P, the acceleration down the plane is g sin  (  = angle of inclination of the plane).

1 2
Hence, L  0   g sin   2n 
2

 L   2g sin   n 2

2n
The time, for the upward and downwards journeys of the particle Q, would be   n  seconds. Also it
2
would again experience an acceleration  g sin   down the plane. We, therefore, have

(Consider the upward journey of particle Q)

O  v   g sin   n

 v   g sin   n

The distance,  , moved by the particle Q, up the plane, is related to v through the relation.

O 2  v 2  2  g sin   

399
2

 
v2

 g sin   n
2g sin  2

2
  g sin   n 1 1
   2

L 2  2g sin  n 4
Option (1) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average Impulse
57. The position time graph of a particle (mass = 5kg) is as shown. The impulse, on this particle,
around t = 5s and t = 10s, would be

(1) 20 kg ms–1 and –20 kg ms–2, respectively (Incorrect)


(2) –20 kg ms–1 and 20 kg ms–2, respectively (Correct)
(3) –5 kg ms–1 and 20 kg ms–2, respectively (Incorrect)
(4) –20 kg ms–1 and 25 kg ms–2, respectively (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
As seen from the graph, the particle is
(i) at rest from t = 0 to t = 5 s

 5  15 
(ii) moving with a constant velocity of   m / s , i.e. –4 ms–1
 7.5  5 

400
(iii) at rest again from t = 7.5 s to t = 10 s

 25  5 
(iv) moving with a constant velocity of   m / s i.e. 4 ms–1
 15  10 

 Change in momentum (= impulse), around t = 5s, is [(5×–4) – 0] kg ms–1 = –20 kg ms–1


and change in momentum (= impulse), around t = 10s, is [5×4 – 0] kg ms–1 = –20 kg ms–1
Option (2) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average Second Law
58. A stream of glass balls, moving vertically upwards with a speed u, strike a horizontal plate
(of mass M) and rebound, therefrom, with the same speed. The disc can be kept floating
horizontally, if the number of glass balls (each of mass m), striking it per second, equals.

 2mU 
(1)   (Incorrect)
 Mg 

 Mg 
(2)   (Correct)
 2mU 

 Mg 
(3)   (Incorrect)
 mU 

 mU 
(4)   (Incorrect)
 Mg 
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
Let N be the required number of balls striking the plate per second. The change in momentum of each ball,
upon striking the plate is
mU – (–mU) = 2mU
 Total change in momentum, per second, when N balls strike the ball in one second, is
(2mU) × N = 2mUN.
This rate of change of momentum equals the force exerted on the plate by the glass balls, striking it from

401
below. It is this force that balances the weight of the horizontally floating plate. Hence,
2mUN = Mg

 Mg 
 N  
 2mU 
Option (2) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average Varying Force
59. A particle, of mass 200g, is initially moving with a speed of 15 ms–1, along the X–axis. It is
acted upon by a force that remains directed along the X–axis but whose magnitude varies
with time in the manner shown. The final speed of the particle, at t = 20s, would be

(1) 160 ms–1 (Incorrect)


(2) 165 ms–1 (Incorrect)
(3) 180 ms–1 (Incorrect)
(4) 185 ms–1 (Correct)
Correct answer: (4)
Solution:

dp
We known that F 
dt

 Fdt  dp

  Fdt   dp  p f  pi

402
The integral, on the left, representing impulse, equals the area under the F vs t graph.
From the given figure, this area is

1 1  1  
   4  3    4  2  4  1    6  1    4  2  4  1    2  3   N  s
2 2  2  
= 34 N–s
 Change in momentum = 34 N–s

 200 
 Final momentum, after 20 s =  1000  15  34  N  s
 
= 37 (N–s)

 37  1
 Final speed of the ball =  200  ms
 1000 
= 185 ms–1
Option (4) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average Momentum Conservation
60. An object, of mass 5m (initially at rest), breaks up into three fragments whose masses are
in the ratio 1:1:3. The two equal mass pieces fly off with equal speeds, along mutually
perpendicular directions. If the speed of the heavier fragment is v, the speed of each of the
other two fragments, is

(1) 3 2v (Incorrect)

 2
(2)   v (Incorrect)
 3 

(3) 1.5 2 v (Correct)

 2
(4)   v (Incorrect)
 1.5 

Correct answer: (3)

403
Solution:
Let u be the common speed of either of the two ‘equal mass’ fragments. The total momentum, of these two
fragments, has a manitude
1
2 2 2
p   mu    mu  
 

 p  2 mu
This is directed midway between the two mutually perpendicular
directions. Since the total momentum, after the ‘break up’, has to again
equal zero, we must have,

 3m  v  2  mu 

 3 
 u
 2

 v  1.5 2 v 
Option (3) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average Second Law
61. A system of two masses M1 and M2, a smooth inclined plane,
a light inextensible string and a smooth pulley is set up as
shown. The time taken by the mass M1, to get hauled up
the plane, when the mass M 2 is ‘let-go’, is t 1 . On
interchanging the two masses, the corresponding time is t2.
 t1 
The ratio  t  equals
 2
1
2
 M1  M 2 sin  
(1)   (Correct)
 M 2  M1 sin  

1
2
 M 2  M1 sin  
(2)   (Incorrect)
 M1  M 2 sin  

 M 2  M1 sin  
(3)   (Incorrect)
 M1  M 2 sin  

404
 M1  M 2 sin  
(4)   (Incorrect)
 M 2  M1 sin  

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:
Let a1 be the common acceleration of the two masses in the case shown. Using the free body diagrams for
the two masses, we get

T  M1g sin   M1a1

M 2 g  T  M 2 a1

Adding, we get

g  M2  M1 sin    M1  M2  a1

 a1 
 M 2  M1 sin   g
 M1  M 2 
We have,

1
L  0  a1t12
2

2L 2L  M1  M 2 
or t12  
a1  M 2  M1 sin   g

On interchanging M1 and M2, we would have

2L 2L  M 2  M1 
t 22  
a 2  M1  M 2 sin   g

t12  M1  M 2 sin  
 
t 22  M 2  M1 sin  

1
2
t  M  M 2 sin  
 1  1 
t 2  M 2  M1 sin  

Option (1) is correct.

405
Unit–3 : Laws of Motion
Average F.B.D.
62. A box, of mass M, is (i) pullled (ii) pushed, on a horizontal floor, by applying a force F (is a
cirection inclined at an angle θ to the horizontal), in each case. The coefficient of friction,
between the base of the box and the floor is μ .
If the time taken, to move the box through a distance L, in the two cases is t 1 and t2,
 t1 
respectively, the ratio  t  is
 2

1
2
 F  cos    sin    Mg 
(1)   (Incorrect)
 F  cos    sin    Mg 

1
2
 F  cos    sin    Mg 
(2)   (Incorrect)
 F  cos    sin    Mg 

1
2
 F  cos    sin    Mg 
(3)   (Correct)
 F  cos    sin    Mg 

1
2
 F  cos    sin    Mg 
(4)   (Incorrect)
 F  cos    sin    Mg 

Correct answer: (3)


Solution:
The free body diagrams, for the two cases, are as shown. For case (i) we have
N + F sin  = Mg

or N = (Mg – F sin  )

406
and Fcos   N  Ma1

F cos     Mg  Fsin  
 a1 
M

F  cos    sin    Mg



M

2L 2ML
 t12  
a1 F  cos    sin    Mg

For case (ii), we have

N '   Mg  Fsin  

and Fcos   N '  Ma 2

F  cos    sin    Mg


or a2 
M

2L 2ML
 t 22  
a 2 F  cos    sin    Mg

1
2
t  F  cos    sin    Mg 
 1  
t 2  F  cos    sin    Mg 

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average Tension in Strings
63. Three identical blocks, of mass M each, are connected to each other by inextensible strings
and are kept on a smooth horizontal floor. On applying a force F, as shown, the system
moves with an acceleration a. If the tensions in the two strings are T1 and T2, respectively,

F F
the ratios   and   equal respectively to
 T2   T1 

407
(1) 3 and 1.5 (Incorrect)
(2) 1.5 and 3 (Correct)
(3) 2 and 1 (Incorrect)
(4) 1 and 2 (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
For the first mass, on the right, we have

F  T2  Ma

For the second mass, we have

T2  T1  Ma

For the third mass, we have


T1 = Ma
Adding the three equations, we get

F
F  3Ma or a
3M

M.F F
 F  T2  
3M 3

2F
 T2 
3

M.F. F
Also, T1  Ma  
3M 3

F 3
   1.5
T2 2

F
and 3
T1

Option (2) is correct.

