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COLLEGE

PENN FOSTER

PENN FOSTER COLLEGE


Undergraduate Student Catalog

Everything You Need To Get Started!

Academic Year — 2019


A Message from the
Vice President of
Education and
Academic Dean

Dear Penn Foster Student,

Welcome to Penn Foster College. Your decision to enroll with us marks an


important step on your path to success. You have chosen an institution that
has been helping independent learners succeed since 1890, and we are
here to help you too.

This Student Catalog contains information that you will need to know, from
a statement of our mission and the outcomes you can expect from your
Penn Foster education, to a description of policies and procedures that
will guide your study, to learning support services available to you, and to
an explanation of our nationally accredited degree programs and courses.
Please spend some time in reading this document, and be sure to keep it
handy as a reference tool throughout your program.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us. We are


committed to your success.

Best wishes,

Lisa Rutsky
Vice President of Education and Academic Dean
Welcome to Penn Foster College
Penn Foster College is located at 14300 N. Northsight Blvd. in Scottsdale, Arizona,
and is authorized by the Arizona State Board for Private Postsecondary Education to
award Associate of Science and Bachelor of Science Degrees and Undergraduate
Certificates. Students may contact the college in Arizona at 480.947.6644.

Penn Foster College has contracted with the Student Service Center at
925 Oak Street in Scranton, Pennsylvania, to offer certain student services. You
will be directed throughout your catalog regarding when to use the services of the
Student Service Center.

History
Penn Foster College is a leader in guided independent study. This method of
instruction was pioneered by newspaper editor Thomas Foster, founder of the
International Correspondence Schools, to help coal miners educate themselves.
Since its founding in 1890 in Shenandoah, Pennsylvania, the institution has
developed into a worldwide education system. The institution has been offering
degree programs since 1975 and has enrolled over 100,000 students in degree
programs in Business, Veterinary Technology, Allied Health, Information Technology,
and Engineering Technology.
Table of Contents
Mission Statement 5

Student Core Competencies 6

Accreditation and Licensure 6

College Credit Recommendations 7

Admissions 8

Tuition and Fees 14

Academic Integrity 17

Academic Policies 21

Graduation Requirements 28

Student Services 30

Curriculum 36

Course Descriptions 80

Ownership, Governance, Administration, & Faculty 118

Advisory Councils 122


Mission Statement
Institutional Description
Penn Foster College provides programs and services that are designed to meet the
lifelong learning needs of the adult learner. Programs of study, which are offered
via distance learning, lead to certificates and undergraduate degrees in the areas of
business, technology, health, education, design, and social services.

Mission
Penn Foster’s mission is to enhance the lives of our students and clients through the
acquisition of knowledge, skills, and credentials that will allow them to achieve their goals
by advancing in their chosen field, starting a new career, or pursuing lifelong learning.

Penn Foster Institutional Goals


• Provide educational programs that enable self-motivated, independent learners
to acquire core competencies in their chosen technical and professional fields.
• Employ contemporary learning strategies based on academic standards of good
practice in distance education.
• Develop and maintain systems that optimize student opportunities for broadly
participative, interactive learning.
• Establish and communicate high standards of academic performance for
students and the institution.
• Assess student learning and institutional effectiveness systematically in order to
improve student performance.
• Provide an extensive suite of student support services based on student needs
and interests.
• Conduct fiscally responsible planning that balances the institution’s commitment
to academic excellence with its concern for profitable financial performance.

The mission is supported by an admissions policy that allows students with appropriate
prior education to enroll in programs without regard to race, religion, gender, age,
color, national origin, or physical disability.

The school regularly assesses fulfillment of its mission and achievement of its
institutional goals through ongoing studies of student learning, measurement of student
satisfaction, and evaluation of career outcomes of graduates.

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Student Core Competencies
Students who complete any Penn Foster College degree program will be able
to demonstrate to employers and others the following six core competencies:

•  Effective written and interpersonal communication skills


•  A high level of inquiry, analytical, and problem-solving skills
•  Effective quantitative skills
•  Computer and information literacy
•  An understanding of the liberal arts, natural sciences, and social sciences
•  Job-specific technical and professional skills

Accreditation and Licensure


Penn Foster College is licensed by the Arizona State Board for Private Postsecondary
Education and is authorized to award Associate of Science and Bachelor of Science
Degrees and Undergraduate Certificates.

Penn Foster is accredited by the Distance Education Accrediting Commission (DEAC).


The DEAC is listed by the U.S. Department of Education as a recognized accrediting
agency and is recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA).

Penn Foster College has been approved by Arizona to participate in the National
Council for State Authorization Reciprocity Agreements. NC-SARA is a voluntary,
regional approach to state oversight of postsecondary distance education. Please visit
http://nc-sara.org/sara-states-institutions for a list of participating states.

Penn Foster College’s Veterinary Technician Associate Degree program is accredited


by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) as a program for educating
veterinary technicians.

Many Penn Foster College programs are approved for U.S. Armed Forces veterans
training benefits. Reservists may also qualify for veterans training benefits. Check your
local or regional VA office for eligibility requirements.

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College Credit Recommendations
The American Council on Education’s College Credit Recommendation Service (ACE
CREDIT) has evaluated and recommended college credit for many Penn Foster College
courses. The American Council on Education, the major coordinating body for all
the nation’s higher education institutions, seeks to provide leadership and a unifying
voice on key higher education issues and to influence public policy through advocacy,
research, and program initiatives.

ACE CREDIT connects workplace learning with colleges and universities by helping
adults gain access to academic credit at colleges and universities for formal courses and
examinations taken in the workplace or other settings outside traditional higher education.

For more than 30 years, colleges and universities have trusted ACE CREDIT to provide
reliable course equivalency information to facilitate their decisions to award academic
credit. For more information, visit the ACE CREDIT website at www.acenet.edu.* No
form of accreditation guarantees that any learning institution will accept credits from
any school as transfer credits.

* Credits earned in Penn Foster College programs may transfer to some, but not all, learning institutions.
Students planning to continue their education with another school after earning a degree from Penn Foster
College should check with that school regarding credit transfer policies.

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Admissions
Penn Foster College enrolls all students without regard to race, religion, gender, age,
color, national origin, or physical disability. Penn Foster College programs require that
students have access to high-speed Internet, a Microsoft® Windows® based computer
running Windows 7® or later or an Apple® Mac® computer running OS X® or later,
and an email account. Exceptions to these computer requirements are listed with the
program description. To qualify for admission to Penn Foster College, an applicant
must do the following:

Certificate Programs
1. Request program information and an enrollment agreement for admission to
the college.
2. Complete the enrollment agreement for admission. The agreement outlines the
obligations of the college and the student. The required down payment must be
submitted with the enrollment agreement.
3. Submit complete information on high school completion. All students are required
to have a High School Diploma or its recognized equivalent to enroll in a Certificate
program. A downloadable form for this purpose is available on the Forms and
Handbook section of the student portal.
4. Once the college has received and reviewed the agreement, the applicant will
receive prompt notification of the acceptance or rejection of the application.
5. Students enroll in the entire program at one time.
6. If previous coursework was completed at an accredited institution, official transcripts
may be submitted for evaluation. Up to 75% of the total credits may be awarded in
transfer. If transfer credit is awarded, an evaluation will be sent to the student.
7. All students must complete the Basic Skills Assessment as a first step in the
program. Once the assessment is completed, a student’s program of study
is established, and the student can then begin the first course in their curriculum.
8. As lessons are completed, additional courses will become available online which
can be found on the student portal.

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Associate Degree Programs
1. Request program information and an enrollment agreement for admission to
the college.
2. Complete the enrollment agreement for admission. The agreement outlines the
obligations of the college and the student. The required down payment must be
submitted with the enrollment agreement.
3. Submit complete information on high school completion. All students are required to
have a High School Diploma or its recognized equivalent to enroll in an Associate
Degree program. A downloadable form for this purpose is available on the Forms
and Handbook section of the student portal.
4. Once the college has received and reviewed the agreement, the applicant will
receive prompt notification of the acceptance or rejection of the application.
5. Students enroll in each semester separately. Certain programs require students
to complete a prerequisite semester of general education credits before full
acceptance to the program of study is granted.
6. If previous coursework was completed at an accredited institution, official transcripts
may be submitted for evaluation. Up to 75% of the total credits may be awarded in
transfer. If transfer credit is awarded, an evaluation will be sent to the student.
7. All students must complete the Basic Skills Assessment as a first step in the
program. Once the assessment is completed, a student’s program of study
is established and the first course in the curriculum is sent to the student.
8. As lessons are completed, additional courses will become available online which
can be found on the student portal.

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Bachelor’s Degree Programs
1. Request program information and an enrollment agreement for admission to
the college.
2. Complete the enrollment agreement for admission. The agreement outlines the
obligations of the college and the student. The required down payment must be
submitted with the enrollment agreement.
3. Submit complete information on high school completion. All students are required
to have a High School Diploma or its recognized equivalent to enroll in a
Bachelor’s Degree program. A downloadable form for this purpose is available on
the Forms and Handbook section of the student portal.
4. Once the college has received and reviewed the application materials, the applicant
will receive prompt notification of the acceptance or rejection of the application.
5. Students are admitted to the complete program, but enrollments are processed
one semester at a time. The first enrollment agreement outlines the requirements
for the complete degree program, but obligates the student financially for only
one semester at a time.
6. If previous coursework was completed at an accredited institution, official
transcripts may be evaluated for transfer credit. Once all official transcripts have
been received and reviewed, an evaluation form will be sent to the student
showing all transfer credits awarded. A maximum of 75% of the total program
credits may be accepted in transfer.
7. Students will be sent the first required course and subsequent courses, based on
their transfer credit evaluation and the curricular requirements.

Application for subsequent semesters:


1. At the end of each semester, students complete a proctored exam and final
grades for each course are determined. If all courses are passed and the
appropriate Quality Point Average has been achieved, the student is eligible for
re-enrollment. The following QPA requirements apply to re-admission:

The end of semester one 1.6 cumulative QPA


The end of semester two 1.8 cumulative QPA
The end of semester three 2.0 cumulative QPA

Students in the Bachelor’s Degree program must maintain a cumulative 1.6 QPA for
semesters 1 to the end of semester 5 in order to continue to next semester.
The end of semester six 1.8 cumulative QPA
The end of semester seven 2.0 cumulative QPA

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2. If all requirements are met, students will receive a new enrollment application for
the appropriate semester.
3. A down payment is required to re-enroll in a subsequent semester of any degree
program. The student must also be current in payments.
4. Students submit the application and the college will make their next course
available on the student portal.

If English is not your native language


All applicants whose native language is not English, or who have not earned a degree
or diploma from an accredited institution where English is the principal language of
instruction, must receive a TOEFL score of 500 on the paper-based test (TOEFL), or a
61 on the Internet-Based test (iBT). For more information refer to www.TOEFL.org. Other
acceptable test results include a 6.0 on the International English Language Test (IELTS)
(see www.IELTS.org), or a 44 on the Pearson Test of English Academic Score Report
(PTE Academic) (www.personpte.com), or the equivalent.

Advanced Standing
Transfer Credit - Advanced standing may, on approval by the Registrar’s office
or faculty, be granted to those applicants who have completed comparable work
with a “C” grade or higher, from accredited institutions, as evidenced by an official
college transcript or evidence of College Level Examination Program (CLEP), the ACT
Proficiency Examination Program, or the College Board’s Advanced Placement (AP)
program. Students must meet the ACE designated passing score for CLEP exams
and a score of 3 or higher on an AP exam. Students will need to submit official
documentation from the outside testing agency for courses to be considered for
transfer credit. Students who are granted advanced standing credit may receive a
corresponding tuition adjustment to their account.

Penn Foster College will evaluate transcripts from previous schools for advanced
standing. The former school(s) must send an official sealed copy to Penn Foster.
Penn Foster College will inquire about each veteran’s previous education and training,
and request transcripts from all prior institutions, including military training, traditional
college coursework and vocational training. Previous transcripts will be evaluated and
credit will be granted, as appropriate.

Transcripts not in English must be evaluated by an appropriate third party and translated
into English or evaluated by a trained transcript evaluator fluent in the language on the
transcript. In this case, the evaluator must have expertise in the educational practices of
the country of origin and include an English translation of the review.

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In addition, Penn Foster College considers the guidelines of the College Credit
Recommendation Service (CREDIT) of the American Council on Education (ACE). ACE
provides guidelines for nontraditional education experiences, such as military service.
Advanced standing credit may be granted for certain prior Penn Foster coursework.
Some courses are evaluated based on the date they were completed and may not
transfer if they are considered obsolete. For example, computer applications courses
must have been completed within seven or fewer years for some programs, and three or
fewer years for Technology and Graphic Design programs.

For CDA Credential Preparation Undergraduate Certificate students, no transfer credit


will be granted from any other college or university. All courses must be completed at
Penn Foster College.

For Veterinary Technician degree students, no transfer credit will be granted toward Veterinary
Technician core courses from any other college or university unless covered by an articulation
agreement (this limitation does not include General Education courses). Transfer credit will
be considered from other colleges and universities toward General Education courses in the
Veterinary Technician degree program. Introduction to Biology must have been completed
within 10 years for transfer into the Veterinary Technician degree program.

Certain current certifications such as the Child Development Associate (CDA) credential
and MOUS certification can also be considered for transfer credit.

Students who wish to appeal their transfer credit evaluation may contact the Registrar
Department at transfercredit@pennfoster.edu.

Articulation Agreements with Other Schools


Penn Foster has articulation agreements with academic institutions that allow our students
and graduates to transfer their applicable Penn Foster credits to these schools and earn a
higher degree. Go to https://community.pennfoster.edu/docs/DOC-55356 for a list of these
Education Partnerships.

Assessing Prior Learning (not available for most programs)


For Resident Laboratory in Technology Programs:
1. Contact Student Services for an information package.
2. Submit actual completed work projects which show competence in the area of training.
3. Submit evidence of job experience or other experiences that shows mastery
of the concerned subject matter. (Contact an instructor for details on procedures
for a prior learning assessment.)
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4. Satisfactorily complete tests which measure competence in the areas in question.
These may include CLEP tests or other specially designated examinations.
5. Return the Processing Form with the portfolio of work completed.
6. All materials must be submitted prior to completion of Semester 3.
7. A $100 fee is charged for this evaluation.

For Externship in Medical programs:


1. Contact Student Services for an information package.
2. Complete ALL forms.
3. Submit documentation of experiential learning that shows mastery
of the concerned subject matter.
4. Return the Prior Learning Assessment Form with the portfolio of work
and documentation.
5. All materials must be submitted before the completion of your first course
in Semester 4.
6. A $100 fee is charged for this evaluation.

Challenge Exams
Students may have the opportunity to take one or more challenge examinations in
courses for which transfer credit has not been granted. Challenge examinations will
be presented to students at the point when that course is next in the curriculum. If a
student passes the challenge exam, a PE (proficiency exam) allowance will be added to
the student record, but no monetary adjustment will be given. If students meet the 25%
maximum credit through prior learning assessment or other outside examinations, they
cannot take the Penn Foster College challenge exams.

Total Credit Granted


Students can receive advanced standing credit for a total of 75% of the program. This
includes transfer credit (TR) earned from a college or university, proficiency credit (PE) earned
from challenge examinations taken at Penn Foster, and prior learning credit (PL) earned
from an assessment of CLEP exams, DSST exams, AP exams, and documented training
or certifications obtained through military experience, employment, or through continuing
education. A maximum of 25% of the total credits in a program may be granted from a
combination of challenge exams and prior learning assessments. Any advanced standing
credit granted will not be calculated into the student’s Quality Point Average (QPA).

All applicants accepted with advanced standing must complete a minimum of 25% of
the total credit hours with Penn Foster College to be eligible for the Associate Degree,
Bachelor Degree, or Undergraduate Certificate programs.
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Student Orientation
All new students enrolled at Penn Foster College must complete an orientation course
at the beginning of their program. This course introduces students to the particular
field of study and orients them to the process of distance learning and how it is
conducted with Penn Foster College. Students may not receive transfer credit for this
course as it contains material specific to the school that students are required to know.

Tuition and Fees


All students are charged an admissions fee of $75 and a one-time registration fee as
stated on your Enrollment Agreement. Current tuition fees for each program at the time of
enrollment are stated on the enrollment agreement. The agreement lists the registration fee
and the tuition for each semester. Students, however, are only contractually liable for one
semester at a time. Students sign a new enrollment agreement for each semester. Tuition
and fees are fixed for the semester at the time of enrollment. They are, however, subject to
change on subsequent semesters with notification to students at the time of re-enrollment.

Tuition for Associate and Bachelor's Degree students ranges from $69 to $85 per credit
depending on the program. Tuition for Undergraduate Certificate programs is up to $79
per credit. The following additional non-refundable fees are charged if applicable:

Assessment of Prior Learning .................................................... $100


Federal Express Fee for Proctored Exam.............................. $ 20
Change of Program Fee................................................................ $ 50
Change of Elective Fee................................................................. $ 20
Extension Fee ................................................................................... $ 95
Shipping & Handling (per semester).........................................$ 65-70*
Transcript.............................................................................................. $ 11
Reinstatement Fee........................................................................... $ 25
Rush Shipment Fee (per shipment).......................................... $ 19.95
Remote Proctor Option.................................................................. $ 10

* Varies by program.

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California law requires Out of State institutions to provide the following STRF assessment
fee disclosure to California residents who enroll in a Penn Foster program*:
You must pay the state-imposed assessment for the Student Tuition Recovery
Fund (STRF) if all of the following applies to you:
1. You are a student in an educational program, who is a California resident, or
are enrolled in a residency program, and prepay all or part of your tuition either
by cash, guaranteed student loans, or personal loans, and
2. Your total charges are not paid by any third-party payer such as an employer,
government program or other payer unless you have a separate agreement to
repay the third party.
You are not eligible for protection from the STRF and you are not required to pay
the STRF assessment, if either of the following applies:
1. You are not a California resident, or are not enrolled in a residency program, or
2. Your total charges are paid by a third party, such as an employer, government
program or other payer, and you have no separate agreement to repay the third party.

The State of California created the Student Tuition Recovery Fund (STRF) to relieve or
mitigate economic losses suffered by students in educational programs who are California
residents, or are enrolled in a residency programs attending certain schools regulated by
the Bureau for Private Postsecondary and Vocational Education.

You may be eligible for STRF if you are a California resident or are enrolled in a residency
program, prepaid tuition, paid the STRF assessment, and suffered an economic loss as a
result of any of the following:
1. The school closed before the course of instruction was completed.
2. The school's failure to pay refunds or charges on behalf of a student to a third
party for license fees or any other purpose, or to provide equipment or materials
for which a charge was collected within 180 days before the closure of the school.
3. The school's failure to pay or reimburse loan proceeds under a federally
guaranteed student loan program as required by law or to pay or reimburse proceeds
received by the school prior to closure in excess of tuition and other costs.

“This program has opened doors that I never thought were


possible. I have received several job offers from several
big law firms. Nothing can describe how good this feels.”
- Maurice S.
Criminal Justice Graduate
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4. There was a material failure to comply with the Act or this Division within 30
days before the school closed or, if the material failure began earlier than 30 days
prior to closure, the period determined by the Bureau.
5. An inability after diligent efforts to prosecute, prove, and collect on a judgment
against the institution for a violation of the Act.

*While this disclosure is required for all California enrollments, the current STRF fee is zero.

Financial Aid
Penn Foster College offers interest-free monthly payment plans. However, the school
does not participate in federal financial aid.

Cancellation Policy for Degree Programs (for undergraduate


certificates, refer to your Enrollment Agreement)
You can cancel your enrollment in the Semester in which you have enrolled via email or first
class mail to the physical or email address listed in the “contact us” section of Penn Foster’s
student portal. If you cancel your enrollment, you will receive a Tuition refund, as follows:
1. If you cancel within 6 days after midnight of the day you enroll, you will receive a
refund of all monies paid to Penn Foster for that Semester;
2. If you cancel more than 6 days after enrolling in a Semester but before submitting
a completed Program assignment for that Semester, you will receive a refund of all
monies paid to Penn Foster for that Semester less (a) the admissions and shipping
and handling fees, if applicable, and (b) the registration fee (such fees, in aggregate,
the “Non-Refundable Fees”);
3. If you cancel after completing at least one Program assignment but less than 50% of the
Program assignments for that Semester, then Penn Foster will retain the Non-Refundable
Fees, and you will remain responsible for paying Penn Foster for the following:

a) 10% of the Semester’s Tuition if you have completed up to and


including 10% of the Program assignments for that Semester;
b) 25% of the Semester’s Tuition if you have completed more than 10% and
up to and including 25% of the Program assignments for that Semester;
c) 50% of the Semester’s Tuition if you have completed more than 25% and
up to and including 50% of the Program assignments for that Semester.

4. You are responsible for paying and Penn Foster shall be entitled to receive the
entire Tuition for the Semester and the Non-Refundable Fees if you cancel (a) more
than 12 months after your enrollment in the Semester, or (b) after completing more
than 50% of the Program assignments.

All refunds will be issued within 30 days of Penn Foster's receipt of your notice of
cancellation. For refund examples, go to www.pennfoster.edu/admissions/refund-policy.
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Academic Integrity
Student Identity Verification
All new students are provided with a unique student number. This student number should
not be shared with anyone else. In order to gain entry into the online learning management
system and access student materials, students need to enter their student number
and a unique password that restricts anyone else from accessing their student record.
Sharing student numbers or passwords with any other individual is in violation of the
Code of Conduct and can lead to disciplinary action. Students will also need to provide a
government-issued photo ID during the proctored exam process to verify their identity.

Students are required to update Penn Foster with any change to their account
information, including name, address, email, and phone number.

Penn Foster official communications are sent by electronic communication (email, message
center, etc.) or postal mail. Most official forms require electronic communication by email,
unless forms or directions state otherwise. Students are responsible for official Penn Foster
communications sent to them, and should check their email accounts and message center
regularly and respond, when needed to any communications sent from Penn Foster.

Student Code of Conduct


Penn Foster students, faculty and staff are held to the highest standards of academic
integrity. Penn Foster’s Student Code of Conduct protects the rights of students,
faculty, staff, and Penn Foster itself. This code ensures that all student and faculty/staff
interactions are characterized by mutual respect and civility. All Penn Foster students and
those authorized to speak on students’ behalf are required to abide by all standards and
policies established by the school in their academic work and their personal conduct.

Students shall:
1. Treat fellow students, faculty, and staff with courtesy, respect, and dignity and
behave in a manner that reflects the integrity of the school.
2. Abide by all published policies, including but not limited to, those that appear in
Penn Foster catalogs, study materials, and enrollment agreements.
3. Present themselves and their relationship to Penn Foster honestly.
4. Behave professionally and follow all policies set by practicum, externship, and field
experience sites.
5. Comply with directions of Penn Foster officials acting in the performance of their duties.
6. Never misrepresent the school or its staff in any online social communities.

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The Student Code of Conduct, as well as the preceding guidelines, applies to all Penn
Foster students. An official of Penn Foster may, at his or her discretion, take disciplinary
action that ranges from a warning to academic probation to dismissal from the school
for failure to comply with any aspect of the Student Code of Conduct.

Online Behavior
Netiquette
Penn Foster expects students to be courteous and polite in the online environment.
Students should use good judgement when communicating online with faculty, staff,
and other students through email, chat, social media groups, and other online forums
sponsored or supported by Penn Foster.

In course or classroom environments such as webinars and discussion forums, students


should demonstrate respect for their instructor and classmates by honoring others’
opinions, acknowledging disagreements honestly and thoughtfully, and being prepared
to clarify statements others may have misinterpreted or misunderstood.

Students should always sign their names on any online communications and
contributions. Students should also respect their own privacy and the privacy of others
by not revealing personal or embarrassing information about themselves or others.

Students should avoid discourteous behavior such as using all-caps, trolling, flaming,
spamming, and any other forms of inappropriate behavior and communication.

Bullying
Penn Foster defines bullying as an intentional electronic, written, verbal, or physical act
or series of acts that

• Occur in a school setting, whether in person or online;


• Is severe, persistent or pervasive;
• Is directed at another student(s) or member(s) of the Penn Foster faculty, staff, or
administration; and
• Impacts the institution in any of the following ways:
o Substantially interferes with a student’s education
o Creates a threatening environment; or
o Substantially disrupts the orderly operation of the school.

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As an online institution, Penn Foster is not limited or prohibited from defining bullying
in such a way as to encompass acts that occur outside a school setting if those acts fall
under the above definition of bullying.

Penn Foster does not tolerate bullying in any form. Abusive behavior, such as
threatening, insulting, and doxing, in any of Penn Foster’s digital environments, including
Penn Foster’s social media sites and groups, email, chat, and phone calls, should be
reported to a faculty or staff member for investigation.

Violations of Penn Foster’s netiquette and bullying policies will result in disciplinary action.

Academic Honesty
Students are expected to complete coursework, exams, and graded projects according
to instructions and to contact their instructors for help with coursework.

Students should:
• Complete all coursework as directed, including required reading, self-check and
discover more exercises, discussion boards, exams, skills, and graded projects, as
well as required paperwork for site selection, field experience, externships, and
practicums.
• Use materials provided by Penn Foster to complete coursework, and properly
acknowledge any outside resources used in the preparation of exams and graded
projects.
• Contact a faculty or staff member for help with coursework.
• Never ask for, receive, or give unauthorized help on graded assignments, quizzes,
projects, or examinations via any method including email or the internet.

Violations of Penn Foster’s Academic Honesty policy include but are not limited to:

• Collaborating with another student or students, either in person or online, to


complete an assignment or project and/or submitting the same essay as a classmate
or classmates.
• Colluding with another student or students, either in person or online, who are
enrolled in or have completed a course, to share an assignment or project and/or to
make revisions to the same graded assignment or project to deliberately disguise
similarities.
• Providing unauthorized help to another student or students by sharing coursework
privately or publicly by uploading it to an online forum.
• Submitting a previously graded exam or project without first receiving permission
from an instructor.
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• Submitting documentation that misrepresents qualifications, clearances, and/or
authorizations required for site selection, field experience, practicum, or externship.
• Submitting documentation that misrepresents the amount of time spent at a site and/
or the skills or tasks performed during field experience, practicum, or externship.

Plagiarism
Plagiarism is a violation of academic honesty that includes, but is not limited to:
• Submitting coursework that is not your own, including assignments found at online
help or tutoring sites; assignments purchased online, and assignments you have
paid someone else to complete for you.
• Misrepresenting someone else’s work as your own.
• Failing to cite and document sources properly.
• Using online or other resources to alter someone else’s work or to disguise the
original source.

The Academic Honesty policy applies to all Penn Foster students. An official of Penn
Foster may, at his/her discretion, take disciplinary action that ranges from a warning to
academic probation to dismissal from the school for failure to comply with the Academic
Honesty policy.

