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Cirilo F.

Bautista

Cirilo F. Bautista is a Filipino critic, poet and writer. Recognized for his works that had earned
him literary awards for his excellence in the field of literature. Furthermore, he is a co- founding
member of the Philippine Literary Arts Council (PLAC). Cirilo studied at University of Sto. Tomas where
he got his degree in AB Literature and became a magna cum laude in 1963. He also took MA Literature
at St. Louis University in Baguio where he again became a magna cum laude and Doctor of Arts in
Language and Literature at De La Salle University. ( De La Salle University website)

After studying, Cirilo entered the field of education which made him into a professor. Became a
professor at Waseda University in Japan and Ohio University in US. He has also taught poetry and
creative writing at De La Salle University. (Filling Station website)

(http://thecirilobautista.blogspot.com/2013/03/his-works.html)

A man immersed in the greatness of the creative word throughout his life, Cirilo Francisco
Bautista died Sunday at the age of 76.

Bautista was elevated to the Order of the National Artist (ONA) of the Philippines in 2014 by
President Benigno Aquino. He is survived by his wife Rosemarie and three children.

Presidential proclamation No. 809 read: “Whereas, the works and achievements of Cirilo F.
Bautista as a poet, fictionist and essayist have greatly contributed to the development of the country’s
literary arts and has strengthened the Filipino’s sense of nationalism.”

At a 2015 testimonial dinner at his alma mater the University of Santo Tomas, Bautista said this
of being named National Artist: “It is a kind of confirmation, that after 74 years, you know you can
write.”

That he truly did. One of the last living iconic writers of his generation, Bautista wrote poetry,
fiction and essays. His best known work is the epic poetry trilogy “The Trilogy of Saint Lazarus,” made up
of the “The Archipelago (1970), “Telex Moon” (1981) and “Sunlight on Broken Stones” (1999).

A prolific writer, he had written more than 20 books, his last being the poetry collection “In
Many Ways: Poems 2012-2016,” published by the University of Santo Tomas Publishing House in 2018.

He was also a noted critic and respected teacher. He was literary editor and a columnist for the
Manila Bulletin’s Philippine Panorama Magazine.

Bautista was born in Manila on July 9, 1941, growing up in Balic-Balic in Sampaloc. He graduated
from the University of Santo Tomas with a degree in AB Literature magna cum laude.

He earned his MA in Literature from St. Louis University magna cum laude and his doctorate in
Language and Literature from De La Salle University. He remains the only Filipino to be given an
honorary degree from the prestigious International Program at the University of Iowa.
“It is with deep sadness we announce the passing of our beloved professor/mentor and perhaps
the greatest poet in the annals of Philippine literature–Dr. Cirilo F. Bautista. Rest in peace, our Moses,
Gandalf, Nero Wolfe, Obi Wan Kenobi. Till we meet again in Paradise,” read a statement on the DLSU
Department of Literature Facebook page.

Much published locally and aboard, Bautista was named to the Carlos Palanca Memorial Awards
Hall of Fame in 1995, which is given to winners of five first prizes. Bautista had won nine Palanca in all,
for essay, fiction, poetry in both English and Filipino.

He had also won First Prize in the 1998 National Centennial Commission literary tilt. He received
the Gawad Balagtas from the Unyon ng Manunulat ng Pilipinas, among many other accolades.

Bautista taught at St. Louis University, San Beda College and DLSU, where he was Professor
Emeritus for Literature and sat on the board of advisors of the Bienvenido Santos Creative Writing
Center. He served as Senior Associate at the UST Center for Creative Writing and Studies.

A thoughtful man known to his close friends as “Toti,” Bautista served as a mentor to countless
younger writers through his own efforts and as part of many panels at writing workshops.

Bautista had funded the Cirilo F. Bautista Prize for Short Fiction at the National Book Award and
the separate Cirilo F. Bautista Prize for the Novel. He was also an avid painter, having exhibited his work
professionally several times.