408
Unit–3 : Laws of Motion
Average Laws of Motion
64. An elevator, in a building, starts from rest; accelerates uniformly upwards. It takes a time
t1 to go up to second floor, situated at a height H, above the ground. The corresponding
time, for its downward journey, is t2.
If a person were to hold a mass M with the help of a massless string, the ratio of the
respective tensions in the string, in the two cases, would be

 gt 2
1  2H   t 22 
(1)  2 (Correct)
 gt 2
2  2H   t 1 

 gt 2
1  2H   t12 
(2)  2 (Incorrect)
gt 2  2H   2 
2
t

 2gt 2
1  H   t 22 
(3)  2 (Incorrect)
 2gt 2  H  1 
2
t

 2gt 2
1  H  t12 
(4)  2 (Incorrect)
 2gt 2  H  2 
2
t

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:
For the upward journey; if a1 is the (uniform) acceleration of the elevator, we have

1 2
H a 1t 1
2

 2H 
 a1   2 
 t1 

The apparent weight, of the mass M, during the upward journey, would be

 2H 
W1  M  g  a1   M  g  2 
 t1 

409
For the downward journey, if a2 is the (uniform) acceleration, of the elevator, we have

1 2
H a2t2
2

 2H 
 a2   2 
 t2 

The apparent weight, of the mass M, during the downward journey, would be

 2H 
W2  M  g  a 2   M  g  2 
 t2 

The tensions, in the string, in the two cases, equal these apparent weights. Hence, the ratio of the tensions,
in the two cases, is

T1 W1  gt2  2H  t22 
   12  2 
T2 W2  gt 2  2H  t1 

Option (1) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average Second Law
65. A system of two masses, a light inextensible string and a smooth pulley, is set up as shown.
The masses are ‘let-go’ at t = 0 s and are allowed to move for n seconds. At t = n, the string
is suddenly cut-off. The ratio of the displacements of the masses m and M, in the next N
seconds, would equal.

 N M  m  2M  m n 
(1)   (Incorrect)
 N M  m  2 M  m n 

 n M  m   2 M  m  N 
(2)   (Incorrect)
 n M  m  2 M  m N 

410
 n M  m  2 M  m N 
(3)   (Incorrect)
 n M  m   2 M  m  N 

 N M  m  2 M  m n 
(4)   (Correct)
 N M  m  2M  m n 

Correct answer: (4)


Solution:
The equations of motion of the two masses, for 0 < t < n, are
T – mg = ma and Mg – T = Ma

 Mm
These give a   g
Mm

Hence the speeds of the two masses at the end of n seconds are

Mm 
for mass m    gn  upwards 
Mm

Mm 
for mass M    gn  downwards 
Mm

The displacements of two masses, is N seconds, after the string is cut, now, are those of two freely falling
masses having these respective initial velocities.

Hence,

 M  m   1 2
S1 = Displacement of mass m (in the next N seconds) =   gn  N   g  N
 M  m   2

 M  m  N gN
   n   gN   2  M  m  n  N  M  m  
 M  m  2 2M  m 

 gN 
    N  M  m   2  M  m  n 
 2 M  m 

411
 M  m  1 2
and S2 = Displacement of mass M, in the next N seconds =    gn.N  gN 
 M  m  2 

gN
   2  M  m  n  N  M  m  
2 M  m

S1  N  M  m   2  M  m  n 
  
S2  N  M  m   2  M  m  n 

Option (4) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Easy Second Law
66. A particle, of mass 100g, initially at rest at the origin, is acted upon by two forces F1 and F2,
(in the X–Y plane), directed as shown, for 10s. The coordinates of the particle, at t = 10s, in
m would be (nearly)

(1) (22.8), (–9.14) (Incorrect)


(2) (11.4), (–4.57) (Correct)
(3) (11.4), (–4.57) (Incorrect)
(4) (2.64), (–4.57) (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
We have,

F1  i 10cos 300   10sin 300  j 103


 

412
  5 3 i   5  j 10 3 N
 
 

and F2  20cos  450  i  20sin  400  j 103 N


 

  10 2 i  10 2 j 103 N
   
 
 Net force on the particle = (F1 + F2)

 F   5 3  10 2 i  5 10 2 j 103 N


   
 

  22.80 i   9.14 j 103 N


 

F
 Net acceleration of the particle =
M

 22.80 i  9.14j  3
a   10
 0.1 

 0.228 i  .0914 j

 Displacement, along X–axis, in 10 s

1
 0  a x  10 2
2

 50a x  50   .228  m  11.4m

Displacement, along Y–axis, in 10 s

1
 0  a y  102  50 a y
2

 50  .0914  m    4.57 m

 The coordinates of the particle, at t = 10 s,

are 11.4 m  ,  4.57  m 

Option (2) is correct.

413
Unit–3 : Laws of Motion
Average Second Law
67. Two identical particles, each of mass, m initially located at the points (–a, 0) and (a, 0), are
joined to each other by a massless string of length 2a. If a force F  = – F j  , acts continuously
on the midpoint of this string, the relative (horizontal) acceleration of the two masses, when
4a
the (horizontal) distance between then becomes , is
3

0.4 5 F
(1) (Correct)
m

0.2 5 F
(2) (Incorrect)
m

0.25 8 F
(3) (Incorrect)
m

0.5 8 F
(4) (Incorrect)
m
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:
The ‘set-up’ would be of the form shown here when the horizontal distance between the particles becomes
 4a 
 .
 3 
If T is the tension in each string at this instant, we would have

T cos   T cos   F

F
or T
2 cos 

414
The horizontal force on each particle in T sin  . Hence the horizontal acceleration, of each particle, is
T sin 
.
m
The particles are approaching each other (The particle, on the left of the origin, experiences a horizontal
force, directed towards right due to the tensino in the ‘right side’ part of the string and vice-versa). Hence
2 T sin 
their relative (horizontal) acceleration is .
m

2a
 Relative (horizontal) acceleration of the two masses when the distance between them becomes , is
3

2 T sin  2 F F
 . sin    tan  
m m 2 cos  m

F  2a 3 
 . 1
m  2 2

2  2a  
a    
  3  

 0.4 5 F 
  
 m 

Option (1) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Difficult Varying Force
68. The ‘set-up’ shown here, is used to raise a mass M through a height
h above the ground. The vertically upward force,F (z) applied by
an external agency, varies with the height, z, above the ground as
F (z) = F (0) – kz.
The instantaneous speed, acquired by the mass M, when it has
been raised through a height h, is given by
1
 2h  F  0   Mg   kh 2  2

(1)   (Incorrect)
 M 

415
1
 2h  F  0    kh 2 
2

(2)   (Incorrect)
 M 

1
 2h  F  0   Mg   kh 2 
2

(3)   (Correct)
 M 

1
 h  F  0   Mg   kh 2 
2

(4)   (Incorrect)
 M 

Correct answer: (3)


Solution:
The net upward force, acting on the mass M, when it is at a height z above the ground, is