Program Material Copyright Notice


Penn Foster or its vendors hold all ownership rights in the Program materials. Students are
strictly prohibited from copying and/or providing to any third party all or any part of the Program
materials that Penn Foster provides to students without Penn Foster’s written consent. If a
student violates this prohibition, they may be subject to criminal and civil penalties and fines, as
well as disciplinary action up to and including expulsion from the Program.

Disciplinary Action
Any inappropriate behavior can result in disciplinary action ranging from a failing grade on an
exam or for a course, to academic probation, to dismissal from Penn Foster. Faculty and staff
members will report inappropriate behavior by students to the Academic Review Board (ARB)
for review, at which point the student will be asked to respond in writing to the charge. The
ARB will then make a final decision regarding the student’s standing with Penn Foster.

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Academic Policies
Expectation
Penn Foster College uses a number-letter system of grading, with number grades being
assigned to examinations and letter grades to completed courses. The letter grade for each
course is found by counting the average of the lesson examination grades as two-thirds of the
course grade and the final exam/project grade as one-third. Letter grades are converted to
quality points for the purpose of computing the Quality Point Average (QPA) for each semester
and the cumulative Quality Point Average for more than one semester. Quality points range
from 4.0 for an “A” grade to 0.0 for an “F” grade.

Lesson Grade Letter Lesson Grade Letter


(Percentage) Equivalent Rating (Percentage) Equivalent Rating

92-100 A Excellent 90-100 A Excellent


81-91 B Good 80-89 B Good
75-80 C Average 70-79 C Average
70-74 D Passing Below 70 F Failing
Below 70 F Failing

(Effective Until April 30, 2012) (Effective May 1, 2012)

Students may also receive an incomplete (“I”) for a course. This means all requirements have not been met. A passing
grade (“P”) is awarded for certain courses and/or projects. A “P” is required to complete a semester, but does not carry a
grade or Quality Point equivalency.

Students who fail a subject must repeat the subject. Students cannot enroll in the
next semester until the failed subject is repeated and passed. Students must also meet
end-of-semester QPA requirements (refer to admission policies).

Replacement subjects for some courses are available through Penn Foster College. You
will be notified of course availability and the cost to repeat the subject if applicable. If
a student completes a replacement subject, credit is granted only for the replacement
course, if passed. The original course(s) and grade(s) will appear on the transcript, but is
not included in the QPA calculation. Students can request grade forgiveness for up to
12 credits. If a student requires more than 12 credits of repeated coursework, additional
replacement courses can be arranged; however both the original course grade and the
repeated course grade will be computed in the QPA.

Exam Submissions
Students can submit exams online at the school’s website,
http://login.PennFosterCollege.edu, by selecting the “Take an Exam” option.
Special instructions are available for any essay exams that must be submitted.

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Proctored Final Examinations
The degree or certificate candidate completing all lessons for a given semester with an
acceptable academic performance will be eligible to take the required proctored final
examination on selected subjects.

There will be timed, proctored final examinations at the end of each semester or
Certificate program. Proctor’s names will be submitted by the student and approved by
Penn Foster College.* Each comprehensive examination will test the student on selected
courses completed in the semester covered.

To be eligible to continue as a degree candidate, the student must complete the


proctored examination according to the required procedures and must earn a passing
grade (“C” or higher) on all courses in the semester. In addition, students must maintain an
acceptable Quality Point Average (QPA) in order to be re-enrolled in the next semester.
Please refer to page 10 for the required cumulative QPA at the end of each semester.
Students who do not achieve the required QPA may be discontinued from the program.
Students who do not pass their proctored exams may be required to take a makeup exam.

Procedure: When students approach the completion of studies in a semester or


Certificate program, the College will notify them of all proctored exam procedures.

The proctored exam process is closely monitored. All procedures must be strictly adhered
to. Any instances of inappropriate action on the part of the student or proctor could result
in an invalid exam. If an exam is considered invalid, the student will be required to take an
alternate exam. The highest grade awarded on that exam would be 70%.

Students will be mailed only the grade results of the exam. Proctored exams
are never returned to the student. If a student wishes to discuss results, he/she may
contact the instructor, who will discuss the exam in detail.

* The proctor is someone you know in your own area who holds at least an Associate Degree
and is not related to you.

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Exam Results
Multiple choice exams are taken online. They are easy to use and give instant
feedback. Most essay and project exams will also be submitted online.
Students must access the Penn Foster student portal to get evaluations as well as
receive feedback. The evaluations will tell students which answers (if any) were
incorrect. If students have a question or problem with the exam evaluation, they should
contact the school immediately.

Multiple choice Exam Retake Policies


Exams Taken Students may retake the exam whether their score was
between May 21, 2013 passing or failing on the first attempt. The retake must be
and December 14, submitted within 30 days of the initial submission, or the
2016 first attempt will become the final grade. Students earn the
higher of the two grades.

Exams taken between Students earning a passing score on the first attempt are not
December 15, 2016 eligible for a retake. If the first attempt score is failing (below
and October 18, 2017 70%), students have the option to retake the exam. The
highest score a student can earn on a retake exam is 70%. If
a student scores below 70% on the retake exam, the student
will earn the higher of the two scores.

Exams taken starting Students are given two chances to pass each exam. An
October 19, 2017 exam may be retaken as soon as the first attempt has been
graded; there is no waiting period. Regardless of whether
the first attempt resulted in a passing or failing grade,
students are given one opportunity to retake the exam and
earn the higher of the two scores. This policy is effective for
all open exams on a student’s record as of October 19, 2017.

Students are presented with a new exam for the retake and must submit the ENTIRE
retake online. The retake must be submitted within 30 days of the initial submission, or
the first attempt will become the final grade.

For all other exams (subjective, non-multiple choice exams), retakes are required
for a failed first attempt, and not offered if the exam was passed. The highest score
a student can earn on a retake exam is 70%. The retake grade becomes the final
grade. Retakes on proctored exams are only required if the course grade is failing.
Each program may contain one or more practical exercises, projects, or externships
that must be successfully completed in order to meet the requirements for graduation.
Some of these may be graded on a pass/fail basis.

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Online Discussions/Webinars
Certain programs require online discussions with faculty members and other students.
Such discussions are linked with specific courses and must be completed at the time
the student is taking the course. Students who do not participate in these required
online discussions will not be allowed to continue with their programs.

Students in certain programs may also be required to attend scheduled online classes
in order to pass the course.

Dean’s List
Degree students who complete at least nine credits and achieve a 3.4 or higher
average in a given semester are included on the Dean’s List. Students who provide
written permission may appear on our published Dean’s List. The Dean’s List does not
apply to the Certificate programs.

Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy


Standards of Progress:
Learners are expected to successfully complete each semester before enrolling in the
subsequent semester and must repeat any failed subject.

Learners are given one year to complete each semester. Learners may progress more
quickly through the semester, but are contractually required to complete it within one year.
Time frames may vary for international learners due to shipping times.

Learners may request an extension for a fee, but the entire Associate Degree program
must be completed within six years, and the entire Bachelor’s Degree program must be
completed in eight years. Learners who do not complete a degree program within the
required time limit must be re-enrolled and evaluated against the current program for
internal transfer credit.

Learners who do not demonstrate satisfactory progress may be academically cancelled


from the program, or denied admission to the subsequent semester. Re-enrollment
in a program is not allowed if the learner was enrolled in the same program and was
academically failed. Re-enrollment in another program will require review of previous
coursework to determine eligibility.

If a learner is out of school and then re-enters into the current curriculum, the Registrar will
evaluate prior earned credits for possible transfer into the new program. If the learner has
been out of school for at least one year beyond the expiration of their latest semester, then
the lessons from incomplete courses will not transfer into the new program.

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Academic Probation/Cancellation
Learners who continually score below the passing average on exams may be placed on
academic probation for a period of time during which grades will be closely monitored.
Continued academic failure may result in the learner’s record being submitted to the
Academic Review Board. The Academic Review Board members will consider the
academic progress of the learner and, with the approval of the Vice President of Education
and Academic Dean, determine if cancellation is required. If cancelled, the learner will be
notified in the mail, and the Refund Policy will be applied.

Semester structure:
Learners are admitted to the complete program, but enrollments are processed one
semester at a time. The application process for each semester after the first is below. As
lessons are completed, the next course will be available. After passing all courses in the
first semester, learners will receive materials for re-enrollment into the next semester.

Application for subsequent semester:


1. At the end of each semester, students complete a proctored exam and final grades
for each course are determined. If all courses are passed and the appropriate Quality
Point Average (QPA) has been achieved, the student is eligible for re-enrollment.
The following QPA requirements apply to re-admission:
• The end of semester one 1.6 cumulative QPA
• The end of semester two 1.8 cumulative QPA
• The end of semester three 2.0 cumulative QPA
Students in the Bachelor’s Degree program must maintain a cumulative 1.6 QPA from
semester 1 to the end of semester 5 in order to continue to next semester.
• The end of semester six 1.8 cumulative QPA
• The end of semester seven 2.0 cumulative QPA
2. If all requirements are met, learners will receive a new enrollment application for the
appropriate semester.
3. A down payment is required to re-enroll in a subsequent semester of any degree
program. The learner must also be current in payments.
4. Learners submit the application and the college will make their next course available
on the learner portal.

Veterans Benefits — Standards of Progress


In order to receive educational benefits from the Veterans Administration, Penn Foster
College students must meet minimum standards for Satisfactory Academic Progress
(SAP). The minimum standards are measured through attendance, as reflected in the
submission and grading of exams and assignments. More specifically, students may
not miss more than 30 days during any course if they want to retain their eligibility for
VA educational benefits for that course.
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Once a student receives a grade for the first lesson in a course, they must continue
to submit exams/assignments or complete the discussion boards/webinars for that
same course at least once every 30 days or less. Failure to achieve SAP standards
(missing 30 days or more in a course) will result in that course not being certified with
the Veterans’ Administration for benefits. For many students, it may be easier to meet
these attendance standards by completing one course at a time.

Course credits will be certified to the VA after a student completes each course and
earns a final grade as long as attendance reflects no absence greater than 30 days.
Courses that do not include a proctored exam must be completed without a 30-day gap in
attendance and receive a final grade in order for it to be certified for benefits. For courses
where a proctored exam is required at the end, we will report only your “Dates of Training”
to the VA, providing you complete all lessons without a 30-day gap in attendance. We will
not include the proctored exam in the VA certification regardless of when you complete it.

Students in danger of not achieving SAP standards will receive notices by the college that
their eligibility for VA educational benefits is at risk because of their attendance record.

When a student who receives VA benefits begins submitting lessons for a course,
a grade of “I” for incomplete will be assigned to that course until the final exam has
been submitted and graded. Then the final grade will replace the incomplete grade.
If the student does not complete the course within a year, all remaining exams for
that course will receive a grade of “1” which could result in a final grade of “F.”

Student Grievances
Student Grievance Policy:
Most student complaints can be handled at first point of contact with the school. Student
complaints are addressed using the policies and provisions of the enrollment agreement,
student catalog, and academic requirements of the school. Students who have a complaint
should contact their instructor regarding academic issues or a Student Services Center
supervisor regarding servicing issues. The instructor or Student Services Center supervisor
will provide a verbal or written response depending on the student’s preferred choice of
communication. If the student believes that the complaint has not been properly handled at
that point, the student should use the following procedure to register a grievance.

Steps in Grievance Procedure:


1. The student should contact the Academic Team Lead for academic issues or
Manager, Student Services either by phone or in writing expressing his/ her concern

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within 30 days of receiving a response to the original complaint. The Academic
Team Lead or Manager, Student Services will respond either by phone or in writing
within two weeks of receiving the complaint.

2. If the student feels that the issue is still unresolved, he/she has 30 days to express
continued concerns either by phone or in writing to the Program Director or Director,
Student Services. A response will be sent to the student within 2 weeks.

3. If the student still believes the grievance is unresolved, he/she may complete the
school’s grievance form within 30 days from receiving the response from the Vice
President of Education and Academic Dean or Director, Student Service. This form
can be obtained by contacting Student Service Center. The form can be emailed,
faxed, or mailed to the student.

4. All grievance forms will be returned to the Vice President of Education and
Academic Dean, who will turn them over to the Dispute Resolution Committee. The
Dispute Resolution Committee will meet and render a decision within two weeks of
receipt of the grievance form. The decision of the Committee will be final and will be
sent to the student in writing.

5. All grievance forms and final decision notifications will be filed in the office of the
Vice President of Education and Academic Dean.

6. If the complaint cannot be resolved after exhausting the institution’s grievance


procedure, the student may file a complaint with the Arizona State Board for Private
Postsecondary Education. The student must contact the State Board for further
details. The State Board address is 1740 W. Adams Street, Suite 3008, Phoenix, AZ
85007, phone # 602-542-5709, website address: http://azppse.state.az.us.

The student may also contact the DEAC at 1101 17th Street NW, Suite 808
Washington, D.C. 20036 and at www.deac.org.

7. If the complaint cannot be resolved after exhausting the institution’s grievance


procedure, the student also may choose to file a complaint in their state of residence.

SARA Complaint Resolution Process


The Arizona SARA Council has jurisdiction over Arizona SARA-approved
institutions, including Penn Foster College, in relation to non-instructional complaints.
Instructional complaints, such as grade grievances, are not reviewed by the Council and
should not be submitted for review. Prior to registering a non-instructional complaint with
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the Arizona SARA Council, students must complete the Penn Foster College Grievance
Policy shown above and the Arizona State Board for Private Postsecondary Education’s
complaint process. Non-instructional complaints that have not been resolved through
these measures may be submitted to SARA at http://azsara.arizona.edu/complaint-process.

Complaints Against Faculty


If a student has a complaint regarding treatment by a member of the faculty or
suspects a conflict of interest, the student should report this complaint to the
Department Chairman in which the student is enrolled.

If the student has consulted with the appropriate supervisor and still believes that the
matter has not been dealt with satisfactorily or equitably, the student should contact
the Vice President of Education and Academic Dean If the complaint is still not
resolved, the student must submit a formal written signed complaint to the school’s
Academic Review Board for further consideration.

Grade Appeal
Students who wish to dispute a grade or an answer to a question should contact their
instructor. Only an instructor has the authority to change a grade. If the student is not
happy with the grade appeal results, he/she should follow the “Student Grievance”
procedure listed in this catalog.

Graduation Requirements
Undergraduate Certificate Requirements
Students who complete the final proctored exam for the Certificate will be eligible for
graduation. To be awarded a Certificate, a candidate must:

1. Earn the total number of credits required for the Certificate program.
2. Pass all courses.
3. Complete a minimum of 25% of the total credit hours through Penn Foster College.
4. Achieve a cumulative Quality Point Average (QPA) of 2.0 or higher in all studies.

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5. Complete all courses required for the Certificate within the required contractual
time frame.
6. Meet all financial obligations.*
* All payments must clear before undergraduate certificate will be issued.

Associate Degree Requirements


Students who complete the final proctored exam for the fourth semester will be
eligible for graduation. To be awarded an Associate of Science Degree, a candidate must:

1. Earn the total number of credits required for the degree program.
2. Pass all courses.
3. Complete a minimum of 25% of the total credit hours through Penn Foster College.
4. Achieve a cumulative Quality Point Average (QPA) of 2.0 or higher in all studies.
A candidate may score below a 2.0 QPA in the first or second semester and still
continue as a degree candidate, provided that the QPA by the conclusion of the
given semester is not below the following: semester one, 1.6; semester two, 1.8;
semester three, 2.0.
5. Complete all courses required for the four semesters within six (6) years of enrollment.
6. Meet all financial obligations.*
* All payments must clear before degree will be issued.

Bachelor’s Degree Requirements


To be awarded a Bachelor of Science Degree, a candidate must:
1. Complete the required number of credits in the program. (Minimum of 120 credits)
2. Pass all courses.
3. Complete a minimum of 25% of the total credits through Penn Foster College.
4. Achieve a cumulative QPA of 2.0, or higher.
5. Complete all courses required within eight (8) years of enrollment.
6. Meet all financial obligations.*
* All payments must clear before degree will be issued.

Extensions
In most programs, students are given 12 months to complete each semester. Students
may request two paid six-month extensions per semester as long as the entire
program is completed within six (6) years for the Associate Degree or eight (8) years
for the Bachelor’s Degree. Students who do not complete the program within the
required time limit would need to re-enroll in the program that is current at that time.
Previous work would be evaluated against the current curriculum to determine which
courses could be transferred into the new enrollment. Students in Certificate programs
may also request an extension beyond their contract time for a fee.
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Graduation Honors
Students who achieve a minimum 3.4 or higher cumulative grade point average upon
completion of the program will receive their degrees with the following honors designation:

3.4 Cum Laude 3.6 Magna Cum Laude 3.8 Summa Cum Laude

Honor Society
Degree students who complete at least 30 credits with Penn Foster College and
achieve a minimum 3.4 or higher cumulative quality point average upon graduation will
be eligible to join the Delta Epsilon Tau Honor Society. Students who choose to pay a
fee can become members of the Alpha Epsilon Chapter of the DET Honor Society.
The Honor Society does not apply to Undergraduate Certificate Programs.

Student Services
How the Program Works
Students receive the following information to begin studying with Penn Foster College:
• ID Card — The Student ID Card is included with a welcome letter that arrives in the mail.
• Student Catalog — Special information on the Penn Foster College experience.
(Available online)
• Program Outline — The Program Outline lists all courses in the program and is
available online at the student’s home page.
• First Set of Lesson Materials — The first lesson should be read thoroughly. The self-
tests in each lesson help students prepare for the “open-book” exams. Questions
about the lessons can be answered by going to the “Frequently Asked Questions ”
(FAQ) section of the website.

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All lessons and study guides included in the program are online. Textbooks and
learning equipment, if included, will be shipped at the appropriate time.

If students have additional questions about getting started, they should go to


http://login.PennFosterCollege.edu or call the Student Service Center at
1-888-427-1000. Students may also fax their request to 480-947-2680.

Additional Materials
As lessons are completed, the next course will be available. Proctored final exams are
administered for select courses at the end of the semester. Information on this process
can be found in the Proctored Exam Information booklet, available under “View Forms
and Handbooks” on the student portal. After passing all courses in the first semester,
students will receive materials for re-enrollment into the next semester.

Contacting the School


Courses at Penn Foster College are designed to ensure success. Students who have
questions or problems with any course are encouraged to visit the website at
http://Login.PennFosterCollege.edu. The Penn Foster College website features information
on the school and details on every program offered, as well as links to other educational
resources. From the website, students can view their records, take exams, and email
instructors (edserv@pennfoster.edu). Visit the site at www.PennFosterCollege.edu.

Students who need to call the college or speak with an instructor can call
1-888-427-0600. Instructors are on duty to answer questions from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.,
Mountain Time (9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Eastern Time), Monday through Friday. After that time,
and on weekends and holidays, students may leave a message; calls will be returned
the next business day. Callers must have their student numbers available.

Online Library
Students at Penn Foster College will have access to an online library for use during their
studies with the school. Students can use this library to do the required research in the
courses they complete or can use it for general reference and links to valuable resources.
The library contains helpful research assistance, articles, databases, books, Web links, and
email access to a librarian. Students can access the library from their home page. A library
services manager is available to answer questions on general research-related topics via
email and assist students in research activities during their studies in Penn Foster.

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Payments
Payments can be made by visiting our website, by phone, or by mail. If mailing
payment, please include the appropriate coupon from the payment book to:

Student Service Center


925 Oak Street
Scranton, PA 18515-0001

Student numbers must be included on all payment materials. Accounts are updated in
approximately one week.

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)


The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) provides you with certain privacy
rights with respect to student records if (A) you are over the age of 18 or enrolled in a post-
secondary program, and (B) you are a parent or legal guardian of a student who is under the
age of 18 and not enrolled in a post-secondary program. These rights include:
1) The right to inspect and review your or the minor student’s education records within 45
days after Penn Foster receives a written request from you for such access.
2) The right to request an amendment to your or the minor student’s education records if
you believe something is inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of your or the
minor student’s privacy rights; this does not give you any rights to have your or the minor
student’s grades changed or similar changes made to the record of your or the minor
student’s academic performance. You need to provide us with a written request for the
change and an explanation for why you think it should be made. If we agree, we will
make the correction; if we disagree, we will communicate further with you as to the issue.
3) The right to provide written consent before we disclose personally identifiable
information (PII) from your or the minor student’s education records, except (a) with
respect to Directory Information (discussed more below), and (b)in certain defined
situations where FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent, including disclosures to
school officials and regulatory bodies with legitimate educational interests.
4) The right to file a complaint with the Family Compliance Office of the U.S. Department
of Education, located at 400 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20202, if you
believe Penn Foster has violated your or the minor student’s FERPA rights.

For Penn Foster students, Directory Information includes:


• Student name
• Dates of attendance
• Penn Foster program
• Enrollment status (graduate, attending, pending, withdrawn)
• Honors and Awards

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Unless you notify Penn Foster in writing that you do NOT want your Directory Information
disclosed to anyone without your consent, Penn Foster may disclose these categories of
information without your consent. Please send any such “opt out” notice to Penn Foster
Student Service Center at 925 Oak Street, Scranton, PA 18515 or via FAX at (570) 961-4888.
Your decision to “opt out” will remain in effect unless and until you elect to “opt in.” In
addition, whether or not you have decided to “opt out,” Penn Foster will not disclose any
of your Directory Information to any third party during the first two weeks following your
enrollment.

If you have any questions about your FERPA rights, you can learn more at the
government’s helpful website at https://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa/index.html.

Basic Skills Assessment


All degree and certificate applicants will be required to complete a basic skills
assessment in reading and math to determine the level of readiness for beginning
their selected program. Students who demonstrate the need for additional instruction
in math or reading will receive developmental course materials to help prepare for the
rigor of the program. Students who successfully complete either the assessment or the
developmental courses will matriculate and begin the first semester. Students who do
not successfully complete the developmental courses will be counseled regarding their
enrollment and may not be allowed to continue. Developmental courses will appear
on the student transcript but will not carry any credit value and will not enter into a
student’s QPA.

Failed Subject Replacements


Students who fail a course on the first attempt may be able to repeat the subject
if a replacement course is available. Students will be notified of the availability of a
replacement subject, if needed, at the time of their final grade calculation.

Accommodating Students with Disabilities


Penn Foster College believes in opportunity for everyone. Therefore, the school
strives to meet the needs of all students by providing instructional support and student
services which will enable them to reach their maximum potential. The school does not
discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, religion, national origin, age, or physical
disability. The school will offer a reasonable accommodation for any qualified student
with known disabilities provided the accommodation does not pose an undue hardship
on the school or does not force the school to fundamentally alter the educational course,
compromise its academic standards, or place the disabled individual in a better than
equal position with nondisabled students.

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Students who need special accommodations should call a Student Service Center
representative and request an accommodation form. The student must also provide
documented evidence of the disability.

Change of Address
A change of address may be made by logging on to your student portal at http://Login.
PennFosterCollege.edu. Click Update My Profile (at the bottom of your Personal
Homepage). Make the necessary changes and submit.

Transcripts
Along with your degree, you will receive one free copy of your official transcript. If you
desire additional copies, they are available at a cost of $13.00 for an electronic copy or
$15.00 for a paper copy. Utilize the transcript ordering service on your student portal or
the Contact Us Page to submit your request. If you want the transcript sent to someone
else (i.e., an employer or school), please have the address handy when you call. (You
must be current in your payments to receive this service.) If you request your official
transcript prior to graduation, it will only be released if certain financial criteria is met.

Career Assistance
The Career Center, which is located in the library, offers many resources to help with
career planning and job search efforts. In addition to the resources for researching
companies and businesses, there are guides for career planning, instructions for
writing a winning resume, tips and advice to succeed at a job interview and how
to follow-up after the interview, and information on negotiating and understanding
compensation levels and offers. There are many job listings categorized by subject
also shown in the Career Center. Graduates can also take advantage of our Alumni
Services online. Job placement is not guaranteed to graduates, upon program
completion.

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Transfer of Credits
Students planning to continue their education with another school after earning a degree
or certificate from Penn Foster College should check with that school regarding credit
transfer policies. Credits earned at Penn Foster College may transfer to some, but not all,
learning institutions. Many of the courses have been reviewed by the ACE College Credit
Recommendation Service and are listed in the National Guide to Educational Credit for
Training Programs. Many colleges use the recommendations made by ACE to determine
credit transfer values. No form of accreditation guarantees that any learning institution will
accept credits from any school as transfer credits.

School Calendar
Penn Foster College operates 12 months of the year. The
Student Service Center and the instructors are available
Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. E.T.
The school is closed for 8 holidays during the year. The
holidays usually include New Year’s Day, Memorial Day,
Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and


Christmas Day. The other days may vary. The school’s
phones will have a “closed” message on these holidays.

“An investment in knowledge


pays the best interest.”

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Curriculum
International students may visit:
http://www.pennfostercollegeintl.com/programs_degrees.html
for program and pricing details.

General Education Philosophy


Penn Foster College seeks to provide the students it serves with a core general
education component, which is essential as a basis for lifelong learning inside and
outside the workplace.

Students should receive a well-rounded education with an appropriate balance between


specific skills in their major areas and those skills gained through general education
courses that are part of the curriculum. Those courses that are directly related to a
specific major are an important part of building a foundation for a successful career.
However, these skills are not enough to ensure that students will be successful. Students
also need to develop skills that enable them to develop creative solutions, to effectively
communicate with others, and to work as a team with fellow employees. Students can
also benefit from greater understanding of the world through the appreciation of history,
the arts, and the various cultures of the world.

General education courses provide students with quantitative and critical thinking skills,
communication skills, and an understanding of society and culture. These are important
skills that enable students to be a more vital and productive part of society. Penn
Foster College is committed to ensuring the success of all students by forming the core
of the programs around various general education courses. Students who complete
programs that include a solid general education component are better prepared for
success in the future.

The following general education courses are offered either as required subjects in the
program or as electives. The curriculum outlines that follow will show the requirements
for each program.