At the 2015 dinner, Bautista spoke about the point of writing poetry, the form he is most
identified with. “The poem is meant to give delight to the readers,” he said.

He spoke one truly extraordinary statement that evening, one that seemed to exemplify his life
and legacy.

“For artists, art does not just imitate life,” Cirilo F. Bautista said, surrounded by the words he
savored and the people he love. “Art becomes the life.”

(https://lifestyle.inquirer.net/293547/national-artist-literature-cirilo-f-bautista-76-writes-30/)

Cirilo F. Bautista, whose poems, stories and essays in English and Filipino have made him one of the
Philippines’ most honored authors and earned him the title of National Artist for Literature, died early
Sunday after a lingering illness. He was 76.

Bautista succumbed to pneumonia, complicated by his degenarative muscular dystrophy, at the


Philippine Heart Center in Quezon City, author and physician Alice Sun-Cua told The Manila Times.

He had been confined there for more than a month, according to Dr. Shirley Lua, a literature professor
at De La Salle University (DLSU), where Bautista had taught for years.
Malacañang expressed its condolences to Bautista’s family and friends, describing him in a statement as
“one of the country’s most passionate authors, whose devotion to the study of literature paved the way
for more Filipinos to develop their creative talent.”

“Dr. Bautista’s contribution to the continuous growth and progress of Philippine literature will always be
inscribed in the pages of our nation’s history. His teachings and literary works will live on forever,” it
said.

The National Artist’s colleagues and fellow writers also paid tribute, and expressed sympathies and
gratitude, as news of his death spread on social media.

In a Facebook post, DLSU’s Department of Literature called Bautista “[possibly] the greatest poet in the
annals of Philippine literature.”

“Rest in peace, our Moses, Gandalf, Nero Wolfe, Obi Wan Kenobi. Till we meet again in Paradise,” it
added, referring to the Old Testament prophet who led the Israelites out of Egypt and the
mentors/father figures in J.R.R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings, mystery author Rex Stout’s detective novels,
and the first two Star Wars trilogies.

“I’m saddened by the news of National Artist for Literature Cirilo F. Bautista’s passing. He was kind to
me and encouraged the publication of Salamanca [and gave a generous blurb],” author Dean Francis
Alfar wrote on Facebook, referring to his debut novel that won the Palanca Grand Prize for the Novel in
2005.

“Thank you, Cirilo, for helping create space for me and many others,” he said.

“Time to rest, dear Cirilo. Thank you for your legacy, your wisdom, your friendship,” prize-winning
fictionist Susan S. Lara wrote on Facebook.

Boy from Balic-Balic

Born on July 9, 1941 and raised in Balic-Balic in Manila’s Sampaloc district, Bautista earned a bachelor’s
degree in Literature at the University of Santo Tomas (magna cum laude, 1963); a master’s degree, also
in Literature, at Saint Louis University in Baguio City (also magna cum laude, 1968); and a doctoral
degree in Language and Literature at DLSU (1990).

His first book, The Cave and Other Poems, won second prize for poetry at the Carlos Palanca Memorial
Awards for Literature in 1968, a year before he received a fellowship grant in the University of Iowa’s
renowned International Writing Program.

Other Palanca Award-winning works are his first-placed poetry collections The Archipelago (1971),
Charts (1973), Telex Moon (1975), and Crossworks (1979); his short story The Ritual (1971); and his
essay Philippine Poetics: The Past Eight Years (1981).

For winning at least five first prizes, the prestigious literary competition elevated Bautista to its Hall of
Fame in 1995.
Another book of poetry, Sunlight on Broken Stones, won the Philippine Centennial Literary Prize for
poetry in 1998. This book, The Archipelago, and Telex Moon comprise what many consider his
masterpiece, the epic poem The Trilogy of Saint Lazarus (2001).

Bautista’s other books include Stories (1990), Words and Battlefields (1998), and Galaw ng Asoge (2004).