F  net   F  z   Mg

  F  0   kz  Mg 

Let a be the instantaneous acceleration at the height. We have


Ma = F (net)

dv
M  F  0   kz  Mg
dt
(v = instantaneous velocity)

dv dv dz dv
But  . v
dt dz dt dz

dv F  0   kz  Mg
 v 
dz M

or v dv 
 F  0   kz  Mg  dz
M

 If v is the instantaneous speed of the mass M when it is at a height h above the ground, we have

416
v h
F  0   kz  Mg
 v dv  
0 0 M
dz

2  kh 2 
 v2 
M 
h   
F 0  Mg  2 


1
2
1 
or v    2h  F  0   M  g  kh 2  
M 
Option (3) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average Second Law
69. Two massess M and 2M, are arranged to be at the same initial height H, above the ground,
by using a massless inextensible string and a smooth pulley. The masses are ‘let-go’, at
H
t = 0, and the string is suddenly cut when the mass M has risen through a height   . The
2
velocity, with which the mass 2M would hit the ground, is given by

(1) 4gH (Incorrect)


5

3gH
(2) (Incorrect)
4

4gH
(3) (Correct)
3

417
gH
(4) (Incorrect)
2

Correct answer: (3)


Solution:
The equations of motion of the two masses are T – Mg = Ma
and 2Mg – T = 2Ma

Mg g
a 
3M 3

H H
When the mass M rises through a height , the mass 2M falls down through a distance .
2 2

H
The downward velocity of mass 2M, when it has moved downward through a distance , is, given by
2

 g   H  gH
v2  o2  2     
 3  2  3

gH
 v
3

At this instant the string is cut. The mass, 2m, therefore, falls subsequently as a freely falling mass with an
H
acceleration g. It is, at this instant, at a height above the ground. Hence the velocity, V, with which it
2
would hit the ground, is given by

H
V2  v2  2  g   
2

 gH 
or V2     gH
 3 

4gH
or V
3

Option (3) is correct.

418
Unit–3 : Laws of Motion
Average Second Law
70. A trolley, having an open rear end, has a small box at mass m, put on it at a distance  from
that open rear end. The coefficient of friction between the box and the trolley is  . If the
trolley (initially at rest on a horizontal floor), were to be given a constant acceleration a, the
distance, it would travel before the box falls off it, would equal

(1) 
 a  g  (Incorrect)
a

a
(2)  (Incorrect)
 a  g 
a
(3)  (Correct)
 a  g 

(4) 
 a  g  (Incorrect)
a
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:
When trolley accelerates from left to right, with an acceleration a, the box has a force (= ma), acting on it
from right to left. The free body diagram, showing the forces acting on the box, is as shown. The net force,
on the box, directed from right to left, is (ma –  N) = (ma –  mg) = m(a –  g).

m  a  g 
Hence the net acceleratino of the box, directed from right to left, is i.e.  a  g  .
m
The box needs to move a distance  (from right to left) before it falls off. If it takes a time t, for this
purpose, we would have

1
  0  a  g  t 2
2
1
2
 2 
 t 
  a  g  
The distance, s, moved by the trolley, in this time, is

419
1 1 2
s  0  at 2  a
2 2  a  g 

 a 
  
 a  g 
Option (3) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average F.B.D.
71. A system of three masses m1, m2, m3 [m3 > (m1 + m2)], a smooth inclined plane, two smooth
light pulleys and inextensible massless strings, is set up as shown. The acceleration, of the
mass m3, if the masses were ‘let-go’, would equal

 m 3  m 2  m1  g
(1) (Incorrect)
 m1  m 2  m3 

 m3  m 2 sin   m1  g
(2) (Correct)
 m1  m 2  m3 

 m3  m 2 cos   m1  g
(3) (Incorrect)
 m1  m 2  m3 

 m3  m 2 sin   m1  g
(4) (Incorrect)
 m1  m 2  m3 
Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
Let (i) T1 be the tension in the string between masses m1 and m2 and (ii) T2 the tension in the string between
masses m2 and m3.
The free body diagrams of the three masses (which would all have an acceleration, say a, of the same
magnitude) are as shown.

420
Their corresponding equations of motion are

T1  m1g  m1a

T2  T1  m 2 g sin   m 2 a

and m3g  T2  m3a

Adding, we get

 m3  m2 sin   m1  g   m1  m2  m3  a

 a
 m3  m 2 sin   m1  g
 m1  m 2  m3 
Option (2) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average F.B.D.
72. A smooth inlclined plane, of mass m1, has a mass m2 kept on
it, as shown. The inclined plane is kept on a smooth horizontal
surface. A light inextensible string and a light smooth pulley
are used to connect it to a mass M hanging vertically. It is
observed that when the mass M is ‘let-go’, the mass m2 does
not slip over the inclined plane. The relation between M, m1
and m2, is, then

m1  m 2
(1) M (Correct)
 cot   1

421
m1  m 2
(2) M (Incorrect)
 tan   1
m1  m 2 sin 
(3) M (Incorrect)
 cot   1
m1  m 2 sin 
(4) M (Incorrect)
 tan   1
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:
Let ‘a’ be the common acceleration of the mass M and the
(staying intact) ‘combination’ of the inclined plane and the mass
m2. The mass m2, by itself, can slide down the inclined plane
with an acceleration g sin  . It would not slip over the inclined
plane if the component of the horizontal acceleration, a, of the
‘combination’, equals g sin  . We thus need to have

a cos   g sin  .....(1)

To find ‘a’ we look at the free body diagrams of (i) mass M and (ii) the ‘combination’ of masses m1 and m2.
We then have,
Mg – T = Ma
and T = (m1 + m2)a

 Mg   M  m1  m 2  a

M
 a g
 M  m1  m 2 
Putting this value of ‘a’, in the above equation (1), we get

 M 
 g  cos   g sin 
 M  m1  m 2 

 M cot   M  m1  m 2

422
 M
 m1  m 2 
 cot   1
Option (1) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average F.B.D.
73. A system of two blocks, of masses m1 and m2, a smooth inclined plane, a light pulley and an
inextensible light string, arranged as shown, is observed to be in equilibrium. If the normal
reaction, due to the inclined plane, on the mass m1 equals that due to a mass M, on a
horizontal surface, we would have

(1) M  m12  m22 (Incorrect)

(2) M  m12  m22 (Correct)

(3) M   m1 sin   m2  (Incorrect)

(4) M   m1 cos   m 2  (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (2)


Solution:
The free body diagrams, for the masses m1 and m2, are as shown. Since the system is in equilibrium (i.e.
has zero acceleration), we have

m 2g  T  0 .....(1)

and N  m1g cos  .....(2)

and T  m1g sin   0 .....(3)

423
Adding (1) & (3)

 m2g  m1g sin    0


m2
 sin  
m1

 N  m1g cos   m1g 1  sin 2 

m 22
 m1g 1 
m12

m 2
1  m 22 
 m1g
m1
g m
2
1  m 22 

For the mass m1 on the horizontal surface, we have


N = Mg

 Mg  m12  m22

or M m 2
1  m22 

Option (2) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average Second Law

74. A given box gets crushed when a mass of M kg is kept on its top. If this box were to be kept
in an elevator, with a mass m on its top (m < M), the box would get crushed if the elevator
were to start

M
(1) ascending with an acceleration   g (Incorrect)
m

m
(2) descending with an acceleration   g (Incorrect)
M

424
M 
(3) ascending with an acceleration   1 g (Correct)
m 

 m
(4) descending with an acceleration  1   g (Incorrect)
 M
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:
For the box to get crushed, the apparent weight, of the mass m, should be come equal to the normal weight
of mass M (= Mg).
The apparent weight needs to increase. Hence the elevator must start ascending with an acceleration ‘a’,
such that

m  a  g   Mg

 a
M  m g
m

M 
   1 g
m 
Option (3) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average F.B.D.
75. A simple pendulum, having a bob of mass m, is suspended from the roof of a car. It is
observed that when the car starts moving with an acceleration a, the string, of the pendulum,
gets inclined at an angle  to the vertical. The acceleration, a, of the car, and the tension,
T, in the string of the pendulum are, then, given by
(1) a  g sec ; T  mg tan  (Incorrect)