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General Education General Studies
Courses Undergraduate Certificate
This program is appropriate for adults looking
Arts & Humanities Credits to earn credits in general education subjects.
Art Appreciation 3 Credits earned in this certificate may be used to
Introduction to Literature 3 meet general education requirements in Penn
Music Appreciation 3 Foster degree programs. Students wishing
to transfer credits earned in this certificate to
Communications
other colleges should check with the college
Interpersonal Communication 1
to determine if the credits will be accepted
Career Readiness 1
in transfer. For tuition details, please visit the
Speech 3
program page on the website at http://www.
English pennfoster.edu/programs-and-degrees/general-
Advanced Composition 3 studies/general-studies-undergraduate-certificate/
Business and Technical Writing 3 tuition.
English Composition 3
Foundation Skills in English 3 Program Goal
Information Literacy 1 The undergraduate certificate in general studies
program prepares students to continue their
Mathematics education in an associate’s or bachelor’s degree
Business Statistics 3 program.
Computer Applications 3
Foundation Skills in Math 3 Program Outcomes
Intermediate Algebra 3 Upon completion of the program, students will
Precalculus 3 be able to:
Research and Statistics 3 • Demonstrate computer & information literacy
• Demonstrate an understanding of the liberal
Natural Science
arts, natural sciences, & social sciences
Earth Science 3
• Demonstrate a high level of inquiry, analytical,
Essentials of Biochemistry 3
& problem-solving skills
Introduction to Biology 3
• Demonstrate effective written & interpersonal
Nutrition 3
communication skills
Physical Science 3
Social Sciences Basic Skills 0
Economics 1 (non-business major) 3 CSC 104: Computer Applications 3
Economics 2 (non-business major) 3 Science Elective (choose one) 3
Essentials of Psychology 3 SCI 120: Introduction to Biology
Introduction to Sociology 3 SCI 110: Earth Science
Organizational Behavior 3 SCI 140: Nutrition
Sociology of Diversity 3 Social Science Elective (choose one) 3
World Civilizations 3 SSC 105: World Civilizations
SSC 125: Introduction to Sociology
SSC 130: Essentials of Psychology
Arts & Humanities Elective (choose one) 3
HUM 102: Art Appreciation
HUM 104: Music Appreciation
ENG 115: Introduction to Literature
ENG 100: English Composition 3
Total 15
Proctored Final Examination

37
Business Department Basic Skills
BUS 100: Business Orientation
0
1
The Business Department of Penn Foster
College offers men and women a variety of BUS 101: Introduction to Business 3
career choices: Criminal Justice, Early Childhood MAT 106: Mathematics for Business
Education, Health Information Technology, and Finance 3
Paralegal Studies, Accounting, Business ACC 111: Financial Accounting 3
Management, Human Resources, Finance, or ACC 112: Managerial Accounting 3
Marketing. Associate of Science and Bachelor FIN 101: Financial Management 3
of Science degrees provide the student with ACC 201: Intermediate Accounting 1 3
the full business background needed in today’s ACC 202: Intermediate Accounting 2 3
complex business environment. ACC 210: Cost Accounting 3
ACC 211: Computer Applications
in Accounting 3
Accounting Undergraduate BUS 213: Business Law 1 3
Certificate Total
Proctored Final Examination
31
This program is appropriate for adults looking
to learn new job skills, refresh or refine existing
accounting knowledge used in a current Accounting
position, or improve the performance of a small
business by better understanding the essentials
Associate of Science
The objectives of the Penn Foster College
of accounting and finance. In addition, all of
Accounting Program are to provide the
the course credits earned with this program
student with an in-depth study of accounting
are transferable to an Associate of Science
supplemented by a broad acquaintance with
Degree in Accounting. For tuition details,
related subjects necessary in business and
please visit the program page on the website
industry. Training in basic computer operations
at http://www.pennfoster.edu/programs-and-
and applications is also included. The student
degrees/accounting-and-finance/accounting-
will develop skills in accounting, management,
undergraduate-certificate/tuition.
and using a personal computer. A graduate
Program Goal will have the necessary academic background
The Accounting Undergraduate Certificate for employment in one of the many careers of
program provides students with the skills to the accounting profession. For tuition details,
expand existing accounting knowledge for please visit the program page on the website
a current or future job, or prepares them for at http://www.pennfoster.edu/programs-and-
further education at the undergraduate level. degrees/accounting-and-finance/accounting-
associate-degree/tuition.
Program Outcomes
Upon completion of the program, students will Program Goal
be able to: The Accounting Associate Degree program
• Discuss the basic theories, principles and is primarily designed to prepare students for
processes involved in various functional opportunities in entry-level positions in the
areas field of accounting but can also be used as a
• Create financial statements that show an foundation for further training.
understanding of the accounting cycle,
are accurate, and comply with generally Program Outcomes
accepted accounting procedures Upon completion of the program, students will
• Explain issues of internal control of cash be able to:
in balance and cash flow statements and • Demonstrate effective written and
external financial reporting interpersonal communication skills
• List how to create, organize, and maintain • Demonstrate a high level of inquiry,
financial records analytical, and problem-solving skills
• Outline how to assess financial data and • Demonstrate effective quantitative skills
make best-practices recommendations to • Demonstrate computer and information
management literacy
• Demonstrate an understanding of the liberal
arts, natural sciences, and social sciences
• Demonstrate an understanding of the
38
principles and processes involved in Semester 2
various functional areas and the need for CSC 104: Computer Applications 3
collaboration among the different functions ACC 112: Managerial Accounting 3
• Complete the accounting cycle and create ENG 100: English Composition 3
and analyze financial statements to ensure BUS 110: Principles of Management 3
that they are accurate and comply with Arts & Humanities Elective (choose one) 3
Generally Accepted Accounting Procedures. HUM 104: Music Appreciation
• Explain the key issues of internal control of ENG 115: Introduction to Literature
cash in balance and cash flow statements BUS 121: Economics 1 3
and external financial reporting Total 18
• Create, organize, and maintain financial Proctored Final Examination
records
• Discuss and apply ethical and legal Semester 3
standards to the business environment ACC 201: Intermediate Accounting 1 3
• Demonstrate an understanding of economic FIN 101: Financial Management 3
and financial markets and the business ENG 121: Business and Technical Writing 3
economy MAT 115: Intermediate Algebra 3
• Demonstrate how to assess financial data ACC 202: Intermediate Accounting 2 3
and make best-practices recommendations Science Elective (choose one) 3
to management SCI 120: Introduction to Biology
SCI 140: Nutrition
Semester 1 SCI 110: Earth Science
Basic Skills 0 Total 18
BUS 100: Business Orientation 1 Proctored Final Examination
ILS 103: Information Literacy 1
BUS 101: Introduction to Business 3 Semester 4
HUM 102: Art Appreciation 3 ACC 210: Cost Accounting 3
MAT 106: Mathematics for Business MAT 210: Business Statistics 3
and Finance 3 BUS 213: Business Law 1 3
ACC 111: Financial Accounting 3 ACC 211: Computer Applications
Total 14 in Accounting 3
Proctored Final Examination ENG 200: Speech 3
Social Science Elective (choose one) 3
SSC 130: Essentials of Psychology
SSC 105: World Civilizations
SSC 125: Introduction to Sociology
Total 18
Total Credits 68

Penn Foster College reserves the right to change program


content and materials when it becomes necessary.

Business Management
Undergraduate Certificate
This program is appropriate for adults seeking
to learn new job skills, refresh or refine existing
business management knowledge used in a
current position, or improve the performance of
a small business by better understanding the
essentials of business and finance. In addition,
all of the course credits earned with this program
are transferable to an Associate of Science
Degree in Business Management. For tuition

39
details, please visit the program page on the • Explain the law of supply and demand, cost
website at http://www.pennfoster.edu/programs- of living, monetary systems, international
and-degrees/business-management/business- factors, and short run economic fluctuations
management-undergraduate-certificate/tuition. • Discuss managerial accounting including
budgeting and performance evaluation,
Program Goal decentralized operations; differential
The Business Management Undergraduate analysis, product pricing, and capital
certificate program provides students investment analysis, and cost activities
with the skills to expand existing business
management knowledge for a current or future Basic Skills 0
job, or prepare for further education at the BUS 100: Business Orientation 1
undergraduate level. BUS 101: Introduction to Business 3
Program Outcomes BUS 110: Principles of Management 3
Upon completion of the program, students will MAT 106: Mathematics for Business
and Finance 3
be able to:
CSC 104: Computer Applications 3
• Understand the Penn Foster distance
ACC 111: Financial Accounting 3
learning process, the materials used in
BUS 121: Economics 1 3
the program, successful study skills and
ACC 112: Managerial Accounting 3
techniques, individual life goals and steps
HRM 201: HR Management 3
needed to fulfill them, similarities between
ENG 121: Business and Technical Writing 3
personal financial goals and business
BUS 213: Business Law 1 3
goals, the basics of setting up a budget and
Total 31
starting up and maintaining a business
Proctored Final Examination
• Discuss the various functions of business
including competition, economics,
accounting, technology and information Business Management
systems, marketing, management through
the phases of starting and growing a Associate of Science
business, and management of financial and The Business Management Program has been
human resources along with the ethical and structured to provide a thorough background in
social responsibilities of business the functional areas of business management,
• Discuss both the business environment finance/ accounting administration, and
and the manager’s role in decision making, marketing and operation at the associate
planning, organizing, leading, controlling, degree level. Training in basic computer
and developing an ethical perspective operations and applications is also included.
• Demonstrate understanding of basic The program prepares men and women for a
mathematical operations including management career in business or industry.
percentages, discounts, interest, present Typical areas in which a graduate will have
worth, sinking funds, installment buying, the necessary academic background to
pricing, depreciation, investments, insurance, enter are merchandising, sales management,
use of symbols and their applications, store management, financial analysis, credit
equations and formulas, and the importance and collection management, operations
of statistics management, executive administration, and
• Compose professional documents using customer service management.
word processing, spreadsheet, and For tuition details, please visit the program
presentation software, and integrate the page on the website at http://www.pennfoster.
applications edu/programs-and-degrees/business-
• Explain the principles of Financial Accounting management/business-management-associate-
including analyzing transactions, completing degree/tuition.
the accounting cycle, merchandising
businesses, inventories, assets, liabilities,
stocks, bonds and cash flow

40
Program Goal Semester 1
To provide students with the education they Basic Skills 0
need to launch their own business or join an BUS 100: Business Orientation 1
established business in an entry-level position ILS 103: Information Literacy 1
developing the strategies, plans, procedures, BUS 101: Introduction to Business 3
and policies that guide a business on both a BUS 110: Principles of Management 3
day-to-day and long-term basis. HUM 102: Art Appreciation 3
MAT 106: Mathematics for Business
Program Outcomes and Finance 3
Upon completion of the program, students will Total 14
be able to: Proctored Final Examination
• Demonstrate effective written and
interpersonal communication skills Semester 2
• Demonstrate a high level of inquiry, CSC 104: Computer Applications 3
analytical, and problem-solving skills ENG 100: English Composition 3
• Demonstrate effective quantitative skills ACC 111: Financial Accounting 3
• Demonstrate computer & information literacy MKT 301: Marketing 3
• Demonstrate an understanding of the liberal Social Science Elective (choose one) 3
arts, natural sciences, and social sciences SSC 130: Essentials of Psychology
• Demonstrate an understanding of the SSC 105: World Civilizations
principles and processes involved in SSC 125: Introduction to Sociology
the functional areas and the need for Arts & Humanities Elective (choose one) 3
collaboration among the different functions HUM 104: Music Appreciation
• Discuss the management function and ENG 115: Introduction to Literature
application to the business organization Total 18
• Understand the steps of the accounting Proctored Final Examination
cycle and utilize financial document
information as a management tool to plan, Semester 3
and track the financial status of a business BUS 121: Economics 1 3
•  Discuss the factors affecting marketing plans ACC 112: Managerial Accounting 3
to promote the business’s products or services MAT 115: Intermediate Algebra 3
through an understanding of marketing ENG 121: Business and Technical Writing 3
principles and consumer buying habits HRM 201: R Management 3
• Discuss and apply ethical and legal Science Elective (choose one) 3
standards to the business environment. SCI 120: Introduction to Biology
•  Demonstrate an understanding of economic SCI 140: Nutrition
and financial markets & the business economy SCI 110: Earth Science
• Understand the fundamentals of human Total 18
resources as it relates to the business Proctored Final Examination
environment
• Demonstrate an understanding of the Semester 4
principles and processes involved in FIN 101: Financial Management 3
the functional areas and the need for BUS 213: Business Law 1 3
collaboration among the different functions BUS 340: Organizational Behavior 3
MAT 210: Business Statistics 3
ENG 200: Speech 3
Total 15
Proctored Final Examination
Total Credits 65

Penn Foster College reserves the right to change program


content and materials when it becomes necessary.

41
business, such as human resources, finance/
accounting, administration, marketing, and
operations. Students will obtain skills they can
apply immediately in the business workplace and
the professional practices and benefits of general
education required for life-long personal growth
in today’s global economy. In addition, this
program provides a foundation for further studies.

Program Outcomes
Upon completion of the program, students will
be able to:
• Demonstrate effective written and
interpersonal communication skills
• Demonstrate a high level of inquiry, analytical,
Business Management and problem-solving skills
• Demonstrate effective quantitative skills
Bachelor of Science • Demonstrate computer and information literacy
The Business and Legal Studies at Penn
• Demonstrate an understanding of the liberal
Foster College is an Educational Member
arts, natural sciences, and social sciences
of the International Assembly for Collegiate
• Demonstrate an understanding of the
Business Education (IACBE), and has affirmed its
principles and processes involved in the
commitment to excellence in business education.
functional areas and the need for collaboration
The objective of the BS in Business Management
among the different functions
is to prepare students for professional
• Discuss the management function and
opportunities in management by providing a
application to the business organization and
thorough background in the functional areas of
develop problem solving skills needed for
modern business: human resources, finance/
management
accounting, administration, marketing, and
• Discuss the steps of the accounting cycle
operations. Students will obtain skills they can
and utilize financial document information
apply immediately in the business workplace
as a management tool to plan, and track the
and the professional practices and benefits of
financial status of a business
general education required for lifelong personal
• Discuss the factors affecting marketing plans
growth in today’s global economy. This program
to promote the business’s products or services
also provides a foundation for graduate studies.
through an understanding of marketing
Students are prepared for a wide variety of
principles, consumer buying habits, and
entry-level management positions in the for-
advertising strategies
profit and not-for-profit sector of the economy,
• Discuss and apply ethical and legal standards
including various supervisory, analyst, operations,
to the Business environment
administrative, and service functions. Students
• Demonstrate an understanding of economic
will need access to high-speed internet, a
and financial markets and apply financial and
Microsoft® Windows® based computer running
economic principles to business decisions
Windows 7® or later, Microsoft® Office 365, and
• Discuss the human resources function as it
an email account to complete their program
relates to the business environment
with Penn Foster. For tuition details, please visit
• Analyze and evaluate the main structural
the program page on the website at http://www.
features of a business or industry and develop
pennfoster.edu/programs-and-degrees/business-
strategies to position a firm attractively in the
management/business-management-bachelors-
business environment
degree/tuition.
• Discuss the theories, influences, cultural forces,
Program Goal labor factors and methods of successfully
The objective of the Business Management entering international markets
Bachelor of Science degree is to prepare • Discuss the scientific method and approach
students for professional opportunities to a variety of research methods likely to
in management by providing a thorough be useful to supporting successful decision
background in the functional areas of modern making in business

42
Semester 1 Semester 7
Basic Skills 0 BUS 415: Business Research Methods 3
BUS 100: Business Orientation 1 BUS 400: Business Ethics 3
ILS 103: Information Literacy 1 Elective (See Table) 3
BUS 101: Introduction to Business 3 Business Elective (See Table) 3
BUS 110: Principles of Management 3 BUS 430: International Business 3
HUM 104: Music Appreciation 3 Total 15
MAT 106: Mathematics for Business Proctored Final Examination
and Finance 3
Total 14 Semester 8
Proctored Final Examination BUS 425: Strategic Business Management 3
Elective (See Table) 3
Semester 2 Business Elective (See Table) 3
CSC 104: Computer Applications 3 Business Elective (See Table) 3
ENG 100: English Composition 3 BUS 450: Senior Capstone: Business 4
MAT 115: Intermediate Algebra 3 Total 16
ACC 111: Financial Accounting 3 Proctored Final Examination
SCI 140: Nutrition 3 Total Credits 120
Total 15
Penn Foster College reserves the right to change program
Proctored Final Examination content and materials when it becomes necessary.
Semester 3
SSC 105: World Civilizations 3 Electives
ENG 121: Business and Technical Writing 3 (Course Number/Title/Prerequisites)
ACC 112: Managerial Accounting 3 ACC 201: Intermediate Accounting 1 ACC112
ENG 200: Speech 3 ACC 202: Intermediate Accounting 2 ACC201
BUS 121: Economics 1 (Macroeconomics) 3 ACC 210: Cost Accounting ACC112
Total 15 ACC 211: Computer Applications in Accounting
Proctored Final Examination ACC112
HRM 210: Compensation Management HRM201
Semester 4 FIN 101: Financial Management
HUM 102: Art Appreciation 3 FIN 210: Personal Financial Management
MAT 210: Business Statistics 3 CSC 218: Visual Basic CSC104
CSC 221: Advanced PC Applications 3 INT 205: Introduction to the Internet CSC104
BUS 122: Economics 2 (Microeconomics) 3 COM 110: Public Relations 1 ENG300
Elective (See Table) 3 COM 115: Public Relations 2 COM110
Total 15
Proctored Final Examination Business Electives
(Course Number/Title/Prerequisites)
Semester 5 MKT 320: Consumer Behavior MKT301
SSC 130: Essentials of Psychology 3 HRM 350: Labor Relations HRM201
MKT 301: Marketing 3 FIN 305: Securities and Investments
ENG 300: Advanced Composition 3 MKT 310: Advertising Principles MKT301
HRM 201: HR Management 3 MKT 340: Retail Management MKT301
Elective (See Table) 3 HRM 320: Employee Benefits HRM201, HRM210
Total 15 HRM 355: Training Concepts BUS110, HRM201
Proctored Final Examination BUS 330: Risk Management BUS110

Semester 6
BUS 315: Legal Environment of Business 3
FIN 310: Corporate Finance 3
SCI 120: Introduction to Biology 3
Business Elective (See Table) 3
BUS 340: Organizational Behavior 3
Total 15
Proctored Final Examination

43
Criminal Justice workings of an adversarial system of justice
• Discuss the principles of criminal responsibility
Associate of Science and the requirement of culpable mental states,
The Criminal Justice Program prepares students the various defenses used to negate or to
with an in-depth study of topics necessary for mitigate criminal liability, victims’ interaction
a career in criminal justice such as criminology, with the criminal justice system, and the
criminal law, police studies, private security, prevailing theories and philosophies for
organized and white-collar crime, criminalistics, criminal punishment including restitution,
community corrections, security management, retribution, rehabilitation.
and crisis intervention. The program prepares • Discuss and compare recognized biological,
students to obtain entry-level positions in psychological, and sociological theories
security, prison, or police work. For tuition about the causes of criminal behavior and the
details, please visit the program page on the types of criminal behavior and methods for
website at http://www.pennfoster.edu/programs- predicting future crime.
and-degrees/law-enforcement/criminal-justice- • Analyze the management and organizational
associate-degree/tuition. components in the modern police organization
and the various methods and theories of
Program Goal
policing, including reactive, proactive, problem-
To prepare students for professional
solving, community policing.
opportunities in the criminal justice field and for
a wide array of entry-level positions in criminal
Semester 1
justice, or to prepare for further training.
Basic Skills 0
Program Outcomes CJS 100: Criminal Justice Orientation 1
Upon completion of the program, students will ILS 103: Information Literacy 1
be able to: CJS 101: Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
• Demonstrate effective written and CJS 123: Courts 3
interpersonal communication skills CSC 104: Computer Applications 3
• Demonstrate a high level of inquiry, analytical, ENG 100: English Composition 3
and problem-solving skills SSC 130: Essentials of Psychology 3
• Demonstrate effective quantitative skills Total 17
• Demonstrate computer and information literacy Proctored Final Examination
• Demonstrate an understanding of the liberal
arts, natural sciences, and social sciences Semester 2
• Discuss the legal system in the United States, SSC125: Introduction to Sociology 3
including the origins and history of the law, CJS238: Criminal Law 3
the development of common law, statutory CJS105: Ethics in Criminal Justice 3
law, constitutional law and how this affects the Science Elective (Choose one) 3
criminal justice system SCI110: Earth Science
• Analyze the substantive and procedural SCI120: Introduction to Biology
operations of the criminal justice system SCI140: Nutrition
with focus on the prosecutorial, judicial, and CJS120: Police Studies 3
defense functions CJS210: Crime Scene Investigation Basics 3
• Evaluate issues of justice, professionalism and Total 18
ethics within law enforcement, the courts, and Proctored Final Examination
the private sector security industry
• Examine the external and internal factors Semester 3
that control the dynamics of law enforcement CJS203: Criminal Procedures 3
from the police, prosecution, and defense CJS130: Police Management 3
perspectives as they apply to ethical, moral, CJS135: Introduction to Private Security 3
and legal applications CJS211: Correctional Institutions 3
• Discuss the origins and development of the MAT115: Intermediate Algebra 3
law of search and seizure on the federal
and state levels, the ethical and legal issues
surrounding the exclusionary rule as it impacts
the Fourth and Fifth Amendments, and the

44
Arts & Humanities Elective (Choose one)
ENG115: Introduction to Literature
3 Criminal Justice
HUM102: Art Appreciation Bachelor of Science
HUM104: Music Appreciation The objective of the BS in Criminal Justice
Total 18 degree program is to prepare students for
Proctored Final Examination professional opportunities in the criminal
justice field by instilling within the student the
Semester 4 knowledge and skills required to understand,
CJS235: Multicultural Law Enforcement 3 appreciate, and function within the diverse
CJS205: Juveniles and the Legal Process 3 area of laws, ethics, and subjects that
CJS308: Criminology 3 comprise the criminal justice system. The
Free Elective 3 academic methodology will utilize a multi-
Free Elective 3 dimensional approach, thereby exposing the
Free Elective 3 student to local, state, and federal processes
Total 18 and institutions. The program will prepare
Proctored Final Examination the student for a wide array of entry-level
Total Credits 71 positions in criminal justice, as well as provide a
foundation for graduate studies.
Free Criminal Justice Electives Credits
Course Number Credits Prerequisites Students obtaining their BS degree in Criminal
CJS215: Terrorism 3 CJS120 Justice will have the academic and practical
CJS220: Organized Crime 3 CJS101 skill set needed to pursue a career in the
CJS225: White Collar Crime 3 CJS123, criminal justice field. The most common career
CJS238 paths include law enforcement, investigative,
CJS245: Security & 3 CJS135 and security positions, in both the public and
Loss Prevention private sectors, on local, state, and federal
CJS255: Computer-Based 3 CJS101 levels; administrative positions within the courts;
Crime and probation, parole, corrections, and forensic
CJS260: Crisis Intervention 3 CJS120 science careers. For tuition details, please visit
CJS265: Security Management 3 CJS135 the program page on the website at http://www.
CJS307: Victimology 3 CJS101, pennfoster.edu/programs-and-degrees/law-
CJS105, CJS238 enforcement/criminal-justice-bachelors-degree/
CJS350: Community tuition.
Corrections 3 CJS120
Program Goal
Penn Foster College reserves the right to change program To prepare students for professional
content and materials when it becomes necessary. opportunities in the criminal justice field and for
a wide array of entry-level positions in criminal
Residents of Minnesota will receive an Associate of Applied
Science Degree upon completion of this degree program.
justice, as well as to provide a foundation for
graduate studies.

Program Outcomes
Upon completion of the program, students will
be able to:
• Demonstrate effective written and
interpersonal communication skills
• Demonstrate a high level of inquiry, analytical,
and problem-solving skills
• Demonstrate effective quantitative skills
• Demonstrate computer and information literacy
• Demonstrate an understanding of the liberal
arts, natural sciences, and social sciences
• Apply the procedures used to obtain,
evaluate, and communicate information in a
legal environment

45
• Explain the typical levels of management and • Analyze the different types of evidence,
organizational components in the modern such as crime scene evidence, documentary
police organization and other major entities evidence, witness testimony, and scientific
of the criminal justice system and different evidence. Describe the admissibility
leadership styles and theories requirements for the various forms of evidence
• Discuss the legal system in the United States, as well as the attendant ethical and legal
including the origins and history of the law, issues presented
the development of common law, statutory
law, constitutional law and how this affects the Semester 1
criminal justice system Basic Skills 0
• Analyze the substantive and procedural CJS 100: Criminal Justice Orientation 1
operations of the criminal justice system ILS 103: Information Literacy 1
with focus on the prosecutorial, judicial, and CJS 101: Introduction to Criminal Justice 3
defense functions SSC 130: Essentials of Psychology 3
• Evaluate issues of justice, professionalism, and SSC 125: Introduction to Sociology 3
ethics within law enforcement and the courts CJS 123: Courts 3
• Examine the external and internal factors Total 14
that control the dynamics of law enforcement Proctored Final Examination
from the police, prosecution, and defense
perspectives as they apply to ethical, moral, Semester 2
and legal applications CSC 104: Computer Applications 3
• Discuss the origins and development of the ENG 100: English Composition 3
law of search and seizure on the federal CJS 105: Ethics in Criminal Justice 3
and state levels, the ethical and legal issues CJS 120: Police Studies 3
surrounding the exclusionary rule as it impacts SCI 140: Nutrition 3
the Fourth and Fifth Amendments, and the Total 15
workings of an adversarial system of justice Proctored Final Examination
• Evaluate the relationship between victims and
the criminal justice system and provide details Semester 3
of the interaction of victims with the police, PLS 202: Legal Research and Writing 4
prosecutors, court, and defense attorneys CJS 130: Police Management 3
• Discuss the principles of criminal responsibility HUM 102: Art Appreciation 3
and the requirement of culpable mental states, MAT 115: Intermediate Algebra 3
the various defenses used to negate or to CJS 238: Criminal Law 3
mitigate criminal liability, and the prevailing Total 16
theories and philosophies for criminal Proctored Final Examination
punishment including restitution, retribution,
and rehabilitation Semester 4
• Discuss and compare recognized biological, CJS 203: Criminal Procedures 3
psychological, and sociological theories ENG 200: Speech 3
about the causes of criminal behavior and the SSC 260: Adolescence and Adulthood 3
types of criminal behavior and methods for CJS 307: Victimology 3
predicting future crime. Science Elective (choose one) 3
• Analyze the various methods and theories of SCI 120: Introduction to Biology
policing, including reactive, proactive, problem- SCI 110: Earth Science
solving, community policing Total 15
• Analyze theories of corrections, rehabilitation, Proctored Final Examination
and punishment and how they affect
correctional management practices
• Describe the juvenile court process, including
the rights of juveniles, detention and its
alternatives, and how juveniles are processed
in adult criminal court

