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Buddy Rich's Modern Interpretation of Snare Drum Rudiments Copyright © 1942 (Renewed) by Embassy Music Corporation ‘A Division of Music Sales Corporation, New York. NY. All right reserved. No pat of this book may be reproduced in any form or by any electronic or mechanical means ‘including information storage and retrieval systems, without permission in writing from the publisher ‘except by a reviewer who may quote brief passages in a review. {nemational Standard Book Number: 0.8256, Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 43 Exclusive Distriburrs Music Sales Corporation 225 atk Avenue South, New York, New York 10003 USA Music Sales Limited {8/9 Frith Street, London WIV STZ England Music Sales Py. Limited 120 Rothschild Steet. Rosebery, Sydney, NSW 2018, Australia en ne Unie State of Ares ‘Vek Lidoggn sn Poneng Corpo Amsco Publications New Vark Fondon Steines Contents Foreword 3 Introduction : 7) Selecting the Drum Sticks 4 The Practice Pad, 4 Holding the Drum Sticks 4 Hand, Wrist and Arm Action 5 Elementary Principles of Music 6 Development of the Hands, Lession 1 B Alternate Single Strokes, Lesson 2 B Accents, Lesson3 ........., Be The Three Stroke Ruff, Lessons 4, 5, 6, 7 “16 The Four Stroke Ruff, Lessons 8, 9, 10, 11 “18 The Five Stroke Ruff, Lessons 12, 13,14, 20 The Five Stroke Roll, Lessons 15, 16, 17, 18 n The Seven Stroke Ruff, Lessons 19, 20, 21 4 The Seven Stroke Roll, Lessons 22, 23, 24, 25 2s The Nine Stroke Ruff, Lessons 26,27, 28 2 The Nine Stroke Roll, Lessons 29, 30, 31, 32 28 The Double Stroke Roll, Lesson 33 5 30 The Single Stroke Roll, Lesson 34, 2 The Press Roll, Lesson 35 : 3 The Single, Double and Triple Paradiddles, Lessons 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42 33 ‘The Flam, Lesson 43 36 The Single, Double and Triple Flam Paradiddles, Lessons 44, 45, 46 The Flam Tap, Lessson 47 The Flam Accent, Lesson 48 The Flamacue, Lesson 49, ‘The Half Drag, Lessons 50, $1, 52, 53 The Single, Full and Double Drags, Lessons 54, 55,56... The Single, Double and Triple Drag Paradiddles, Lessons 57, $8, 59, 60 The Three Stroke Ruff Single, Double and Triple Paradiddles, Lessons 61, 62, 63, 64 The Four Stroke Ruff Single, Double and Triple Paradiddles, Lessons 65, 66, 67, 68 The Single, Double and Triple Ratamacues, Lessons 69, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 77 ‘The Compound Strokes, Lessons 78, 79, 80, 81, 82 Exercises in Triplets, Lesson 83 Reading Exercises... eee ee eee eee Explanatory Remarks Concerning Exercises Employing Rudiments Exercises Employing Rudiments ................ 7 Buddy Rich in Action +89 Advanced Rhythmic Studies -90 Musical Terms - , Pe +96 Foreword ‘The circumstances surrounding the conception and publica- tion of Buddy Rich’s Modern Interpretation Of Snare Drum Rudiments were quite unusual. The thought of writing a érum book had never occurred to Mr. Rich, until he was suddenly inspired to do so through the vast number of inquiries he received from drum students and teachers from all parts of the country. He soon discovered, however, that his duties with the Tommy Dorsey organization would not allow him suf: ficient time to devote to writing a drum method, especially if the book called for early publication, Therefore, he im- mediately contacted his instructor and friend, Henry Adler — the well-known authority on percussion instruments — who agreed to collaborate with him in the compilation and pre- paration of such 2 work. The result of the combined efforts of the Rich-Adler partnership is a book with all the fundamental material needed for an instructive drum method. In addition to the elementary Introduction by Tommy Dorsey It is the opinion of the general public, especially of those who do not understand the importance and qualifications of a drummer, that he does not necessarily have to be a musician to play in a band or orchestra. They think that itis not neces sary for a drummer to read music, that he is engaged merely to maintain cempi, and to beat a variety of shythmical strokes as loudly as possible. This is false reasoning in regard to suc. cessful drummer. In order to attain the height of his profession, a drummer must be as good @ musician as any member of a band or orchestra, Not only is it important that he read music, but he susust also have a solid background in the art of drumming; that is to say, he must be well versed in all of the rudiments. However, it might be well for me to state here that a drummer is often called upon to improvise a suitable part, because of the many faulty parts written by arrangers. Most of the drum parts, especially a great number of those in dance arrange- ‘ments, ate written as “guide” parts, leaving it entirely to the ingenuity of the player to use his own judgment. It is true that a drummer can make more noise than eny other member in the band, but an intelligent, capable drum- mer never goes to extremes in this respect; he carefully fol- lows the dynamics, accents, etc. of the arrangement and style ff the composition i bringing out the various necessary ef- fects. At no timecan a drummer do as he please, when it comes to playing louder than the music calls for; but his finesse in interpolating the various rudiments is always appreciated. Principles of musi, there are eighty-thee lessons of exercises and rudiments, twenty-one reading exercises, ten exercises employing rudiments, forty-six advanced rhythmic studies and a list of the most frequently used musical terms. All of the ‘material has been carefully graded as to difficulty Buddy Rich's Modern Interpretation of Snare Dram Rudi- ments not only differs from all other drum books, in that it contains a systematic course for the beginner, but itis also Of great value to the teacher and professional who wishes to increase his knowledge of the rudiments When Mr. Rich approached us in reference to the publica- tion of this work, we accepted it with a complete knowledge Of his ability and genius in the drum world. We had perfect confidence that the book would prove to be an outstanding contribution to drum literature. ‘The Publishers Most important of all, of course, is for a drummer to maintain 2 strict tempo. Nothing irritates a conductor more than for the drummer to play an irregular tempo ~ a tempo that constantly varies from fast to slow and vice versa The drummer who cannot read music, sooner or later, will ‘be put through a test where he will be asked co read his part exactly as it is written or seek employment elsewhere. This is especially true of the drummer who plays in theatre, concert, school or symphony orchestras, or in concert bands. Buddy Rich, the drummer supreme, has been with me for some time; and whether he is reading his drum part or creating. cone of his own, his handling of the drums and various traps shows the work of a genius. Buddy Rich, even with his natural ability and talent, knew that, in order to become eminently successful, it would be necessary for him to gain the appropriate training. He had the foresight to engage a competent teacher, so that he would not, later on, have to overcome or undo any faulty habits. In selecting Henry Adler to instruct him, Buddy Rich showed good judgment, for Mr. Adler has had great success in developing young drum students. In this connection, I also wish to say that Buddy Rich was extremely fortunate in securing Mr. Adler’s assistance in the preparation of this drum method ~ a method which I'feel sure will become a standard work in this fleld of instruction. Selecting The Drum Sticks When selecting the proper drum sticks, four extremely important features must be taken into consideration — size, weight, leveness and balance. ‘The size of the sticks is judged by the size of the student’s hands; if his hands are large, he will naturally, need a larger pair of sticks than if his hands are small. The weight of the sticks is determined by placing a stick in each hand and turing the wrists from side to side, several times. Then, if the sticks do not feel perfectly comfortable, as to the weight, other sticks should be tested, until the proper pair is found. Tt is also necessary that the sticks weigh the same; therefore, each stick should be weighed separately, ‘The leveiness of the sticks is best tested by rolling them on the glass counter in the store. If, during this test, the sticks do not roll evenly, or have a tendency to wobble, they should be refused. The center of balance should be a distance of about two- thirds from the knob (tip) of the stick, at the exact spot where itis held with the thumb and first finger. A good way to determine the center of balance is to hold the sticks in the correct manner and agitate the wrists with a motion. similar to that used in executing the “bounce.” (See Lesson 33, p. 30) Various wellssasoned woods are used in the manufacture of drum sticks, but itis conceded by experts that hickory is the ‘most satisfactory wood because ofits durability ané tone. The hardness of the wood denotes the tone.Naturaly, a hard stick wall have a sharper, crisper tone than a soft stick. A good hard stick has a twofold purpose; frst, it is easier to handle and second, it gives a firmer stroke. Drum sticks also come in a varity of stains, and with dif ferent shaped knobs (ips) and tapers, the choosing of which is a purely personal matter. None of these points, however, are as important as the size, the weight, the levelness and the balance, ‘After the proper pair of sticks has been selected, it is suggested that each stick be given a final test so a8 to insure a perfect match, The Practice Pad ‘The best means of acquiting drum technique is to practice with the aid of a pad known as a practice pad.