(2) a  g tan ; T  mg sec  (Correct)

(3) a  g tan ; T  mg tan  (Incorrect)

(4) a  g sec ; T  mg sec  (Incorrect)


Correct answer: (2)

425
Solution:
The three forces, keeping the bob, in equilibrium, in the accelerated car are, as shown. We then have, by
Lami’s theorem.

ma mg T
 
sin        
sin     sin
2  2

g sin 
 a  g tan 
cos 

1
and T  mg  mg sec 
cos 
Option (2) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average Laws of Motion
76. A train starts moving with a uniform velocity u, along a straight horizontal track, at t = 0.
Brakes are applied to it, at t = 100 s, and these produce a uniform retardation ‘a’, on the
train, for the next 10 s.
The displacement (relative to the train, of a small object, kept on a smooth long (horizontal
top table), as a function of time, would be represented by the graph, labelled as graph

426
(1) A (Correct)
(2) B (Incorrect)
(3) C (Incorrect)
(4) D (Incorrect)
Correct answer: (1)
Solution:
There is no force acting on the object as long as the train is moving with a uniform velocity. The object, in
this inertial frame of reference, does not move, relative to the train, from (t = 0) to (t = 100 s).
When the brakes are applied, the train experiences a backward force that produces a uniform retardation.
The object would, therefore, experience a forward force that would give it a forward acceleration (=a).
The displacement, of the object, relative to the train, from (t = 100 s) to (t = 110 s) would then be
represented by

1
s  ut  at 2
2
(Where t would now take the values from 0 to 10).
The graph, showing the displacement of the object, relative to the train, from (t = 0 s) to (t = 110 s), would,
therefore, have the form shown in graph A.
Option (1) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Difficult F.B.D.
77. A system of two light smooth pulleys and light inextensible strings, has two masses M1 and
M2, attached as shown. The pulley P2 is movable and pulley P1 is a fixed pulley. If the mass
M2 moves up and the mass M1 moves down, the accelerations of the masses M1 and M2,
are, respectively

427
 4M1  2M 2   2M1  M 2 
(1)   g and  g (Correct)
 4M1  M 2   4M1  M 2 

 2M1  M 2   4M1  2M 2 
(2)   g and  g (Incorrect)
 4M1  M 2   4M1  M 2 

 M1  2M 2   2M1  4M 2 
(3)   g and  g (Incorrect)
 4M1  M 2   4M1  M 2 

 4M1  2M 2   2M1  M 2 
(4)   g and  g (Incorrect)
 4M1  2M 2   4M1  2M 2 

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:
Let T1 and T2 be the tensions in the strings, as shown. We see that
T1 = 2T2
Pulley P2 is massless. If there is a net force on it, acceleration will approach infinity. For the mass M2,
moving upward, the acceleration will be half that of the mass M1, moving downwards. [This is because a
 x 
downward displacement, x , of mass M1, will result in an upward displacement of   of mass M2].
 2 
Hence the equations of motion of the two masses are

a
T1  M 2 g  M 2 .....(1)
2

and M1g  T2  M1a .....(2)

a
Also 2T 2  M 2 g  M 2 .....(3)
2

Again 2M1g  2T2  2M1a .....(4) [From (2)]

Adding (3) and (4), we get

a
 2M1  M 2  g   M 2  4M1 
2

428
2  2M1  M 2   4M1  2M 2 
 a g g
 4M1  M 2   4M1  M 2 

The acceleration of mass M1 is, therefore,

 4M1  2M 2 
  g and that of mass M2 is
 4M1  M 2 


 2M1  M 2  g
 4M1  M 2 
Option (1) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Average Laws of Motion

78. A block, of mass M, is kept on a smooth inclined plane, of incline ‘1 in  ’. When the
inclined plane is given a horizontal acceleration a, it is observed that the block says
stationary relative to the ‘incline’. The acceleration, a, equals

g
(1) (Incorrect)
2  1

g
(2) (Correct)
2 1

1
(3) g  (Incorrect)


(4) g
 2 1  (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (2)
Solution:
For the given incline, we have

1
sin  

429
 2 1 
cos    
  
 

The acceleration, of the block, down the inclined plane is g sin  .


The component of the horizontal acceleration, a, of the ‘incline’,
along the inclined plane, is a cos  .
The block will remain stationary, relative to the incline, if

a cos   g sin 

or a  g tan 

1
g
2 1
Option (2) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Difficult F.B.D.
79. An insect, of mass 7 m, is at the bottom of a hemispherical bowl of radius R. The coefficient
of friction, between the legs of the insect, and the surface of the bowl, is  . The insect
starts crawling up the hemisphere, but slides down after climbing up a height h above its
starting point. The equation, connecting h and R, is

(1) h 2   2R    h  R  0 (Correct)

(2) h 2   2R    h  R  0 (Incorrect)

(3) h 2  2Rh  R  0 (Incorrect)

(4) h 2   2R    h  R  0 (Incorrect)

Correct answer: (1)


Solution:
The insect can keep on crawling up till the component of its weight, down the bowl, equals the force of
limiting friction between the insect and the bowl.
At the height, h, we then have

430
N  mg cos 
and F = force of limiting friction

 N  mg sin 

   tan 

   
In OAB, OAB        
 2  

 
  
2 

  OB R  h 
 tan      
2  AB R2  R  h
2

cot  
R  h 
or
 2hR  h 
2

2hR  h 2
 We have 
Rh

 2hR  h 2    R  h 

or  2R    h  h 2  R  0
or h 2   2R    h  R  0

Option (1) is correct.

Unit–3 : Laws of Motion


Difficult F.B.D.
80. A force, F, acts, in the direction shown, on a block of mass M. The coefficient of friction,
between the block, and the horizontal surface is  . If the block is initially at rest, the speed
acquired by it when it has moved a distance, s, on the horizontal surface, is

431
1
2
 2s 
(1)   F  sin    cos    Mg   (Incorrect)
M 
1
2
 2s 
(2)   F  sin    cos    Mg   (Incorrect)
M 
1
2
 2s 
(3)   F  cos    sin    Mg   (Correct)
M 
1
2
 2s 
(4)   F  cos    sin    Mg   (Incorrect)
M 
Correct answer: (3)
Solution:
The free body diagram, for the forces acting on the block, is as shown.
We then have N  Mg  Fsin 
and f = force of friction

 N    Mg  Fsin 

The net force, accelerating the block, along the horizontal surface, is

FNet  F cos   f

 Fcos     Mg  Fsin 

 F  cos    sin    Mg

 F
Acceleration, along the horizontal,    , is given by
 m

 F  cos    sin   
a  g 
 M 

432
If v is the speed of the block, after moving a distance s, we have

v 2  o 2  2a s

2s
 v2   F  cos    sin   Mg 
M
1
2
 2s 
 v    F  cos    sin   Mg  
M 
Option (3) is correct.

433
UNIT–4 : WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

Learning Objectives
After going through unit, you would be able to understand, appreciate and apply the following concepts:
 Scientific definition of work.
 Expression for work done by
(i) a constant
(ii) a variable force
 Area under F vs x graph as work done by a variable force.
 The concept of energy and different forms of energy.
 Kinetic energy, expression for K.E and its relation with linear momentum.
 Work – energy theorem and its applications.
 Definition of power. Relation beteen work and power.
 Power as scalar product of F and v.
 Potential energy – Conservative and non-conservative forces.
 Potential energy due to
(i) gravitational force
(ii) spring force
 Statement and use of law of conservation of energy for
(i) conservative
(ii) non-coonservative forces
 Collision – Definition.
 Perfectly elastic and inelastic collisions.
 Definition and use of “coefficnet of restitution”.
 One demensional perfectly elastic collisions.
 Qualitative ideas of a two dimensional collision.