46
Semester 5
CJS 211: Correctional Institutions 3
CDA Credential Preparation
ENG 300: Advanced Composition 3 Undergraduate Certificate
CJS 205: Juveniles and the Legal Process 3 Students can take this certificate to improve
SSC 265: Introduction to Public Policy 3 their child development knowledge, whether
CJS 308: Criminology 3 to augment their knowledge for a current
Total 15 job, to advance their career, or to prepare
Proctored Final Examination for a new career in a child-care setting. This
Semester 6 includes after-school and day care programs,
CJS 350: Community Corrections 3 camps or preschool centers, and government
MAT 210: Business Statistics 3 agencies or institutions. In addition, starting
SSC 310: Sociology of Diversity 3 a child care business is one of the best
Elective (See Table) 3 opportunities in this economy.
HUM 104: Music Appreciation 3
Total 15 After enrolling, students will select a
Proctored Final Examination concentration, based on the student’s
preferred child care setting. This concentration
Semester 7 becomes the focus of their studies, guiding
BUS 340: Organizational Behavior 3 the development of items for the portfolio
CJS 400: Administration of Justice 3 submission, and the selection of a core elective.
CJS 415: Evidence 3 This program meets the CDA credential
Elective (See Table) 3 requirements for 120 hours of formal education
Elective (See Table) 3 related to professional child care, and for the
Total 15 development of the professional portfolio. For
Proctored Final Examination tuition details, please visit the program page
on the website at https://www.pennfoster.edu/
Semester 8 programs-and-degrees/counseling-and-human-
BUS 350: Supervision and Leadership 3 development/cda-undergraduate-certificate
MAT 415: Research and Statistics 3
Elective (See Table) 3
Elective (See Table) 3 Program Goal
CJS 450: S enior Capstone: Criminal Justice 4 This program helps students fulfill the 120
Total 16 hour educational component and compile
Proctored Final Examination the required portfolio of items necessary
Total Credits 121 to obtain the Child Development Associate
(CDA) Credential, the most widely recognized
Electives credential in Early Childhood Education.
(Course Number/Title/Prerequisites) The college-level course work and the CDA
CJS 220: Organized Crime CJS101 credential are key stepping stones on the path
CJS 225: White Collar Crime CJS123, CJS238 of career advancement in this field.
CJS 215: Terrorism CJS120, CJS308
CJS 210: Crime Scene Investigation
Program Outcomes
CJS 255: Computer-Based Crime CJS101
Upon completion of the program, students will
CJS 260: Crisis Intervention CJS120
be able to:
CJS 235: Multicultural Law Enforcement CJS120
• Create a portfolio of collection items to aid in
PLS 213: Family Law
preparing and applying for the CDA Credential
BUS 315: Legal Environment of Business
• Identify the requirements needed to
Penn Foster College reserves the right to change program establish and maintain a safe, healthy
content and materials when it becomes necessary. learning environment
• Comprehend methods that will support
and advance children’s physical and
intellectual competence

47
• Determine how to support children’s social instruction regarding the appropriate attitudes,
and emotional development and to provide environment, and specific content teaching
positive guidance strategies for language, literacy, mathematics,
• Recognize the guidelines needed science, and the arts. In addition to developing
to establish positive and productive skills to work with children, students will learn
relationships with families how to cooperate with parents and encourage
• Understand the components needed to their participation in the early education of
ensure a well-run, purposeful program their children.
responsive to participant needs
• Identify the requirements needed to maintain Graduates will have the necessary academic
a commitment to professionalism background for employment as teacher
assistants, associate teachers, or as teachers
Basic Skills 0 in a developmentally appropriate educational
ECE 100: Orientation to program that serves children from birth
Early Childhood Education 1 to preschool age. Since requirements for
ECE 130: Health, Safety, and Nutrition employment in this field vary by state, students
for the Young Child 3 should check with their applicable licensing
ECE 210: Child, Family and Community 3 body for specific requirements.
ECE 220: Child Growth and Development 3
Core Elective (choose one) 3 Field work is required in each semester and in
ECE 120: Infant and Toddler Care semester 4 students are expected to complete
ECE 223: W orking with Preschoolers a minimum of 300 hours in a licensed early
ECE 225: Family Child Care childhood center that has a developmentally
Total 13 appropriate program that includes infants,
toddlers, and preschoolers. For tuition details,
*Upon enrollment students will select one of three child care please visit the program page on the website
settings as a concentration for their studies. The setting also at http://www.pennfoster.edu/programs-and-
determines the final course they should take
degrees/education-and-child-care/early-
childhood-education-associate-degree/tuition.
Early Childhood Education
Associate of Science Program Goal
The program in Early Childhood Education To prepare graduates for employment, but
intends to provide those enrolled with a also provide the foundation for entry into
comprehensive study of the way young Bachelor of Science programs, and includes at
children (from birth through preschool age) least 30 semester credits in general education
develop and learn. Our students learn how subjects.
to guide this development and learning in Program Outcomes
children from diverse backgrounds and with Upon completion of the program, students will
various needs. Students receive the necessary be able to:
• Demonstrate the ability to apply knowledge
of child development and learning in an
early childhood setting
• Demonstrate an understanding of the
development and execution of family and
community relationships
• Apply best practices, observation, and
assessment to enhance learning and
h
Mat development
• Plan, evaluate, and design curriculum
appropriate for the education of young
children
• Demonstrate an understanding of the
importance of individuality and cultural
diversity to assist in creating a meaningful
curriculum

48
• Demonstrate a commitment to and an Semester 3
awareness of the need for life long professional ECE 013: ECE Site Selection 3 0
growth, learning, community involvement and ECE 223: Working with Preschoolers 3
advocacy in regards to current early childhood ECE 120: Infant andToddler Care 3
research, practices and issues Science Elective (choose one) 3
• Demonstrate an understanding and SCI 110: Earth Science
knowledge of foundational concepts in the SCI 120: Introduction to Biology
general education areas including science, HUM 106: Interpersonal Communication 1
mathematics, English composition, and the ECE 107: Play in the Lives of Young Children 3
social sciences ECE 203: Working with Children with
Special Needs 3
Semester 1 Total 16
Basic Skills 0 Proctored Final Examination
ECE 100: Orientation to
Early Childhood Education 1 Semester 4
ILS 103: Information Literacy 1 ECE 014: ECE Site Selection 4 0
CSC104: Computer Applications 3 ECE 212: Guidance in Early Childhood Education 3
SSC 130: Essentials of Psychology 3 MAT 106: Mathematics for Business and Finance 3
ECE 130: Health, Safety, and Nutrition ECE 210: Child, Family, and Community 3
for the Young Child 3 Early Childhood Education Elective (choose one) 3
ECE 011: ECE Site Selection 1 0 ECE 213: Art, Music, and Movement
ECE 111: Fundamentals of Early ECE 216: Language and Literacy
Childhood Education 3 Development in Young Children
Total 14 ECE 217: Developing Math and Science
Proctored Final Examination Skills in Young Children
ECE 160: Cultural Diversity in the
Semester 2 Early Childhood Program
ECE 012: ECE Site Selection 2 0 ECE 221: Administration of an
ECE 220: C hild Growth and Development 3 Early Childhood Education Center
ECE 215: Curriculum for Early ECE 225: Family Child Care
Childhood Education 3 ECE 240: Assessment in Early
ECE Elective (choose one) 3 Childhood Education
ECE 213: Art, Music, and Movement ECE 230: Field Experience 6
ECE 216: Language and Literacy Humanities Elective (choose one) 3
Development in Young Children HUM 102: Art Appreciation
ECE 217: Developing Math and Science HUM 104: Music Appreciation
Skills in Young Children Total 21
ECE 160: Cultural Diversity in the Proctored Final Examination
Early Childhood Program Total Credits 66
ECE 221: Administration of an Early
Penn Foster College reserves the right to change program
Childhood Education Center content and materials when it becomes necessary.
ECE 225: Family Child Care
ECE 240: Assessment in Early Residents of Minnesota will receive an Associate of Applied
Science Degree upon completion of this degree program.
Childhood Education
ENG 100: English Composition 3
CSC 104: Computer Applications 3
Total 15
Proctored Final Examination

49
Fashion Merchandising • Describe the operations of retail stores that
sell fashion merchandise
Associate of Science
The Fashion Merchandising associate degree Semester 1
program provides a thorough background Basic Skills 0
in the functional areas of retail management, ILS 103: Information Literacy 1
marketing, buying, fashion promotion, product CSC 104: Computer Applications 3
development, textiles, and merchandising Science Elective (choose one) 3
at the associate degree level. The program SCI 120: Introduction to Biology
prepares men and women for a fashion SCI 140: Nutrition
merchandising career. Typical areas in SCI 110: Earth Science
which a graduate will have the necessary SSC 130: Essentials of Psychology 3
academic background to enter the field are Arts & Humanities Elective (choose one) 3
merchandising, sales management, marketing, HUM 102: Art Appreciation
e-commerce, and retailing. Students in this HUM 104: Music Appreciation
program must pass the general education ENG 115: Introduction to Literature
prerequisite credits with a cumulative QPA of ENG 100: English Composition 3
1.6 in order to be admitted to the full program. Total 16
For tuition details, please visit the program
page on the website at http://www.pennfoster. Semester 2
edu/programs-and-degrees/apparel-and- FSH 101: Introduction to the Fashion Industry 3
textile/fashion-merchandising-associate- GRD 105: Color Theory 3
degree/tuition. FSH 110: History of Fashion 3
BUS 121: Economics 1 3
Program Goal
MAT 115: Intermediate Algebra 3
The Fashion Merchandising Associate’s
Total 15
Degree program prepares students for an
entry-level position in the field of fashion
Semester 3
merchandising and can also be used to
ACC 113: Basic Accounting 3
prepare for future studies.
FSH 120: Introduction to Textiles 3
Program Outcomes MKT 301: Marketing 3
Upon completion of the program, students will ENG 121: Business and Technical Writing 3
be able to: MKT 320: Consumer Behavior 3
• Demonstrate effective written and MAT 215: Merchandising Math 3
interpersonal communication skills Total 18
• Demonstrate a high level of inquiry,
analytical, and problem-solving skills Semester 4
• Demonstrate effective quantitative skills BUS 310: Merchandising Planning and Buying 3
• Demonstrate computer and information literacy INT 114: Internet Marketing and E-commerce 3
• Demonstrate an understanding of the liberal MKT 340: Retail Management 3
arts, natural sciences, and social sciences FSH 205: Fashion Promotion 3
• Discuss how the business of fashion works FSH 220: Product Development 3
from concept to the consumer Total 15
• Apply knowledge of fabrics, embellishments, Total Credits 64
colors, and style for each garment or
Penn Foster College reserves the right to change program
accessory to the fashion decision process content and materials when it becomes necessary.
• Describe the processes and factors involved in
fashion designing, production of textile materials, Residents of Minnesota will receive an Associate of Applied
Science Degree upon completion of this degree program.
and purchasing materials from suppliers
• Discuss the importance and methods of
marketing and promotion in the fashion industry
• Demonstrate understanding and the use
of company financial reports and reports
associated with planning, buying and selling
fashion merchandise

50
Finance Associate Semester 1
Basic Skills 0
of Science BUS 100: Business Orientation 1
The objective of the Finance Program is to ILS 103: Information Literacy 1
provide a basic knowledge of finance. In BUS 101: Introduction to Business 3
addition, instruction is provided in accounting HUM 102: Art Appreciation 3
procedures and basic business principles. The MAT 106: Mathematics for Business and Finance 3
student will not only have a basic knowledge ACC 111: Financial Accounting 3
of finance and business but will also develop Total 14
judgment and reasoning abilities. For tuition Proctored Final Examination
details, please visit the program page on
the website at http://www.pennfoster.edu/ Semester 2
programs-and-degrees/accounting-and- CSC 104: Computer Applications 3
finance/finance-associate-degree/tuition. ACC 112: Managerial Accounting 3
ENG 100: English Composition 3
Program Goal
BUS 110: Principles of Management 3
The Finance associate degree program will
Arts & Humanities Elective (choose one) 3
prepare the student to work as an entry-level
HUM 104: Music Appreciation
financial analyst, financial planner, or financial
ENG 115: Introduction to Literature
manager, and will also provide a foundation for
BUS 121: Economics 1 3
further education and training.
Total 18
Program Outcomes Proctored Final Examination
Upon completion of the program, students will
be able to: Semester 3
• Demonstrate effective written and ACC 201: Intermediate Accounting 1 3
interpersonal communication skills FIN 101: Financial Management 3
• Demonstrate a high level of inquiry, ENG 121: Business and Technical Writing 3
analytical, and problem-solving skills
MAT 115: Intermediate Algebra 3
• Demonstrate effective quantitative skills
FIN 210: Personal Financial Management 3
• Demonstrate computer and information literacy
• Demonstrate an understanding of the liberal Science Elective (choose one) 3
arts, natural sciences, and social sciences SCI 120: Introduction to Biology
• Demonstrate an understanding of the SCI 140: Nutrition
principles and processes involved in SCI 110: Earth Science
various functional areas and the need for Total 18
collaboration among the different functions Proctored Final Examination
• Complete the accounting cycle and create
and analyze financial statements to ensure Semester 4
that they are accurate and comply with MAT 210: Business Statistics 3
Generally Accepted Accounting Procedures FIN 305: Securities and Investments 3
• Explain the key issues of internal control of
BUS 213: Business Law 1 3
cash in balance and cash flow statements
Business Elective (choose one) 3
and external financial reporting
• Create, organize, & maintain financial records FIN 310: Corporate Finance
• Discuss and apply ethical and legal ACC 211: Computer Applications in
standards to the Business environment Accounting
• Demonstrate an understanding of economic & ENG 200: Speech 3
financial markets and the business economy Social Science Elective (choose one) 3
• Demonstrate how to assess financial data SSC 130: Essentials of Psychology
and make best-practices recommendations SSC 105: World Civilizations
to management SSC 125: Introduction to Sociology
• Use knowledge of the financial marketplace, Total 18
financial instruments, and the analysis Proctored Final Examination
of financial issues to achieve success in Total Credits 68
managing personal financial affairs
• Discuss the role capital markets play in world Penn Foster College reserves the right to change program
economies, and explain how capital markets content and materials when it becomes necessary.
are used to achieve financial goals

51
Health Care Management
Associate of Science
Upon completion of the program in Health
Care Management, students will be
prepared for positions in the medical records
departments of hospitals, ambulatory and
long-term care facilities, psychiatric facilities,
insurance companies, and state and federal
agencies. In these venues, students will
be prepared to analyze health data for
completeness, accuracy, and quality. They
will code health data and deal with medical
and legal issues regarding health records and
quality improvement. A practicum is required
in the fourth semester. Students are expected
to complete a minimum of 160 hours proctored • Identify how to supervise assistant
experience in varied health-care settings. administrators in facilities that are large
enough to need them
Penn Foster Health Care Management • Discuss the management of the facility’s
Practicum Participation Requirements: finances, such as patient fees and billing
1. All students are required to have a • Explain the creation of work schedules
cumulative average of 70% or higher in this • Recognize how to represent the facility at
program in order to participate in a Practicum. investor meetings or on governing boards
2. CPR and AED Certification • List the steps to keep and organize records
3. Medical insurance verification of the facility’s services
4. Policy paperwork: review and signature • Recognize appropriate and professional
required communication concerning members of the
Students will need access to high-speed medical staff and department heads
internet, a Microsoft® Windows® based
computer running Windows 7® or later, Semester 1
Microsoft® Office 365, and an email account to HIT 100: Introduction to Allied Health 1
complete their program with Penn Foster. ALH 105: Law, Ethics,
For tuition details, please visit the program and Confidentiality in Allied Health 3
page on the website at http://www.pennfoster. ILS 103: Information Literacy 1
edu/programs-and-degrees/medical-and- ENG 100: English Composition 3
health-careers/health-care-management- HIT 107: Medical Terminology 3
associate-degree/tuition. MAT 106: Mathematics for Business and Finance 3
CSC 104: Computer Applications 3
Program Goal Total 17
The Health Care Management Associate’s Proctored Final Examination
Degree program prepares students for an
entry-level career in health care management Semester 2
in which they’ll plan, direct, and coordinate HUM 106: Interpersonal Communication 1
medical and health services. ALH 225: Health Care Management 3
SCI 135: Anatomy and Physiology 1 3
Program Outcomes
SCI 136: Anatomy and Physiology 2 3
Upon completion of the program, students will
ACC 113: Basic Accounting 3
be able to:
General Education Elective (choose one) 3
• Recognize how to improve efficiency and
HUM 102: Art Appreciation
quality in delivering healthcare services
HUM 104: Music Appreciation
• Describe why it is important to keep up to
ENG 115: Introduction to Literature
date on new laws and regulations
Total 16
Proctored Final Examination

52
Semester 3 Program Outcomes
HRM 201: Human Rsources Management 3 Upon completion of the program, students will
HIT 201: Quality Management/Performance be able to:
Improvement 2 • Discuss features, founders, and benefits of
HIT 130: Electronic Medical Records 3 various management perspectives, skills
HIT 203: Medical Coding 3 required by managers, and the need for
HIT 115: Reimbursement Methodologies 3 an ethical business structure and a diverse
Total 14 business environment
Proctored Final Examination • Explain specific responsibilities of and skills
needed for human resource management
Semester 4 (HRM), types of illegal discrimination, and
BUS 350: Supervision and Leadership 3 techniques to conduct successful interviews
HIT 209: Department Management 2 and choose prospective employees
HIT 210: Healthcare Statistics 3 appropriately
SSC 130: Essentials of Psychology 3 • Discuss features and examples of various
ALH280: Practicum in Health compensation strategies, calculate appropriate
Care Management 4 pay increases, and analyze features of total
Total 15 compensation
Proctored Final Examination • Explain accepted theories regarding training
Total Credits 62 and the management of the training function
in organizations, and identify successful and
Penn Foster College reserves the right to change program unsuccessful training practices
content and materials when it becomes necessary.
• Describe the legally required social insurance
Residents of Minnesota will receive an Associate of Applied programs for employees in the United States,
Science Degree upon completion of this degree program.
the difference between group and individual
Human Resources insurance; the requirements for qualified
Undergraduate Certificate pension plans and evaluate benefit packages
to determine comprehensive plan coverage
This program is comprised of courses
designed to provide participants with • Explain the features of labor organizations,
comprehensive exposure to the skills the effects of labor unions on employees and
necessary for advancement in the human businesses, and how labor organizations fit into
resources job market. Students will learn the business structure of the United States
how to professionally hire, train, retain, and
manage the type of employee talent that will Basic Skills 0
help their businesses succeed. In addition BUS 100: Business Orientation 1
to a foundation in HR practice, students BUS 110: Principles of Management 3
also complete courses in compensation HRM 201: HR Management 3
management, training, benefits, and labor ENG 121: Business and Technical Writing 3
relations. All of the course credits earned with HRM 210: Compensation Management 3
this program are transferable to an Associate HRM 355: Training Concepts 3
of Science Degree in Human Resources HRM 320: Employee Benefits 3
Management. For tuition details, please visit HRM 350: Labor Relations 3
the program page on the website at Total 22
http://www.pennfoster.edu/programs-and- Proctored Final Examination
degrees/business-management/human-
resources-undergraduate-certificate/tuition.

Program Goal
To gain skills and knowledge related to human
resources to prepare for a job or continue
education at the undergraduate level.

53
Human Resources • Describe the basic components, development,
implementation, & maintenance of a total
Management compensation package
Associate of Science • Describe the legally required social insurance
The Human Resources Management Program programs for employees in the United States,
prepares students to perform administrative the difference between group and individual
duties related to human resources insurance, and the requirements for qualified
management, including pension plans
data entry, preparation of employee catalogs, • Discuss the interaction between organized
and research. Graduates will also be able to labor unions and company management
classify jobs, interview job applicants, assist pertaining to rights and responsibilities,
in the orientation, train new employees, and negotiations, and collective bargaining
administer employee benefits.For tuition • Explain accepted theories regarding training
details, please visit the program page and the management of the training function
on the website at http://www.pennfoster. in organizations, and identify successful and
edu/programs-and-degrees/business- unsuccessful training practices
management/human-resources-management-
associate-degree/tuition. Semester 1
BUS 100: Business Orientation 1
Program Goal ILS 103: Information Literacy 1
To prepare students for entry-level employment BUS 101: Introduction to Business 3
in human resources management and provide a BUS 110: Principles of Management 3
foundation for further training. HUM 102: Art Appreciation 3
HRM 201: Human Resources Management 3
Program Outcomes
MAT 106: Mathematics for Business and Finance 3
Upon completion of the program, students will
Total 17
be able to:
Proctored Final Examination
• Demonstrate effective written and
interpersonal communication skills
Semester 2
• Demonstrate a high level of inquiry, analytical,
CSC 104: Computer Applications 3
and problem-solving skills
ENG 100: English Composition 3
• Demonstrate effective quantitative skills
Arts & Humanities Elective (Choose one) 3
• Demonstrate computer & information literacy
ENG 115: Introduction to Literature
• Demonstrate an understanding of the liberal
HUM 104: Music Appreciation
arts, natural sciences, and social sciences
Science Elective (Choose one) 3
• Demonstrate an understanding of the
SCI 120: Introduction to Biology
principles and processes involved in the
SCI 140: Nutrition
functional areas and the need for collaboration
SCI 110: Earth Science
among the different functions
HRM 355: Training Concepts 3
• Discuss the management function and
Total 15
application to the business organization
Proctored Final Examination
• Understand the steps of the accounting cycle
and utilize financial document information as a
Semester 3
management tool to plan.
SSC 130: Essentials of Psychology 3
• Discuss and apply ethical and legal standards
ACC 111: Financial Accounting 3
to the Business environment.
HRM 210: Compensation Management 3
• Demonstrate an understanding of economics
ENG 121: Business and Technical Writing 3
and the business economy
HRM 320: Employee Benefits 3
• Discuss the fundamentals of human resources
BUS 121: Economics 1 3
as it relates to the business environment
Total 18
Proctored Final Examination

54
Semester 4 Program Outcomes
MAT 115: Intermediate Algebra 3 Upon completion of the program, students will
ENG 200: Speech 3 be able to:
MAT 210: Business Statistics 3 • Demonstrate effective written and
HRM 350: Labor Relations 3 interpersonal communication skills
BUS 315: Legal Environment of Business 3 • Demonstrate a high level of inquiry, analytical,
BUS 340: Organizational Behavior 3 and problem-solving skills
Total 18 • Demonstrate computer & information literacy
Proctored Final Examination • Demonstrate an understanding of the liberal
Total Credits 68 arts, natural sciences, and social sciences
• Identify architectural periods, styles, features
Penn Foster College reserves the right to change program
content and materials when it becomes necessary. and elements
• Demonstrate the use of line, light, texture and
Interior Design perspective through drawings and sketches
and creating a presentation board
Associate of Science • Discuss the fundamental principles of the
The Interior Design Program will teach students design process for residential & commercial
the drawing, design, and business skills used design
by Interior Designers. The program provides • Identify various textiles and explain how they
the entry-level education and training that can are used and produced
be applied toward state licensure as an Interior • Recognize furniture periods, styles,
Designer. construction, and how they are developed
• Demonstrate skills required to navigate the
Students will need access to high-speed computer-aided drafting (CAD) program to
internet, a Microsoft® Windows® based prepare 2-dimensional drawings
computer running Windows 7® or later, • Demonstrate the knowledge of various
Microsoft® Office 365, and an email account to systems such as air quality control, lighting, fire
complete their program with Penn Foster. For safety, acoustics, and conservation in all types
tuition details, please visit the program page of buildings
on the website at http://www.pennfoster.edu/ • Identify & specify products, properties & uses of
programs-and-degrees/home-and-garden/ non-structural materials. Address environmental
interior-design-associate-degree/tuition. concerns & locate manufacturers & distributers
Program Goal of design materials
The Interior Design Associate Degree program • Design lighting for specific spaces by
prepares students for an entry level position comprehending lighting options and
in the field of Interior Design. This program applications, create lighting plans, schedules
provides 45 credits towards meeting the and specifications
educational requirement for the National • Demonstrate the ability to market ideas, attract
Council for Interior Design Qualification clients, budget and manage client relations
(NCIDQ) licensing exam. Students must by creating a mission statement, business
also complete at least 5,280 hours of work card and a PowerPoint presentation of a
experience under the supervision of a licensed redesigned space
and/or NCIDQ-certified designer before • Create and coordinate functional and creative
becoming eligible to sit for the exam. residential and commercial interior spaces
that include site plans, bubble and blocking
diagrams, floor plans, elevations and materials
on a presentation board
• Discuss how to adhere to design codes and
regulations for interior spaces
• Understand how to establish a business
and focus on the details of proper business
practices
• Demonstrate understanding of design
requirements and processes by specializing in
a particular topic area in one of three electives
choices
55
Semester 1
Basic Skills 0
Manufacturing
ILS 103: Information Literacy 1 Associate of Science
CSC 104: Computer Applications 3 To prepare students for the opportunity to seek
GRD 105: Color Theory 3 employment or advance their careers in
BCT 101: History of Interior Design 3 the manufacturing and production industries,
BCT 105: Drawing for Interiors 3 specifically related to positions that require
HUM 102: Art Appreciation 3 college level training
Total 16
Program Goal
Proctored Final Examination
To prepare students for the opportunity to seek
employment or advance their careers in
Semester 2
the manufacturing and production industries,
ENG 100: English Composition 3
specifically related to positions that require
BCT 115: Interior Design Fundamentals 3
college level training
BCT 135: Textiles 3
BCT 140: History of Furniture 3 Program Outcomes
Science Elective (choose one) 3 Upon completion of the program, students will
SCI 110: Earth Science be able to:
SCI 120: Introduction to Biology • Identify various roles in manufacturing,
SCI 140: Nutrition conventional steps of the manufacturing
Total 15 process, and the similarities or differences of
Proctored Final Examination manufacturing techniques
• Demonstrate effective written and
Semester 3 interpersonal communication skills
BCT 145: CAD for Interiors 3 • Demonstrate effective quantitative skills
BCT 150: Building Systems • Demonstrate proficient computer and
for Interior Design 3 information literacy skills
BCT 165: Materials for Interiors 3 • Read and interpret various types of technical
BCT 235: Architectural Lighting Design 3 drawings, including those used in engineering
SSC 130: Essentials of Psychology 3 applications, to understand the basics of
BCT 205: Marketing and Sales in Interior Design 3 computer-aided design (CAD)
Total 18 • Demonstrate an understanding of the liberal
Proctored Final Examination arts, natural sciences, and social sciences
• Describe total quality management (TQM),
Semester 4 materials and inventory management,
BCT 201: Residential Design 3 inspection plans, measuring tools that collect
BCT 202: Commercial Design 1 3 quality data, and various statistical process
BCT 215: Codes for Interiors 3 control methods
BCT 225: Professional Practice 3 • List the steps and materials used in the tool
MAT 115: Intermediate Algebra 3 design process, including the design of work
Interior Design Elective (choose one) 3 holding devices, jigs, presses, dies, and gages
BCT 230: Kitchen and Bath Design • Recognize important safety facts and
BCT 248: Commercial Design 2 practices associated with electrical, chemical,
Total 18 fire, material handling, and machine hazards
Proctored Final Examination • Discover the symbols to describe a product
Total Credits 67 and ASME codes and standards used in
manufacturing
Penn Foster College reserves the right to change program
content and materials when it becomes necessary.
• Discover CNC systems and machines,
operating and programming machining, turning
Residents of Minnesota will receive an Associate of Applied centers, and alternate machining technology
Science Degree upon completion of this degree program. • Identify manufacturing systems and
processes, and recognize different materials
used in manufacturing and engineering
applications
• Define the basics of lean manufacturing and
the key lean and continuous improvement
56
(CI) fundamental principles in conjunction with
continuous-improvement methods and tools
Marketing
• Discover other technologies and topics in Associate of Science
manufacturing and manufacturing processes The Marketing Program provides instruction
• Discover valuable workplace skills and related to basic marketing skills. The
confidence building in striving for a successful, principles and applications of business
advancement focused career subjects are provided to the student at the
associate degree level. This program includes
Semester 1 information on retailing, advertising, business
SYP101 Starting Your Program law, finance, business management, and
BUS115 Introduction to Manufacturing 1 marketing research. A graduate will have
ENG101 Foundation Skills in Writing 3 the background for an entry-level position in
EST100 Introduction to Technical Drawings 3 marketing, pricing, advertising, sales, customer
MAT100 Foundation Skills in Math 3 or dealer relations, marketing management, or
SCI167 Physical Science 3 marketing research. For tuition details, please
CSC104 Computer Applications 3 visit the program page on the website at
Total 16 http://www.pennfoster.edu/programs-and-
degrees/marketing-and-public-relations/
Semester 2 marketing-associate-degree/tuition.
IET243 Industrial Safety 3
Program Goal
MET202 Drafting with AutoCAD 3
To provide students with the education they
EST110 Manufacturing Materials 3
need to join an established business in an
and Processes
entry-level capacity, or provide a foundation for
MAT115 Intermediate Algebra 3
further training
ENG121 Business and Technical Writing 3
Total 15 Program Outcomes
Upon completion of the program, students will
Semester 3 be able to:
EST210 AutoCAD Applications- 3 • Demonstrate effective written and
Engineering Technology interpersonal communication skills
IET248 CNC Technology 3 • Demonstrate a high level of inquiry,
MET221 Quality Control Systems 3 analytical, and problem-solving skills
MET243 Tool Design 3 • Demonstrate effective quantitative skills
Social Science Elective (Pick 1) 3 • Demonstrate computer & information literacy
SSC130 Essentials of Psychology • Demonstrate an understanding of the liberal
SSC105 World Civilizations arts, natural sciences, and social sciences
SSC125 Introduction to Sociology • Demonstrate an understanding of the
BUS121 Economics 1
Total 15