(See illustration.) ‘The practice pad is a small wooden contraption on top of which is cemented a rubber disk, or mat, forming the strik- ing surface. In seecting the pad, particular attention should be qald to the quality of the rubber used for the disk which can be tested by tapping it with the drum sticks to see that the proper resiliency (bounce). If the rubber is soft or spongy, the sticks wall nt rebound quickly. “The purpose of a practice pad is threefold. Firs, the strokes ae more pronounced than they are on a drum ~ every tap being clear and distinct, Second, it eliminates noite ~ the strokes being barely audible, Thitd, itis not as cumbersome asa dum. “The practice pad is manufactured in two different models: the table model andthe stand model. After learning the rudiments on a practice pad, the student may then apply them to the snare drum. He will, at first, discover a slight difference in the technique required for “plucking” the various strokes off the drum but, with alittle practice, this difference can shortly be remedied. In the following pages no further reference is made to the pad, because it is understood that the student wil substitute the pad for the drum, at least, until he has gained perfect control of the sticks through accurate action of the hands, wrists and arms. practice pad Holding the Drum Sticks To the novice, it would seem to be a comparatively easy matter to pick up a pait of drum sticks and mark time or beat Out a simple rhythm. However, if the student sspires to become a proficient drummer, and reach the pinacle of success in this line of endeavor, it wil be necessary for him to start at the beginning and learn to hold and manipulate the sticks correctly. ‘The correct manner of holding the sticks is explained in the following instructions. How to Hold the Right- Hand Stick (See tik 1) Grasp the stick with the thumb and first finger of the right hand, at about two-thirds of the distance from the knob (tip) of the stick (the center of balance). The second, thied and fourth fingers act in an auxiliary capacity as they aid in controlling the various movernents of the stick. The palm of the hand is turned downward, upon striking the drum. How to Hold the Left -Hand Stick (See It 2) ‘The lefthand stick is held at about two-thirds of the dis: tance from the knob (tip) of the stick (the center of balance) in the crotch formed by the thumb and fist finger. The second finger, acting as @ guide, is placed on top of the stick, The third and fourth fingers, placed under the stick, act in an auxiliary capacity, while controlling the “swing” of the stick. ‘The palm of the hand is tuned toward the body, upon striking the drum. Ilustration | Hand, Wrist and Arm Action After the student has learned to hold the sticks correctly, the next important procedure is to learn the correct move- iments of the hands, wrists and arms during actual playing, Before striking the drum, the sticks are held with the points ‘upward, a§ shown in illustrations 3 and 4. It will be noticed that the sticks are held in relative positions, with the hands raised slightly higher than the elbows. The wrists are not bent, and the arms, from the elbows to the hands, ave straight. The elbows are close to the body, while the hands and forearms are Illustration 3 lustration 2 away from the body In starting the exercises and rudiments, the position of the stick varies; sometimes the sticksis held up and, at other time: it is held down, In any case, the movements of the hands wrists and arms are always the same. “Taking each hand separately, the following instructions ar iven the student, in order to acquaint him with the corree method of manipulating the sticks. Tustration 4 The Right Hand Start with the stick held as shown in illustration 3. Tum the wrist, while gradually bringing the forearm toward the drum. Upon striking the drum, see that the elbow is away from the body and that the hand is the same height as that of the elbow. (See MIL 5,) After striking the drum, return the hand immediately to its original position. Illustration $ Elementary Principles of Music NOTE: In the following definitions and explanations of the various signs, symbols and characters used in music, there are @ few which do not necessarily concer the snare drummer. They are included here, however, in the event che student ‘ight wish to increase his knowledge of music and perhaps, later on, take up the study of bells, xylophone, timpani, et Music is the effect produced by the combination of time and sound; or, in other words, of duration and pitch. Music is written on a ladder-ike arrangement called a staff ‘This staff consists of a series of five parallel horizontal lines, with their spaces. The Left Hand Start with the stick held as shown in illustration 3, Turn the wrist, while gradually bringing the forearm toward the rum. Upon striking the drum, see that the elbow is away from the body and that the hand is the same height as that Of the elbow. (See fi 6,) After striking the drum, retum the hand immediately to its original position All of the exercises and rudiments in this book call for the same hand, wrist and arm movements; the only variation is in the position of the stick when starting and ending an exercise or rudiment. Mlustration 6 Short auxiliary lines, called leger lines, may be added either above or below the staff, in order to extend its compass. The spaces between the leger lines are called leger spaces, 3 —$ Leper lines 2 —} and spaces Lines TF above the Copyright 1942 by EMBASSY MUSIC CORPORATION, New York, N.Y. 'aematonal Copy ight Secured. Made in U.S-A AIDRights Reserved, ncluding the Right of Pubic Performance for Profit A vertical line drawn through the staff is called a barline. The completion of a musical phrase or sentence is indicate ‘The strong or down beat always falls on the note immediately by a double bar — two light vertical lines. The end of a following a badine. composition is indicated by a double bar, consisting of one light line and one heavy line, Dotted double bars, called The space between two baulines is called a measure, repeat marks, indicate that the strain between two such marks is tobe repeated. Battine Barline rae Dome tN End End of of strain composition [At the end of a strain, there sometimes occurs one or more endings, a8 follows: * (1st ending) (and ending) ‘The above endings might contain any number of measures. The duration of shythmical sound is represented by the ‘After repeating the strain, the second ending is to be substi- shape of characters called notes. There are six kinds of notes tuted for the first ending. in common use, as follows: Notes Whole Half Quarter Eighth Sixteenth Thirty-second | J - ¢ Jd db db 3 (Thestems of he various notes may be tured upward or downvar) Each note has its equivalent rest which represents silence, as follows: pest Vole Halt Quaer, gh Sent) Tiyan -— = 1 3 i Chart Illustrating the Relative Value of Notes A whole note is equal to 2 half notes 4 quarter notes 8 eighth notes 16 sixteenth notes 32 thirty-second notes A dot () placed immediately after a note or rest increases the duration of that note or rest one-half, Single dotted notes equal to Single dotted rests equal to Two dots (*+) placed immediately after a note or rest Double dotted notes equal to Double dotted rests equal to The pitch of a tone is represented by a character called a lef, which is placed at the beginning of the staff. There are several kinds of clefs used in modern notation; however, drum music, only two clefs are needed — the creble (4) or G clef and the bass (S) or F clef. The treble clef, whi establishes the note G on the second line, is used for bells, xylophone, marimba, vibraphone, etc. The bass clef, which establishes the note F on the fourth line, is used for timpani, snare drum, bass drum, etc. ete, ete increases the duration of that note or rest three-quarters. etc. ete, ‘The degrees of the staff and the leger lines and spaces ‘epresent the pitch of various sounds which are named after the fist seven letters of the alphabet — A,B,C,D.EF.G. ‘These letters are repeated as often necessary. The note called middle Cis placed on the first leger line below the staff in the treble clef and on the first leger line above the staif in the bass clef. Names of Notes in the Treble Clef Treble or G clef (On the five lines In the Four spaces Abote the staff soe EG BDF F AC & DCBAGFEF GA BCD E Names of Notes in the Bass Clef Bass Above the staff oF clef On the five lines In the four spaces Below the staff e z£ 2 ee tt 5 ot * : =a = 7 = = Hl G BDF A AC E£E G F EDC XS BecDEFG The time or tempo in which a certain movement, or entire composition, is to be played, is indicated by two numerals (forming 4 fraction) placed at the beginning. This is called the time signature, The upper numeral (numerator) denotes the number of beats (counts) in each measure, while Table of Time Signatures in General Use Simple ‘The key of a composition is indicated by characters called sharps and flats placed at the beginning of the staff, im- mediately following the clef. These signs of chromatic alteration are called the key signature, When no key signature appears after the clef, the composition is in the key of C major, or in its relative key of A minor, All of the notes effected by the key signature are to be played sharp or flat, as the case may be. ‘When sharps and flats, not indicated in the key signature, and other signs such as double sharps, double flats and naturals appear throughout a composition, they are known as accidentals. the lower numeral (denominator) denotes the kind of note, or rest, receiving one best, for example: = Beats (counts) to a measure [Note or rest receiving one beat (count) ‘Compound A sharp (f) raises the note, before which i placed, a halftone ‘A double sharp (:) raises the note, before which it is placed, a whole tone. ‘A flat (b) lowers the note, before which itis placed, 2 halftone ‘A double fat (Sp ) lowers the note, before which i x placed, a whole-tone. ‘A natural (£) counteracts the effect of a sharp of at and restores the note tits normal pitch F F F sharp double sharp natural B oubie Nat B natural Key Signatures (Treble Clef) Major keys with sharps, and ther relative minor keys. (The key-note, or tonic, is given in each case.) CMajor G-Major D Major AMajor — E Major B Major FA Major CH Major Aminor — Eminor — B minor Feminor ——C minor G4minor Dfminor Adminor Key Signatures (Treble Clef) Major keys with flats, and their relative minor keys. (The key-note, or tonic, is given in each case.) F Major Bb Major Eb Major ‘Ab Major Db Major GbMajor jor D minor G minor C minor F minor ‘Bb minor. Eb minor Ab minor Key Signatures (Bass Clef) Major keys with sharps, and their relative minor keys. (The key-note, or tonic, is given in each case.) C Major —GMajor =D Major A Major E Major B Major FE Major C8 Major (Natural) A minor Eminor — B minor FR minor C# minor G4 minor Djminor Ag minor Key Signatures (Bass Clef) Major keys with flats, and their relative minor keys. (The key-note, or tonic, is given in each case.) FMajor Bb Major Eb Major Ab Major Db Major Gb Major Cb Major D minor G minor C minor F minor Bb minor Eb minor “Abminor 10 Notes grouped unevenly are indicated as follows: el — = — — : aid dae Siddddd ca Abbreviations ‘This means to repeat the This means to repeat the preveding measure ‘ao preceding measures The word bis, meaning twice, is sometimes used to indicate the repetition of one or more measures. Written Played Drum rolls are indicated in this manner: Dynamics (Various Degrees of Power) imp, mezzo piano mp, mezzo piano means moderately soft. », plano means sot. p pianissimo means very sof. op means as soft as possible mf, mezzo forte means moderately loud. {forte means loud. {ff fortissimo means very loud. {if means as loud a possible sf or sf, sforzando means forced — with sudden emphasis. rf or rf, rinforzando means to reinforce — with special emphasis. 1p, forte e subito piano means loud, then suddenly sot rese, crescendo 0 —== means increasing in loudness. dim, diminuendo decrese, decrewendo! 