His last book, In Many Ways: Poems 2012–2016, was launched at DLSU in late January.

On its website, the National Commission for Culture and the Arts said Bautista “has established a
reputation for fine and profound artistry; his books, lectures, poetry readings and creative-writing
workshops continue to influence his peers and generations of young writers.”

“As a way of bringing poetry and fiction closer to the people who otherwise would not have the
opportunity to develop their creative talent, Bautista has been holding regular funded and unfunded
workshops throughout the country,” it added.

“In his campus-lecture circuits, Bautista has updated students and student-writers on literary
developments and techniques,” the agency said.

For his contributions to Philippine literature, Bautista received numerous awards. These include the
Makata ng Taon (Poet of the Year) title from the Komisyon sa Wikang Filipino (KWF, or Commission on
the Philippine Language) in 1993, the Gawad Balagtas for lifetime achievement from the Unyon ng mga
Manunulat ng Pilipinas (Umpil, or Writers Union of the Philippines) in 1997, and the Order of National
Artists in June 2014.

“I think being named National Artist is the greatest achievement in my career. In a sense, it is the
highest recognition you can get as a writer in our country, and the best award that you can win as a
Filipino citizen,” Bautista said in an interview with the Sunday Times Magazine in July 2014.

“To wish beyond that is wishful thinking. I can dream for the Nobel Prize, but that’s too far away, so I
confine myself and do my best in my country,” he added.

Bautista is survived by his wife, the former Rose Marie Jimenez, and their children Maria, Laura and
Nikos.

His remains lie in state at the Heritage Park Chapels and Crematory on Bayani Road, Fort Bonifacio,
Taguig City. Cremation is scheduled on Tuesday at 7 p.m.

A necrological service at the Cultural Center of the Philippines (CCP) that is accorded to deceased
National Artists is expected later this week.

(https://www.manilatimes.net/2018/05/07/news/top-stories/national-artist-cirilo-f-bautista-76-
2/397305/397305/)

Dr. Cirilo F. Bautista


AY 1986-1987
Status: RETIRED | Rank: FULL PROFESSOR | Department: LITERATURE, DEPARTMENT OF |
College:COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS | Present Role in the University: PROFESSOR EMERITUS

Dr. Cirilo F. Bautista was conferred the Order of National Artist in 2015 by Philippine President Benigno
C. Aquino, Jr. Nominated to this highest honor by his peers for the sheer quantity and substance of his
literary production, Cirilo F. Bautista has become not only an exemplar in the University but is also an
inspiration to young Filipino writers in the archipelago and wherever they may be in the world, for them
to enrich the body of Philippine Literature with substance and song.

Conferment of the Order of National Artist given in Malacañan Palace by President Benigno Aquino, Jr.
National Artist for Literature Cirilo F. Bautista, seated.

His magnum opus, the epic “The Trilogy of St. Lazarus,” published by De La Salle University Press in
2012, reimagines the journey of the peoples of the Philippines throughout its history and boldly
reinvents through the epic singer’s voice and temperament the unending quest for freedom from want,
from oppression, from the forces of society that threaten the dignity of the individual citizen, especially
the poor.

CIRILO F. BAUTISTA’S LYRIC SENSE OF HISTORY


Pagpupugay: A Tribute to the National Artist for Literature

By Marjorie Evasco

In a lecture called “Shaping the Past” delivered at his alma mater, the University of Santo Tomas,
National Artist Cirilo F. Bautista revealed that it was his father who had given him the words which
defined the poet’s ground of being and gave him his lifetime errand:

“I became a writer because I took to heart my father’s advice to “shape the past.” He did not tell me
how, but I thought writing was the way to do it. He did not tell me why, either, but I felt it was to gain
some degree of happiness, some ascendancy over the travails of existence…And a strong desire to make
of the past something beyond the past drove me into a fine madness and defined the borders of my
artistry. And so, every time I am asked when I decided to be a writer, because, strangely enough, I did
decide to be a writer—I answer, “When I first got mad.” That moment, of course, was not accompanied
by a roar of thunder and a blaze of lightning; like all life-altering decisions, it developed quietly and
gradually until, many years later, I found that I was irrevocably engaged in the fashioning of prose and
poetry. I discovered that writing was the most effective way of configurating the elements of reality into
an ever-fresh world and that literature was the only possible, faithful, and unassailable reconstruction of
human values in a gaudy and duplicitous environment.”
One of the marks of the lyric poems of Bautista is the constitution or the making of the image or eidos of
persons who are familiar in Philippine society and history, like Rizal, Bonifacio, the tear-gassed man, and
even the one who says he is being used by big shots for target practice. Eidos here is used to mean “that
which is seen, the form, shape, figure, or its Latin meaning, as species.” Bautista reconstitutes figures
from history by giving them an individual speaking voice. This lyric imperative is best seen in the light of
the Greek concept of the figured masks or personae that represent the self as well as others like the self.
Bautista reconfigures figures from history by giving them an individual speaking voice.

In the poem “What Rizal Told Me,” Bautista presents to us the personae of Rizal and Cirilo, the poet’s
double. The discursive situation is a conversation through 13 stanzas of 4 lines each between the man
that Filipinos hail as the nation’s hero and the poet Cirilo. The voice, as we read from the title, is the
voice of Cirilo, retelling the reader what Rizal told him. The retelling, however, is in the dramatic mode,
and from the first line to the last, it is Rizal’s voice that is represented in the poem.

I have learned the subtle virtue of regret,


how it can ride a mad horse and not fall off.
At times it is necessary to invent
Illusions that would change the map

Of your consciousness, if only to feel


you could not have done things any better.
A man is bound, shot, and carted off
to argue with worms—is he less valid

as an agent of peace, will you break


the bones of his philosophy?

The voice is that of a man of intellect engaging the poet in the rhetoric that burdens an otherwise
peaceful man with the irretrievability of the past and places the law “between violence and violence”
where there are “…angels and vampires/ whose diction vexed [my] blood”. Language, such as that used
by the colonizers was used to turn worship into a terrorizing religion. On the other hand, language, such
as the one used by the revolutionaries turns idealists into beasts baring their teeth for the kill.

In the middle of the poetic discourse, Rizal faces and addresses Cirilo directly but in a conspiratorial tone
assuming a friendship that has shared many a secret:

…You know
how it was, Cirilo, you saw the hole
I was cramped in and despaired enough

to write that I failed because I left


no proof of “bloodstains on broken stones.”
There it is again, the phrase that is a consistent refrain in the poems of Bautista, and it is always always
spoken in the tone of anger and continuing confrontation with failure. Here is one of the sharpest
examples of what Bautista calls his choice of a “reasoned romanticism” over “unreasoned skepticism.”
Rizal reasons to Cirilo that even as the failure is irredeemable, the “sweating mass//…the roadmenders
and gardeners,/ the glassblowers and plowmen..” who are ignorant, need some solace, some hope:

I am the first thing they seek when they bleed,

I wipe the sorrow from their brow,


my throat sings their children to sleep,
they stick my face where fear has been,
I shape the lies that enliven their hopes—

That is how we rescue each other


from the rigors of obedience.

An elegiac statement concludes the poem: “History is the other side of regret.” At this point the voices
of Rizal and Cirilo merge, and the nature of the pain of regret is made intelligible. Behind the mask of the
hero, there is only the naked human face of a dead man. Behind the mask of the poet, there is the
vulnerable human heart of the poet singing an elegy to the race.

In the light of his poetics, Bautista must believe in the power of poetry, and betray the duplicitous world
that passes itself off as true. In the poem “The Intensity of Things” in which Bautista memorializes one of
his earliest teachers, a medicine woman named Anselma Carpio, the dialogue of a hard realist’s wisdom
with that of the poet’s reaches out of the long and common history of the dying poor in this country:

Believe and betray—is that not


the system we support to survive,
chance and certainty commingling

in the acts we put up and then regret?