Semester 4
MET245 Geometric Dimensioning 3
and Tolerancing
IET135 Lean Manufacturing 1
Arts and Humanities Elective (Pick 1) 3
ENG115 Introduction to Literature
HUM102 Art Appreciation
HUM104 Music Appreciation
Technical Elective (Pick 1) 3
HRM350 Labor Relations
BUS220 Supply Chain Management
MKT301 Marketing
HUM108 Career Readiness 1
Total 14
Total Credits 61

57
principles and processes involved in Semester 3
the functional areas and the need for BUS 121: Economics 1 3
collaboration among the different functions ACC 112: Managerial Accounting 3
• Discuss the management function and MAT 115: Intermediate Algebra 3
application to the business organization ENG 121: Business and Technical Writing 3
• Understand the steps of the accounting cycle MKT 310: Advertising Principles 3
and utilize financial document information Science Elective (choose one) 3
as a management tool to plan and track the SCI 120: Introduction to Biology
financial status of a business SCI 140: Nutrition
• Discuss the factors affecting marketing SCI 110: Earth Science
and implementation plans to promote Total 18
the business’s products or services by Proctored Final Examination
understanding marketing principles, how
relevant marketing information is obtained, Semester 4
consumer buying habits, & retailing methods MAT 210: Business Statistics 3
• Discuss and apply ethical and legal standards BUS 213: Business Law 1 3
to the business environment MKT 320: Consumer Behavior 3
• Demonstrate an understanding of basic MAT 260: Marketing Research 3
economic theory ENG 200: Speech 3
• Discuss key advertising principles, including MKT 340: Retail Management 3
how advertising influences consumer buying Total 18
habits and techniques used to market Proctored Final Examination
products and services Total Credits 68
• Describe the steps of problem formation,
research design, data collection, sampling, Penn Foster College reserves the right to change program
content and materials when it becomes necessary.
analysis and interpretation of data, and report
preparation and delivery
Medical Assistant
Semester 1 Associate of Science
Basic Skills 0 The Medical Assistant Associate Degree
BUS 100: Business Orientation 1 Program will fll the needs of students who
ILS 103: Information Literacy 1 are seeking to become Medical Assistants.
BUS 101: Introduction to Business 3 Under the guidance of a physician/practitioner,
BUS 110: Principles of Management 3 medical assistants prep examination rooms,
HUM 102:  Art Appreciation 3 take vital signs, assist in minor surgical
MAT 106: Mathematics for Business and Finance 3 procedures, give injections, perform
Total 14 venipuncture, assist in laboratory operations,
Proctored Final Examination and administer electrocardiograms. Medical
Assistants also perform administrative
Semester 2 duties, including patient communications,
CSC 104: Computer Applications 3 maintaining patient records, billing, scheduling
ENG 100: English Composition 3 appointments, ordering supplies, and
ACC 111: Financial Accounting 3 processing insurance claims.
MKT 301: Marketing 3
Arts & Humanities Elective (choose one) 3 Students in this program must participate in weekly
HUM 104: Music Appreciation online classes and discussion board activity. In the
ENG 115: Introduction to Literature fourth semester, students will be required to take
Social Science Elective (choose one) 3 a Clinical Procedures Lab course. Each individual
SSC 130: Essentials of Psychology skill is documented with an accompanying form.
SSC 105: World Civilizations Students are required to record themselves
SSC 125: Introduction to Sociology performing the skill or perform the skill under the
Total 18
Proctored Final Examination

58
supervision of an approved proctor. A proctor Program Outcomes
is needed to validate the blood pressure, pulse, Upon completion of the program, students will
and other types of skills that cannot be verified be able to:
by videotape alone. Additionally, students will General Orientation
contribute a post to a weekly discussion board, Replace all program outcomes with:
as well as respond to their peers’ posts. Each •  Demonstrate a high-level of proficiency in
discussion board assignment gives the students analytical, quantitative, and problem-solving
the opportunity to perform critical thinking and skills
apply their knowledge to scenarios and real-life • Demonstrate computer and information
issues that medical assistants face today in the literacy
workplace. • Demonstrate effective written and
interpersonal communication skills using
Students will also be required to complete correct medical terminology
a medical externship in the fourth semester. • Discuss elements of the liberal arts and social
When students complete Clinical Procedures sciences as they relate to human behavior
Theory, Medical Surgical Procedure, and Clinical and expression
Procedures Lab, they will begin externing in a • Explain the role, responsibilities, scope of
health-care setting. Students will use knowledge practice, standards of care, and credentials of
and skills derived from the Medical Assistant medical assistants
Program to demonstrate competencies in the • Using correct terminology, differentiate
areas of clinical, administrative, and general among the structures and their functions
medical assisting. The externship will require within the six levels of structural organization
at least 160 hours of practice. Students are of the human body
encouraged to participate in the selection of • Explain the importance of diet and nutrition
externship sites. including the elements of a proper diet,
nutrition guidelines, and options for patients
Students will need access to high-speed that require special diets or diet modifications
internet, a Microsoft® Windows® based • Identify etiology, processes, symptoms, and
computer running Windows 7® or later, treatments for common diseases
Microsoft® Office 365, and an email account • Apply ethical standards and legal
to complete their program with Penn Foster. responsibilities, including those related to the
Student must also have the ability to install confidentiality of personal health information,
software, watch and listen to videos via to patient care
speakers or headset, and have the ability to • Perform clinical and laboratory procedures
connect to Universal Serial Bus (USB) devices applicable to the role of medical assistant in
on their computer. Students will need to have medical office and laboratory settings
access to a recording device. Students must • Perform administrative duties applicable to
have a clear understanding on how to operate the role of a medical assistant in medical
the recording devise and the ability to upload office and laboratory settings.
recorded files. For tuition details, please visit Anatomy and Physiology
the program page on the website at • Comprehend and explain to the patient the
http://www.pennfoster.edu/programs-and- importance of diet and nutrition. Effectively
degrees/medical-and-health-careers/medical- convey and educate patients regarding the
assistant-associate-degree/tuition. proper diet and nutrition guidelines. Identify
categories of patients that require special
diets or diet modifications
Program Goal
• Identify the body systems, their structure and
The Medical Assistant Associate’s Degree
functions, and common diseases, symptoms,
program will provide students with the
and etiologies
concepts and skills to gain employment in the
• Apply the knowledge of all body systems,
out-patient setting. Students will be prepared to
their structure and functions, and common
perform administrative and clinical duties under
diseases, symptoms, and etiologies
the direction of a physician, mid-level provider,
• Explain the disease processes and
or licensed nurse.
treatment modalities.

59
Medical Terminology Pharmacology
• Identify the basic structural parts of a word • Demonstrate accurate occupational math and
(i.e., root, prefix, suffix, combinations, spelling metric conversions for proper medication
and definitions) administration
• Build medical terms from roots/suffixes to • Properly utilize PDR, drug catalog, and
understand the word element combinations other drug references to identify a drug’s
that create medical terminology classification, usual dosage, usual side
• Understand the various medical terminology effects, and contraindications
for each specialty • Identify common abbreviations that are
• Identify acceptable medical abbreviations. accepted in prescription writing
Medical Law and Ethics • Identify legal aspects of writing prescriptions,
• Identify federal and state guidelines when including federal and state laws
documenting and releasing medical records • Comply with federal, state, and local health
or information laws and regulations.
• Follow established policies when initiating or Medical Office/Business Procedures/
terminating medical treatment Management
• Identify the importance of maintaining liability • Perform basic clerical functions
coverage once employed in the industry • Prepare medical records
• Explain risk management procedures • Schedule appointments
• Comply with federal, state, and local health • Apply concepts for office procedures
laws and regulations. • Locate resources and information for patients
Psychology of Human Relations and employers
• Define abnormal behavior patterns • Schedule inpatient and outpatient admissions
• Identify appropriate therapeutic • Post entries on a day sheet
communication skills when working/caring for • Perform billing and collection procedures
patients with special needs • Perform accounts payable procedures
• Identify common stages that terminally ill • Perform accounts receivable procedures
patients go through and list organizations/ • Post adjustments
support groups that can assist patients and • Process credit balances
family members of patients struggling with • Process refunds
terminal illness • Post non-sufficient funds
• Identify means of advocating on behalf of • Post collection agency payments
family/patients, having ability to deal and • Apply third-party guidelines
communicate with family • Obtain managed care referrals &
• Explain developmental stages of life precertifications
• Analyze the effect of hereditary, cultural, and • Perform diagnostic and procedural coding
environmental influences. • Prepare and submit insurance claims
Basic Keyboarding/Computer Concepts • Use physician fee schedule
• Perform basic keyboarding skills including: • Use manual or computerized bookkeeping
• Locating the keys on a keyboard systems
• Typing medical correspondence & basic • Maintain medical facility
reports • Perform routine maintenance of
• Demonstrate the proper use of office administrative and clinical equipment
machines, computerized systems, and • Maintain inventory equipment and supplies
medical software such as: • Recognize effective communication
• Efficiently maintain and understand techniques
different types of medical correspondence • Communicate on the recipient’s level of
and medical reports comprehension
• Apply computer application skills using a • Serve as a liaison between physician &
variety of different electronic programs others
including both practice management • Use proper telephone techniques
software and EMR software. • Interview effectively

60
• Use pertinent medical terminology • Chemistry testing
• Receive, organize, prioritize, and transmit • Immunology testing
information expediently • Microbiology testing
• Recognize and respond to verbal and • Kit testing
nonverbal communication • Pregnancy
• Perform fundamental writing skills including • Quick strep
correct grammar, spelling, and formatting • Dip sticks
techniques when writing prescriptions, • Dispose of biohazardous materials
documenting medical records, etc. • Collect, label, and process specimens
• Adapt to individualized needs • Perform venipuncture
• Apply electronic technology. • Perform capillary puncture
Medical Office Clinical Procedures • Perform wound collection procedures
• Obtain chief complaint, recording patient history • Obtain throat specimens for microbiological
• Apply principles of aseptic techniques and testing
infection control • Instruct patients in the collection of a clean-
• Take vital signs catch mid-stream urine specimen
• Recognize various treatment protocols • Instruct patients in the collection of a fecal
• Recognize emergencies and treatments and specimen.
minor office surgical procedures Career Development
• Screen and follow up patient test results • Perform the essential requirements for
• Maintain medication and immunization records employment such as resume writing, effective
• Wrap items for autoclaving interviewing, dressing professionally, and
• Use standard precautions following up appropriately
• Prepare oral and parenteral medications as • Demonstrate professionalism by:
directed by physician • Exhibiting dependability, punctuality, and
• Administer oral and parenteral medications as a positive work ethic
directed by physician • Exhibiting a positive attitude and a sense
• Prepare examination room and treatment area of responsibility
• Prepare patient for examinations & treatments • Maintaining confidentiality at all times
• Assist physician with routine and specialty • Being cognizant of ethical boundaries
examinations and treatments • Exhibiting initiative
• Assist physician with minor office surgical • Adapting to change
procedures • Expressing a responsible attitude
• Perform: • Being courteous and diplomatic
• Electrocardiograms • Conducting work within scope of
• Respiratory testing education, training, and ability.
• Telephone and in-person screening
• Sterilization techniques Semester 1 Credits
• First aid and CPR HIT 100: Introduction to Allied Health 1
• Advise patients of office policies and 45 Lecture hours
procedures ILS 103: Information Literacy 1
• Instruct patients with special needs 45 Lecture hours
• Teach patients methods of health CSC 104: Computer Applications 3
promotion and disease prevention. 135 Lecture hours
Medical Laboratory Procedures ENG 100: English Composition 3
• Practice quality control 135 Lecture hours
• Perform selected CLIA-waived tests that ALH 105: Law, Ethics, and Confidentiality 3
assist with diagnosis and treatment in Allied Health
• Urinalysis 135 Lecture hours
• Hematology testing HIT 107: Medical Terminology 3
135 Lecture hours
Total 14
Proctored Final Examination

61
Semester 2
SCI 140: Nutrition 3
Paralegal Studies
135 Lecture hours Associate of Science
SCI 135: Anatomy and Physiology 1 3 In the Paralegal Studies Program, the goal is to
135 Lecture hours provide students with instruction in the subjects
SCI 136: Anatomy and Psychology 2 3 that would be most helpful to them as members
135 Lecture hours of a legal team. Beyond that, the program also
Arts and Humanities Elective (choose one) 3 provides for general education in areas related
HUM 102: Art Appreciation to contemporary culture and issues relevant
135 Lecture hours to the business community. Students receive
HUM 104: Music Appreciation training in office technology, communication,
135 Lecture hours legal writing and research, and legal specialties.
ENG 115: Introduction to Literature Graduates will have the necessary academic
135 Lecture hours background to sit for the National Association of
ENG 121: Business and Technical Writing 3 Legal Assistants certification examination, and
135 Lecture hours to obtain an entry-level position as a paralegal
HUM 106: Interpersonal Communication 1 with a law firm, corporate legal department, or
45 Lecture hours government office. For tuition details, please
Total 16 visit the program page on the website at
Proctored Final Examination http://www.pennfoster.edu/programs-and-
degrees/legal-services/paralegal-studies-
Semester 3 associate-degree/tuition.
HIT 115: Reimbursement Methodologies 3
Program Goal
135 Lecture hours
To prepare students for entry-level positions
HIT 203: Medical Coding 3
as paralegals or legal assistants or to provide a
135 Lecture hours
foundation for further training.
HIT 130: Electronic Medical Records 3
135 Lecture hours Program Outcomes
SCI 130: Essentials of Psychology 3 Upon completion of the program, students will
135 Lecture hours be able to:
MAT 115: Intermediate Algebra 3 • Demonstrate effective written and
45 Lab hours interpersonal communication skills
Total 15 • Demonstrate a high level of inquiry,
Proctored Final Examination analytical, and problem-solving skills
• Demonstrate effective quantitative skills
Semester 4 • Demonstrate computer & information literacy
ALH 201: Pharmacology 3 • Demonstrate an understanding of the liberal
135 Lecture hours arts, natural sciences, and social sciences
ALH 210: Clinical Procedures Theory 3
135 Lecture hours
MAS 215: Medical Surgical Procedures 3
135 Lecture hours
MAS 205: Clinical Procedures Lab 3
135 Lecture hours
MAS 225: Extrenship 3
160 Externship hours
Total 15
Proctored Final Examination
Total Credits 60

Length: 2,995 clock hours/208 weeks


65 Semester credit hours is equivalent to 2995 clock hours.

Residents of Minnesota will receive an Associate of Applied


Science Degree upon completion of this degree program.

62
• Discuss the legal system in the United States, Semester 1
including the origins and history of the PLS 101: Introduction to Paralegal Studies 1
law and the development of common law, ILS 103: Information Literacy 1
statutory law, and constitutional law PLS 105: Legal Terminology 2
• Understand when communications with PLS 110: Ethics 2
clients and others are privileged and how to CSC 104: Computer Applications 3
avoid conflicts of interest ENG 100: English Composition 3
• Recognize and use legal terminology CJS 123: Courts 3
appropriately PLS 114: Investigations and Interviews 2
• Recognize ethical violations and understand Total 17
ethical rules that regulate conduct of lawyers Proctored Final Examination
and paralegals
• Identify the paralegal’s role in the interview Semester 2
process and discuss proper investigation MAT 106: Mathematics for Business and Finance 3
techniques, including interviewing clients PLS 121: Torts 3
and witnesses and understanding types of ENG 121: Business and Technical Writing 3
testamentary evidence BUS 121: Economics 1 3
• Discuss torts and defenses to tort actions Science Elective (Choose one) 3
and understand negligence, liability, and SCI 110: Earth Science
workers’ compensation SCI 120: Introduction to Biology
• Describe different forms of business SCI 140: Nutrition
organization, the elements of contracts and HUM 102: Art Appreciation 3
rules pertaining to contracts, ownership of Total 18
property, creditors and bankruptcy, and the Proctored Final Examination
law of agency
• Write an effective legal memorandum; state Semester 3
and characterize facts and legal arguments PLS 202: Legal Research and Writing 4
to best advance a legal position Social Science Elective (Choose one) 3
• Research primary and secondary sources to SSC 105: World Civilizations
determine relevant case law, find statutes SSC 125: Introduction to Sociology
and other information from appropriate SSC 130: Essentials of Psychology
sources using Lexis.com and other Internet PLS 205: Civil Litigation 3
sources, and correctly cite sources Arts & Humanities Elective (Choose one) 3
• Understand jurisdiction, venue, and evidence ENG 115: Introduction to Literature
law; describe some important hearsay HUM 104: Music Appreciation
exceptions MAT 115: Intermediate Algebra 3
• Understand how to prepare, file, and serve Total 16
complaints and motions Proctored Final Examination
• Explain criminal law and procedure, the
elements of crimes, criminal defense, and the Semester 4
role of the Constitution PLS 211: Criminal Litigation 3
• Discuss the fundamental principles of law BUS 315: Legal Environment of Business 3
dealing with marriage, divorce, and parenthood PLS 213: Family Law 3
• Understand the paralegal’s role in real PLS 215: Real Estate Law 3
estate transactions, including contracts, PLS 217: Wills, Trusts and Estate Administration 3
title abstraction, deeds, mortgages, closing ENG 200: Speech 3
documents, and leases; prepare preliminary Total 18
drafts of commonly used documents Total Credits 69
• Discuss the responsibilities of practicing Penn Foster College reserves the right to change program
paralegals in the field of wills, trusts, and content and materials when it becomes necessary.
estate administration, including preparing
Residents of Minnesota will receive an Associate of Applied
preliminary drafts of wills and trusts Science Degree upon completion of this degree program.

63
Retail Management Semester 1
Basic Skills 0
Associate of Science BUS 100: Business Orientation 1
The Retail Management Program provides a ILS 103: Information Literacy 1
thorough background in the functional areas BUS 101: Introduction to Business 3
of retail management, finance/accounting, BUS 110: Principles of Management 3
marketing, buying, and merchandising at the MAT 106: Mathematics for Business and Finance 3
associate degree level. The program prepares HUM 102:  Art Appreciation 3
men and women for a retail management Total 14
career. Typical areas in which a graduate will
have the necessary academic background Semester 2
to enter the field are merchandising, sales MKT 301: Marketing 3
management, store management, marketing, CSC 104: Computer Applications 3
e-commerce, and supply chain management. ENG 100: English Composition 3
For tuition details, please visit the program SSC 130: Essentials of Psychology 3
page on the website at http://www.pennfoster. BUS 121: Economics 1 3
edu/programs-and-degrees/apparel-and-textile/ INT 114: Internet Marketing and E-Commerce 3
retail-management-associate-degree/tuition. Total 18
Program Goal
The Retail Management Associate’s Degree Semester 3
program prepares students for an entry-level MAT 115: Intermediate Algebra 3
position in the field of retail management. ENG 121: Business and Technical Writing 3
ACC 111: Financial Accounting 3
Program Outcomes MKT 320: Consumer Behavior 3
Upon completion of the program, students will MAT 210: Business Statistics 3
be able to: General Education Elective (choose one) 3
• Demonstrate effective written and HUM 104: Music Appreciation
interpersonal communication skills ENG 115: Introduction to Literature
• Demonstrate a high level of inquiry, Total 18
analytical, and problem-solving skills
• Demonstrate effective quantitative skills Semester 4
• Demonstrate computer & information literacy MKT 340: Retail Management 3
• Demonstrate an understanding of the liberal BUS 310: Merchandising Planning and Buying 3
arts, natural sciences, and social sciences ENG 200: Speech 3
• Discuss topics such as budgets and develop MKT 260: Marketing Research 3
an understanding of financial statements General Education Elective (choose one) 3
• Understand and apply how to develop SCI 120: Introduction to Biology
pricing strategies for products or services SCI 140: Nutrition
marketed to the target customers of a firm SCI 110: Earth Science
• Discuss the management function and BUS 220: Supply Chain Management 3
application to the business organization and Total 18
develop problem solving skills needed for Total Credits 68
management
• Apply the factors affecting marketing plans to
promote the business’s products or services
through an understanding of marketing
principles, consumer buying habits, and
advertising strategies
• Demonstrate an understanding of the
principles and processes involved in
the functional areas and the need for
collaboration among the different functions
• Demonstrate an understanding of
macroeconomics as well as the modern
market economy

64
Associate of Science This program meets the prerequisite general-
education component of all Penn Foster A.S.
Degree Programs programs in technology. For tuition details,
please visit the program page on the website
Technology Department
at http://www.pennfoster.edu/programs-and-
The Technology Department of
degrees/general-studies/foundation-skills-for-
Penn Foster College offers men and women
technology-undergraduate-certificate/tuition.
a variety of career choices: Engineering
Technology, Construction Technology, Program Goal
Industrial Electronics and Electrical To provide foundational knowledge and
Maintenance Technology, PC Maintenance courses that meet the general education
Technology, Graphic Design, and Computer requirements of Penn Foster’s technology
Information Systems. These degree programs degree programs.
provide the student with the full technical
background needed to qualify for careers with Program Outcomes
today’s complex technological equipment. Upon completion of the program, students will
be able to:
Resident Laboratory • Identify work habits and characteristics
Students in the Engineering Technology, demonstrated by successful technicians,
Industrial Electronics and Electrical including the codes and standards that
Maintenance Technology, and Construction technicians must know
Technology Programs will be required to • Demonstrate effective quantitative skills by
complete a three-credit resident laboratory solving math problems using knowledge of
course in the fourth semester. Pennsylvania the metric system, mathematical formulas,
State University in Harrisburg offers a algebra, geometry, and trigonometry
course annually in the spring that meets the • Demonstrate effective written and
requirements for this lab. All registrations are interpersonal communication skills
handled by Penn State University. Students • Demonstrate proficient computer and
who want to register for this course will information literacy skills and understand how
be notified regarding arrangements at the to use the internet, library resources, and
appropriate time. Students may also receive search engines, as well as word processing
transfer credit for this course from another and spreadsheet software
institution, providing the coursework matches • Explain the process for reading technical
the criteria set by Penn Foster College. and construction drawings, blueprints, and
Students may qualify to receive credit for computer-aided designs
this lab by submitting a life/work experience • Discuss the principles that define and
portfolio showing that the student has acquired govern the physical universe in the areas
similar skills to those emphasized in the of chemistry, physics, as well as earth and
laboratory training. space sciences

Foundation Skills for


Basic Skills 0
Technology Undergraduate MET 100: Orientation to
Certificate Program Engineering Technology 1
This program provides students with a focused MAT 100: Foundation Skills in Math 3
collection of courses designed to promote ENG 101: Foundation Skills in Writing 3
success in future college-level studies in CSC 104: Computer Applications 3
technology-related fields. This program EST 100: Introduction to
contains courses in math, writing/basic English, Technical Drawings 3
science, computer technology, and visual SCI 167: Physical Science 3
communications. This variety of subjects will Total 16
create a solid academic foundation for students
planning to earn an A.S. degree in engineering
or other technology-based curriculum.