9" =——— means decreasing in loudness When a note is to be given special emphasis, a sign called an accent (ord )is placed over or under it. (Further study of accents will be found in Lession 3, p. 14) Although a rather incongruous term, the word “fingering,” in connection with drumming, refers to the right and left- hand strokes, such as LRLL, RLRR, ete. formate SS A curved line (~) placed over or under two or more notes of various pitch is called a slur, which means that the notes so marked are to be played in a smooth and connected man ner. This method of playing is called legato. ‘A note, cver or under which a dot ( - ) is placed, is to be played in a short, crisp manner. This is called ordinary staccato playing. (This is called ordinary staccato playing.) Ordinary staccato When a group of notes is to be played an octave (eight notes) higher than written, the abbreviation va is placed over Full staccato A sign called a fermata or hold ( @ ), placed over or under a note, means that, at the conductor's or performer's pleasure, the counting ceases while the note is sustained beyond its normal duration. This is also true in the case of a rest having a fermata placed over or under it A short stop, or pause, is indicated by this sign, J, A curved line (>) connecting two notes alike in pitch is called a tie. The second note is not struck but its time: Value is added to that of the first note slur (legato) When a note is marked by a wedge-shaped stroke (¥ ), the effect is increased. This is called the full staccato. When a curved line (slur) is placed over the staccato marks, the effect is decreased. This is called mezzo staccato or half staccato. Mezzo (half) staccato the group. Loco means to play as written 12 Lesson 7 Development of the Hands In every drum rudiment, the important thing to remember is to make sure that the sticks are held correctly. In fact, before commencing any exercise, the student is advised to “check up,” not only on the correct manner of holding the sticks, but also on the correct movernent of the hands, arms and wrists. Exercise I: Count out loud Fingering ROR ORR LOL OL Exercise Il: Count outloud |) Fingering ROR R v L L Exercise IIT: Count cout loud 1 Fingering ROR OR OR R R RR Exercise IV: Count A 5 7 cout loud. Fingering ROR R R R R Lesson 2 Alternate Single Strokes ‘Alternate Single Strokes are very extensively used in both udimental, as well as in original drumming. This method of playing Alternate Single Strokes is commonly referred to as Shand to hand” playing, and simply means that the hands alternate when striking the drum; each hand playing 2 single stroke at a time Instructions for Playing Alternate Single Strokes ‘The correct position of the hands and arms, when playing Alternate Single Strokes, is as follows: (See starting position shown in Illustration 3, p.5.) Each of the following exercises is to be played in a very slow tempo, at first; later on, the tempo may gradually be increased, until @ fairly rapid arte of speed has been attained. ‘This, of course, must be done without interrupting the chythm of the rudiment. As the speed increases, the stucent’s forearms and hands will, naturally, get closer to the drum and still retain the same motions as those required for a slower tempo. First: Strike the drum with the right stick, and keep it dow. (See lilustration 5, p. 3.) Second: Strike the drum with the left stick and, at the same time, bring the right stick up to its original position. (See Illustration 6, p. 6.) Keep on repeating this process, first ‘with the right hand, and then with the left hand, until the Alternate Single Strokes have been mastered. 13 In the beginning, the following exercises are to be played very slowly, the student bearing in mind the fact that the hands work in opposite directions, that is; when one hand is going toward the drum, the other hand is going away from the drum. Exercise I: icone 304 2003 out loud Fingering RL ROL R LR Exercise II: 1203 4 10203 ‘Count out loud Fingering L The above exercises are given here for the purpose of Preparing the student for the study of the Single Stroke Roll, which will be taken up later on, following the study of the Five, Seven and Nine Stroke Rolls. Lesson 3 Accents ‘An accent is indicated by a certain symbol, or sign, denoting special emphasis. A note, over or under which an accent is placed, is to be played louder than the note not so marked. ‘There are two kinds of accents; the light, or weak (>), and the heavy, or strong (A). A note marked with a heavy accent (A) is to be played as forcefully as possible, AA finished performer on the drums will always make sure that he plays all of the unaccented notes in a normal way; which means that he plays them with an equal amount of volume. Then, when an accented note appears, he scrikes it with more emphasis than he does the other notes. ‘The following exercises are to be played very slowly, at first, and in strict tempo. The accent must be perfected to such a degree that it will not interfere with the tempo of the 14 ‘These exercises should be constantly repeated, until the student is positive that the hands move correctly. After the exercises have been thoroughly learned in a slow tempo, the rate of speed may be increased. By diligently practicing Alternate Single Strokes, the student will be able to acquire the proper movement of the hands and arms, which is extremely necessary in perfecting any rudiment. The hand motions, used in these exercises, are the same as those used for developing the hands. See Lesson 1. p., 13) However, when playing an accented note, the arms and wrists are used with a “snapping of a whip” motion. This “snap” of the arms and wrists takes place during their normal movements. The student is advised against increasing the power of the accent by adding to the height of the stick, or by taking a longer swing with the arm. The stronger the wrists become (in the “snap”), the les the arms will have to move, The secret of executing an accent in 2 smooth, even manner, is to play it as close to the drum at possible, with a sudden’ “snap” of the wrist, but with only a slight arm motion ‘When the student finds that he has perfected the system of playing an accent in a slow tempo, he may then gradually increase the speed, until he can play the exercises in a very rapid tempo. Exercise I: Fingering ROR OR RL &L LE & R R R R LE EL Exercise Il: Count cout loud Fogrng ROR RR LL Lb R R RR EL EL LL Exercise I: Count out loud , 7 i . 3 5 Fingering R ROR L LoL R R R L LoL Exercise IV: Count P outloud |) 4 a 3 : 2 3 Fingering R R OR book L R R R Lok oL Exercise V: count a 304 1 2 3 4 1 2 30 4 out loud Fingering ROR OR OR R R RR Lo-L Lob LoLoeou Exercise VI: ca \ 203 4 1 203 4 out loud Fogg ROR OR RR R RR L LE Lo EL EL E Exercise VII: Count Riana 1 2 3 1 2 3 1 2 3 Fingering R ROR ROR R L L L LoL L Exercise VIL: Count cout loud Fingering R. R R ROR R L L L L LoL Lesson 4 The Three Stroke Ruff with an accent on the third stroke All short, Single Stroke Rolls are known as Ruffs, The rudiment, in this lesson, consists of three altemate strokes, the third of which is accented, The rhythmic model of this rudiment, shown below, is ritten in common time (4/4). There are four beats to each measure, the fourth of which is a quarter rest. By playing this rudiment in strict tempo, slowly at first, and counting each beat out loud, the student will soon discover that the rudiment will automatically set itself into a definite tempo; especially as the rate of speed is increased. Instructions for Playing the Three Stroke Ruff At the start, both sticks must be up; that is, they must be raised above the drum. (JIL 3, p. 3.) On the count of one, bring the right stick down on the drum. (I 5, p. 6.) Then, on the count of two, bring the left stick down and, at the same time, bring the right stick up. (IIL 6p. 6.) On the count of thee, bring the right stick down with a “snap” of the wrist and arm, in order to produce the accent, and, at the same time, bring the left stick up. 5, p.6,) Then retain this position (right stick down and left stick up) on the count of four, whichis a rest. Continue the exercise (ehythmie mosel) in the manner just explained, but take notice that the hands alternate on the first beat in each measure. Always pay strict attention to the fingering, Rhythmic Model: Play stowly at frst; increase speed gradually. Keep strict chythm, Count outloud 434 Se | Fingering RL OR L oR OL Examples in usual notation: Count yt out loud ' 3 : 2 Fingering RE R LRL RLR LRL 1_an-duh 2 an-duh 1 an-duh 2__an-duh RLRLRL Lesson 5 The Three Stroke Ruff ‘with an accent on the first stroke This rudiment is almost identical to the one mentioned above in Lesson 4, except for the fact that the accent falls on the first stroke, instead of om the third stroke, The preceding Three Stroke RufT (Lesson 4) isthe accepted version of this particular rudiment. By practicing the Three ‘Stroke Ruff with the accent on the first stroke, instead of on 16 RLRL RL Grace notes are to be played very “close” to the large note. 1_uh-and 2_uh-and RLRLRL RLRLRL the third stroke, a much finer technique, as well as a firmer and broader knowledge of rhythmical beats, will be acquired. ‘The instructions given in Lesson 4 also apply to the follow- ing rhythmic model, with, however, the exception of the accent. Rhythmic Model: Play slowly at first; increase speed gradually. Keep strict rhythm. Count out loud 23 4 +f 2 3 4 bF 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 Fingering Ro OLR LOR OL R LR L oR OL Examples in usual notation: Count en an_- duh 2 duh 1 an_ = duh an__=_ duh = SS Fingering ROL ORO OL R L R L R L R L Lesson 6 Combination of the Two Previous Three Stroke Ruffs ‘This lesson will give the student better control over each wrists, individual Three: Stroke Ruff. It should be practiced very ‘After this lesson has been perfected in a fairly rapid tempo, slowly, at first, gradually increasing the speed, and always the student will experience little difficulty with 2 Three bearing in mind the correct movements of the arms and ‘Stroke Ruffin any combination of accents. Count 4 bo. 30 4 out loud Fingering Ro OLR LR OL R LR LOR OL Lesson 7 Wrist Exercise for the Three Stroke Ruff “This exercise, with the exception of the fingering, is the thet orginal postions. same as the one given in Lesson 6. ‘When starting slowly, the arms and wrists must be used in Tn une teyianng, both sicks should be up. (See Musearion playing every stroke. Theo. after a litle speed fas. oen 3 ps.) Tcquired, the hands wil gradually get closer to the drum, P fce striking the drum, the sticks must be cetumed 10 with the wists doing most of the work Count 203 4 1 2 3 4 4 outloud |, Fingering RRR LoL oL R ROR L 7 Lesson 8 The Four Stroke Ruff with an accent on the fourth stroke This rudiment consists of four altemate