Bautista asserts that Anselma “was the only sane person” in his insane world in his youth in the slum
areas of Balic-Balic Sampaloc after World War II. It was a world haunted by death and the proximity of
bitterness and despair. But like Selma, he “never despaired of [my] situation” but believed that there
was a way of squeezing from the world some astonishment by becoming a poet.

The betrayed poor can only return to faithlessness for the treason that is committed against them. But
in the same breath, the lyric voice enjoins them to understand the price of choosing to live:
But we say to ourselves, “We will be strong,
life is long,” though we quake in the saying
of it, in the terrible burden of it.

This is the heart of Cirilo F. Bautista’s historia, his sense of history, his intimate knowing of the story of
our people. In his poem called “The New Philippine National Anthem,” the speaker concludes:

But I will always love you, Philippines


because in the dead of night, when the enemies
creep closer to the gate to break the bones of our hate,
when the pale men with foreign tongues pillage
your mountains and meadows for minerals of money,
money, money, when we are broke and hungry and cold,
you keep us together with the warmth of your voice
whispering such word as “Peace,” such word as “Freedom.”

We listen to the cadence of this song and know it is our anthem, too, the dream we share with Cirilo F.
Bautista, poet of the first order, who serves to “reinstate words to their position in the social
imagination.”

We as readers, lovers of words, believers in the language of “peace” and “freedom,” have the task to
engage, under the instruction of the poet, in “respecting and safeguarding the language of the soul.”

Only then can we stand side by side with Cirilo F. Bautista, speaking like him unflinchingly to power, to
ensure that the language of our soul is never going to be corrupted by the greedy and the malicious.
Poetry like Bautista’s shapes for us our first and only frontier of being.

(https://www.dlsu.edu.ph/university-fellows/dr-cirilo-f-bautista/)
WORKS

This book brings together some 115 essays from Bautista's weekly
column, "Breaking Signs," which has been appearing in the Philippine
Panorama, Sunday magazine of Manila Bulletin, for 17 years now. The
subject is the interlink between life and literature, how one provokes the other
for an interesting and fruitful dialogue. How far is life reflected in literature,
and literature in life? Bautista speculates on books, people, events, and
institutions, looking even for the most tenuous of answers, to bring us little
reports with enjoyable freshness and insight. He studies human action with
the view of explaining their irony or peculiarity, as in Mike Tyson biting off
Evander Holyfield's ears in their boxing match in 1997; the grandeur of
Kublai Khan; the commercialization of Christmas; the kindness of strangers;
and the art of piano repair. He shows us how life refracts poetry and fiction
and makes them significant concerns even in a society not known for literary
patronage.

An author of several books of poetry, fiction, criticism and translation,


Bautista proves in The House of True Desire that he can also handle the genre
of short composition with expertise and style
This festschrift in honor of poet Cirilo F. Bautista was first conceived
more than two years ago by the late Br. Andrew Gonzalez, FSC, who
envisioned the book to be the best way of honoring one of the great pillars of
the literary tradition of De La Salle University as well as of the Philippines.
"Believe and Betray: New and Collected Poems" is composed of four
collections of Bautista's lyric poems from the early '60s to 2005, spanning
more than 50 years of writing.

he Trilogy of Saint Lazarus, consisting of The Archipelago, Telex Moon,


and Sunlight on Broken Stones, and hailed by local and international critics
as the greatest modern epic poetry in the English language confirms
Bautista's position as the foremost Filipino poet today

In the past few years, many young poets have enlivened our literature
with their fresh voices and unique interpretation of the human condition.
Mostly products of the various writing workshops in the country, they
respond to social and personal realities with exciting and well-informed
facility. Their reflections vibrate with a taut understanding of common virtues
and falsities, with deft handling of poetic surfaces and undertows.
The third part of Bautista’s magnum opus The Trilogy of Saint Lazurus.
In this culminating work, the Bard of De La Salle University traces the
positive future of the Filipino people, as guided by the lessons of the
Revolution. This epic consists of 3,100 lines of verse arranged into 5-line
stanzas. Awarded the first prize in the epic category of the National
Centennial Commission in August 1998.