65
Engineering Technology • Identify the basic terminology, theories,
and applications relating to electricity and
Associate of Science electronics, including the components and
The Engineering Technology Associate operation of electrical and electronic systems
Degree Program enables students to prepare • Identify various types of electric motors and
and qualify for positions as an Engineering describe how they are controlled; list the
Technician in areas such as manufacturing steps to use when troubleshooting electric
plants, laboratories, construction companies, motors and controllers
government agencies, engineering firms, and • Explain the methods, laws, and procedures
building contractors. For tuition details, please used in engineering mechanics, including the
visit the program page on the website at branches of statics, dynamics, kinematics,
http://www.pennfoster.edu/programs-and- and kinetics
degrees/engineering-and-drafting/engineering- • Identify manufacturing systems and processes,
technology-associate-degree/tuition. and recognize different materials used in
manufacturing and engineering applications
Program Goal
• Describe total quality management (TQM),
The overall program goal for the A.S. in
materials and inventory management,
Engineering Technology Degree is to
inspection plans, measuring tools that collect
prepare students for entry-level positions as
quality data, and various statistical process
engineering technicians.
control methods
Program Outcomes • List the steps and materials used in the
Upon completion of the program, students will tool design process, including the design
be able to: of workholding devices, jigs, presses, dies,
• Demonstrate effective written and and gages
interpersonal communication skills • Understand the basic concepts of pneumatic
• Demonstrate a high level of inquiry, systems and how they compare and contrast
analytical, and problem-solving skills with hydraulic systems; identify the concepts
• Demonstrate effective quantitative skills related to the delivery of compressed air
• Demonstrate proficient computer & • Recognize important safety facts and
information literacy skills practices associated with electrical, chemical,
• Demonstrate an understanding of the liberal fire, material-handling, and machine hazards
arts, natural sciences, and social sciences • Understand the fundamentals of designing
• Recognize the work habits and machine elements, including developing
characteristics that are demonstrated by an awareness of procedures and materials,
successful technicians, including the codes identifying how forces and stresses affect
and standards that technicians must know materials, and recognizing machine components
• Read and interpret various types of • Demonstrate common technical skills
technical drawings, including those used in employed by engineers, such as the use
engineering applications, and understand the of manufacturing processing equipment,
basics of computer-aided design (CAD) measuring devices and quality control
• Develop engineering graphics, utilizing equipment, and skills in the testing of materials
orthographic projections, dimensioning,
sectioning, tolerance, and threads

66
Semester 1
Basic Skills 0
Computer Information
MET 100: Orientation to Engineering Technology 1 Systems Associate of Science
MAT 100: Foundation Skills in Math 3 The Computer Information Systems program
ENG 101: Foundation Skills in Writing 3 will prepare students to obtain careers as
CSC 104: Computer Applications 3 entry-level application computer programmers,
EST 100: Introduction to systems analysts, database administrators,
Technical Drawings 3 and support specialists. Students will learn to
SCI 167: Physical Science 3 use word processing, spreadsheet, database,
Total 16 and presentation software, HTML coding,
Proctored Final Examination programming in Java,™ systems analysis and
Semester 2 design, programming with Visual Basic,® Internet
EST 110: Manufacturing Materials and Processes 3 server environments, Internet networking, and
MAT 115: Intermediate Algebra 3 database technology. Students will need access
MET 202: Drafting with AutoCAD® 3 to high-speed internet, a Microsoft® Windows®
ENG 100: English Composition 3 based computer running Windows 7® or later,
EET 115: Electrical-Electronics Theory 3 Microsoft® Office 365, and an email account to
Total 15 complete their program with Penn Foster. For
Proctored Final Examination tuition details, please visit the program page
on the website at http://www.pennfoster.edu/
Semester 3 programs-and-degrees/computer-programming-
MET 170: Engineering Mechanics 3 and-support/computer-information-systems-
MET 221: Quality Control Systems 3 associate-degree/tuition.
MAT 222: Precalculus 3
Program Goal
Arts & Humanities Elective (choose two) 6
The Computer Information Systems Associates
ENG 115: Introduction to Literature
Degree program prepares students for an
HUM 102: Art Appreciation
entry-level position in the field of computer and
HUM 104: Music Appreciation
information technology.
Total 15
Proctored Final Examination Program Outcomes
Upon completion of the program, students will
Semester 4 be able to:
EST 210: AutoCAD® Applications – • Demonstrate the ability to create programs
Engineering Technology 3 following basic problem solving principles
Technical Electives (choose two) 6 and guidelines common to all programming
EST 200: Fluid Power languages
IET 232: Programmable Logic Controllers • Demonstrate the ability to create and
IET 237: Materials Management and integrate documents using word processing,
Inventory Control spreadsheet, and presentation software
IET 243: Industrial Safety applications
MET 231: Mechanical Design 1
MET 232: Mechanical Design 2
MET 240: Electro/Mechanical Control
Technology
MET 243: Tool Design
MET 248: Industrial Plastics
Social Science Elective (choose two) 6
BUS 121: Economics 1
SSC 125: Introduction to Sociology
SSC 130: Essentials of Psychology
MET 300: Precision Machining 3
Total 18
Proctored Final Examination
Total Credits 64

Penn Foster College reserves the right to change program


content and materials when it becomes necessary.
67
• Demonstrate an understanding of Semester 4
communication systems used by computers INT 215: Programming in Java™ 3
to form networks and identify different CIS 245: Structured Systems Analysis and Design 3
networking implementation strategies and Core Elective (choose two) 6
technologies available CSC 275: Computer Forensics
• Demonstrate the ability to create and INT 114: Internet Marketing and E-Commerce
maintaining a database and how the INT 125: Internet Server Environment
collected data can be deployed INT 130: Internet Security
• Demonstrate an understanding of the INT 201: Website Project Management
system development cycle and the role of INT 205: Introduction to Internet Multimedia
the systems analyst in developing business INT 210: Creating Web Pages with PHP
applications INT 220: Programming in CGI/Perl
• Demonstrate a high level of inquiry, analytical INT 238: Multimedia and Interactive
and problem-solving skills INT 242: Advanced Database Technology
• Demonstrate effective written and Arts & Humanities Elective (choose two) 6
interpersonal communication skills ENG 115: Introduction to Literature
• Demonstrate a high level of inquiry, HUM 102: Art Appreciation
analytical, and problem-solving skills HUM 104: Music Appreciation
• Demonstrate effective quantitative skills Total 18
• Demonstrate computer and information Total Credits 65
literacy
• Demonstrate an understanding of the liberal
arts, natural sciences, and social sciences
Construction Technology
Associate of Science
Semester 1 The Construction Technology Program
Basic Skills 0 enables students to prepare and qualify for
INT 101: Computer Technology Orientation 1 more advanced positions in residential and
ILS 103: Information Literacy 1 light commercial construction, applying the
MAT 115: Intermediate Algebra 3 learned principles of building technologies.
CSC 104: Computer Applications 3 The program provides a breadth of theory
CSC 105: Introduction to Programming 3 and knowledge in core subjects, electives,
Social Science Elective (choose two) 6 and general-education studies that provide
SSC 105: World Civilizations the technical and managerial expertise that
SSC 125: Introduction to Sociology will allow for future advancement. For tuition
SSC 130: Essentials of Psychology details, please visit the program page on
Total 17 the website at http://www.pennfoster.edu/
programs-and-degrees/engineering-and-
Semester 2 drafting/construction-technology-associate-
CSC 221: Advanced PC Applications 3 degree/tuition.
INT 120: HTML Coding 3
Program Goal
ENG 100: English Composition 3
The overall program goal for the A.S. in
INT 128: Network Protocols and Internetworking 3
Construction Technology Degree is to prepare
MAT 222: Precalculus 3
students to enter positions in residential and
Total 15
light commercial construction, applying the
learned technical and managerial expertise that
Semester 3
will allow for future advancement.
ENG 121: Business and Technical Writing 3
CSC 218: Visual Basic 3
INT 225: Introduction to Database Technology 3
Science Elective (choose two) 6
SCI 110: Earth Science
SCI 120: Introduction to Biology
SCI 140: Nutrition
Total 15

68
Program Outcomes Semester 3
Upon completion of the program, students will MAT 222: Precalculus 3
be able to: BCT 210: Statics/Strengths of
• Demonstrate effective written and Construction Materials 3
interpersonal communication skills BCT 249: Basic Surveying and Measurement 3
• Demonstrate a high level of inquiry, Social Science Elective (choose two) 6
analytical, and problem-solving skills SSC 105: World Civilizations
• Demonstrate effective quantitative skills SSC 125: Introduction to Sociology
• Demonstrate proficient computer & SSC 130: Essentials of Psychology
information literacy skills EST 215: AutoCAD Applications —
• Demonstrate an understanding of the liberal Construction 3
arts, natural sciences, and social sciences Total 18
• Recognize appropriate techniques for Proctored Final Examination
administering and evaluating construction
contracts, documents, and codes Semester 4
• Estimate costs and quantities, and Technical Elective (choose two) 6
determine how to evaluate materials for BCT 160: Architectural Drawing
construction projects BCT 220: Building Systems
• Demonstrate the methods of surveying BCT 250: Codes and Specifications
measurements and perform calculations BCT 280: Architectural Design
to determine the strength of various BCT 260: Construction Estimating
construction materials BCT 275: Construction Planning and Control
• Develop and interpret various types BCT 255: Green Building Practices
of engineering drawings used in the Arts & Humanities Elective (choose two) 6
construction field, including computer-aided ENG 115: Introduction to Literature
design (CAD) HUM 102: Art Appreciation
• Describe types of materials and management HUM 104: Music Appreciation
and building practices used in the BCT 300: Drafting and Engineering Mechanics 3
construction industry Total 15
• Interpret and identify nationally accepted code Proctored Final Examination
requirements and industry standards necessary Total Credits 64
for application of construction materials
Graphic Design
Semester 1
Basic Skills 0 Undergraduate Certificate
MET 100: Orientation to Engineering Technology 1 This program will teach students the essential
MAT 100: Foundation Skills in Math 3 knowledge and skills needed to use commercial
ENG 101: Foundation Skills in Writing 3 software packages for graphic design in print
CSC 104: Computer Applications 3 and web-based applications. Students will learn
EST 100: Introduction to Technical Drawings 3 the basics of graphic design theory and how
SCI 167: Physical Science 3 to apply that theory using industry accepted
Total 16 software packages. The program also includes
Proctored Final Examination complimentary courses in typography and
corporate and personal portfolio development.
Semester 2 All of the course credits earned with this
BCT 110: Introduction to Construction Technology 3 program are transferable to the Associate of
MET 202: Drafting with AutoCAD® 3 Science Degree in Graphic Design.
ENG 121: Business and Technical Writing 3 For tuition details, please visit the program
MAT 115: Intermediate Algebra 3 page on the website at http://www.pennfoster.
BCT 125: Construction Materials and Methods 3 edu/programs-and-degrees/web-and-graphic-
Total 15 design/graphic-design-undergraduate-
Proctored Final Examination certificate/tuition.

69
Program Goal Graphic Design
The Graphic Design undergraduate certificate
program prepares students to use Adobe® Associate of Science
software for graphic design and production in Graphic Design will prepare students for careers
a current career or to continue their graphic in the graphics industry as designers, commercial
design education. artists, and computer graphic designers. Such
positions combine the skills of graphic art,
Program Outcomes graphic design, Web graphic arts design, and
Upon completion of the program, students will desktop publishing. Students will receive the
be able to: training and the portfolio necessary to interview
• Identify different career options available to for entry-level positions in advertising agencies,
digital artists design studios, publishing houses, and corporate
• Understand the correct use of color and its communications departments. For tuition details,
effectiveness in creating designs please visit the program page on the website at
• Describe the formal elements of design, http://www.pennfoster.edu/programs-and-
including line, shape, form, direction, texture, degrees/web-and-graphic-design/graphic-design-
value, color, and composition associate-degree/tuition.
• Use Adobe Illustrator® to create graphics
illustrations for print, multimedia and the web Program Goal
• Use Adobe Photoshop® to create high quality The Graphic Design Degree program prepares
photos, graphics for product illustrations, students for an entry-level position in the
logos, animations, and websites design industry.
• Use Adobe Illustrator® or Adobe Photoshop® Program Outcomes
to enhance words, phrases or quotations, to Upon completion of the program, students will
communicate effectively with the audience, be able to:
and use both traditional and contemporary • Identify different career options available to
typographic skill digital artists
• Use Adobe InDesign® to design an image, • Understand the correct use of color and its
brochure, magazine or web page to reach effectiveness in creating designs
target audiences with printed publications • Describe the formal elements of design,
that can be repurposed into interactive digital including line, shape, form, direction, texture,
documents for delivery on the Web and on value, color, and composition
mobile and tablet devices • Use Adobe Illustrator® to create graphics
• Use brand information to design a package illustrations for print, multimedia and the web
that’s appropriate for the target audiences • Use Adobe Photoshop® to create High
• Discuss general manufacturing and printing quality photos, graphics for product
processes related to packaging design illustrations, logos, animations, and websites
• Create a digital portfolio to use on an • Use Adobe Illustrator® or Adobe Photoshop®
interview for an entry level position to enhance words, phrases or quotations, to
communicate effectively with
Basic Skills 0 the audience, and use both traditional and
GRD 101: Graphic Design Orientation 1 contemporary typographic skill
GRD 105: Color Theory 3 • Use Adobe InDesign® to design an image,
GRD 110: Introduction to Graphic Design 3 brochure, magazine or web page to reach
GRD 115: Graphic Design and Production target audiences with printed publications
(Illustrator®) 3 that can be repurposed into interactive digital
GRD 130: Photo Image Editing 1 3 documents for delivery on the Web and on
GRD 135: Photo Image Editing 2 3 mobile and tablet devices
GRD 201: Typography 3 • Use brand information to design a package
GRD 205: Electronic Publishing 3 that’s appropriate for the target audiences
GRD 212: Corporate Design 3 • Discuss general manufacturing and printing
GRD 220: Web Design 3 processes related to packaging design
GRD 225: Portfolio Development 3 • Use Adobe Dreamweaver® to design and
Total 31 launch a web page using HTML and XHTML
Proctored Final Examination

70
• Design user friendly and visually appealing Semester 4
web pages that include multimedia features GRD 220: Web Design 3
such as animation Science Elective (choose one) 3
• Use Adobe Flash® to create animations and SCI 110: Earth Science
allow for user interaction, then integrate the SCI 120: Introduction to Biology
animation and interactions into web pages SCI 140: Nutrition
created with Dreamweaver INT 120: HTML Coding 3
• Use Adobe Fireworks® to create graphs, then INT 238: Multimedia and Interactive 3
integrate the graphs into web pages created GRD 222: Dreamweaver 3
with Dreamweaver GRD 225: Portfolio Development 3
• Use Adobe Dreamweaver® to design and Total 18
launch a web page that includes multimedia Proctored Final Examination
features such as animation and interactivity Total Credits 65
• Create a digital portfolio to use on an
interview for an entry level position Penn Foster College reserves the right to change program
content and materials when it becomes necessary.
• Demonstrate effective written and
interpersonal communication skills Residents of Minnesota will receive an Associate of Applied
Science Degree upon completion of this degree program.
• Demonstrate a high level of inquiry,
analytical, and problem-solving skills
• Demonstrate effective quantitative skills Industrial Electronics &
• Demonstrate computer & information literacy Electrical Maintenance
• Demonstrate an understanding of the liberal
arts, natural sciences, and social sciences
Technology Associate of
Science
Semester 1 The Industrial Electronics and Electrical
Basic Skills 0 Maintenance Technology Associate Degree
GRD 101: Graphic Design Orientation 1 Program enables students to prepare and qualify
ILS 103: Information Literacy 1 for positions where they will be able to help
CSC 104: Computer Applications 3 design, troubleshoot, and maintain electrical and
GRD 105: Color Theory 3 electronic equipment. For tuition details, please
ENG 100: English Composition 3 visit the program page on the website at https://
GRD 110: Introduction to Graphic Design 3 www.pennfoster.edu/programs-and-degrees/
Total 14 engineering-and-drafting/industrial-electronics-
Proctored Final Examination and-electrical-maintenance-technology-associate-
degree.
Semester 2
HUM 102: Art Appreciation 3
Program Goal
The overall program goal for the A.S. in
GRD 201: Typography 3
Industrial Electronics and Electrical Maintenance
INT 205: Introduction to Internet Multimedia 3
Technology Degree is to prepare students to
GRD 115: Graphic Design and Production
enter positions in which they’ll help design,
(Illustrator®) 3
troubleshoot, and maintain electrical and
GRD 130: Photo Image Editing 1 3
electronic equipment.
Total 15
Proctored Final Examination Program Outcomes
Upon completion of the program, students will
Semester 3 be able to:
GRD 135: Photo Image Editing 2 3 • Recognize the work habits and characteristics
GRD 212: Corporate Design 3 that are demonstrated by successful
GRD 205: Electronic Publishing 3 technicians, including the codes and
ENG 121: Business and Technical Writing 3 standards that technicians must know
MAT 115: Intermediate Algebra 3 • Read and interpret various types of technical
SSC 130: Essentials of Psychology 3 drawings, including those used in electrical/
Total 18 electronics applications, and understand the
Proctored Final Examination basics of computer-aided design (CAD)

71
• Develop schematics, line drawings, and panel Semester 3
prints used for the design, manufacture, and EET 105: Electrical/Electronic Measurements
maintenance of electrical and electronics and Instruments 3
systems EET 182: Electronic Circuits 3
• Identify the basic concepts, terminology, and MAT 222: Precalculus 3
applications relating to electricity, including the Social Science Elective (choose two) 6
components and operation of electrical systems BUS 121: Economics 1
• Recognize the components and applications SSC 125: Introduction to Sociology
of circuits, and list how to troubleshoot circuits SSC 130: Essentials of Psychology
• Identify the basic concepts, terminology, and Total 15
applications relating to electronics, including the Proctored Final Examination
components and operation of electronic systems
• Explain how to test and diagnose electrical Semester 4
and electronic equipment using measuring EST 220: AutoCAD® Applications —
and diagnostic devices, such as multimeters Electrical/Electronics 3
and oscilloscopes Technical Electives (choose two) 6
• Describe the operation of transformers, and EET 210: Electric Motors and Controls
identify various types, including single- and EET 214: Interpreting the
three-phase transformers National Electrical Code®
• Identify electrical-system installation and EET 215: Electronic Process Controls
design processes, and evaluate sample EET 216: Electrical Installations
installations to ensure code compliance EET 218: Basic Industrial Computer Systems
• Identify various types of electric motors & EET 221: Pulse Circuits
describe how they are controlled; list the EET 235: Digital Electronics
steps to use when troubleshooting electric IET 232: Programmable Logic Controllers
motors & controllers Arts & Humanities Elective (choose two) 6
• Demonstrate an understanding of the hands- ENG 115: Introduction to Literature
on, technical skills employed by electrical HUM 102: Art Appreciation
and electronics technicians in a laboratory HUM 104: Music Appreciation
setting, including the topics of measurements, EET 300: Drafting Electrical and
circuitry, transformers, and motors Electronic Schematics 3
Total 18
Semester 1 Proctored Final Examination
Basic Skills 0 Total Credits 64
MET 100: Orientation to Engineering Technology 1
MAT 100: Foundation Skills in Math 3
ENG 101: Foundation Skills in Writing 3 Industrial Supervision
CSC 104: Computer Applications 3 Associate of Science
EST 100: Introduction to Technical Drawings 3 Penn Foster’s Industrial Supervision Associate
SCI 167: Physical Science 3 Degree Program consists of 61-credits that are
Total 16 designed for those looking to advance their
Proctored Final Examination careers or join the workforce in supervisory roles.
For tuition details, please visit the program page
Semester 2 on the website at http://www.pennfoster.edu/
EET 101: Fundamentals of Electricity 3 programs-and-degrees/skilled-trades/industrial-
MET 202: Drafting with AutoCAD® 3 supervision-associate-degree.
EET 103: Fundamentals of Electronics 3
MAT 115: Intermediate Algebra 3 Program Goal
ENG 100: English Composition 3 To provide students the understanding needed
Total 15 to seek employment or advance their careers
Proctored Final Examination in supervisory roles in the Industrial space,
specifically related to positions that require
college-level training.

72
Program Outcomes Semester 2
Upon completion of the program, students will IET237 Materials Management 3
be able to: and Inventory Control
• Identify key skills for the supervision and ENG100 English Composition 3
leadership of employees and successful work ACC111 Financial Accounting 3
relationships Social Science Elective (Pick 1) 3
• Demonstrate effective written and SSC130 Essentials of Psychology
interpersonal communication skills SSC105 World Civilizations
• Demonstrate effective quantitative skills SSC125 Introduction to Sociology
• Describe total quality management (TQM), BUS121 Economics 1
materials and inventory management, inspection MET221 Quality Control Systems 3
plans, measuring tools that collect quality data, Total 15
and various statistical process control methods
• Discover the principles of materials Semester 3
management and inventory control to maximize BUS110 Principles of Management 3
the use of resources for the required level of ACC112 Managerial Accounting 3
customer service ENG121 Business and Technical Writing 3
• Recognize important safety facts and practices IET135 Lean Manufacturing 1
associated with electrical, chemical, fire, material Arts and Humanities Elective (Pick 1) 3
handling, and machine hazards ENG115 Introduction to Literature
• Discuss the steps of the accounting cycle HUM102 Art Appreciation
and utilize financial document information as a HUM104 Music Appreciation
management tool to plan, and track the financial BUS105 Customer Service 1
status of a business Total 14
• Define the basics of lean manufacturing and
the key lean and continuous improvement Semester 4
(CI) fundamental principles in conjunction with HRM201 Human Resources 3
continuous-improvement methods and tools Management
• Demonstrate computer and information literacy ENG200 Speech 3
• Demonstrate an understanding of the BUS350 Supervision and Leadership 3
principles and processes involved in the BUS340 Organizational Behavior 3
functional areas and the need for collaboration Technical Elective (Pick 1) 3
among the different functions HRM350 Labor Relations
• Discuss the steps of the accounting cycle BUS220 Supply Chain Management
and utilize financial document information as a MKT301 Marketing
management tool to plan, and track the financial Total 15
status of a business Total Credits 60
• Demonstrate an understanding of the liberal
arts, natural sciences, and social sciences
• Discover other topics in supervision and PC Maintenance
leadership that may apply also in the Industrial
Workplace Technology
Associate of Science
Semester 1 The PC Maintenance Technology Program
SYP101 Starting Your Program prepares students to use common business
BUS115 Introduction to Supervision 1 software, such as MS office; adapt to changing
and Leadership personal computer software and hardware
ENG101 Foundation Skills in Writing 3 environments; install, configure, and troubleshoot
MAT100 Foundation Skills in Math 3 personal computers and peripheral equipment;
SCI167 Physical Science 3 and work in personal computer technical areas
CSC104 Computer Applications 3 as multi-user systems.
IET243 Industrial Safety 3 For tuition details, please visit the program page
ILS103 Information Literacy 1 on the website at http://www.pennfoster.edu/
Total 17 programs-and-degrees/computer-programming-
and-support/pc-maintenance-technology-
associate-degree/tuition.
73
Program Goal Semester 3
The PC Maintenance Technology associate INT 125: Internet Server Environments 3
degree program will prepare the students to ENG 121: Business and Technical Writing 3
work as computer maintenance technicians, SSC 130: Essentials of Psychology 3
teaching such skills as PC hardware and Arts & Humanities Elective (choose two) 6
operating systems maintenance, programming, ENG 115: Introduction to Literature
Internet security, and database technology. HUM 102: Art Appreciation
HUM 104: Music Appreciation
Program Outcomes Total 15
Upon completion of the program, students will Proctored Final Examination
be able to:
• Demonstrate effective written and Semester 4
interpersonal communication skills ENG 124: Applied Research Skills 2
• Demonstrate a high level of inquiry, analytical, Technical Core Elective (choose one) 3
and problem-solving skills INT 120: HTML Coding
• Demonstrate effective quantitative skills INT 130: Internet Security
• Demonstrate computer & information literacy INT 215: Programming in Java™
• Demonstrate an understanding of the liberal INT 220: Programming in CGI/Perl
arts, natural sciences, and social sciences INT 225: Intro to Database Technology 3
• Describe how to converse with customers to INT 242: Advanced Database Technology 3
determine the details of equipment problems Social Science Elective (choose two) 6
• Know how to reassemble computers after BUS 121: Economics 1
making repairs or replacing parts SSC 105: World Civilizations
• Identify and describe computer operating SSC 125: Introduction to Sociology
systems, maintenance, and programming Total 17
• Explain how to install and configure operating Total Credits 64
software and peripheral equipment
• Know how to secure the safety of computer, Penn Foster College reserves the right to change program
internet, and mobile information content and materials when it becomes necessary.

• Discuss the role of database technology in


PC maintenance Veterinary Technician
Semester 1
Associate of Science
The Mission Statement of the Veterinary
Basic Skills 0
Technician Program here at Penn Foster
PCM 101: Orientation to PC Maintenance
College is to develop veterinary technicians
Technology 1
that have both excellent “people” skills as well
PCM 103: Introduction to PC Repair 2
as excellent “technical” skills. Our Veterinary
ILS 103: Information Literacy 1
Technician Program will challenge students to
PCM 105: PC Hardware 1 3
be the BEST they can be! It will provide them
ENG 100: English Composition 3
with a balance of academics and clinical skills
CSC 107: Introduction to Microsoft Windows® 3
in both the online classroom as well as the
PCM 106: PC Hardware 2 3
veterinary communities where they live, allowing
Total 16
them to achieve a high degree of knowledge,
Proctored Final Examination
hands-on technical skills, and people skills. Our
program has full accreditation with the American
Semester 2
Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) through
PCM 107: PC Operating Systems 3
their Committee on Veterinary Technician
MAT 115: Intermediate Algebra 3
Education and Activities (CVTEA). Graduates of
HUM 106: Interpersonal Communication 1
our program will have career opportunities in
CSC 104: Computer Applications 3
private veterinary practice, research, industry,
SCI 167: Physical Science 3
government, educational institutions, and more.
INT 128: Network Protocols and Internetworking 3
The program is a four-semester program, with
Total 16
clinical externship experiences occurring at the
Proctored Final Examination
end of both Semester 2 and 4.

74
Physical Requirements Job opportunities and responsibilities are many.
Working as a veterinary technician is physically After graduation they include, but are not limited
demanding. Veterinary technicians must be to the following areas: managing a veterinary
able to walk and stand for long periods of time. practice, operating and maintaining a veterinary
The ability to reach, bend, climb, and crouch is pharmacy, providing postoperative nursing care
needed to perform job responsibilities. Other and therapeutic support, assisting veterinarians
requirements include the ability to lift and carry in surgical procedures, administering anesthesia
50 pounds without assistance, to see, to speak (in and monitoring anesthetized animals, performing
English), and to hear well enough to communicate laboratory tests, and properly handling and
observations about animals, and to possess arm restraining all species of animals. For tuition details,
and hand steadiness — as well as finger dexterity please visit the program page on the website at
— to operate equipment and work with animals. http://www.pennfoster.edu/programs-and-
Students will learn many important fundamentals degrees/veterinary-studies/veterinary-technician-
needed in their careers in the following academic associate-degree/tuition.
courses: animal anatomy And physiology, office
Student Health Policies
management, computer skills, diagnostic imaging,
Students are responsible for their own medical
pharmacology, clinical pathology, animal care and
care and health insurance during Clinical
management, surgical procedures, anesthesiology,
Externship 1 and Clinical Externship 2 in the
animal parasitology, animal diseases, laboratory
Penn Foster Veterinary Technology Program.
animal science, and animal nutrition.
The student is responsible for the costs
associated with obtaining medical insurance,
Students are encouraged to prioritize their time
and any costs associated with needed medical
schedule while in the program in order to focus
care. Neither the college nor the program nor
on the excellent education they will receive
the externship site is responsible for needed
during the program. Graduates will be joining the
medical care. Proof of medical insurance will
veterinary technician profession as trained and
need to be provided to the school as part of the
skilled professionals upon successfully passing
clinical externship documents.
the Veterinary Technician National Examination
(VTNE) graduates will become credentialed
Veterinary Technology students should inform the
veterinary technicians. And depending on the
program faculty immediately if there is any health
state lived in, the graduate who successfully
condition that will interfere with their participation
passes the VTNE, will either be a licensed
in the Clinical Externships. It is important to note
veterinary technician (LVT) registered veterinary
that all students are required to perform all skills
technician (RVT) or a certified veterinary
in each of the Clinical Externships in order to
technician (CVT). To view our VTNE Results
graduate from the program. Program faculty can
Click Here.
discuss the options the student has for waiting to
complete the Clinical Externship Course. Students
will also need to keep our normal enrollment
guidelines in mind. They may have to purchase a
study time extension, or re-enroll into the program
depending on the length of time that has passed.
For our female students there are additional
guidelines regarding pregnancy (See Pregnancy
Policy below).