strokes, with an _ Illustrating the Four Stroke Ruff accent on the Fourth stroke. When the left hand stick begins the Ruff, the right hand stick plays the accented (fourth) First stroke, Ill. 6, p. 6 stroke: and, when the right hand stick starts the Ruff, the Second stroke, Il. §,p. 6 Starting with the lefthand:—Thied stroke, Il 6, p-6 left hand stick is given the accented (fourth) stroke. In other Fourth stroke, Il. 5, p. 6 words, the hand that is down on the drum, remains down, after playing the accent, and starts the ensuing Ruff fron ca * " Fifth and sixth beats are rests. (Keep right hand down.) this position, The shythmic model of this rudiment, shown below, is First stroke, ML. 5, p. 6 written in 6/8 time. There are six beats to each measure, the Second stroke, IL 6, p. 6 fifth and sixth of which are eighth rests. Starting with the right hand: Third stroke, Ill 5, p. 6 It is advisable to start playing this Ruf in a slow tempo, GE ES at first, gradually increasing the speed, until the desired tempo is obtained. By counting out loud and retaining a steict tempo, the student will, in a comparatively short time, acquire a perfect Four Stroke Ruff, Rhythmic Model: Play slowly at first; increase speed gradually. Keep strict rhythm, cut 123 4 5 6 123 4 56 1253 4 55 123456 Fingering LR LOR RULRL LRLR RLRL Examples in usual notation: I Count 1 2 an- duh 3 4 0 ans duh 12 ans duh so 3 # oan duh cout loud Z = J. 3 Fingering L ooL oR L~L R R L~L R L L R LR R LR tRER aurRbL tcreReR eer LRLER RLERL LRLR RLERL um 1 and 2 and 1 and 2 and 2 - es as SS — —— —— a a ————_] SS ——— f R R L R L L R L R R L R L L R L 18 Lesson 9 The Four Stroke Ruff with an accent on the first stroke ‘This rudiment is to be played in the same manner a the It is extremely important to count out fous, one given in Lesson, 5, p. 16, with the exception of the accent ‘The hand playing the fourth stroke of the Ruff must be ‘The latter falls on the fist stroke, instead of on the fourth kept down, ready to begin the Rut following stroke, Rhythmic Model: Play slowly at frst; increase speed gradually, Keep strict chythm, Count 1 203 4 5 6 out loud, Fingering LR OL OR RL RL LRLER RLRL Examples in usual notation: r cout | a-duh 2 3 am- duh 4 an - duh 2 3 a duh out loud 4 _ ’ Fingering LOR OL OR OR LR OL LR OLR R LR OL Lesson 10 Combination of the Two Previous Four Stroke Ruffs ‘This lesson is exactly what its caption implies. It will be playing the first stcoke of the Ruts. noticed that, in each of the first four measures, the accent ‘Though careful practice, and by complying with the rules ‘occurs on the fourth stroke of each Ruff; and, in each of the and instructions given previously, the student will, in a short next four measures, the accent falls on the first stroke of space of time, master the Four Stroke Ruff, regardless of the each Ruff, Throughout the exercise, the hands alternate in accent Count 123 45 6 23 45 6 1 3456 12345 6 ost loud yk Fingering LR LOR RLRL LRLR RLRL LRLR RLRL LRLR RLRL 19 Lesson 11 Wrist Exercise for the Four Stroke Ruff ‘The instructions given for the wrist exercise in Lesson 7, Ruff, except for the accents and the difference in time, P-17 also apply to the wrist exercise for the Four Stroke Count 2 out loud 3456 1 Fingering R R RR LLULUL R RRR LLLEL Lesson 12 The Five Stroke Ruff with an accent on the fifth stroke Ths rudiment consists of five alternate strokes, with an stroke accent on the fifth stroke With the exception of the accents, the instructions given The em and hand motions, used for executing this forthe Thee Stoke Ruffin Lesson 4p 16,ar slo epoca Ruff, ate the same as those used to execute the Three Stroke tothe Five Stroke Ruff Ruff. Both of these Ruffs are practically alike: in fact. the While increasing the speed from a slow tempo to a fast only noticeable difference between them is that the Five tempo, the correct motions of the hands and seme dhould so Stroke Ruff contains two more strokes than the Three be sacrified Stroke Ruff. In each Ruff, the accent ovcurs on the last Rhythmic Model: Play slowly at first; increase speed gradually. Keep strict chythm. Count out loud 12345 6 123456 41 5 Fingering RL OR LOR LRLRL RLRLR LRLRL Examples in usual notation: 1 1 Count a 1_and 2_and 3_and 4_an cutioud } ZgUizan-duh 1 2_uhs an-duh Fingering RL RLR LO RLRL R LRLRL RLRLER LRLRL RLRL Mm Iv I lube an-duh 2 3 uh an-duk 4 iv noes and I RLRLR LRLERE RELRLR LRLERL v VI : tand 2 and 3 and 4 and 1 2 3 4 , 2 RL LRROLLR RL ROL RL ROL 20 Lesson 13 The Five Stroke Ruff with an accent on the frst stroke ‘This rudiment is played in the same manner as the preoed~ ‘The instructions given in Lesson 12, p. 20 also apply to ing Five Stroke Ruff, except for the difference in the accent. the following rudiment. Rhythmic Model: Count aaa 3 3456 123 45s 2 Fingering R LOR LR LRUERL RLRLR LRERL Examples in usual notation’ u I Count = y _uh_an = duh 2 1_uh— an -duh 2 Vand. and out loud, Fingering RL RL OR LRLRL R LRLRL RLRL ML Vv 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and L R-LLRRLLR R LO oR L.R L RL Lesson 14 Combination of the Two Previous Five Stroke Ruffs In each of the first four measures, of the following exercise, Ruff, regardless of the accent. the accent occurs on the fifth stroke; while, in each of the ‘The student is again advised to begin the exercise in a ext four measures, the accent falls on the frst stroke. slow tempo, gradually increasing the speed, until a fairly When this exercise has been sufficiently practiced, the rapid tempo has been reached. Counting out loud is also student will have little difficulty in playing any Five Stroke extremely important. jcoaae 56 123 4.56 123 4 5 6 cout loud Fingering R LOR LOR LRLRL RLRLR LRERE Lesson 15 The Five Stroke Roll with an accent on the fifth stroke ‘The first four strokes of this rudiment are executed with each hand playing two strokes at a time; therefore, when playing the following thythmic model, the first and second strokes are played with the cight hand, the third and fourth strokes with the left hand, and the fifth (accented) stroke is played with the right hand, which should be raised so that it will be in position to start the next Five Stroke Roll. The latter is played in the same manner as the preceding Five Stroke Roll, except that itis begun with the left hand, instead of with the right hand, Rhythmic Model: Count A co, 2 4s 6 Ls 4s Fingering R ROL LOR LLERRL Examples in usual notation Il Count 1_uh_an-duh 2 1_uh_an-duh 2 out loud | Fingering RR LOL OR LLERRL a t_and 2 and 3_and 4 and Although the hands altemate by playing two strokes at a time, it can readily be seen that this is a “hand to hand” rudiment; however, the accented fifth stroke must not interfere with the position of the hands. The count is the same as that of the foreoging Five Stroke Ruff. It is advisable to master the Five Stroke Roll in a glow tempo, before attempting to play it repidly LLERRL 1 Land 2 and 3 and 4 and R LLRRL RRLLR LLRRL RRLL Iv Lesson 16 The Five Stroke Roll with an accent on the first stroke With the exception of the accent, this eudiment is played in the same manner as the preceding one in Lesson 15 Rhythmic Model: Count * out loud. 1203 456 123 45 Fingering R ROL OL OR LLERRLE 2 RRLELER LLER RL Examples in usual notation: 1 Count out loud uh-an- duh 2 1_uh-an- duh 2 Fingering R ROLL Ro LL RRL U1 1_and 2 and 3 and 4 and 1 2 3 46M, 2 3 4 RLLRRLLUR Ro oL ROL R ~LOR OL Lesson 17 Combination of the Two Previous Five Stroke Rolls This lesson should be practiced slowly, until itis mastered: the rate of speed and still maintain clean rolls. then, when this is accomplished, it will be easier to increase The accents should be carefully observed. Count 23 45 6 12053 456 123 456 123 456 out loud, Fingering R RL LR LL RRL RRLLR “LELRRL Lesson 18 Wrist Exercise for the Five Stroke Roll This exercise, with the exception of the fingering, is the The instructions given for the wrist exercise in Lesson 7, same asthe one given in Lesson 17, 17 also apply to this one Count 123456 123 456 1273 45 6 123 456 out loud Fingering R RR RR LLLLUL RRRRR LLLLEL 23 Lesson 19 The Seven Stroke Ruff with an accent on the seventh stroke ‘This rudiment consists of seven alternate strokes, with an other notes or rests, is given one beat. However, in order to accent on the seventh stroke, The latter, in 6/8 time, also maintain an even tempo, the student is advised to count each. hhappens to fall on the second major beat in the measure, half beat in thismanner: | and, 2and, 3and, 4 and, Sand, and, which is the count of four. This rudiment should not be attempted in a rapid tempo, Im the following rhythmic model, in 6/8 time, the count is until it has been thoroughly practiced in slow and moderately six to each measure. Each eighth note, or its equivalent in fast tempos, Rhythmic Model (A): Count jand2and3and4 5 6 land 2and3and4 5 6 © Land2and3and4 5 6 Land 2and3and4 56 out toud Fingering RLRLRLR LRLRLRL RLRLRLR LRLRERL Rhythmic Model (B): (This rhythmic model may also be used for all the succeeding Seven Stroke Rolls and Ruffs, except for the difference in fingering and accents.) Count, Land 2and Jand 4 and Land 2 and 3and 4and Land 2and 3and 4 and 1 and 2 and 3.and 4 and out lous Fingerng RLRLRLR LRLERLRL RLRERLR LRLERLRL Examples in usual notation Count 2 "4 2 tang 2 and “and 2 and out loud 3 > a > R L LR R LoL R Fingering RLR LRLER LebelbLeab Lesson 20 The Seven Stroke Ruff with an accent on the first stroke ‘The instructions given in Lesson 19 also apply to the following rudiment, except forthe difference in the accent. Rhythmic Model: Count and 2and3and 456 1and2end3and4 5 6 imd2and3and4 56 Land2and3and4s 6 out lou Fingering RL RL RLR LRLRLRL RLRLRLR LRLRLRL Examples in usual notation: 1 Count 1 2 1 2 1 and 2 and 1 and 2 and out loud > > F 7 Fingering RL R LR LR LaLealeb Lesson 21 Combination of the Two Previous Seven Stroke Ruffs It is best to practice this exercise in a slow tempo, until itis well leamed; after which, the rate of speed may gradually be increased. Count and Qand 3and4 $6 Land2and3and4 5 6 land2end3and¢s 6 tmd2and3andé 5 6 out loud = Fingering RL RL RLR LRLRLRL RLRLRLR LRLRLRL land Jand3and4 5 6 Land 2and3and4 $6 land2and3and4 56 Landpanddans4 5 6 RLRLRLR LRLRLRL RLRLRLR LRLRLERL Lesson 22 The Seven Stroke Roll an accent on the seventh stroke ‘The thythm of the Seven Stroke Ruff and Roll is similar to the student from playing it incorrectly. that of the Four Stroke Ruff. ‘The hand ending a Seven Stroke Roll should be kept dow ‘The most appropriate manner in which to illustrate a Seven. ready to begin the following Seven Stroke Roll—the same as Stroke Ruff or Roll is to play it in 6/8 time. This will prevent _the Four Stroke Ruff. Rhythmic Model: Count tand2and3and4 56 land 2and3and4 56 1 and and and 4 $6 land2and 3and 4 5 6 out fou Fingering LL R RLLR RRLLRRL LLRRLLR RRLLRRL Example showing similarity to a Four