434
435
WORK, ENERGY AND POWER

Work
Work is said to be done when a force is applied on a body and the body undergoes a finite displacement.
For a finitework   0  to be done on a body; the following two conditions must be satisfied:

(a) A force must act on the body.


(b) There is a finite displacment of the body.
Examples
(1) The force of gravity does work on a falling body.
(2) Frictional force used to bring a moving car to rest;
(3) A horse pulling a cart etc. making cart move does work on the cart.

Work done by a Constant Force


For constant force F applied on body producing a displacement S as shown in Fig.; the work is measured
as scalar product of the force vector and the displacement vector.
Work done,W = F.S
 FScos 

  Fcos   S

= Component of force in the direction of displacement × Magnitude of displacement.


It is also equal to magnitude of force and the component of displacement in the direction of force. Work is
a scalar quantity.
The dimensions of work, W, are

 W    Force Displacment   MLT –2L


= ML2T–2
The SI unit of work in joule (J) 1J = 1 Nm.
The gravitatinoal unit of work in kg wt – m or kgf m. We have 1 kgf m = 9.8 Nm = 9.8 J.
Work done by a force may be positive, negative or zero.
 
(i) Positive Work : For 0    900 i.e. when angle between F and S is acute; the work done by the
force is positive. We say the applied force does work on the body.

436
(ii) Negative Work: For 900    1800 i.e. when the angle between F and S is obtuse; the work done
by the force is negative. In other words work is done against the applied force.
(iii) Zero Work: Work done can be zero if
(a) No force is applied on the body i.e. F = 0.
(b) F  0 but the force is unable to produce any displacement i.e. S  0 .
(c) Both force and displacement have finite, non-zero values but F  S i.e. the angle between the
directions of force and displacement is 900.
Example–1 :
What is the sign of work done in each of the following cases? Justify
your answer:
(a) Work done by the force of gravitation on a freely falling body.
(b) Work done by the force of gravitation when a body is lifted upwards.
(c) Work done by the electrostatic force when a positive charge is moved closer
to another positive charge.
(d) Work done by the electrostatic force of nuclus on an electron revolving around
it.
(e) Work done by the gas enclosed in a cylinder fitted with a piston
when the gas is allowed to expand.
Solution :
(a) Positive because; force of gravity and the displacement are in same
direction i.e. vertically downwards.
Remember :
Positive work done by a force on a system increases the energy of the system by imparting energy to the
system E  E f  E i  0 .

Negative work takes away energy from the system. Hence the final energy of the system is less than its
initial energy E  E f  E i  0 .

Zero work niether increases nor decreases the energy of the system E  0 or E f  E i .

(b) Negative because Fgravity is vertically downwards and the displacement is upwards. So   1800

W  FS cos1800  FS

437
(c) Negative. The direction of F and S are opposite to one another as shown in Fig. (a)
(d) Zero. The infintesimally small displacement dS is always perpendicular to instantaneous direction
force as shown in Fig. (b)
(e) Positive because force applied by the gas on the cylinder and the displacement are in same direction.
Example–2 :
A braking force of 2000 N applied on a car stops it in 7.5 m. How much work is done by the force on
(i) the car (ii) the road?
Solution :
(i) We have, F = 2000 N
S = 7.5 M

 = 1800 because the braking force acts opposite to displacement or motion.


 Work done by the applied force = W = FS cos 1800
= (2000) (7.5) (–1) = – 15000 J
(ii) Work done on the road is zero because there is not displacement of the road.
Example–3 :
A 1 sq. km area records a rainfall of 25 mm due to 1000 m high clouds. Calculate the work done to raise
the water to the height of the clouds. Given g = 10 m/s2. Density of water = 1000 kg m–3.
Solution :
We have area A = 1 sq. km = 1000 m × 1000 m
= 106m2
d = 25 mm = 25 × 10–3m
Volume of water collected due to rainfall = A.d = 25 × 103m3
Mass of water = Volume × density
= 25 × 106 kg
Fore applied to raise water = F = mg = 25 × 107 N
Distance moved = h = 1 km = 103 m
 Work done = Fh = 25 × 107 × 103 = 2.5 ×10111 J

438
Example–4 :
A 60 kg man carrying a 30 kg brick load moves 20 m up an incline of 1 in 10. What is the work done by
the man? (g = 9.8 m/s2)
Solution :
Total mass of man and bricks = 60 + 30 = 90 kg
Let F be force applied by the man along the plane as shown in Fig.

For dynamic equilibrium F = mg sin 

1
 90  9.8   88.2 N
10
W = The work done = F × s
= 88.2 × 20
= 1764 J
Example–5 :

A force F   7 i  2 j  3 k  newton acting on a particle produces a displacement of  2 i  8 j  n k  m but


does no work in the process. Calculate n and the magnitude of displacement.
Solution :

We have, F   7 i  2 j  3 k  N

S  2i  8 j  n k  m

Work done = W = F.S

  7 i  2 j  3k  . 2 i  8 j  n k 

= (7) (2) + (2) (8) – (3) (n)


= 30 – 3 n
Given W = 0; therefore,
30 – 3n = 0
or n = 10

439
 S   2 i  2 j 10 k  m

2 2 2
and S  2  8  10

 4  64  100  168

 2 42 m

Example–6 :
A 2 kg block is suspended by a light thread in an elevator. The elevator
accelerates upwards at a uniform rate of 2 m/s2. What is work done by the
tension in the thread in 4 s and the fourth second. [Use g = 10 ms–2]
Solution :
For the block using free body diagram; shwon in Fig. we have
T – mg = ma
T = m(g + a)
= 2 (10 + 2) = 24N
S = The distance travelles in 4s

1
 ut  at 2
2

1 2
 0  2  4   16 m
2

 Work done is 4 s = FS = T.S. = (24) (16) = 384 J


S4 = Distance in 4th is given by

a
Sn  u   2n  1
2

2
S4   0    7   7m
2

 Work done in 4th second = W’ = (24) (7) = 168 J

440
Example–7 :

A particle subjected to a force F   i  2 j 3 k  is constrained to move along negative z direction. Calculate


the work done to displace the particle through 2m.
Solution :

We have F   i  2 j  3 k  N

S  2k m (In negative z–direction)

 W  F .S

  i  2 j  3 k  .  2 k 

 6J
The following facts about work be noted carefully.
1. Work done by a force depends on the frame of reference. Let a man pull a box inside a moving bus
through a distance S; work done with the bus as reference frame is F.S. However the work done by
the force with respect to an observer on ground will be W '  F .  S  S '  where S ' is the displacement
of the bus with respect to the observer on ground.
2. Work done by force of friction may be zero, positive or negative. If the force applied on a body is
unable to move the body, the work done by the frictional force is zero.
If the force applied on a body exceeds the limiting friction and the body moves, the work done by the
friction is negative.
Consider a trolley with rough surface accelerating along horizontal; the force of friction between a
block in the trolley and the trolley does positive work an the trolley.

Work done by a Variable Force


Let the force applied on a body vary with time or position; of the body. The work done is given by

W   F. ds where F is instantaneous force and ds is infinitesimally small


displacement in time interval dt.
The work done by a variable force equals the area under force vs
displacement graph. Fig. shows F vs S graph. For displacement from
S1 to S2.
The work done, W = Area of the shaded part of the F vs S graph.