A Native Clearing is the sequel to Man of Earth (1989). It covers


Filipino poetry wrought from English since the 1950s to the present. Because
there are many more poets over that period, Prof. Abad decided to include
only those who were born between 1919 and 1941, i.e., those who, from
Edith L. Tiempo to Cirilo F. Bautista, worked and remolded English to the
Filipino sense of his own reality. A few older poets from Man of Earth
provide continuity in the poetic tradition.
Bautista delivers thirty-six discourses on poetry and meaning. The author
mines diverse sources such as Hannah Arendt, Gemino Abad, Theodor
Adorno, Michel Foucault, Lionel Trilling, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Teo
Antonio, and Liu Hsieh to deliver concise meditations on everything from
“lantay na ginto,” the essence of Filipino poetry, Conrado Balweg, to the
tyranny of the caesura.

The second volume in Cirilo F. Bautista's epic The Trilogy of Saint


Lazarus won first prize in English poetry in the 1975 Don Carlos Palanca
Memorial Awards for Literature. Telex Moon continues from the execution
of Rizal in the first volume and uses the "Intelligence of Rizal" as the reader's
perspective, thus shifting through space and time and presenting otherwise-
missed details in the history of the Filipino soul.

Kirot ng Kataga was published in De La Salle University Press, 1995.

Galaw ng Asoge was published in UST Press, 2004


Tinik sa Dila was published in The University of the Philippines Press, 2003

Sugat sa Salita was published in De La Salle University Press, 1987

AWARDS

He is a recipient of many awards and fellowships, including:

1. Palanca Hall of Fame Award

2.Gawad Manuel L. Quezon,

3. Gawad Balagtas National Book Awards

4. Knight Commander of Rizal

5. Centennial Literary Award


6.Parangal Patnubay ng Sining at Kalinangan

7. Gawad Gatpuno Antonio Villegas from the City of Manila

8.Honorary fellowship in creative writing from the State University of Iowa,

9. Visiting writer fellowship from Cambridge University in England

10.Exchange professorship in Waseda University of Tokyo

11.Exchange professorship in Ohio University in Ohio, USA

12.He was cited in The Oxford Companion to the English Language (1992)

(http://thecirilobautista.blogspot.com/2013/03/his-works.html)

Cirilo F. Bautista and


Baguio: How the poet
became the muse of the
city
The Baguio Writers Group has since expanded, and literature is no longer the weak link
in the Baguio art scene, thanks to the Sampaloc boy who decided to teach here more
than 50 years ago

BAGUIO'S MUSE. Cirilo Bautista leaves a lasting legacy in the city, where he started writing and met his future
wife. Photo courtesy of Shirley Lua

BAGUIO CITY, Philippines – After graduating magna cum laude in AB Literature at the University of Santo Tomas
(UST) in 1963, Cirilo Bautista was in a quandary on what to do.

A friend invited him to come up to Baguio and teach at St Louis University.

He went on to teach there for 5 years as well as finish his Masters Degree in Literature in SLU, magna cum laude,
in 1968 . More importantly, he was able to write poems and publish his first book of poetry, The Cave and Other
Poems.
The 70-page chapbook, which included his paean to Baguio – like “Pegasus at Session Road,” “Burnham Park,”
and “Woods: for Rose Marie” – was published by Ato Bookshop, a small bookstore along Session Road owned by
Cecile Hamada Afable.

The “Rose Marie” in the poem is Rose Marie Jimenez, whom he met in Baguio and would later become his wife.
The Cave and Other Poems would be Bautista’s passport to the International Writing Program at the University
of Iowa.