Stroke Ruf: 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 5 6 1 and count LoL OR R LL R RR out loud x and 30 and 4 LR R L Be Fingering L R L gq R L R c Examples in usual notation: 1 7 Count 1 2 1 2 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 ane 7 out loud, R LCR RLULER LE 3 3 Fingering LL RoR L LR RRLeRee Lesson 23 The Seven Stroke Roll with an accent on the frst stroke This rudiment is played in the seme manner as the preceding Seven Stroke Roll, except for the difference in the accent. Rhythmic Model Count, land 2and3and4 $6 and 2and 3and4 $6 — Land?and3and4 5.6 Land 2and3and4 5 6 cout lou; Fingering LL RRLLR RRLLRRL LLRRLLR RRLLRRL Examples in usual notation: hl 1_and 2 and 1 and 2 and Count 1 outloud =z Fingering L LR RL LR RRLLRRL : Lesson 24 Combination of the Two Previous Seven Stroke Rolls Count and 2and3and4 5 6 Land 2and3and4 $6 1and2end3and4 5 6 cout loud land 2and3and4 5 6 Fingering LL RRLLR RRLLRRL LLRRLLR RRLLRRL land2and3and4 5 6 land 2and3and4 5 6 land2and3and4 5 6 Land2and3and 4 5 6 SS LLRRLLR RRLLRRL LLRRLLR RRLLRRL Lesson 25 Wrist Exercise for the Seven Stroke Rolls and Ruffs ‘The instructions given for the wrist exercise in Lesson 7, - 17 also apply to this one. Count cout loud Jand2and3and4 56 1and2and3and4 $6 Land2and3and45 6 {and 2and3and4 5 6 Fingering RRRRRRR LLLLLLL RRRRRRR LLLLLLL 26 Lesson 26 The Nine Stroke Ruff with an accent on the ninth stroke This rudiment is very similar to the Five Stroke Ruff. ‘he countand, following each beat; in which case, the accented It will be noticed that, in the rhythmic model, the accented ninth stroke falls on each beat ninth stroke is also the fifth beat of the measure. Example Il illustrates the abbreviated method of writing a In Example, I, given below, the Nine Stroke Ruff begins on Nine Stroke Ruff, Rhythmic Model: Count | and2and3andéands § —tand2and3anddands 6 Jand2and3and4and5 6 — land2end3and4and5 6 out loud SS Fingering RLRLRLRLR LRLRLRLRL RLRLRLRLR LRLRLRLRL Example showing similarity to a Five Stroke Roll: 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and 5 6 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and 5 6 Count out loud 1 2 3 4 Fo6 0 2 3 4 5 6 Fingering R LOR LOR LOR LR LR OER iLRER LE Examples in usual notation: As a rule, these are not played as Single Stroke Rolls Count 1 and 2 and I 1 and out loud and Wie Fingering Rob oR LR LR Lesson 27 The Nine Stroke Ruff with an accent on the frst stroke The instructions given in Lesson 26 also apply to the following rhythmic model, except for the difference in the accent. Rhythmic Model: wclooa 1aRd2and3anddands 6 land 2and3anddands 6 —1and2andJanddandS 6 1 andandsand4andS 6 out loud LRLRLRLRL Fingering RLRLRLRLR LRLRLRLRL RLRLRLRLR Examples in usual notatio Count 1 and 2 and Land 2 and outloud 4% % Fingring REoRL RE RERERtRERLERLE Rertrertrbt R Lesson 28 Combination of the Two Previous Nine Stroke Ruffs Count tioud 12nd2and3and4ands 6 —land2and3and4and5 6 ——tand2and3and4andS. 6 © 1and2and3and4and$ 6 ut lous Fingering RLRLRLRLR LRLRLRLRL RLRLRLRLR LRLRLRLRL land 2and3and4andS 6 land2and3and4andS. 6 © land2and3andgandS 6 land 2and3and4and$ 6 RLRLRLRLR LRLRLRLRL RLRLRLRLR LRLRLRLRL Lesson 29 The Nine Stroke Roll with an accent on the ninth stroke In this rudiment, the hands altemate by playing two strokes at a time; whereas, in the Nine Stroke Rul, single strokes are alternated. Rhythmic Model: Count outloud 120¢Zand3anddands § — 1and2and3anddandS 6 —LandJandJanddands 6 land 2and3and4and5 6 Fingering RRLLRRLLR LLRRLLRRL RRLLRRLLR LLRRLLRRL Examples in usual notation: 1 1 mt) Land Zand 1 and ao \_and 2 and 3 and 4 and out lou RLLRRLLR Fingering RicRRtoRRL RReLRRLL R LERRLLRRL R 28 Lesson 30 The Nine Stroke Roll with an accent on the first stroke This rudiment is the same as the one given in Lesson 29, p-28, except for the difference in the accent. Rhythmic Model: Renan Jand2and3anddandS 6 — Land2and3andgand5 6 land2and3and4and5 6 land2and3and4and 5 6 Fingering RRLLRRLLR LLRRLLRRL RRLLRRLLR LLRRLLRRL Examples in usual notation: 1 Count 1 and 2 and 1 and 2 and outloud Fingering RE LR RLLERRLRRLLERRLLE RLEERRELRRER Lesson 37 Combination of the Two Previous Nine Stroke Rolls (Gout, tand2andanddands 6 Iand2andSanddands 6 tané2and3and4ands 6 — land2and3and4ands 6 Fingering RRLLRRLLR LLRRLLRRL RRLLRRLLR LLRRLLRRL land 2andSand4andS 6 land2andJand4andS 6 — land2and3anddands 6 — andZand3and‘and> 6 RRLLRRLLR LLRRLLRRL RRLLRRLLR LLRRLLRRL Lesson 32 Wrist Exercise for the Nine Stroke Rolls and Ruffs ‘The instructions for the wrist exercise given in Lesson 7, - 17 also apply to this one Count and 2and3and4and5 6 out loud, Fingering RRRRRRRRR LLLLLLLLL Lesson 33 The Double Stroke Roll This rudiment consists of the alternate playing of two strokes with each hand. It is commonly referred to as the “Daddy-Mammy” system for playing the Long (Double) Roll Every stroke must be played with an equal amount of volume, and there must be no deviation in the rhythm. After the student has acquired a certain amount of speed. through the practice of this Roll, he will be ready to employ what is known as a “bounce.” This will not only serve to increase the speed but it will also aid in relaxing the muscles of the hands, wrists and arms. It will be noticed that, upon striking the drum with the stick, the latter has a tendency to rebound (bounce) of its own accord, although uncontrolled. The object is to control the “bounce” so that the student will decrease the amount of effort in his playing. During the “bounce” the hand and arm should be allowed to follow the upward action of the stick, ‘After practicing the “bounce” for a while, the student will gradually begin to coordinate the wrist and stick action; then, it will be only a matter of time when he will acquire perfect control of the “bounce.” Rhythmic Model: (Long Roll) Count cout loud sr ee 1 R R LoL R R L L Fnerog ob ROR OL UL OR OR Rhythmic Model: (Long Roll; Triplet Rhythm) Count out loud. 7 4 a 7 3 7 3 Fingering RRLLRRL RRL L ReLiReb eRele LuRRLiRaLeR Rete. 30 land2and3and4andS 6 I and2and3and4ands 6 land2and3anddand5 6 RRRRRRRRR LLLLLLLLL When starting slowly, the wrist coordinates with each stroke; as the speed increases, the first right hand stroke is executed normally, and the second right hand stroke is “pounced,” the fingers around the stick controlling the “bounce.” This also applies to the lett hand. ‘As the speed increases, the student must remember not to allow the second stroke of either hand to diminish in volume. In other words, every stroke, in a perfectly smooth Roll, must bbe made with an evenness of rhythm and an equal amount of volume. ‘The triplet shythm exercise is a little more difficult to execute properly; it, therefore, will require more study, and ought not to be attempted until the Long Roll is thoroughly learned. The thythmie models, shown below, are self-explanatory. ‘The student should be able to start a Roll with either hand; therefore, in order to insure this, he should practice it accordingly. (Nore fingering.) RR LoL R oR LoL LoL RR LoL RR L 2 L 2 o 7 3 z RaLoRebLeRebe RelLiReb cRele xamples in usual notation: count vtloud — g Written Played Written Played Written Piayed 7 7 7 7 RRELRRLLRRLLRARLLERRLEERREL R LURRL Leto vy Written { Played RLLARLL RRULRALLRRLERRLL RRELRRLLRRLL RRLLRR LLRRLL R LLRRLLRR LLRR, etc. 31 VI Written (Efe 1 2 3 4 Played : am r ==. e- = ca i —_ 7 7 7 7 RRELRRELRRLLELRRLLRRLLRRL LLUR RL L, ete Lesson 34 The Single Stroke Roll Having already leamed the correct arm and wrist motion Both sets of fingering, indicated beneath the staff of the of the Alternate Single Strokes, earlier inthis book (Lesson 2, _shythmic model, should be practiced. The reason for this i p. 13), the student is now prepared to take up the study of thatthe drummer must be proficient in starting any vadiment the Single Stroke Roll. The latter is merely a succession of with either hand, Alternate Single Strokes, which are to be played as rapidly Ut is suggested that the student cefzain from practicing the and as evenly as possible. triplet chythm execcise, until he has thoroughly mastered the : Single Stroke Roll Rhythmic Model: (Single Stroke Roll) Comt 1 2 3 4 4 2 3 4 4 2 3 4 4 ut loud iogeringR OL OR LOR OL OR OL feemey R GOR - RR - R op ze tn ze cp ae Rhythmic Model: (Single Stroke Roll; Triplet Rhythm) Count out loud ¥ 3 3 3 z 3 Fingering RLR URURLRERL ReRcRLRLRtRL RiuRcReRcReRe RiRcRLRLRRe Leb aL eLaLaber Labebrbab abe Lrbrbabababe LaLalabalala Count 1 an-duh 2 an-duh 1 an-duh 2° an-duh 1 an-duh 2 an-duh 1 an-duh 2 an-duh 7 Examples in usual notation: zg , Written { : Played LRLRLRLRLERLRLRLRLRLRLRLRL R Ry ete. 32 u Written Played LRLERLRLRLRLR, ect. Lesson 35 The Press Roll ‘This rudiment is executed with both sticks striking the drum sinultaneousiy. The “bounce” ofthe sticks i controled by “pressing” them on the drum. ‘The Press Roll should begin promptly on the beat, on which it is written, and care should be taken so that it does hot continue to drag into the following beat. Examples in usual notation: County out loud RURLRURL RURLRLRERL RERERL RERERLRLRLRE BI RERLRLRLRL R “The Press Roll is only used to produce a short, crisp Roll; however, dance drummers generally use it when executing Guarter note Rolls in fast tempos. (See Example 3, below ) Tn any event, it is not advisable to employ the Press Roll, lint both the Single and Double Stroke Rolls have been thoroughly precticed. Press roll--# LR # aL Lesson 36 The Single Paradiddle ( ‘Stroke Paradiddle) ‘This eudiment combines two single strokes with one double stroke, The fest stroke of the Single Paradidale is accented bby means of a natural down blow of the stick. ‘Afer completing the fourth stroke, the hand playing = shoulé remain downs the other hand should be in an upward position, ready to begin the next Paradiddle ach suoke, with the exception of the first (accented) stroke, should be equal in volume. {LLUSTRATING THE SINGLE PARADIDDLE ( rns stroke, M$, 9.6 Second stoke 6, 6 staring wth the ght band!) Shrd sre, I 3.9.6 Fourth stroe, fl, 5, 7-6 [Fie auoke, 6.9.6 Second stoke, Il. 5, 9-6 4 Third stoke, ll. 6, 9-6 | Fourth stroke, Il 6, 9-6 ‘tasting with the left hand: 33 Exercise I: Count out loud 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and Fingering RLRRLRLR Lesson 37 The Double Paradiddle (A) with two accents This rudiment contains six strokes; four single altemate strokes, followed by a double stroke, The first and third strokes are accented, Exercise I: Count out loud 23456 12 Fingering RLRLRR LRLRLL Lesson 38 The Double Paradiddle (B) with one accent With the exception of the accent, which occurs on the first stroke only, this rudiment is the same as the one in Lesson 37. Exercise I: Count 4 om, 23g 4s Fingering RLRLRR LRLRLL Lesson 39 The Triple Paradiddle This rudiment contains eight strokes; six single altemate strokes, followed by a double stroke. The