Students need to be aware of the risk of


zoonotic disease (rabies, ringworm, brucellosis,
intestinal parasites, toxoplasmosis, etc.) that
is associated with participation in the Clinical
Externship courses, and with the veterinary
technician profession in general. Zoonotic
diseases are diseases that can be passed
between animals and people. People working
in the veterinary field are generally considered

75
to be at high risk for encountering zoonotic of veterinary medicine as a technician. Program
diseases due to their daily interactions with faculty will discuss the options available to the
animals. Rabies is one example of a zoonotic student to fulfill the educational requirements of
disease. Students are strongly encouraged to the program. The pregnant student must follow
seek pre-exposure Rabies vaccination prior to the established program policies and meet the
their first clinical externship. After discussion with same clinical and educational criteria as all other
their personal physician, students can elect to students before graduation from the program.
waive the rabies vaccination. Students that are • The student may remain in the Program if the
not vaccinated will not be allowed to handle student is not at the clinical externship 1 or
non vaccinated animals, or animals of unknown clinical externship 2, and therefore is able to
vaccine status, while in their Clinical Externships. continue with her coursework.
Vaccinated students are highly encouraged to • If the student has reached, but not yet started,
handle only animals with a known vaccine status clinical externship 1 or clinical externship
while completing their clinical externships. A 2 – they can stop progress in the program.
rabies vaccination policy form will be provided They will be allowed to restart the program
with the Clinical Externship Course Materials. in accordance with our normal enrollment
This will need to be filled out by the student guidelines. Students may be required to
and returned to the school with the rest of the pay for a study time extension when they
Clinical Externship Documents. are ready to start the program again. If the
student is at risk of going beyond the 6 year
Students will be handling animals during Clinical time limit of the program, they will have to
Externship 1 and Clinical Externship 2. Because re-enroll into the program according to our
of the professional nature of the program, the normal policies.
College is in no way liable for students being • If the student is currently in clinical externship
bitten or scratched while handling animals during 1 or clinical externship 2 – they can voluntarily
their clinical externship courses. It is our policy that stop progress in their externship. They will
students should not handle aggressive animals need to notify the clinical coordinator when
during their clinical externships. Students should they are able to continue with their clinical
only be handling non-aggressive animals with a externship. Students will have to re-apply for
known vaccine history. Even with these policies the clinical externship, and may be required
in place, animals can be unpredictable, and bites, to restart the clinical externship from the
scratches and other injuries can occur. If any injury beginning. Students will also need to keep our
occurs to a student during their clinical externship, normal enrollment guidelines in mind. They
they should follow the clinic’s protocol and seek may have to purchase a study time extension,
appropriate medical care as soon as possible. or re-enroll into the program depending on the
Students are then required to inform the program’s length of time that has passed.
clinical coordinator about the injury. • Students may undeclare their pregnancy at
any time. This must be done in writing. If she
Student Pregnancy Policy
chooses this option, she will be considered
Female students who become pregnant
not pregnant and be required to complete the
while enrolled in the Veterinary Technology
coursework as designed (including the clinical
Program have the option to voluntarily inform
externships).
the program faculty of their pregnancy. This
• Although it is both the policy and practice
must be given to the program in writing, and
of the program to offer the utmost in safety
must include the expected date of delivery.
precaution for its student, Penn Foster College
A student will not be considered pregnant
or its affiliates will not be responsible for injury
until this written disclosure is received by the
to either the mother or child due to hazard
program. Upon written disclosure, the student
exposure during pregnancy.
will meet with program faculty to discuss the
All students will be required to sign a form
risks and possible harmful effects of exposure to
before each clinical externship verifying that
animals, radiation, anesthetic gases, and other
they have read and understand this policy.
risks to the fetus that are inherent in the practice

76
Penn Foster’s Institutional Animal Care our Veterinary Technology Program. We will
and Use Committee (IACUC) Procedures evaluate our animal care and use protocols,
The Penn Foster’s IACUC mission statement is clinical externships, and ensure compliance
to provide clinical instructional oversight and with the Animal Welfare Act. The meeting
evaluation of the veterinary technology program’s minutes are kept by the chair, who will prepare
externships by ensuring compliance with federal and distribute them after the meeting to each
regulations related to the proper care, use, and committee member, the program director, and
humane treatment of animals used in research, the institutional officer (IO). If there is a need
testing, and education. The externships are to appoint a new member of the IACUC, they
created in accordance with the American must be approved by the IO and the incoming
Veterinary Medical Association’s (AVMA) member must accept the position.
Committee on Veterinary Technician Education
VTNE Policy
and Activities’ (CVTEA) standards.
It is our belief that students should wait until
Policy on reporting complaints in after they have completed the program to take
regards to Penn Foster’s use of animals: the Veterinary Technician National Examination
1. Penn Foster’s Veterinary Academy is (VTNE). The Clinical Externship 2 Course is like
committed to the ethical and humane care another review course for the VTNE. During your
and use of animals in teaching situations. If a Externship 2 you will need to review information
clinical supervisor, student, or faculty member before completing skills, actually perform the
is aware of any potential violation to the stated skills, and then complete all the materials to be
animal care and use criteria or observes the submitted for the skills. These tasks will help
mistreatment of animals, they are strongly prepare you for the VTNE. We are aware that a
encouraged to report their concerns. small number of states will allow students to take
2. Concerns can be reported directly to the VTNE before graduation if the school can
the chair and veterinarian by emailing to verify the graduation date. Penn Foster is unlike
vettechpracticum@pennfoster.edu Attention: a traditional school. Students study at a pace
Veterinary IACUC, Ms. Vicki McLain CVT, LATg, that is right for them, and students can begin the
VTS-LAM (Chair). program at a time convenient for them. Due to
3. The chair will compose a written document this, we are unable to provide exact graduation
of the issue, the committee’s actions/ dates for our students before they have
recommendations and any other pertinent completed the program.
information.
4. This document will be forwarded to the It is our policy that we will only fill out state
Institution Official, the Program Director, and the VTNE Application forms after a student
appropriate state veterinary board. completes the program. A student may petition
5. Any action deemed necessary will be clearly to have us fill out a form before they have
documented and handled as appropriate. completed the program if they can meet all of
All information will be filed with the IACUC the following criteria:
documents. 1. The student is active in Clinical Externship 2.
6. Penn Foster’s Veterinary Academy will 2. The student has never had an incomplete or
not tolerate the harassment or any retaliation failing grade posted for Clinical Externship 2.
directed at anyone who reports actual or 3. The student has at least 24 skills accepted
possible violations. The Penn Foster IACUC by their faculty evaluator in Clinical Externship 2.
will protect the positions and reputations of 4. The student’s study time has not expired.
those, who in good faith make allegations of 5. The student has not gone beyond the
animal welfare violations. Investigations will be maximum time allowed in the program
conducted carefully and discreetly as possible. (see standards of progression in the student
handbook).
Meetings
The IACUC meetings are conducted semi- If a student has met all the criteria, they can
annually. At this time, the committee will discuss petition the Veterinary Academy to have a
animal welfare issues where applicable in form completed. The student must provide all

77
necessary forms and information to Penn Foster   • Surgical Nursing
if they want their request considered. It is the      • Understand and integrate all aspects of
student’s responsibility to check with their state patient management for common surgical
licensing agency regarding the application procedures in a variety of animal species
process for the VTNE. Students can find     • Understand and provide the appropriate
information regarding the VTNE, and links to the instruments, supplies and environment to
various state agencies at www.aavsb.org. maintain asepsis during surgical procedures
  • Laboratory Procedures
Program Goal     • Properly package, handle and store
The Veterinary Technician associate degree specimens for laboratory analysis
program will prepare students to work as      • Properly carry out analysis of laboratory
veterinary technicians in small or large animal specimens
hospitals or clinics. The program also prepares   • Imaging
students to take the Veterinary Technician     •  Safely and effectively produce diagnostic
National Examination. radiographic and non-radiographic images
Program Outcomes   • Laboratory Animal Procedures
Upon completion of the program, students will     • Safely and effectively handle common
be able to: laboratory animals used in animal
   • Demonstrate effective written and research
interpersonal communication skills    • Avian, Exotic, Small Mammals and Fish
   • Demonstrate effective quantitative skills Procedures
   • Demonstrate computer & information literacy     • Understand the approach to providing
   • Demonstrate an understanding of the liberal safe and effective care for birds, reptiles,
arts, natural sciences, and social sciences amphibians, guinea pigs, hamsters,
   • Office and Hospital Procedures, Client gerbils, and ferrets
Relations, and Communication
   • Participate in facility management utilizing Below is an in-depth look at the curriculum in
traditional and electronic media and our program:
appropriate medical terminology and
abbreviations Semester 1
   • Communicate in a professional manner in Basic Skills 0
all formats—written, oral, non-verbal, and VET 101: Orientation to Veterinary Technology 1
electronic VET 102: Introduction to Veterinary Technology 2
   • Follow and uphold applicable laws and the ILS 103: Information Literacy 1
veterinary technology profession’s ethical CSC 104: Computer Applications 3
codes to provide high quality care to patients. SCI 120: Introduction to Biology 3
  • Pharmacy and Pharmacology VET 113: Animal Anatomy and Physiology 1 4
    • Safely and effectively administer VET 114: Animal Anatomy and Physiology 2 4
prescribed drugs to patients. Proctored Examination
    • Accurately dispense and explain Total 18
prescribed drugs to clients Semester 2
  • Nursing ENG 100: English Composition 3
    • Demonstrate and perform patient VET 106: Veterinary Office Management
assessment techniques in a variety of and Skill with People 3
animal species MAT 102: Mathematical Applications 3
    • Understand and demonstrate husbandry, VET 110: Medical Nursing for
nutrition, therapeutic and dentistry Veterinary Technicians 3
techniques appropriate to various animal MAT 140: Medical Mathematics 3
species. VET 124: Pharmacology for Veterinary
  • Anesthesia Technicians 3
    • Safely and effectively manage and Proctored Final Examination
maintain patients in all phases of VET 131: Clinical Externship 1 4
anesthesia Total 22
    • Safely and effectively select, utilize
and maintain anesthetic delivery and
monitoring instruments and equipment
78
Semester 3 Program Goal
VET 201: Clinical Pathology 1 3 To prepare students to seek a Veterinary
VET 202: Clinical Pathology 2 3 Practice Manager position by providing them
Arts and Humanities Elective (choose one) 3 with the education to develop strategies,
HUM 102: Art Appreciation procedures, policies and management skills to
HUM 104: Music Appreciation run the daily operations of a veterinary business
VET 212: Anesthesia for Veterinary Technicians 3 and to satisfy the college semester hours
VET 214: Surgical Nursing for required for CVPM certification.
Veterinary Technicians 3
VET 222: Clinical Parasitology for Program Outcomes
Veterinary Technicians 3 Upon completion of the program, students will
Proctored Examination be able to:
Total 18 • Identify individual life goals and steps needed
to fulfill them, similarities between personal
Semester 4 financial goals and business goals, the basics
VET 220: Radiography for Veterinary Technicians 3 of setting up a budget and starting up and
VET 224: Small and Large Animal Medicine 3 maintaining a business
SSC 130: Essentials of Psychology 3 • Discuss both the business environment
VET 225: Animal Nutrition, Reproduction, and a manager’s role in decision making,
Genetics, and Aging 3 planning, organizing, leading, controlling,
VET 228: Laboratory Animal Medicine and Nursing 3 and developing an ethical perspective
VET 229: Veterinary Technician National Comprehend the management of the facility's
Examination Review 1 finances, such as patient fees and billing
Proctored Final Examination • Discover the importance of understanding
VET 231: Clinical Externship 2 4 and implementing laws and requirements in a
Total 20 veterinary practice.
Total Credits 78 • Examine how to provide exceptional customer
service to their clients while helping the
Penn Foster College reserves the right to change program
content and materials when it becomes necessary. veterinary practice to grow financially
Residents of Minnesota will receive an Associate of Applied
• Describe the human resources function as it
Science Degree upon completion of this degree program. relates to the business environment
• Examine the factors affecting marketing
plans to promote the business’s products
Veterinary Practice or services through an understanding of
Management marketing principles, consumer buying habits,
and advertising strategies
Undergraduate Certificate • Discover the importance and methods of
The Penn Foster Veterinary Practice marketing and promotion for a veterinary
Management Undergraduate Certificate practice
will provide you with the education to • Summarize the ethical and legal standards in
develop strategies, procedures, policies, and the business environment
management skills to run the daily operations • Analyze relevant business ethics issues when
of a veterinary business and to satisfy the confronted with a new decision situation in a
college semester hours required for CVPM veterinary practice.
certification. A Veterinary Practice Manager
is an individual who is responsible for the
day-to-day business operations of the Semester 1
veterinary practice. For tuition details, please Basic Skills 0
visit the program page on the website: BUS 100: Business Orientation 1
www.VeterinaryMgmtCert.PennFosterCollege.edu. BUS 110: Principles of Management 3
ACC 113: Basic Accounting 3
VET 250: Veterinary Practice Management 3
HRM 201: Human Resources Management 3
MKT 301: Marketing 3
BUS 400: Business Ethics 3
Total 19

79
Course Descriptions
Accounting ACC202 Intermediate Accounting 2 (3 credits)
This course will provide students with an
ACC111 Financial Accounting (3 credits) expansion on materials presented in Intermediate
This course will provide students with a basic Accounting 1. Topics examined and discussed
understanding of the principles of Financial include: inventories; investments; intangible
Accounting. Topics covered include analyzing assets; current, contingent, and estimated
transactions; completing the accounting cycle; liabilities; premium and discount on long-term
merchandising businesses; inventories, assets, debt; stockholder’s equity. PREREQ: Intermediate
and liabilities; and corporations, stocks, bonds, Accounting 1
and cash flow. PREREQ: None
ACC210 Cost Accounting (3 credits)
Students will be able to use cost data in
ACC112 Managerial Accounting (3 credits) budgeting and capital planning for various types
This course provides an introduction to of manufacturing operations and use a personal
managerial accounting; analysis: C-V-P and computer to perform various accounting
management; budgeting and performance functions. Topics covered include timekeeping
evaluation; decentralized operations; and payroll procedures; setting overhead rates;
differential analysis and product pricing; accounting for spoiled and defective goods;
capital investment analysis, and cost activities. development of cost analysis; process cost
PREREQ: Financial Accounting accounting; job-order cost accounting. PREREQ:
Managerial Accounting
ACC113 Basic Accounting (3 credits)
This course meets the needs of students who ACC211 Computer Applications in Accounting
need to understand accounting language but (3 credits)
aren’t planning on becoming accountants. Builds on concepts learned in Financial and
Students will learn what accounting information Managerial Accounting and covers Sage 50
is, what it means, and how it’s used. Topics Accounting. Combines real-world accounting
covered include financial statements, return systems and examples with computer-based
on investment, bookkeeping process, cost solutions. The course is a blend of problem
accounting, and report systems. PREREQ: None solving, reading, case projects, and computer
applications to problems encountered in today’s
accounting environment. PREREQ: Computer
ACC201 Intermediate Accounting 1 (3 credits)
Applications, Financial Accounting, Managerial
This course will provide students with the
Accounting
knowledge to apply accounting theory,
concepts, and procedures to financial problems.
Topics covered include: computing earnings Allied Health
per share; lease transactions; income tax
ALH201 Pharmacology (3 credits)
accounting; cash flow information; pension and
135 Lecture hours
benefit information; financial statement analysis.
Introduces the students to the essentials of
PREREQ: Managerial Accounting
drugs and pharmaceuticals. The course covers
drug classifications, dosage calculations,
mechanisms of action, therapeutic effects, and
adverse reactions to drugs commonly used in
medical offices. PREREQ: None

80
ALH209 Clinical Procedures Theory 1 (1 credit) ALH215 HIPAA Compliance (3 credits)
45 Lecture hours 135 Lecture hours
Students are introduced to Clinical Procedures The HIPAA Compliance course gives health-care
Theory. Topics include an overview of the professionals and those involved with privacy
medical assisting profession, healthcare and security a better understanding of the Health
settings and the healthcare team, the history Insurance Portability and Accountability Act as
of medicine, therapeutic communication skills, well as the implications of HIPAA legislation on
coping skills for the medical assistant, the health-care organizations. Students will learn the
therapeutic approach to the patient with a purpose and key features of HIPAA along with
life-threatening illness, legal considerations, those affected by HIPAA as well as the impact
ethical considerations emergency procedures of the privacy rules on the health-care industry.
and first aid, infection control and medical Students will also learn the implementation
asepsis, the patient history and documentation, of dates for compliance and penalties for
vital signs and measurements, the physical noncompliance to HIPAA regulations.
examination, basic pharmacology, the calculation
of medications, and dosage and medication ALH225 Health Care Management (3 credits)
administration. PREREQ: Pharmacology, Anatomy The Health Care Management course begins
and Physiology 1, Anatomy and Physiology 2 with an overview of management, focusing on
the supervisor’s role and continuing with decision
making, planning, and organizing. Additional
ALH210 Clinical Procedures Theory topics include human resources management,
(3 credits) 135 Lecture hours labor relations, budgeting, and leadership.
The role of pathogenic organisms in disease;
how to control and prevent infection; assessing
patients; the three components of patient ALH280 Practicum in Health Care Management
examination; assessing vital signs; diagnostic (4 credits)
tests; treatment procedures; major drug and A comprehensive overview designed to prepare
medication categories. PREREQ: Anatomy and the Health Care Management student to perform
Physiology 1 and 2; Pharmacology functions and demonstrate competencies related
to health care management services in a variety
of settings. Students will be tested on health care
ALH211 Clinical Procedures Theory 2 management knowledge, perform project and
(2 credits) 90 Lecture hours research work, practice skills, and gain workplace
Students will finish the final portion of Clinical experience in a variety of settings under the
Procedures Theory. Topics covered include supervision of an externship site supervisor.
obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics,
gerontology, male reproductive system,
examinations and procedures of body Business
systems, assisting with office/ambulatory
surgery, diagnostic imaging, rehabilitation BUS100 Business Orientation (1 credit)
and therapeutic modalities, nutrition in health Introduction to distance learning; study skills and
and disease, electrocardiography, safety and techniques; reading textbooks and study guides;
regulatory guidelines in the medical laboratory, reviewing for examinations. Four basic life goals;
introduction to the medical laboratory, individual life goals and steps needed to fulfill
phlebotomy, venipuncture, capillary puncture, them; similarities between personal financial
hematology, urinalysis, basic microbiology, goals and business goals; determining personal
specialty laboratory tests, the medical assistant financial goals; setting up a budget; researching,
as an office manager, the medical assistant planning, starting up, and maintaining a business.
as a human resource manager, preparing for PREREQ: None
medical assisting credentials, and employment
strategies. PREREQ: Pharmacology, Anatomy
and Physiology 1, Anatomy and Physiology 2

81
BUS101 Introduction to Business (3 credits) BUS122 Economics 2 (3 credits)
This course provides an understanding of the This course will provide an overview of
various facets of business and the challenges microeconomics and the modern market
businesses face in a global environment such economy. Supply and demand; the role of
as competition and economics. Accounting, government; public sector; tax system design;
technology and information systems, marketing firm behavior; organization of industry; and
and management are examined through the labor markets will be examined and discussed.
phases of starting and growing a business. PREREQ: Economics 1
Management of financial and human resources
along with the ethical and social responsibilities BUS213 Business Law 1 (3 credits)
of business are examined. PREREQ: None This course is an introduction to the legal
environment of business. Topics covered
include American court practice and procedure;
BUS105 Customer Service (1 credit) torts; employment law; international law;
Customer service is presented as an integral environmental law; contract law. PREREQ: None
part of any career, in terms of understanding
what customer service encompasses and why BUS214 Business Law 2 (3 credits)
it is essential, recognizing, understanding and This course is a continuation of Business Law
meeting customer needs, and communicating 1. Topics covered include sales; consumer
with customers, including verbal and nonverbal law; negotiable instruments; personal and real
messages, active listening skills, dealing with property law; wills and trusts; insurance; secured
hostility and necessary skills in various mediums transactions; bankruptcy, and torts and crimes.
such as Internet and telephone. PREREQ: None PREREQ: Business Law 1

BUS110 Principles of Management (3 credits) BUS220 Supply Chain Management (3 credits)


This course familiarizes the student with both This course teaches the planning and the
the business environment and the manager’s control of materials that move into, through, and
role within it. It covers decision making, out of stores. It covers transportation planning,
planning, organizing, leading, and controlling, inventory control, warehouse management,
as well as developing an ethical perspective. development of customer service standards, as
PREREQ: None well as the design and operation of supply and
distribution systems. This course also discusses
BUS115 Introduction to Supervision and how the Internet and information systems
Leadership (1 credit) support the previous activities. PREREQ:
This course introduces the student to effective Principles of Management; Economics 1
leadership and interpersonal skills needed to
succeed in a supervisory position. This course BUS310 Merchandising Planning and Buying
provides students with an understanding of the (3 credits)
significance of the supervisor, including key Methods, practices, and operations conducted
opportunities available in the industrial sectors. to promote and sustain certain categories of
Students will learn the importance of effective commercial activity; principles and procedures
communication, problem-solving to overcome used in planning, selecting, pricing, and selling
obstacles, creating successful working goods in retail stores; domestic and foreign
relationships among team members, and the market purchasing; assessing product needs.
skills required to successfully hire, manage, and Students will learn merchandising systems,
terminate employees. PREREQ: Economics 1 assortment plans, and inventory control
methods. PREREQ: Introduction to Business;
BUS121 Economics 1 (3 credits) Mathematics for Business and Finance
This course will provide an overview of
macroeconomics and the modern market
economy. Law of supply and demand, cost of
living, monetary systems, international factors,
and short run economic fluctuations will be
examined and discussed. PREREQ: None

82
BUS315 Legal Environment of Business BUS415 Business Research Methods
(3 credits) (3 credits)
The nature and sources of law, the U.S. This course is an overview of concepts on
court systems, litigation and alternative business research methods covering variables,
methods of dispute resolution, constitutional types of variables, literature review, conceptual
and administrative law; tort law and product framework, research questions, hypothesis,
liability; contract law; agency law; business research design; elements of research design,
organizations; business ethics and social concepts of measurement; reliability and validity
responsibility; and property rights for both in measurement; survey research methods
personal and real property. PREREQ: None review; secondary data sources; questionnaire
design; qualitative techniques; sampling
BUS330 Risk Management (3 credits) technique, data collecting, data coding, and
This course provides students with a framework data analysis. PREREQ: Intermediate Algebra;
for managing the effects of risk and a basic Business Statistics; Advanced Composition;
understanding of risk management and Advanced PC Applications
insurance. Topics include an introduction to
the objective of risk management; general BUS425 Strategic Business Management
theory of insurance markets; personal insurance (3 credits)
issues; employee-employer risk; business risk This course establishes the foundation
management; and contracts for risk management. necessary to understand strategic business
PREREQ: MAT210 Business Statistics management in today’s economy. Students will
integrate knowledge from this course with skills
BUS340 Organizational Behavior (3 credits) acquired in previous courses to make sound
This course covers management approaches; management decisions. PREREQ: Principles of
human decision making; conflict management; Management; Corporate Finance; Marketing;
communication in groups; power and influence; Legal Environment of Business
organizational environment, structure and
design; and fundamental forces of change. BUS430 International Business
PREREQ: Principles of Management or similar (3 credits)
management course This course is an introduction to the
opportunities and risk of doing business outside
BUS350 Supervision and Leadership (3 Credits) the U.S. Students will learn about country-market
Students will learn supervisory leadership differences, trade and investment patterns, the
perspectives and practices as well as the international- financial environment; issues in
knowledge and skills needed to apply them business-government relations and strategies
in contemporary organizations. The course for international business are also covered.
provides perspective on the challenges of PREREQ: Introduction to Business; Principles of
guiding and leading a workforce in today’s Management; Marketing; Corporate Finance
complex society. PREREQ: Essentials of
Psychology; Introduction to Sociology BUS450 Senior Capstone: Business (4 credits)
Students use real fact patterns, real data and the
BUS400 Business Ethics (3 credits) expertise they acquired from courses completed
This course explores the ethical and moral throughout their business curriculum to
responsibilities of businesses in a capitalist complete two business case projects. Students
system. It examines different approaches will estimate the market size and market share
to ethics and morality, including the principles required to break even, and in a separate case
of egoism, utilitarianism, Kant’s categorical they will execute the quantitative analysis of
imperative, and Rawls’s theory of justice. financial data. This course also includes a lab
The course also focuses on how different experience designed to expose students to
moral philosophies might best be applied to real-world business activities in their community.
business organizations and their activities. PREREQ: Business Statistics; Intermediate
Many examples and case studies are used to Algebra; Computer Applications; Managerial
explain how the ethical issues facing businesses Accounting; Business Research Methods
ultimately affect all of us. PREREQ: Business Law
1 or Legal Environment of Business

83
Civil Engineering CET236 Structural Steel Design (3 credits)
Allowable unit stresses; design of connections;
CET111 Basic Surveying 1 (3 credits) composite design of steel
Tapes and accessories; electronic and concrete; design of column base plates.
measurements; use of transit and PREREQ: Mechanics of Materials
theodolite; adjustment of instruments; angle
measurements; trigonometric leveling; error of CET239 Reinforced Concrete Design
closure; computation of area by latitudes and (2 credits)
departures or planimeter. PREREQ: Foundation Investigation and design of rectangular
Skills in Math beams; T-beams; double-reinforced beams,
and continuous beams; design of processed
CET112 Basic Surveying 2 (3 credits) concrete beams. PREREQ: Mechanics of
Tangents and horizontal curves; grades and Materials
vertical curves; transition curves; field layout of
simple, compound, and spiral curves; elevations CET241 Highway Construction and Design 1
on vertical curves. (3 credits)
PREREQ: Basic Surveying 1 Soil studies; subgrades and drainage; location
surveys; volume and speed studies; signs.
CET115 Land Surveying (3 credits) PREREQ: Topographic Drawing and Surveying
Determination of true meridian; latitudes
and longitudes; subdivision of townships CET242 Highway Construction and Design 2
and sections; legal descriptions. PREREQ: Basic (2 credits)
Surveying 2 Stabilized soil-bound surfaces; design of
concrete pavements; design of pipe culverts.
CET120 Concrete (2 credits) PREREQ: Basic Surveying 2; Concrete
Production of concrete; design of concrete
mixes; test for concrete; field methods in CET249 Resident Laboratory
concrete construction. PREREQ: Foundation Training (Civil) (3 credits)
Skills in Math Students will be required to complete
a series of comprehensive, practical
CET123 Topographic Drawing and Surveying experiments using various measuring
(5 credits) instruments. Experiments are designed
Use of drafting instruments; plotting traverses; to provide familiarization with instrumentation,
plotting cross sections and profiles; city and equipment, preparation of data, and laboratory
village maps; plane table surveying; topographic reporting techniques. Students may earn credit
maps; methods of control. PREREQ: Basic for this by completing the course at an approved
Surveying 1 school or by submitting a life/work experience
portfolio demonstrating completion of similar
CET127 Earthwork (1 credit) skills to those emphasized in the laboratory
Surveys for determining grade; cross- training. PREREQ: Semester 3
sectioning; formation of embankments;
shrinkage and swell; moving cut to fill mass Communication
diagrams. PREREQ: Basic Surveying 2
COM110 Public Relations 1 (3 credits)
CET223 Geodetic Surveying (3 credits) Public Relations 1 begins by introducing students
Monuments and markers; triangulation surveys; to the role of public relations writers, including
methods of projection; subdivision of city blocks their ethical and legal responsibilities. Some of
into lots. PREREQ: Topographic Drawing and the general topics covered include persuasion,
Surveying; Land Surveying research skills, the public relations planning
process, writing clearly and simply, and using
proper grammar, spelling, and punctuation.
Specifically, the course covers writing styles and

84
processes for emails, memos, letters, reports,
proposals, news releases, broadcasts, ad copy,
Computer Science
material for the Internet, speeches, newsletters, CSC101 Computer Literacy (3 credits)
brochures, magazines, and annual reports. The Hardware and software; computer networks;
course concludes with an examination of how information systems; personal computer
to communicate information during a crisis. systems; legal and ethical dilemmas. PREREQ:
PREREQ: Advanced Composition None

COM115 Public Relations 2 (3 credits) CSC103 Introduction to Computers


Public Relations 2 begins with an overview of (3 credits)
public relations, including such topics as ethics, Hardware and software; computer networks;
professionalism, public relations departments information systems; personal computer
and firms, research techniques, planning and systems; legal and ethical dilemmas. Software
evaluating a public relations program, and applications include creating a resume,
the communication process. The course also spreadsheet, and slide presentation. PREREQ:
includes the preparation and handling of news None
releases, media alerts, and pitch letters. Finally,
the course covers topics that affect a public CSC104 Computer Applications
relations employee: conflict management, (3 credits) 135 Lecture hours
public opinion, new technologies in public Students will learn about PC applications
relations, corporate public relations, public in word processing, spreadsheets, and
relations and the government, global public presentation software, as well as create
relations, and public relations for nonprofit documents, spreadsheets, and presentations.
organizations. PREREQ: Public Relations 1 Students will also learn how to integrate the
applications. PREREQ: None
Computer Information
Systems CSC105 Introduction to Programming
(3 credits)
Examines the basic logic common to all
CIS235 Structured Systems Analysis
programming languages; shows students how
(3 credits)
to create their own programs not based on any
The system development cycle; information
particular programming language; concentrates
gathering and reporting activities on the analysis
on the basic guidelines and best practices for
phase; interaction of various participants in
developing good programming skills. PREREQ:
the systems process. PREREQ: Introduction to
Introduction to Computers or equivalent
Computers; Business Computer Systems and
Applications or equivalent
CSC107 Introduction to Microsoft® Windows®
(3 credits)
CIS240 Systems Design (3 credits)
This course gives the student a complete
Role of the systems analyst in developing
overview of the Windows® operating system,
business applications; hierarchy charts; IPO;
including an introduction, hands on applications,
decision tables; structured English.
managing and supporting tips, and more
PREREQ: Structured Systems Analysis.
advanced techniques.
PREREQ: Computer Literacy
CIS245 Structured Systems Analysis and Design
(3 credits)
CSC108 Essential Computer Skills (3 Credits)
This course begins with the planning process
This course includes material about Internet
for software development and then shows the
basics, computer hardware, online library
students how to convert the user’s business
resources, and search engines, as well as
needs into a computer information system.
PC applications in word processing and
PREREQ: Introduction to Computers; Business
spreadsheet software. PREREQ: None
Computer Systems and Applications or
equivalent.