He would leave Baguio and teach at UST and De La Salle University. He would become one of the foremost poets
in English and Filipino.

But he left his heart in Baguio and forged friendship with some of the residents here.

One of them was Nap Javier, the anchor of Radyo ng Bayan. Whenever Cirilo came up, he would join Javier on
air and they would recite poetry and discuss poetics.

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On many of the nights in late 1990s, he would host some of the young Baguio-based poets, like Francis
Macansantos, Luisa Aguilar Igloria, Gaby Keith, and me at Mandarin Restaurant. A shy person, Cirilo would
rather listen as the rest would quaff beer and eat the Chinese feast in front of us.

It was here that he broached his idea of forming the Baguio Writers Group (BWG). The Baguio Arts Guild by then
had firmed its roots but, sadly, literature was lagging behind. He had just built his house here and promised to
be our first president.

And then, in 1998, he won the Centennial Prize for his epic, Sunlight on Broken Stones. He bought a car with the
huge cash prize so he could go up to Baguio more often, he said.

But this was not to be. Bautista contracted a heart ailment, which forbade him from staying long in a cold place
like his beloved Baguio.

He later sold his house and the plans for the BWG was shelved.

It was in the early 2000 that other Baguio writers like Babeth Lolarga, Baboo Mondonedo, Luchie and Ed
Maranan (who passed on Tuesday, May 8), Grace Subido, Precy Macansantos, Nonnette Bennett, Merci
Dulawan, Precy Macansantos, Joy Cruz, Junley Lazaga, Chi Balmaceda, Wilfredo Pascual, Jenny Carino, Ronald
Rabang, Padma Perez, and a host of others revived the group.

Cirilo remained the mentor, and even hosted the first BWG workshops.
“Baguio continues to be a working retreat for the creative imagination. There is always some serene spot where
writers can pursue the thread of a metaphor or simply unravel the knotted webbings of their unproductive
mind,” Cirilo wrote in the afterword of Baguio Calligraphy which, together with The Baguio We Know, were the
first book offerings of BWG.

The group has since expanded, and literature is no longer the weak link in the Baguio art scene, thanks to the
Sampaloc boy who decided to teach here more than 50 years ago. – Rappler.com

Books by Cirilo F. Bautista

Cirilo F. Bautista
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Bullets and Roses: The Poetry of Amado V. Hernandez: A Bilingual Want


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The Archipelago Want


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The Trilogy of Saint Lazarus Want


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Believe and Betray: New and Collected Poems Want


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Love Gathers All: The Philippines-Singapore Anthology of Love Want


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Crowns and Oranges: Works by Young Philippine Poets Want


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3.93 avg rating — 28 ratings — published 2008 — 2 editions
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The House of True Desire: Essays on Life and Literature Want


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Sunlight on Broken Stones Want


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Tinik sa Dila: Isang Katipunan ng mga Tula Want


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4.13 avg rating — 23 ratings — published 1995
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stories by cirilo bautista Want


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Latay sa Isipan: Mga Bagong Tulang Filipino Want


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Allan Popa (Editor)
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4.53 avg rating — 17 ratings — published 2007
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A Passionate Patience: Ten Filipino Poets on the Writing of their Want


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Edith L. Tiempo (Contributor)
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4.50 avg rating — 16 ratings — published 1995
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Telex Moon Want


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3.75 avg rating — 16 ratings — published 1981
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Galaw ng Asoge Want


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A Native Clearing: Filipino Poetry and Verse from English Since the Want
'50s to the Present : Edith L. Tiempo to Cirilo F. Bautista to
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4.17 avg rating — 12 ratings — published 1993 — 2 editions
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Words and Battlefields: A Theoria on the Poem Want


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Selected Poems Want


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Revolver Want
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3.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1997
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In Many Ways: Poems 2012-2016


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Cirilo F. Bautista

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2017