accents occur on the first, third and fifth strokes. Exercise I: Count outloud Land 2 and 3 and 4 and Fingering RL RLRLRR 34 Land 2nd 3 and 4 and RLRRLRLL 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and LRLERLRLL Exercise Tuh-an-duhQuhanduh 1uh-an duh 2 uh-an-duh RLRRLRLL RLRRLRLL ‘The arm and wrist motions, used for executing the Double Paradiddle, are the same as those used for executing the Single Paradiddle, Exercise Il 1 and 2 and 3 and 1 and 2 and 3 and LRLRLL RLRLRR Exercise Il ‘and 2 and_3 and 1_and2 and 3_and RLRLRR LRLRLL ‘The arm and wrist motions, used for executing this Paradiddle, are the same as those used for executing all of the previous Paradiddles. Exercise I: Yuh-an-dubuh-anduh Lu-an-duh2uh-an-duh RLRLRLRR LRLRLERLL Lesson 40 The Single Paradiddle ‘This rudiment, except for the added accent, is the same as of the Paradiddle. The rhythmic effect, produced thereform, the preceding Single Paradiddle in Lesson 36, p. 33. This lesson willbe well worth the extra time spent in practice, should also be practiced by accenting only the second stroke Exercise I Exercise I: Count ang 2and 3and4and land 2and 3and 4and Lufeanduh? uban-duh J ubean-duh 2 ubvaneduh out loud = SS SS Fingering RERRLRLL RLERREREL RLRRLRLL RLRRLRLL Lesson 417 The Double Paradiddle ‘with an accent on the first and fourth strokes With the exception of the accents, this cudiment is the same as the Double Paradiddle (A) in Lesson 37, p. 34. Exercise I: Exercise I: coma 1.2.53 4 5.6 1203 456 and? and3 and 1__and2_and 3 and outloud eS ee oooh E : : : pa] Fingering RL RL RR LREREL RLRLRR LRURLE Lesson 42 The Triple Paradiddle with an accent on the first third and sixth strokes. ‘This rudiment is the same as the Triple Paradiddle in ‘Lesson 39, p. 34. with the exception of the accents. Exercise I: Luhanduh 2 uban-duh 1 uleaneduh 2 ubran-dult Exercise 1 count and 2 and 3and 4and 1 and 2_and 3 and 4 and out loud Fingering RLRLRLRR LREREREL RLRLRLRR LRLRLRLL 35 Lesson 43 The Flam This rudiment consists of a principle (lage) note, preceded by a grace note. In executing the Flam, the grave note is lightly tapped as “close” as possible to the principle (accented) note, However, itis advisable, in the beginning, to keep the two notes “open,” gradually closing the grace note to the main note. Aight hand Flam is made by playing the grace note with the left hand, and the accented (large) note with the right hand. (See Mustration 6, . 6.) A left hand Flam is made by playing the grace note with the right hand, and the accented note with the left hand. (See Mlustration 5. p. 6.) Rhythmic Model: Count cutioud 73, Fingering UR RR LR RL UR RL UR RL Flam Exercises: , Count out loud * 1203 “ingerit RLiR LR LR TRIRUTR IR eas tan ARTI TUR Lesson 44 The Single Flam Paradiddle (Flamadiddle) By placing 2 grace note in front of the first stroke of the Paradiddle, we have what is known as the Flam Paradiddle, ‘The grace note, which isa light tap, is queikly followed by an Exercise I: Count 1 and 2 and out loud a 1_and_2_ and Fingering RL OR Ro rb R LL ERLRRRLRLL ‘The important points to remember are, that, when execut- ing a right hand Flam, the left hand leads; and, when playing left hand Flam, the right hand leads. According to the fingering indicated in the rhythmic model, below, the right and left hand Flams altemate; while; in Example I, two sets of fingering are indicated ~ one for the left hand Flam, and the other for the right hand Flam, ‘The student is advised to thoroughly master the Flam, before attempting to play any beat containing it; otherwise, 4ispleasing results are almost certain to follow. eRERRE RL «cRiR aL aL accented stroke; the latter, in tur, is followed by three norm- al taps Exercise Il Iuhanduh 2uhanduh Lubanduh 2ubanduh eRLRReLRLL Lesson 45 The Double Flam Paradiddle (Flama-- flamadiddte ) tains two Flams; whereas, the Single Flam Paradiddle has but By placing a grace note just ahead of the first and third one Flam. strokes of a Double Paradiddle, we have what is known as the Doubie Flam Paradiddle. In other words, this rudiment con- 36 Exercise I: Count A out loud ha a Fingering LR Lot RL RR RLR Lesson 46 The Triple Flam Paradiddle (Flama - flama - flamadiddte) This rudiment contains three Flams. In reality, itis merely 4 Triple Paradiddle with the addition of grace note placed in front of the first, third and fifth strokes. Exercise I: Count outloud and_2 Fingering LR Lok R Exercise IL Count ‘out loud i cms ow Fingeringt ROL. Lesson 47 The Flam Tap ‘This rudiment is exactly what its name implies ~ a Flam followed by a tap. ‘The grace note is a very light tap and the next two notes Exercise I: Count out loud and 2 and Fingering Ro RoreL LotR Ral L Lesson 48 The Flam Accent This rudiment consists of a Flam, followed by two normal taps. The Flam Accent is most commonly written in 6/8 time. 3456 RLRLL Exercise II: Land 2and 3and Land 2and 3 and RLERRLRLL LRL LRLRR are accented with equal volume ‘The exercises in 2/4 and 6/8 tempos, shown below, will sive the student sufficient practice in perfecting this rudiment. Exercise I: However, it is also advisable for the student to practice the Flam Accent in the 2/4 tempo, as given in Exercise I Exercise I: oe! 2 3 4s 6 1 23 4 5 6 out loud Fingering 1 RL RoebL RL eR OL Ro RL R L Exercise Il: Count cen ans duh 2 an = duh Lan duh 2 an_-_duh Fingering t R LR al R L tR LL Ro ork R L Lesson 49 The Flamacue In realty, the Flamacue isa Five Stroke Single Rol, with accented, The Flams and accented note should have the same the first and fifth strokes “Flammed,” and the second stroke volume Exercise | Count A 5 BEE SS 4 Fingering DRL Exercise I Count L uh + an _- duh 2 and 1 uh = an and out loud ——— h SS = 4 Fingering t R L R L LR ab R L R el Lesson 50 The Half Drag (A) with an accent on the third stroke This rudiment consists ofa double, normal stroke, followed The customary notation forthe Half Drag is illustrated in by a single accented stroke. The rhythm of the Half Drag is Example Il, shown on next page; which i two grace aotes similar to that of the Three Stroke Ruff, and should be (Gouble stoke) followed by the sccented principle note. The practiced in the same manner grace note double stroke is to be “bounced,” instead of “pressed,” when speed is attained. Rhythmic Model: Count 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 out loud Fingering LoL OR R oR OL LoL OR RoR L 38 Examples in usual notation: I a uh-and = 1__uhsand 2_uh and 1 2 3 4 Count outloud 1 uh and 2, Fingering b LOOR OR R LoL ob RRR L LLR RRL LLR RRL 1 an = duh 2 an = duh 1 an_- duh 2, an_-_ duh R L L R R R L L L R R R Lesson 51 The Half Drag (B) with an accent on the first stroke ‘This is a “hand to hand” rudiment, which is chiefly used in slow or medium tempos. It is an exceptional rudiment for improving one’s technique. Rhythmic Model: cunt 7 2 3 4 F 2 3 4 Ff 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 cout loud Fingering LL OR RR L LoL- OR RR OL Example in usual notation: Count an- duh 2 an_-_duh 1 ans duh 2 an -_ duh out loud Fingering R LoL R ROR L L L R R R Lesson 52 The Half Drag (C) with an accent on the third stroke (for apid tempos) This rudiment is more practical in a rapid tempo than the _the latter is played from “hand to hand” — a more difficult Half Drag (A) in Lesson 50, p- 38. This is dus to the fact that method of rapid execution. Rhythmic Model: Count 203 4 § 2 3 # 2 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 cout loud 1 Fingering L eens R L LoL L R oL RoR OL RR 39 Examples in usual notation: Count 1 uh-and 2 uh-and = 1 uh-and 2 uh- and 1 2 3 4 out loud Fingering rd op = n 7 = LL RR ML ae ae LER OLR RRL RRL Lesson 53 The Half Drag (D) with an accent on the frst stcoke (for rapid tempos) In a lively tempo, this rudiment is easier for some drummers because it is not played from “hand to hand.” Both, however, to play than the previous Half Drag (B) in Lesson SI, p. 39, should be mastered, Rhythmic Model: Count otloud | 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 2 2 3 4 4 2 3 4 wring EL OLOR LR L LR LoL OR Fingering RRL RR OL RoR - ROR OL Examples in usual notation: Count ans duh 2 mah anh 2a | ah out loud Finy R L L R L L R L L R L L mee RoR OL ROR L R ROL ROR Lesson 54 The Single Drag This rudiment consists of a Half Drag, followed by a single, below, the Half Drag occurs on the fiest and third beats in altemated, accented stroke. In the rhythmic model, given each measure Rhythmic Model: icon 12 304 1 2 34 1 2 304 1 2 304 out loud Fingering tL Ro Lark R wR LoaaL R tuR L arb R ttR L arb R 1 1 and, 2 and Example in usual notation: | coun Land 2_and land 2and out loud Fingering LER Lorre LR wR L eebR Ro uRL rabR eeRL eek Lesson 55 The Full Drag 'A Full Drag consists of a Half Drag, followed by a single, the Half Drag occurs on the first and thd beats in each mes accented stroke: the latter is made with the same hand that sure. completes the Half Drag. In the shythmic model, given here, Rhythmic Model: Count 3 ontwa 4 2 304 12 34 12 304 1 2 304 Fingering UR R eek L wR R rebb teR R eeb bL otR R eek b Examples in usual notation: Count : 1 a and 1_and = 2_and 123 456 1230 456 out loud and 2 Fingering tL R Ro xeb bL reR R ered L teR Rewek L wR R xeb L mm 12 3 4s 6 123 4s 6 “tuR R ae L oR R arb L Lesson 56 The Double Drag ‘This rudiment consists of two Half Drags the second of start the following Double Drag which is followed by a single, accented, altemate stroke, The ‘Once again the student is cautioned to maintain a strict Students attention 1s called to the fact that the two Half tempo, when practicing any rudiment. Even 2 slight deviation Drags, in succession, do not alternate. in tempo is not considered good drumming, and may lead into The stick that concludes the second Drag, of the Double ‘many difficulties later on. Drag, should remain down, so that it will be in position to 41 Rhythmic Model: Count 1 2 1 2 1 2 2 Aecaod 3 3 3 1 3 Fingering LER ttR Lo orekL oreb Ro ttR teR L oreeb rel R Examples in usual notation: joe 1 203 4 56 1 atid — as eS See 2 SSE jaa? Fingering UR LL R Lo orxeb eek R boR LtR L eeb eet R Lesson 57 The Single Drag Paradiddle ‘This rudiment is a Paradiddle of which the first stroke is their relation to the Paradiddle, this exercise should be prac: played as a Half Drag tied in a very uniform tempo. In order to determine the value of the two grace notes in, Rhythmic Model: Count 1 4 1 1 3 1 30 4 permed 1 2 3 2 3 4 2 4 2 Fingering UtR LR Ro orxebL R L LL wtR LR R eek RL Lb Examples in usual notation: Count an an and ‘out loud 7 q tt and_2 and = 3_and_ gan 1 and Fingering tR LOR Reet R Lo L wR L R Ro eeb Ro L L cuR LR Raab R L L~L wR L R Rael R L L Lesson 58 The Double Drag Paradiddle (A) ‘containing one Half Drag making the fint stroke of 2 Double Paradiddle a Half mitt ee tae Double Drag Paradiddle. Rhythmic Model: Co 123 45.6 123 4.5.6 1203 45.6 123 4056 ut loud Fingering LER L RLRR