441
The area above the displacement axis is taken as positive and below it as
negative.
Net work done for a displacement from the origin O to S1 (Fig. b) is given by
W = W1 – W2.

Work done by a Spring Force


Consider a spring of spring constant k; extended by an external applied force F. The force applied and the
elongation / compression produced are in same direction. Therefore the done by the applied force in
positive.
The spring exerts a force against the direction of deformation. So the work done by the restoring force on
an external agent is negative.

Conservative Force
Consider a body moving from point A to B in space under an applied force. A force is conservation if the
work done by the force is independent of the path followed in moving from A to B. The work however
depends on the initial and the final positions; A and B only. The work in such cases in also called the line
B B
integral of the force of the field W   F. d  Path1   F. d  Path 2  . Fig shows particle moving from A
A A

to B in three different paths 1, 2 and 3. For a conservative force.


W1 = W2 = W3
The net work done by a conservative force over any closed path is zero.
Expressed mathematically.

 F . ds  0
Gravitational and electrostatic fields are examples of conservative fields and the corresponding forces are
called conservative forces. The energy is stored in the system when work in done against conservative
force.

Non-conservative Force
A force is said to be non-conservative if work done to move a body between two points A and B depends
on the path followed. Frictional force is an example of non-conservative force. Note that the work done
against friction gets dissipated as heat energy and is not stored in the system. This work cannot be recovered.
Example–8 :
The force F applied on a body vs displacement produced in it is shown in the Fig. Calculate the work done

442
for a displacement from 0 m to 6 m.

Solution :
Work done = Area under F vs S graph
= Ar (OABC) + Ar (CDE)

1 1
= (AB + OC) (  lar distance between AB and OC) – (CE) DE
2 2

1 1
  2  5   4 –  1 4
2 2
= 14 – 2 = 12 J
Please note that the net work done is algebraic sum of the areas of different parts. For the part of the graph
below displacement axis; the work is to be taken as negative.
Example–9 :
An elastic spring with spring constant k has one of its ends (A) fixed
to a rigid support. The other end B is gradually pulled to produce an
elongation ‘a’. Calculate the work done by the applied force.
Solution :
When the spring is relaxed; the force F is zero. As the extension increases; the force required (kx) to
produce extension x also increases. So the force is a variable force. The work done has to calculated by
integration.
For an instataneous extension x; the force F = kx
Work done to produce a further extension dx i.e., x to x + dx is dW = Fdx = kxdx

443
Work done for an increase in length from 0 to ‘a’ is given by
a
W   dW  k  xdx
0

a
x2 1 2
k  ka
2 0
2

Note: This work remains stored in the spring as potential energy.


Example–10 :
A particle moves along the X–axis from x = 0 to x = 3 m under the action of a force given by
F = 2x2 – 3x + 4. Calculate the work done.
Solution :
We have F = 2x2 – 3x + 4
Work done for a displacement dx is
dW = Fdx = (2x2 – 3x + 4) dx
Work done for displacement from x = 0 to x = 3 m is

3m 3
x3 x2
W   dW    2 x  3x  4 dx  2  3  4 x
2

x0 3 2 0

27 27 33
 18   12  30   J  16.5 J
2 2 2
Example–11 :

t3
The position x of a body moving along X–axis, varies with time as x  ; where x is in m and t in second.
3
Calculate the work done by the body in first 4 s. The mass of the body is 2 kg.
Solution :

1 3
Given x  t
3

dx 2
The instantaneous velocity, v  t
dt

444
dv d 2
The instantaneous acceleration, a    t   2t
dt dt
The instantaneous force F on the particle, from Newton’s 2nd law is
F = ma = 2 (2t) = 4t
dx
W   Fdx   F .dt   Fvdt
dt
4

  4t   t  dt
2

t 0

4 4
3 t4
  4t dt  4.
t 0 4 0

4
  4   0  256 J
 
Example–12 :

A ‘lawn–roller” has a moveable handle of length 50 cm. It is pulled along a horizontal surface by some
external applied force F = 102 N in two different ways as shown in Fig. (a) and (b). What is ratio of work
done by the applied force in the two cases?
Solution :
Work done in case I;

 40 
W1  F cos .S  102 N    10 m  103 J
 50 
Work done in case II;

445
30 1000  3
W2  F cos .S  102   10   600 J
50 5

W1 1000
   5:3
W2 600

Example–13 :
A m kg object in lying on the surface of earth. Calculate the work done to move the objected vertically
upwards through a distance equal to the radius of the earth, R. M = the mass of earth.
Solution :
Let the mass m be at A on the surface of the earth. As the mass is moved upwards; the total distance R
involved being large; the acceleration due to gravity does not remain constant. So the force is variable.
Hence the work done is calculated by integration.
When the body is at distance ‘x’ from the centre of the earth, i.e. at point L, we have

GmM
Fgra 
x2
Work done to move the body from a distance x to a distance x + dx or through dx is given by

GmM
dW  Fdx   dx
x2
Work done to move the body from A to B is
2R

W   dW  Gm M  x2dx
R

2R
 GmM x 2 1
R

2R
1
 GmM
xR

1 1
 GmM  
2R R

 GmM 
  
 2R 

446
 GmM 
W   
 2R 
Negative sign indicates that work is done against the gravitational force of earth.
Example–14 :
A spring with spring constant 40 Nm–1 is compressed through 2cm. How much additional work has to be
done to compress is further through 2 cm?
Solution :
We have k = 40 Nm–1

2
Initially x1  2cm  m
100
Work done for compressioni through 2cm

1
or W1  k x12
2

1 2 2
  40    8  103 J
2 100 100
Work done for a compression from 0 cm to 4 cm is

1
W2  k x22
2

1 4 4
  40    32 103 J
2 100 100
 Work for a compression from 2 cm to 4 cm

 W2  W1   32  8 103

= .024 J

Newton’s III Law and Work done


For a system, the bodies within the system exert forces of action and reaction on each other. So F12+F21=0.
For a pair of bodies in the system.
It should be remembered that the work done by the action reaction pair need not always cancal. The
distance travelled by the two bodies of different masses in coming to rest, when allowed to move until their

447
mutual force is not necessarily same. So W12  W21  0 .

However in some cases, the work done by the action–reaction pair is zero.

Energy
It is defined as the ability of a body to do work. It is a scalar. Its SI Unit is same as that of work (J). Energy
can exist many different forms like, kinetic energy, potential energy, spring energy, chemical energy, electrical
energy, wind energy, nuclear energy etc. The smaller units of energy used are:
1 eV = 1.6×10–19 J
1 keV = 1.6×10–16 J (= 103 eV)
1 MeV = 1.6×10–13 J (= 106 eV)

Kinetic Energy
It is the energy possessed by a body by virtue of its motion. For a body of mass m moving with velocity v,
1
K.E. is given by K  mv 2
2
Linear momentum p and kinetic energy k are related as

1 1 1
K mv 2  . m 2 v 2
2 2 m


 mv 

p2
2m 2m

p2
So, k  or p  2mK
2m
Note :
1. For two bodies having equal momenta; the lighter body has larger value of KE.

p2 1
From K  . If p is same; K 
2m m
2. For the two bodies having equal kinetic energy; the heavier body will have larger momentum. As
p  2mK

For constant k; p  p m . So larger the mass, more will be the momentum.

448
Potential Energy
The energy stored in a body or a system by virtue of its position or configuration is called potential energy.
For a body moving from position A to position B; under a conservative force; by definition.
B

U A – U B  WAB   F . ds
A

Let UA and UB denote the potential energy at A and B respectively. The above equation defines difference
in potential energy.
For potential energy at A; if B is taken as a standard reference point;
A
U A  Ustd   F . ds
B

The potential energy UA at a point A is not uniquely defined. Its value depends on standard reference point
chosen. However difference in potential is uniquely defined i.e. it does not depend on the standard reference
point chosen.