RRL RLRLL weRERLERR ae RER ELL Examples in usual notation: I 1 cone 1 2 and 3 and 1_and_2_and_3_ and Land 2and3and 4 and_$ and 6 and a cout loud = = ———— Fingering LLR L RL RR rRLURLRL L LIRLRLRRRRLRLRLL Lesson 59 The Double Drag Paradiddle (B) containing two Half Drags ‘This rudiment is practically the same as the one in Lesson 58, except that the third stroke is also played as a Half Drag. ‘making ¢wo Half Drags instead of one. Rhythmic Model: conn 12.3456 12 345 6 12 3456 12.3456 = — Fingering LURLLiRLRR RRLR RRLRLL ctRLLiRLRR rab Real RbL Examples in usual notation: Count, ' u Pie and 3and 1 _and and 3 and land 2and3and 4and_ Sand 6and 1 and Fingering CUR L LERL RR RRERRRLREL LERL WLRLRRRRLRRRLRL L Lesson 60 The Triple Drag Paradiddle This rudiment is merely a Triple Paradiddle with the first, third and fifth strokes played as Half Drags. Rhythmic Model: (ual novation) Com, tans age atta tangled ged Tet Sande hand teat Fingering LLRL LLRLICRLRR RRLRARLRRRLRLL URL ELRLELRERR RRLRRRLRARLREL 43 Another example in usual notatior Count Lesson 61 The Three Stroke Ruff Single Paradiddle By playing the first stroke of a Single Paradiddle as a Before attempting any of the Ruff Paradiddles, the student Three Stroke Ruff, we produce a Three Stroke Ruff Single must be thoroughly familiar with the Three Stroke Ruff and Paradiddle the Single, Double and Triple Paradiddtes. Rhythmic Model: Count 1 203 4 1 203 4 1 203 4 1 203 4 out loud Fingering RUR “LR Ro web R Lo L etR LR R web R LL Examples in usual notation: 1 sot, and 2 and and nd ian and and 4d SE SS SS SS a z=} Fingering eL ROL RR 0 ROL L riR L R R cel R L L i 1 uh ~ an duh 2_uh an = duh Luh an duh uh an duh reR LR R eeLE R LoL wtR L R R wrk RL L Lesson 62 The Three Stroke Ruff Double Paradiddle (A) containing one Three Stroke Ruff This rudiment is like a Double Paradiddle, except that a ‘Thee Stroke Ruff is substituted for the first stroke. Rhythmic Model: ott, 2 ass 123 456 1203 456 123 456 Fingering RUR LRLRR taL RL RLL etRLRLRR traLRLRLL Examples in usual notation: 1 u count Land 2and3 and 1_and_2_and 3_and 1 and 2 and 3. and 1_and 2 and 3 and Fingering RLRL RL RR vel RLRLL rtRLRLRR tceRLRLRLL Lesson 63 The Three Stroke Ruff Double Paradiddle (B) containing two Three Stroke Ruffs This rudiment is the same as the one in Lesson 62, except that the third stroke is also played as a Three Stroke Ruff. Rhythmic Model: coun 123 456 123456 123 456 123 456 out loud Fingering RUR LaRLRR tel ReaLRLL eiRL RiRL RR cel ReeLRLL Examples in usual notation: Count out loud 5 ig and and 2 and 3 and — Fingering RtR = L oktR OL ORO CRORE Re RL ORL madd ee ee ae ee ——_—— = od = = L R R cree R Leb R L L Lesson 64 The Three Stroke Ruff Triple Paradiddle ‘This rudiment is a Triple Paradiddle with the first, third and fifth strokes played as Three Stroke Ruffs. Rhythmic Model: (usual notation Count land 2and Janddand land 2and-—Ganddand and and Sanddand land 2and 3anddand outloud 5 Cec ooo 5 5 ao Fingering eLRL RRL aLRLRR wrLR veL RaLRLL riRL eR LeiRLRR tal RuALRLRLRLL 45 Another example in usual notation: Count uh + ans duh = 2_iuheam duh ah adh = 2_ghs an duh Fingering euR Lo ortR Lo retR L RR orl R trbL R tab RL L Lesson 65 The Four Stroke Ruff Single Paradiddle By playing a Four Stroke Ruff, in place of the fist stroke of a Single Paradiddle, the result will be a Four Stroke Ruff Single Paradiddle Rhythmic Model Count out loud 1 2 Fingering oeuR LR Roem R L Lo oaR L oR R etal R LL Examples in usual notation: count 1_and_2_and 3_and 4 and 1__and 2 and 3_and 4 and out loud Fingering R LR Ro exerL R LoL oumR L RR eerL R L L veuR Lo oR R reml RL L ik L RR eurkkL R LL Lesson 66 The Four Stroke Ruff Double Paradiddle (A) containing one Four Stroke Ruff This rudiment is executed by playing the first stroke of a Double Paradiddle as a Four Stroke Ruff. Rhythmic Mode! oot 123 4.56 1203 456 1203 4.5 6 123 4 5.6 Fingering LRUR L RE RR RRL RL REL wR L RL RR eel RLRLL Examples in usual notation: : ul Count Land2and3and © 1_and 2 and 3_ and land 2and3and—1_and 2 and 3 and out loud FingeringLRLR LRLRR wal RL RL L tRtLRLRLRR rieL RL RELL Lesson 67 The Four Stroke Ruff Double Paradiddle (B) containing two Four Stroke Ruffs ‘This rudiment is the same as the one in Lesson 66, except that the third stroke is also played as a Four Stroke Ruff. Rhythmic Model: Count 123 436 123 456 1 out loud 23 456 Fingering URURL LgiRLRR RIRLRALRLRLL cecRL caxRLRR eeevR xeL REL ceaLRRERRLLL tack RertRLRR RLRRL RRLRLL treLRLeRLRR Examples in usual notation: [ Count land Qand3and = Land = and3and land 2and3and = and and 3.and out loud TRERLtRRL RR RRL ReeRLRL Fingering CRUR LiRLRE RR ikb R ecrL RLL L RR RERRLRLRL RL LURE RietRLRR RLRRL RRL RLL crtb RertRL Lesson 68 The Four Stroke Ruff Triple Paradiddle ‘This rudiment is executed by substituting a Four Stroke Ruff for the first, third and fifth strokes of a Triple Paradiddie. Rhythmic Model: (usual notation) Count 1_and 2_and and_4_and 1 and and 3__and_4_ and out loud, Fingering LRLR-LoLRLR L trtR rrtR Lo rxtrb R- trtR 1_and 2_and ce TaiR L tatR L tatR L RR atrb R eer R wal Rt L eR ORERL Ro tRtR FRR ateL R tetR Lb rab Rob L 47 Another example in usual notation an_duh Count 1 ooh out loud Fingering urtR L tetR L trRtR L RR crtR L retrabL R treeR L RR Lesson 69 The Single Ratamacue (A) ‘with an accent on the third stroke This rudiment isexecuted like the Four Stroke Ruff, except that a Half Drag is substituted for the fies stroke. In the rhythmic model, all of the notes are equal in value (eighth notes). The purpose of this is to prevent the student from “pressing” the Drags, which might retard his efforts in acquiring clearness and speed in the execution of the rudiment. In the two written examples, shown here, the first two strokes of the Ratamacue are to be played as grace notes. The Rhythmic Model: an - duh 2_uh- an duh, acrL R aurL R LRiR L R LL Riel LoL student should undertake great care not to “press” the grace notes, but to play them as closely as possible to the main (accented) note. After the rhythmic model has been thoroughly leamed, in the notation in which it is written, the student should then practice the examples in strict tempo, without interruption, By applying this method of practice to every Ratamacue, the student will have litte trouble in mastering the rudiment. cont 123s 4s 6 gtd = “§ 5 Fingering LoL ROL ROL Examples in usual notation: 1 an-duh 2 3 an- duh 4 3 2 Count out loud Fingering bLR LO ROL rel RL R U 1 and 2 and eeR L RL rel R LR Lesson 70 The Single Ratamacue (B) with an accent om the third and sixth strokes This rudiment is played in the same manner as the one in Lesson 69, except that the accent falls on the sixth stroke, instead of on the third stroke. Rhythmic Model: Count out loud 23 456 123 45 6 Fingering LLRLRL RRLRLR 43, wR LOR OL weR LOR L RRLRLR LLERLEROE Examples in usual notation: 1 1 an- duh 2 30 an- duh 4 1 an duh 2 3 an-duh 4 3 . x 3 3. Count out loud Fingering uiR Lo oR Lo orereb R LR tuR L RL eek R LR 1 1 and 2 and 1 and 2 and veR L RL oreb R LR eeR Lo R Lo oareb R LR Lesson 71 The Double Ratamacue (A) ‘with an accent on the third and sixth strokes By placing a Half Drag in front of a Single Ratamacue, the accent on the third and sixth strokes. result will be a Double Ratamacue. This Rudiment has an Rhythmic Model: one rpg 4 56789 123456789 123456789 123456789 out fou. Fingering LLRLLRLRL RRLRRLRLRLLRLLRLRL RRLRRLRLR Examples in usual notation: . eon 1 Qanduh 3 2an-duh 3 1 2an-duh3 1 2 an- duh 3 2 2 3 3 ! out loud i Fingering 1tR LiRLRL eek aeL RLR tiR CLRLRL rel rab RLR a 1 2 ane duh 30 4 1 20 an - duh 3 4 3 3 LR eeR LOR OL Rel aeL oR LR Lesson 72 The Double Ratamacue (B) with an accent on the third and ninth strokes ‘This rudiment is played exactly like the preceding one in ninth strokes, instead of on the third and sixth strokes. Lesson 71, except that the accents occur on the third and Rhythmic Model: cout 123456789 123456789 123456789 123456 789 Fingering LL RL LRLRL RRLRRLRLRLLRLLRLRL RRLRRLRLR 49 Examples in usual notation: t 1 2anduh3 1 an -duh 3 1 2an-duh3 1 dan duns Count 2 3 3 3 out loud Fingering uLR LLeRLRL reb rab RLR tLR wtRLRL eek rebLRLR I 1 2 an- duh 3 4 a T 2 an - duh 3 4 2 2 | or = = _ | eee = ee SF =| = uLR utR LOR L are Rev R L R Lesson 73 The Triple Ratamacue (A) with an accent on the third, sixth and ninth strokes By placing a Half Drag in front of a Double Ratamacue, we exact manner in which this rudiment is to be practiced; and seta Triple Ratamacue. the written examples give its proper notation ‘The chythmic madel, shown below, clearly illustrates the Rhythmic Model: cout 133 4s 6 788 12 4s 6 78s HR out loud — Fingering L LRLLERLLRLERL RRLRRLRRLRLR LLRELRELELELRE RL RRLELRRLELRRLRLR Examples in usual notation: I g B 1 and Count out loud Fingering © LR uiR ecR LR OL arc are eeb R LR I ee Lk ean a $ z | i oo | Sa SS SS SS Ss LLR “LR utR L RL RRL Reb Reb R LR 30 Lesson 74 The Triple Ratamacue (B) with an accent on the third, sixth and twelfth strokes Except for @ slight difference in accents, this rudiment is, played exactly like the preceding one in Lesson 73. p. 50 Rhythmic Model: ee 394.55 6 78 9 10112 123 4 6 78 9 wu LLRLELELRELRLERLE RRLERRLERRERLR Example in usual notation: ' and ani 1 a ani em i 2 a ind 2 ie out loud Fingering Ro tkR tt R OL ORL wRL rab ark R LR 1 2 3 an = duh 4 1 2 3 an-duh 4 teR eeRutR OLR arb rel. rebL R LR Lesson 75 Combination of the Two Previous Single Ratamacues ln the shythmic model, shown here, the accent falls on the the sixth stroke in each of the third and fourth Single third stroke in each on the first two Single Ratamacues, and on Ratamacues. Rhythmic Model: Com 123 456 123456 123 45 6 123 455 Finging L L RL RL RRLRLER LLERLERL RRULRLR Example in usual notation: 1 an-duh 2 3 an duh 4 1 an-duh 2 3 ane duh 4 Count outloud 2 3 4 zs Fingering LLR Lo oR L eebL R LR uR LOR L eek R LR SI Lesson 76 Combination of the Two Previous Double Ratamacues In the rhythmic model given below, the accent falls on the Ratamacues, and on the third and ninth strokes in third and sixth strokes in each of the first two Double each of the remaining Ratamacues. Rhythmic Model: cout 123456789 123456789 123456789 23456789 out loud. — = Fingering LLRLLRLRL RRLRRLRLR LLRLLRLRL RRLRRLRLR Example in usual notation: 1 2an-duh3 1 2an- duh 3 1 2 an-duh 3 1 2 an-duh 3 Count , y out loud Fingering LtR teRLRL aab eebLRLR tR wR LRL web waLRLR Lesson 77 Combination of the Two Previous Triple Ratamacues In the chythmic model, given here, the accent falls on the Retamacues, and on the third and ninth strokes in each of the third, sixth and ninth strokes in each of the first two Triple remaining Ratamacues, Rhythmic Model: cy 123 456 789 Oe 125456 78 9 OUR out loud Fingering L L RL LRLELRLRL RRLRRLRRLRLR ozs 4s 6 7809 wo 1235 4 5 6 7 8 ow LLRLLRELRULERLE RRLRRLRRLRLR Example in usual notation: 12 Sandu 12 Ganduhé = 12 aduhé =a Count out loud 3 2 2 4 Fingering LLR LLR LERLRL rel arb aeLRLR LR wR uRLRL ral rel arb RLR 52 Lesson 78 The Compound Stroke (A) accenting the Half Drag his rudiment is a combination of a Half Drag and a Three troke Ruff. The third (accented) stroke of the Half Drag is Iso the first steoke of this Three Stroke Ruff. hythmic Model: 2aunt 23 a oud i 4 2 2 3 4 £2 3 4 22 3 4 Fring LLR LR aebL ROL riuR LOR rebL oR L :xample in usual notation: C tt tuhand Quand Suhvansduhd and Tub-and — Quhand — Suhan-duh 4 and i cing DURLR ceoRLR ceRLRLR wtR b cURLR weLRbL wRLRLR wiR ob Lesson 79 The Compound Stroke (B) accenting the Three Stroke Ruff Im this rudiment the accent falls on the fifth or last stroke fhe Compound Stroke: 1h thmic Model: Count " u oud fl boring ttR LR aeL ROL uuR LR reL RL ixamples in usual notation: Cunt uhsand— 2uh-and — Suh-anduhd and luhean 2uband = 3uh-anduh4 and x loud = TenngitRLR wtRLR wiRERLR wiR weRLR weRLR eeRLRLR wR CURLER aaLRL ecRLRER wtR ttRLR eeLRL LtRLRLR Lesson 80 Combination of the Two 'evious Compound Strokes the following shythmic mode, the first and second the thied and fourth measures contain Compound Stroke (B), ‘sures contain Compound Stroke (A), Lesson 78, while Lesson 79. 33 Rhythmic Model: Count out loud 1 2 Fingering LR LOR reL ROL Examples in usual notation: Count 1__uh_~ and ut loud = 52 — Fingering LtR LR aeL ROL wiR LOR eel ROL Lesson 81 The Compound Stroke (C) ‘This exercise is written in the conventional drum notation, The student should be able to play ith a lady rapid tempo, carefully observing the accents. 1 oad 2 dtd 2 1 and 20 and tad. 2 and count 3 : 3 out loud Fingering LURLRL reLRLR teRLRLRLR ce vURLRL erLRLR tcRLLRLRL Lesson 8&2 The Compound Stroke (D) With the exception of the accents, the instructions given in Lesson 81 also apply to this one. 1 and 20 and tad 2 Count A A out loud Fingering LURLRL aaeLRLR Lt uRLRLRLR Lesson & Exercises in Triplets A triplet is a group of three equal notes, ordinarily played in the time of one beat, When a triplet is played in the time of two beats, it is commonly known as a “drag” triplet, because it has a tendency to drag from one beat to another. Exercises 8, 9 and 10, in this lesson, are splendid examples of the “drag” triplet. While practicing these exercises (8, 9 and 10), it is advisable to mark time with the foot by beating four counts to each measure, ‘A simple way to remember the evenness with which a 54 LERLRL reLRLR cuRLRLRLR ucR RRLRLR LLRLRL Rk RLRRLRLR Lik and 2 and Load 20 and LERLRL reLRLR tiRLRLRLR UR triplet is to be executed, is to pronounce the word “evenly.” during its rendition. (See Exercise 1, next page.) ‘A triplet is easily recognized by the figure 3, which is placed either above or below the center note, as follows: 3 ST] oe fff oh Each of the following triplet exercises is to be treated 2s am individual problem. Instead of playing them in 2 sort of slipshod fashioa, it i best to master them one at 2 time. Exercise I: Play slowly, at first; increase speed gradually. Keep strict rhythm. Count out loud. Observe fingering. (The above refers to all exercises.) 1 an-duh 20 an-duh 3 an-duh 4 an-duh 1 an-duh 2 an-duh 3 an-duh 4 an- duh 1 an-duh 20 an-duh 3 an-duh 4 an-duh 1 an- duh 2 an-duh 30 an-duh 4 an duh 2. 3 2 3 z 3 2 3 ev-en-ly ev-en-ly ev-en-ly ev-en-ly ev-en-ly ev-en-ly ev-en-ly ev-en-ly RLRLRULERLR ERLE RERLELRERERLERLE Exercise II: 1 an-duh 2 anduh 3an-duh 4 an-duh 1 203 4 1 an-duh 2 an-duh 3 an-duh4 an-duh 1 2 3 4 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 RLRLRLRLRLRLE RLRL RLRLRLRLRERL RLRL Exercise IIL an-duh2anduh3 4 lan-duh2anduh3 4 Lan-duh2anduh3 4 = landuh2anduh3 4 3 2 3 3 3 2 ad RLRLRLR L RLRLRLR L RLRLRER L- RLRLRLR L Exercise IV: 1 and 2 and 1 and 2 and RLRLRLELRLERLRL RLRERERERERE 1 and 2 and 1 and 2 and RLRLRLELRERERLE RERLRERE RE RE Exercise V: Land 2 and 1 and 2 and 1 and 2 and 1and 2 and R LRLRLRL RL RLERLERL RL RLRLRL RL RLRLRL Exercise VI: 1 and 2 an- duh 1 and 20 am- duh = 1 and 2 an duh 1 and 2 an duh 1 an-duh 2 and 1 an~ duh 2 and an- duh 2 and 1 an duh 2 and RLRLR LRLRL RLRLR LERLERE Exercise VIII: RLRLRL RLRLRL RLRLRL RLRLR 3 3. 3 3 3 1 2 3 4 1203 4 10203 4 19203 4 Mark time with foot. Exercise IX: L RL 3 r 3 RLRLR LER LR LL RLERE R LR r 1 3 Il i 56 Reading Exercises ‘The folowing nineteen exercises are given here mainly for Ik wil be notied thatthe counting is only indicated on a een evtobe payed im auic "hand tothe ist line of each exercise; ths method of counting, and" style However, apple (0 all the ins in the exec. The large na wy aes contain no involved or “tricky” shythms, enced umerals, in the counting system, reler t0 the merely straight, simple rhythms. tmeastes, and not necessarily to the beats Exercise I: cm G2 3 4 @2 2 4 @2 3 4 Ora 87 Exercise I: Count unt and 2nd 9 ad and @)anta ad 3 and 4nd Dent? and 3 and and @and 2d nd Aad 58 Exercise II: Count, Dian 2 and Band 4 and and 2 and Sand 4 and and 2 and 3and 4 and@and 2 and Sand 4and jo | Exercise IV: ce 2 3 4 @®2 3 4 O23 + O23 4 60 Exercise V: ay © obanduh 2 ubanduh 3 ubanduh 4 uhandun @)ubanduh 2_uhan-duh 3_uhandub4 _ubvan-duh Qtandu 2 uh-anduh 3 vhandub 4 uhanduh @)ubanduh 2_uh-anduk 3 ubvanduh 4 ubanduh = i — £ == = = a ee ee 61 Exercise VI: Coust shancuh 2 uhanduh3 uhanduh 4 uhandsh G@)shandsh 2 dhandsh 9 dhandsh 4 shandth out ou @ vanish 2 vhanduh 3 uhandoh 6 vhanduh @ ubanduh uhm 3 uvandubé ubanduh eS = TE = = Oe 1 De a ee ee ee t rear rar eer = 2 Dee} a co 62 Exercise VII: poe and 2 and 3and 4and (2)and 2and 3 and 4and (@)and 2 and 3 and 4 and @)and 2 and 3 and dand 63 Exercise VIM: ‘This exercise illustrates the gradual development of a Long Roll, when played to a whole note, in four-four tempo. A whole note Roll is generally written in this manner: The three short lines, placed over the note, indicate that thirty-second notes are to be played to the time-value of the note. (See line D.) Sixteenth notes are indicated by placing two short lines over the note, in this manner: =a= (See line CJ When eighth notes are to be played, one short line is Placed over the note, in this manner: =S= (See line B.) (count and 2 and out loud A The above abbreviations also apply to notes of other value, such as half notes and quarter notes. In rare cases, sixty-fourth note Rolls are played but this, of course, depends entirely ‘upon the style and tempo of the composition. In the following exercise, each line clearly illustrates how a whole note may be divided into notes of different value, The student is advised to practice these four lines in succession, without a pause, and to maintain a slow strict tempo through. ut. Counting out loud is extremely essential In perfecting the Roll, this exercise is of great value. 3 and 4 and Fingering R R L L 2 and 3 and 4 and — ss — —z ae ae ae = R R L L R L 1 and 2 and RRLLRRLLERRLELRRLLERRLLR RLLRRLLRRLL 64 Exercise IX: © © ) count (1 out loud 65 Exercise X: Count out loud! Gane 2nd Sand sand @and 2and 3 and 4and Gand 2end 3 and 4 and Gand? and Sand 4 and 66 Exercise XI: count @and and Sand 4and G@)and2 and 3 and Aand Gand 2 and 9 and sand and Zend Sand and omioed 67 Exercise XII Count G2 3 4 cout loud 68 Exercise XIII: cout @2 3 4 @23 2 @ 2.34 @ out loud 69 Exercise XIV: dub 2 uban-duh 3 uhanduh 4 uhan-duh praePrsree se Count @) ubanduh 2 unanduh 3 uhanduh 4 uhansduh 2) uh led = Se a + @® obeanduh 2 uh-anduh 3 ubanduh 4 ukanduh C4) uhanduh 2 ubanduh 3 ubsanduh 4 uhanduh = { — f Ee ee eee = 70 Exercise XV: Count nt Da > and dad and @and 2nd 3 ad at ant 2nd Sand and anda 9 dd 1" Exercise XVI: cut @ 2 3 6 @23 4 @213 4 @13 4 out loud, 1 my n Exercise XVII Count out loud Dans rand sand 4and and 2and3.ané 4and @ and 2 and 3 and sand @and 2and sand dand 1 = eo Exercise XVIII: com © 2 3 4 @2 3 4 out loud © 74 Exercise XIX: count (and 2 and 3 and 4and @and 2and 3and sand @) and 2 and3 and 4andG)and 2and 3and 4and out loud Sy i. - Je i 1 15 Exercise XX: count Gand 2and3 ¢ @and2and3_ 4 Q@andrnds 4 @aar2_ 3 6 out loud 7 2 Sy ie J 16 Exercise XXI: Count Gand 2 and3 and 4 and@)and 2and 3 and 4 and(@)and 2and 3 and 4 and(@)and 2 and 3and 4and out loud z Hi 1 i tH J 7 Explanatory Remarks Concerning Exercies Employing Rudiments The following ten exercises include all of the rudiments, that are necessary in military drumming, The student is advised against attempting to practice any of these exercises, until he thas first mastered all of the previous rudiments in this book, As the rudiments employed in these exercises are not marked with any signs of identification, the student must be able to recognize them at sight, whenever he encounters them: and he should play them exactly as he has learned them. He will find this excellent practice in sight reading, which will offset any difficulties he might have later on, in the event he is called upon to play military drum parts Excerpt from “The Three Camps” 15 camp, Military z rotation Abbreviated notation Excerpt from “The Breakfast Call” Military notation Abbreviated notation Excerpt from “The Dinner Call” Military notation Abbreviated notation 8 Each ine of these exercises should be treated as an individu al problem. In fact, a good system to follow is to take one exercise at a time and play each line repeatedly, in a moderate tempo, until it is committed to memory; then play the entire exercise of ten lines from memory. As a rule, the notation for military drum parts is slightly different from those of orchestra drum parts. In military music, it has always been the custom not to abbreviate the rudiments, especially the Stroke Rolls, In the latter, every stroke is written (usually in small notes) as played. /See examples given below.) However, it is a comparatively simple matter to learn to read either notation. Exercises Employing Rudiments Exercise 1: cut © 2 3 «¢ @ 2 34 @2r3 4 @2r3 4 out loud i fl 79 Exercise I: Count and 2 and 3 anddand@@)and 2and 3 and 4and ee moe 5 ind 2 and 3 and dand($) and 2 and and 4and ud oo 4 Ca Ce 1: ra Bao rao 4 2 BG alae rere Exercise IH: co D2 34 @ 23 4 @2 34 @ 2 3 4 out loud 8I Exercise 1V: count, @ang rand and tnd @and aun and @Dand and 3 an sant @and tan sd dnd 1 $ ea ree = 82 Exercise V: Count ®@ 34© out loud 1 83 Exercise VI: com G23 456 @23 456 @23 456 @23 4 56 84 Exercise VII: cont O23 456 Ora 4s out loud Exercise VII: i Count out loud “ 86 Exercise IX: om © 2 @2 @2 © 1 0:0: 2 @2 87 Exercise X: count (G) snd, 2nd Bane2and(@) and 2 gn @ and and Gand2and@and2and(Aand2and@and 2 and out loud 88 Buddy Rich in Action ic Studies mic Advanced Rhyth 90 aadan Agtaae Mamet Ata wae wae axalne Kae eam vee awaxa eam Crerery Bawa eae aakaa aawea Kea wake Aawag ake Adiga RLRRLRLL L ROL RR LRLELRLRR L L R RLRLRRLRLRLL RLRERRUERLRLE 91 RLRLRRLRLRLLE RLRLRRLERLERLL LRRLRRLRRLERL RLLRLLRLLERLR LRLRLRL R LRLRLR L RLRLRLR RLRLRL a rE a —s ee oe fomanl Zz ——_— 2 z m aw aa) ae RL RLRL LRL LRLROL oR R L R LR ama ame aaa eta wane waka asa ata aman axag Kana aeae eat Aman ot eats