Gravitational Potential Energy


Consider a particle of mass m being moved very-very slowly from ground
(i.e. point A) to a point B at a height h above ground. For h << R; R is radius
of earth; the force mg on particle is constant. Let U be potential energy of
mass at B, then
UA – UB = Work done by force of gravity in moving mass m from A to B
= – mgh
Taking UA as zero, i.e. ground as standard reference point and assigning zero value to P.E. at A; we have
U = mgh

Potential Energy of a Spring


Consider a spring of spring constant k. Let U0 be potential energy of spring when it has its natural length.
U is the potential energy when length of spring changes by x. By definition
U0 – U = work done by spring force to produce a change x in length of spring.

1 
  kx 2 
2 

1
 U  U 0  kx 2
2

449
U vs x graph is as shown in Fig. (a). Commonly; U0 is chosen as zero i.e. when spring is in its natural state,
potential energy is zero. Then

1 2
U kx
2
Under these conditions U vs x graph is shown in Fig. (b).

Total Energy (E)


The sum of kinetic energy (K) and potential energy (U) is known as the total mechanical energy E, i.e.
E=K+U
For a conservative force; the kinetic energy and potential energy are inter-convertible. However, the total
energy (E) remains a constant. In other words, if K.E. decreases, P.E. increases and vice-versa. This is
known as law of conservation of energy. The law of conservation of energy is one of the basic law of
nature. It is very useful in solving problems in a simple and convenient manner.
The following important points about energy should be carefully noted and used appropriately, as required;
in solving problems:
(1) Kinetic energy is always positive.
(2) Potential energy may be positive or negative.
(3) Potential energy is present in a system of two or more bodies / molecules / atoms due to forces of
mutual interaction.
(4) The potential energy due to gravitational force is called gravitational potential energy.
(5) The potential energy due to electrostatic forces is called electrostatic potential energy.
(6) The potential energy may be present in a body due to interatomic / intermolecular forces. (e.g. elastic
energy in a spring / stretched wire etc.)
(7) The potential energy of a body / system is measured with respect to certain reference position.
When the forces involved are repulsive; potential energy is positive. If the forces involved are attractive,
potential energy is negative.

450
(8) The total mechanical energy (KE + PE) may be zero, negative or positive.
(9) An electron in its orbit around an atom has negative energy. Similarly a satellite in its orbit around
earth has negative energy.
(10) Negative mechanical energy signifies that the electron is bound to the nucleus and work will have to
be done to make it free from the nucleus / atom.
Like wise, work has to be done to take a satellite out of the gravitational field of the planet ( to  ).

d
Force F and PE ‘U’ are related as F  x    U x
dx
The PE of a body cannot exceed the total energy of the body. KE may however be greater than total
energy.

Work–Energy Theorem
According to work energy theorem; work done by a body is equivalent to change in kinetic energy of the
body (for same value of potential energy).
Work W = Change in kinetic energy

1 1
 mv 2  mu 2
2 2
Work done on a body results in an increase in kinetic energy of the body by an amount which equals the
work done.
Work done by a body is equal to the decrease in kinetic energy of the body by an equal amount.
During transformation of energy from one form (say PE to KE) to another; the total energy of an isolated
system always remains conserved.

Mass–Energy Equivalence
Mass is also a form of energy. According to Einstein’s relation; a mass ‘m’ may be destroyed and completely
are related as E = mc2 where ‘c’ is the speed of light in vacuum. (c = 3×108 m/s).
In certain nuclear reactions, energy is also converted to mass according to the above equation.
So mass or energy can be obtained at the cost of the other (energy or mass).
In light of mass-energy equivalence, instead of talking separately about (i) law of conservation of mass and
(ii) law of conservation of energy, we talk about “law of conservation of mass-energy.”
It can be shown that 1 atomic-mass unit, if completely converted into energy; is nearly equivalent to
931MeV of energy.

451
Example–15 :
The potential energy function of a particle in one dimension as a
function of position ‘x’ is shown in Fig. The total energy ‘E’ of the
particle is also marked in the diagram. For the system shown, the
particle cannot exist in the region for which the value of x is

b
(1) 
2

b
(2) 
2

a a
(3)  x
2 2

b a
(4)  x
2 2
Solution :
A careful obsrevation of the graph shows the relative values of E, the total energy and the potential energy
of the particle.

b a a b
In the regions   x   and   x   ; the PE of the particle exceeds the total energy ‘E’.
2 2 2 2
Hence the particle cannot exist in these two regions. For all other regions; the PE is less than E and hence
the particle can exist.
Hence option (4) above is correct.
Example–16 :
The potential energy function V(x) of a particle in simple harmonic
motion is given by

1
V  x   kx 2
8
where k is the force constant for the oscillator with appropriate dimension.

For k = 2 Nm–1; show that for values of x   1m , the particle must return towards the origin if the total
energy of the particle is 1 J.

452
Solution :
The total energy of a particle is equal to the sum of its PE and KE.

 E  PE  KE

1 2 1
 kx  mv 2
2 2
Where x and v denote instantaneous displacement and instantaneous speed respectively.

1 2
Given; P.E. v  x   kx
8
We know, PE is maximum when KE is zero.

  PE  max  E when K = 0

1 2
 kxmax
2

 PE max  2 2E
 xmax  
k k

2 1
  1m or –1m
2
Hence the particle must turn back at x = +1 and x = –1 m.
Example–17 :
A cloud burst occurs 500m above the surface of earth and the resulting rainfall causes 8 cm rainfall over an
area of 1 sq. km. How much work is done by the gravitational force during the rainfall. Given
 water  1000 kg / m 3

d = Depth of rain water recieved = 8 cm = 0.08 m


Total volume of water recieved in rainfall = A × d

8
 1000  1000 
100

 8  10 4 m 3

453
  103 kg / m3

 Mass of water recieved as rainfall = V 

 8  104  103

 8  107 kg
W.D. by the gravitationaal force
= Decrease in gravitational potential energy
= m gh = 8×107×10×250
Example–18 :
It is well known that a raindrop falls under the influence of the downward gravitational force and an
opposing resistive/viscous force. The later is known to be proportional to the speed of the drop, but is
otherwise undetermined. Consider a drop of mass 1.00 g falling from a height of 1.00. The drop hits the
ground with a speed of 50.0 ms–1. What is the work done by the unknown resistive force?
Solution :
Given m = 1g = 10–3 kg,
h = 1 km = 1000 m
v = 50 ms–1
Ee= The total initial energy of rain drop
= mgh + 0
= 10–3×10×103 = 10 J
Ef = The total final energy of rain drop (i.e. when rain drop is just about to hit ground).

1
 mv 2  0
2

1 2
  103   50   1.25 J
2
Let W be work done on the rain drop by resistive force. Then
= Ee + Ef = W
= 10 + 1.25 = W
or W = –8.75 J

454
Example–19 :
An automobile is moving at 54 km/hr when it reaches the foot of a 300 upward inclined road. The engine
of the automobile is switched off and it is allowed to go up the incline having 0.2 as the coefficient of
friction. What distance does it cover or the incline beore coming to rest?
Solution :
The initial KE of the automobile is partially used to work against friction and is partly converted to potential
energy. We have
Initial KE = PE gained + work done against friction.
We have,

5
u  54 km / hr  54   15 m / s
18

Component of gravitational force down the plane = mg sin   mg sin 300

Normal reaction N = mg cos 30


 Ffriction =  N = 0.2 mg cos 300

Net force down the plane = Ffr  mg sin 

  mg cos   mg sin 

 mg  sin    cos  

Let '  ' be the distance moved by the automobile up the plane before coming to rest; Then

1
mu 2  mg  sin    cos   
2

u2
or 
2g  sin    cos  

15 15

2 10  sin 30  0.2 cos 30 

15 15

2 10  0.5  0.1732 

455
225
 m
13.464
= 16.7 m
Example–20 :

The velocity of a 5 kg object changes from  3 i  4 j m/s to  2 j  6 k  m/s. What is the change in KE of the
body?
Solution :
We have, m = 5 kg

u   3 i  4 j m / s

 u  42x  42y  5m / s

v  2 j  6k  m / s

2 2
 v  2   6

 40 m / s

1 1
 Change in KE = mv2  mu 2
2 2

1 2
 m     5 
2
40
2  

1
  5  15  37.5 J
2
Example–21 :
Calculate the kinetic energy accquired by a system of two masses
of 5 kg and 4 kg shown in (i) Fig. (a) (ii) Fig. (b) is 4 s. Take g =
10 ms–2 and the pulleys as well as the surfaces to be frictionless
and ideal. The system is let go from rest in both cases.

456
Solution :
Case (i)
Mass, the FBD is as shown. The equation of motion of the two masses is:
For 4 kg mass : mg – T = ma .....(1)
For 5 kg mass T = Ma .....(2)
From (1) and (2) we have
mg = (m + M) a

 m 
or a  g
mM

4  10 40
  m / s2
9 9

40
After 4s; v  u  at  0  4
9

160
 m/s
9

1
KE of system =  m  M  v2
2

1 160 160
 9 
2 9 9

12800
 J
9
Case (ii)
The 5 kg mass will move downwards and 4 kg upwards. Let T be the tension in the string. Using free body
diagram (FBD) we get

457
Mg – T = Ma1 .....(1)
and T – mg = ma1 .....(2)
(1) + (2) gives
(M – m) g = (M + m) a1

 54  10 2
or a1   g  m / s
 5  4  9

Velocity after 4 s = at  u  0 

40
 m/s
9

1
 KE of system at t = 4 s =  m  M  v2
2

1 40 40 800
 9   J
2 9 9 9
Example–22 :
A shot fired with a velocity V1 on a mud wall is able to pierce 4 cm thickwall. The same shot fired at V2
pierces 9 cm thickness of an identical wall. Compare V1 and V2 assuming the resistance offered by the
walls to remain same.
Solution :
Let F be the resistive force offered to the shots.
Work done against the force = Initial K.E.

1
 F.S1  mV12
2

1
F.S2  mV22
2

V12 S1 4
  
V22 S2 9

V1
 2:3
V2

458
Example–23 :
A seconds pendulum (length  1m) is designed using an ideal string and a bob
of mass 200 gm and suspended from a rigid support. The bob is pulled up till
the angular displacement of the bob with the vertical becomes 300. The bob is
now released. Calculate its KE at the lowest point. (Use g = 10 ms–2).
Solution :
Given m = 200, gm = 0.2 kg
OA = OB = 1m

AOB  300
With BC  OA ; we have

OC
 cos 300
OB

3
 OC  OB cos 300  m [OB = 1 m]
2
= 0.866 m
Vertical height through which the bob is raised = h (1 – 0.866) m
= 0.134 m
Potential energy gained by the bob from A to B
= mgh = 0.2 × 10 × 0.134
= 0.268 J
This PE is converted to KE as the bob goes back to A.
 KE at the lowest point = PE at B
= 0.268 J
Example–24 :
A block of mass m = 1kg moving on a horizontal surface with speed 2 ms–1 enters a rough patch ranging
from x = 0.10 m to x = 2.01 m. The retarding force Fr on the block in this range is innversly proportional
to x.

k
With Fr   for 0.1  x  2.01m
x

459
= 0 for x < 0.1 m and x > 2.01 m
where k = 0.5 J. What is the final KE and speed v of the block as it crosses the patch?
Solution :
We have m = 1 kg, u = 2 ms–1; k = 0.5 J

1 1 2
Initial KE  mu 2   1  2   2 J
2 2

k
Frictional force over x = 0.1 m to 2.01 m range is Fr  
x
As the force is variable; work against friction can be calculated by integration.
2.01m x  2.01m
k
We have, W   Fr dx   dx
x  0.1m x  0.1m x

x  2.01m
 0.5 log e x x 0.1m

2.01
 0.5 log e
0.1

 0.5  2.303  log10 20.01

= –0.5 × 2.303 × 1.303 [Using tables]


= – 1.5 J

 K final  K initial  Work done

 Kfinal = Kinitial + Work done


= 2.0 J – 1.5 J = 0.5 J

1
Also, K final  mv 2  0.5 J
2

2  0.5
 v2   1ms1
1

Example–25 :
In a ballistics demonstration, a police officer fires a bullet of mass 50.0 g with speed 200 ms–1 on soft

460
plywood of thickness 2.00 cm. The bullet emerges only with 10% of its initial kinetic energy. What is the
emergent speed of the bullet?
Solution :

50 1
We have m = 50.0 g = kg  kg
1000 20
u = 200 ms–1

1 1 1
Initial KE = mu 2    200  200  1000 J
2 2 20

10
Final KE = 10% of initial KE =  1000
100
= 100 J

1
 mv 2  100
2

2  100
v  4000
1
20

= 63.2 m/s

 200  63.2 
It is important to note that a 90% decreases in KE reduces the speed by   100  % or 68%.
 200 

Example–26 :
A block of mass M is moving with a certain velocity on a
horizontal surface. It approaches the free end of a spring shown
in the figure with a velocity u. The other end of the spring
(assumed to be ideal) with force constant k is fixed to a rigid,
vertical wall.
(i) Calculate the maximum compression produced in the spring if the horizontal surface is smooth.
(ii) Let the horizontal surface shown above be increasingly rough towards the spring and the coefficient
of friction between the block and the surface varies as   ax where a is a constant with appropriate
dimensions and x is the instantaneous compression in the spring. What will be the maximum
compression produced in the spring in this case?

461
Solution :
Case (i)
When the surface is smooth; the entire KE of the block is stored in the spring as elastic PE. If x0 is the
maximum compression produced in the spring; we have

1 2 1
kx0  mu 2
2 2

m
x0  .u
k

Case (ii)
When the surface is rough; work has to be done to overcome friction
and to cause a compression in the spring.
For a compression ‘x’ in the spring, we have   ax .
 Force of friction for a compression x is

Ffr  N  Mg   ax  Mg   aMg  x

Work done against friction for a maximum compression x1 (say) is


x1 x1

Wfr   Ffr dx  a Mg  x dx
0 0

x1
x2 1
 a Mg  a Mg x12
2 0
2

1 2
Energy stored in the spring  k x1
2
From law of conservation of energy;

1 1 1
Mu 2  k x12  a Mg x12
2 2 2

or Mu 2  k x12  a Mg x12

  k  a Mg  x12

462
 M 
 x1   u
 k  aMg 

Example–27 :
To simulate car accidents, the auto manufacturers study the collisions of moving cars with mounted springs
of different spring constants. Consider a typical simulation with a car of mass 1000 kg moving with a speed
of 18.0 km/h on a road with coefficient of friction 0.5 and colliding with a horizontally mounted spring of
spring constant 6.25 × 103 Nm–1. What is the maximum compression of the spring? What will to the
maximum compression on a smooth road?
Solution :
As the car collides with the spring, it does work against the force of friction and for compression in the
spring. Let x0 be the maximum compression produced in the spring.

1 2
Work done for compression = k x0
2

Work done against friction =   mg  x0

By work energy theorem;


Change in KE = Work done in compressing spring + Work done against friction.

1 1
 mu 2  k x02   mg x0
2 2

or k x02  2 mg x0  mu 2  0

Using quadratic formula with a = k; b = 2  mg and c = – mu2


1

2mg   4 2 m 2 g 2  4mku 2 
2