85
CSC110 The Microcomputer and its
Application (3 credits)
Construction Technology
The course gives the student an understanding BCT110 Introduction to Construction
of the fundamentals of PC applications Technology (3 credits)
software. Students gain proficiency in word This course introduces management and
processing, spreadsheets, and presentation building practices used throughout the
software applications. construction industry. Site planning and
PREREQ: None excavating processes are described, followed
by construction methods that apply to
CSC111 PC Applications (3 credits) foundations, steel and wood frames, concrete,
The course gives the student an understanding and masonry. Students obtain an overview of
of the fundamentals of PC applications the challenges often faced by construction
software. Students gain proficiency in word managers, including scheduling, cost-control,
processing, spreadsheets, and presentation contracting process, safety, and productivity
software applications. PREREQ: None improvement. PREREQ: None

CSC218 Visual Basic® (3 credits) BCT125 Construction Materials and Methods


This course takes students through the basics of (3 credits)
writing software, to working with data structures, Students will gain a comparative knowledge
using XAML, and building Windows applications. of material properties and applications
Students learn debugging, structured error in construction. The course provides an
handling, how to build class libraries and register overview of materials used in construction; the
assemblies, programming with SQL Server and fundamental principles of structural, physical
ADO.NET, and develop Windows 8 applications. and long-term performance; material and
PREREQ: PC Applications or equivalent product manufacturing techniques and common
construction methods. PREREQ: None
CSC221 Advanced PC Applications (3 credits)
Database applications; integrating word BCT160 Architectural Drawing (3 credits)
processing, spreadsheet, and presentation An introduction to the basic drafting skills
software applications. PREREQ: PC Applications required for the development of a set of
or equivalent architectural drawings. Students learn line
technique, lettering, dimensioning and symbols
CSC246 Visual C#® (3 credits) and how these concepts apply to drawings
Building C# applications; input devices and for construction. The course also covers site
using timers; dialog boxes and menus; adding plans, foundations, walls, wall sections, floors,
graphics and ActiveX controls to applications; roof design, stairs, elevations, sections, and
document interfacing; toolbars, status bars, and construction details. PREREQ: Drafting with
working with files; ADO applications, classes, AutoCAD®
modules, DLLs, and multitasking; ActiveX
controls and Internet applications. PREREQ: BCT210 Statics/Strengths of Construction
Visual Basic® or equivalent Materials (3 credits)
Students learn the basic principles of vector
CSC 275 Computer Forensics (3 credits) analysis, equilibrium of force systems, friction,
This course teaches how to conduct a high-tech sectional properties, stress/strain, and
investigation, from acquiring digital evidence deformation as they apply to construction
to reporting the findings. Coverage includes materials. Lessons cover the support
how to set up a forensics lab, how to acquire characteristics of trusses, frames, beams,
the necessary tools, and how to conduct an columns, connections, and combined stresses.
investigation and subsequent digital analysis. Students learn to analyze the integrity of simple
Featured in the textbook are free downloads of structures.PREREQ: Technology Orientation
several forensics software programs for students
to become familiar with the tools of the trade.
PREREQ: Visual Basic® or equivalent

86
EST215 AutoCAD® Applications – Construction BCT275 Construction Planning and Control
(3 credits) (3 credits)
Students are presented with a broad introduction In this course, students learn to review
into 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional Computer- and analyze requirements and preparation
Aided Design (CAD) focused on construction- of construction planning and scheduling.
specific applications. Students will use AutoCAD® The course covers scheduling techniques,
in hands-on exercises, assignments and projects. resource and equipment allocation, time-
PREREQ: Drafting with AutoCAD® cost relationships, as well as monitoring and
controlling the work progress. Students learn PC
BCT220 Building Systems (3 credits) applications for scheduling and planning.
This course provides students with technical PREREQ: None
information related to the mechanical and
electrical systems used in various types of BCT280 Architectural Design (3 credits)
buildings. Topics covered include design, Students are introduced to the basic
installation, and operation of building systems fundamentals of architectural design. Concepts
including HVAC, plumbing, fire-protection, include proportion, relationship of masses,
electric, lighting, and communication systems. figure, ground, shades, color and symmetry
PREREQ: None with emphasis on the physical properties of
architectural design. Students will also learn
BCT240 Basic Surveying and Measurement the basic relationships of spaces and specific
(3 credits) program requirements governing the creation of
This course instructs students on the principles these spaces. PREREQ: Drafting with AutoCAD®
of elementary surveying including leveling,
angle measurement, bearings and azimuths,
traversing, topographic mapping, and areas and
Criminal Justice
volumes. Students learn traditional and GNSS
CJS100 Criminal Justice Orientation (1 credit)
(Global Navigational Satellite System) surveying
Discusses the strategies for completing
methods. PREREQ: Intermediate Algebra
the criminal justice studies program as an
independent learner as well as the role of
BCT250 Codes and Specifications (3 credits)
criminal justice in society. PREREQ: None
Students learn the essentials of construction
specifications and how they relate to national,
CJS101 Introduction to Criminal Justice
state, and local building codes. The course also
(3 credits)
provides in-depth coverage of job safety and
This course examines the purpose and functions
OSHA regulations as they apply to the modern
of the criminal justice system with attention
construction environment. PREREQ: None
paid to the police, courts, and corrections on
the local, state, and federal levels. It explains
BCT255 Green Building Practices (3 credits)
the limitations of a system initially designed to
Students learn building techniques and
respond to the needs of Colonial America. The
practices aimed at reducing the consumption
course also focuses on individuals’ involvement
of traditional fossil fuels and energy sources.
in the criminal justice system, as citizens and
The course includes focused units on improved
as actors, and how that involvement affects the
insulation practices and materials, alternative
system. PREREQ: None
energy adaptations for residential and small
commercial buildings and efficiency adaptations
CJS105 Ethics in Criminal Justice (3 credits)
to traditional HVAC systems. PREREQ: None
Begins the study of ethics from the larger issues
of what constitutes morality and moral behavior;
BCT260 Construction Estimating (3 credits)
looks at how ethics develop; discusses the
This course covers unit-price cost estimating,
issues of ethics and specific aspects of criminal
quantity takeoff, labor, material, mechanical
justice, including justice, law enforcement,
and electrical systems; equipment unit pricing
courts, punishment and corrections, and
and computer-aided estimation applications.
management; reviews the consideration of
Students will also examine bidding strategies,
professionalism and of ethics for everyone in
worker and equipment productivity, and value
society. PREREQ: Introduction to Criminal Justice
engineering. PREREQ: None

87
CJS120 Police Studies (3 credits) CJS135 Introduction to Private Security
Looks at the role of policing in America; (3 credits)
discusses the existence of a police subculture, Examines the history and development of
the role of management and the nature of private security; reviews the state of private
patrolling; considers different strategies for security today, including, but not limited to,
investigating and solving problems; includes liability and the relationship between public
a discussion about ethics, civil liability, and and private security; focuses on issues
possible directions for policing in the future. regarding prevention and loss control; looks
PREREQ: Introduction to Criminal Justice; at investigation and prosecution; discusses
Criminology trends in security, including the contemporary
development of security systems and
CJS123 Courts (3 credits) approaches toward security in light of recent
This course looks at the relationship among the events. PREREQ: Introduction to Criminal Justice
judiciary, defense, and prosecution involved in
the United States Courts system. You're studies CJS203 Criminal Procedures (3 credits)
start with an overview of the basic structures of Examines issues involved in the search
courts. You'll also look to the successive steps and arrest of individuals as well as issues
involved in prosecutions and cover topics such dealing with self-incrimination and access to
as plea bargains, trials, juries, sentencing, and counsel through the lens of the Bill of Rights
appeals. PREREQ: Introduction to Criminal Justice protections that focus on prosecution; presents
the rationale underlying decisions like the
CJS238 Criminal Law (3 credits) Miranda warning and the Terry stop and frisk.
Reviews the history of criminal law, from its PREREQ: Introduction to Criminal Justice; Police
start in the common law (and the principles of Studies; Courts; Criminal Law
applying case law) to its contemporary forms
of statutory and regulatory law; looks at crimes CJS205 Juveniles and the Legal Process
and their underlying elements, thereby teaching (3 credits)
what a prosecutor needs to show, beyond Considers the difference in mission and goals
a reasonable doubt, to secure a conviction; between juvenile and nonjuvenile courts;
considers the traditional form of criminal law focuses on how this court’s different mission
as well as strict liability and victimless crimes; reflects society’s views towards the care and
discusses range of criminal offenses, such as management of juveniles; looks at situations
inchoate and property-based crimes, to crimes where juveniles can and do face the possibility
of violence and administrative crimes, and of prosecution in traditional courts and looks
of the excuses, justifications, and defenses at the roles that different actors can play in
to prosecution of such activities. PREREQ: processing juveniles; it then considers how
Introduction to Criminal Justice; Courts many of the new issues a society faces first
come to the attention of society through juvenile
CJS130 Police Management (3 credits) court proceedings. PREREQ: Introduction to
Considers the development of the police Criminal Justice; Courts; Criminal Law
subculture and how that has shaped different
strategies for police management; proceeds to CJS210 Crime Scene Investigation Basics
examine those basic organizational concepts (3 credits)
unique to policing; looks at the different This course provides an understanding of the
responsibilities and how to satisfy those scientific theory as well as the actual practices
responsibilities within the context of policing; and techniques used to process a crime
studies the image that collective bargaining has scene. The student will learn how crime scene
on management of police.PREREQ: Introduction professionals protect themselves and the
to Criminal Justice; Ethics in Criminal Justice; evidence at a crime scene and the different
Police Studies roles law enforcement professionals execute at
the scene of a crime. The course also describes
the many types of evidence and how evidence
is collected and secured before it is processed
by a crime lab. PREREQ: CJS120-Police Studies

88
CJS211 Correctional Institutions (3 credits) CJS230 Criminalistics (3 credits)
Focuses on what the public generally believes Focuses on forensic science and its application
is the most common punishment: incarceration during investigations; looks at the range of types
in a correctional institution; presents the early of evidence present and considers the methods
attempts at rehabilitating offenders in secure, for analyzing that evidence; covers the gamut
custodial facilities; focuses on the different types of physical evidence as well as nonphysical
of correctional facilities that have developed, with evidence, such as evidence on the Internet.
an eye towards how issues of safety can literally PREREQ: Criminology
shape the facility; considers issues relating to
the management and operation of such facilities; CJS235 Multicultural Law Enforcement
explains the Supreme Court’s philosophy towards (3 credits)
“prisoners’ rights” in the context of issues, such Provides a comprehensive review of the
as access to counsel; looks to how treatment impact that race, gender, and ethnicity have
strategies differ based upon the nature and on criminal justice; includes research on police
needs of certain groups. PREREQ: Introduction to practices, sentencing, and corrections, with
Criminal Justice; Courts; Criminal Law attention paid to racial profiling and how certain
ethnic groups receive disparate treatment;
CJS215 Terrorism (3 credits) discusses how discrimination affects criminal
Discusses the most pressing topic for law justice. PREREQ: Police Studies
enforcement: terrorism; reviews some of the
theories advanced to account for acts CJS238 Criminal Law (3 credits)
of terror; considers history and how some With this course, you’ll review the history of
groups have used acts of terror to accomplish criminal law, from its start in the common law
their goals; looks at foreign and domestic acts (and the principles of applying case law) to its
of terror and the political agendas of those contemporary forms of statutory and regulatory
engaged in such acts; and looks to pressing law. You’ll look at crimes and their underlying
issues, such as the forms that acts of terror can elements, consider what a prosecutor needs to
take. PREREQ: Police Studies show in order to secure a conviction beyond a
reasonable doubt, examine the traditional form of
CJS220 Organized Crime (3 credits) criminal law as well as strict liability and victimless
Course opens with a consideration of how crimes, discuss a range of criminal offenses,
organized crime has developed and the such as inchoate and property-based crimes,
structure of organized crime; looks at the crimes of violence and administrative crimes,
different types of criminal activity typical and consider the excuses, justifications, and
to organized crime; reviews international defenses to the prosecution of such activities.
organized crime as the principles underlying
organized crime would naturally lead to CJS245 Security and Loss Prevention (3 credits)
expansion. Course closes with a consideration Begins with a review of issues involving private
of the tools and means available to law security systems and then looks at zones
enforcement to battle organized crime. Each of protection, that theoretical area between
chapter includes links to Internet sites where private and public security issues; discusses
students can go to find more information on issues involving risk management and loss
the subject matter covered in the chapter. control; considers principles of crime prevention
PREREQ: None involving a threat environment; considers issues
relating to legal aspects of private security.
CJS225 White Collar Crime (3 credits) PREREQ: Introduction to Private Security
Presents the distinctions between crimes
of violence and property-based crimes; specifies
what constitutes white collar crime; explores
how criminal activity often causes more damage
to society than do crimes of violence; looks at
the laws involved in prosecuting such crimes;
and how to detect and gather evidence of
such crimes. Also looks at corporate crime and
political crime. PREREQ: Courts; Criminal Law

89
CJS255 Computer-Based Crime (3 credits) CJS307 Victimology (3 credits)
Begins with a review of issues involving Looks to how criminal justice has responded to
information, security, and the privacy of the heightened interest of society paying more
information; and proceeds to examine a attention to the victims of crime in the last few
broadening range of additional criminal decades; presents the laws designed to support
threats, based upon actual cases. Includes a victims, including but not limited to programs
consideration of cybercrime, systems abuse, and services; examines the growing Victim
and the hacker culture; looks to issues of Rights Movement; explores a range of kinds of
prevention and information security, with an victimization, its origins, and will consider what
emphasis on the need to take immediate steps segments of society have been most vulnerable
against this likely criminal activity. PREREQ: to certain crimes. PREREQ: Introduction to
Security and Loss Prevention Criminal Justice; Ethics in Criminal Justice;
Criminal Law
CJS260 Crisis Intervention (3 credits)
Presents the latest research, theories, and CJS350 Community Corrections (3 credits)
techniques of what to do in a crisis, along with Looks at the role that community corrections
case material based on real crisis situations; plays in the criminal justice process; deals
presents the skills and strategies needed to largely with corrections outside of prison and
take crisis intervention theory and technique out includes issues involving diversion and pretrial
of the classroom and onto the street; details a release; teaches the evolution of the field,
six-step model to give practitioners a systematic the range and type of different community
way of dealing with people in crisis (Defining correction options, and future trends for the
the Problem, Ensuring Client Safety, Providing field. PREREQ: Police Studies
Support, Examining Alternatives, Making Plans,
and Obtaining Commitment). Throughout the CJS400 Administration of Justice (3 Credits)
textbook, the model is applied to many different This course will focus on the most common
crisis situations, such as suicide, domestic agencies involved in running the criminal
violence, sexual assault, addiction, post- justice system on both the state and federal
traumatic stress disorder, and school violence. level. The organization of each agency will be
PREREQ: Police Studies examined with a detailed review of its function,
administrative procedures, personnel, planning,
CJS265 Security Management (3 credits) budgeting, and record keeping. PREREQ:
Examines the range of issues involved in Criminology; Introduction to Public Policy;
security management, across disciplines and Criminal Law
around the world; includes a consideration of
industrial security in light of business concerns; CJS415 Evidence (3 credits)
examines the context for security and legal This course examines the fundamental rules
aspects of security management and prevention; of evidence from inception, preservation, and
presents specific security applications and the admission at trial. All types of evidence will be
investigational intelligence gathering studied including the historical development of
used to assess security systems. the hearsay and exclusionary rules, together
PREREQ: Introduction to Private Security; with their permitted exceptions. PREREQ:
Security and Loss Prevention Criminal Law; Criminology

CJS308 Criminology (3 credits)


Following an introduction to criminology, the
student will explore criminological theories,
general types of crime, special types of crime,
as well as the future of crime. The course covers
property and white collar crime, in addition to
organized crime and computer crime. Methods
for predicting what the future holds for crime are
also discussed. PREREQ: Introduction to Criminal
Justice

90
CJS450 Senior Capstone: Criminal Justice ECE120 Infant and Toddler Care (3 credits)
(4 Credits) This course focuses on how to create a safe,
In order to provide the students with an healthy learning environment that helps infants
understanding of the practical application and toddlers increase their physical, intellectual,
of the criminal justice system in their and social qualities. PREREQ: Orientation to
respective jurisdictions, they will undertake a Early Childhood Education; Child Growth and
comprehensive research project. The research Development
project will be based on a topic assigned by
the instructor and allow the students to conduct ECE130 Health, Safety, and Nutrition
detailed research and writing in a relevant area for the Young Child (3 credits)
of the law of their jurisdictions. The research This course presents information on the
project will be reviewed and supervised from importance of health, safety, and nutrition as
inception through final submission. PREREQ: crucial factors in the development of young
Advanced Composition; Criminology; Research children. Provides strategies for the monitoring
and Statistics; Legal Research and Writing of standards in the care environment and
development of good habits in young children.
Early Childhood Education PREREQ: None

ECE160 Cultural Diversity in the Early


ECE100 Orientation to Early Childhood
Childhood Program (3 credits)
Education (1 credit)
A summary of the ways in which cultural
This course provides a snapshot of
differences influence the way children act,
contemporary child day care and the need
communicate, and learn. The major focus is on the
for professionals, as well as strategies for
areas of language and communication, social skills,
completing the Early Childhood Education
school readiness, and emergent literacy. PREREQ:
Program as an independent learner. PREREQ:
Fundamentals of Early Childhood Education;
None
Curriculum for Early Childhood Education
ECE107 Play in the Lives of Young Children
ECE203 Working with Children with
(3 credits)
Special Needs (3 credits)
A study of play that provides current
This course is designed to give the student a
perspectives on culture and gender differences
broad overview of special education, including
in play through a blend of research, theory,
research and laws that authorize and fund early
and practical applications. Topics include brain
education and preschool special education
research and information on how and why play
programs. Content also includes the design
is important for children. The course attempts
of buildings, rooms, and outdoor facilities to
to illustrate the need to understand play and
accommodate children with special needs,
children with disabilities, integrate play into
as well as the use of technology to enhance
classroom curricula, and be aware of special
the special education environment. PREREQ:
places for play. PREREQ: Fundamentals of Early
Orientation to Early Childhood Education; Child
Childhood Education
Growth and Development
ECE111 Fundamentals of Early Childhood
ECE210 Child, Family, and Community
Education (3 credits)
(3 credits)
A survey course which discusses the similarities
This course serves as a guide for students
and differences in young children, the
of early childhood education to the body of
components of quality early childhood education
current research on interactions between
programs, and the role of the professional early
families, schools, and communities.
childhood educator. PREREQ: None
PREREQ: None

91
ECE212 Guidance in Early Childhood Education ECE217 Developing Math and Science Skills
(3 credits) in Young Children (3 credits)
Developmentally appropriate guidance This course emphasizes the integration of
strategies that help young children to become mathematics and science with the other content
responsible, respectful, and productive areas for young children from preschool
members of the community. The course stresses though the primary grades. It follows the
the need to respect the unique qualities that guidelines of the National Association for the
individual children and their families bring to the Education of Young Children. Developmentally
early childhood setting. PREREQ: Fundamentals appropriate assessment is explained. PREREQ:
of Early Childhood Education; Curriculum for Fundamentals of Early Childhood Education and
Early Childhood Education Curriculum for Early Childhood Education

ECE213 Art, Music, and Movement (3 credits) ECE220 Child Growth and Development
The role of art, music, and movement in a (3 credits)
young child’s education. It explains how art This course presents a variety of theoretical
and movement education address the physical, viewpoints to provide students with a well-
social/emotional, and cognitive development balanced view of a child’s developmental
of young children. Students will recognize process. Current studies and research provide
ways to develop creativity and promote self- students with an understanding of the principal
expression among young children by enhancing topics of child psychology as well as recent
the entire curriculum with experiences in visual, trends in socially relevant problem areas.
auditory, and kinesthetic creativity. PREREQ: PREREQ: None
Fundamentals of Early Childhood Education;
Curriculum for Early Childhood Education ECE221 Administration of an Early Childhood
Education Center (3 credits)
ECE215 Curriculum for Early A comprehensive view of the procedures
Childhood Education (3 credits) involved in establishing and administering
Defines and explores the fundamental a child care education program. Topics
components of the early childhood curriculum, include staffing, budgeting, equipment
including creativity, sensory experience, acquisition, parent involvement, and day-to-day
curiosity, exploration and discovery, growth in administration.
literacy, and concepts of mathematics, science,
and social science. PREREQ: Fundamentals of ECE223 Working with Preschoolers (3 credits)
Early Childhood Education This course shows how the learning
environment can facilitate the teaching of
ECE216 Language and Literacy Development preschool children. The use of learning centers
in Young Children (3 credits) is emphasized. PREREQ: Orientation to Early
Provides information and strategies to help Childhood Education, Child Growth and
educators promote successful development Development
in the four areas which young children will use
for the rest of their lives: listening, speaking, ECE225 Family Child Care (3 credits)
reading, and writing. This includes children This course includes the practical consideration
with special needs and those from diverse of issues and responsibilities in providing
backgrounds. Means of assessment are also family child care for infants and young
discussed. PREREQ: Fundamentals of Early children. Topics include developmental
Childhood Education and Curriculum for Early domains, developmentally appropriate
Childhood Education practices, curriculum and creating a successful
environment. PREREQ: Orientation to Early
Childhood Education; Child Growth and
Development

92
ECE230 Field Experience (6 credits) EET105 Electrical/Electronic Measurements
During the fourth semester students will spend and Instruments (3 credits)
300 hours in an approved early childhood Transformer fundamentals; checking simple
center that includes infants, toddlers, and circuits; troubleshooting with basic meters; how
preschoolers in order to observe and participate a voltmeter works; how an ammeter works;
in the direct application of theory. Students will AC measuring instruments; multi-purpose test
have specific assignments during this time. instruments; oscilloscopes; component testers;
They will have a maximum of six months digital test equipment. PREREQ: Fundamentals
to complete the field experience. PREREQ: of Electricity; Fundamentals of Electronics
Students must be enrolled in Semester Four
of the Early Childhood Education Program EET115 Electrical-Electronics Theory
(3 credits)
ECE240 Assessment in Early Childhood This course provides a foundation in electrical
Education (3 credits) and electronics terminology, theory, and
In this course, students will learn the purpose concepts essential for students in a wide
of observation and assessment in the early range of technology programs. Students
childhood classroom; describe the process of learn the basic principles of electricity and
collecting and recording observations; foster the fundamental applications of Ohm’s law
child development in each learning area and to circuit analysis, as well as magnetism and
share their observations with the children’s electromagnetism, and alternating current
family members. PREREQ: None theory and circuit applications. The student also
learns theory and applications of most basic
Electricity and Electronics components, devices, and machines including
capacitors, inductors, batteries, DC and AC
motors, conductors, insulators and basic
EET101 Fundamentals of Electricity
rectification devices. PREREQ: None
(3 credits)
This course introduces to the basic concepts,
EET160 Introduction to Microprocessor
terminology, and applications relating to
(2 credits)
electricity such as circuits, capacitors and
Introduction to computers; introduction to
inductors, magnets and electromagnets,
microprocessor applications; microprocessor
conductors, and cells and batteries. It also
basics. PREREQ: None
covers motors and generators, alternating
current, alternators, and the overall electrical
EET182 Electronic Circuits (3 credits)
system. PREREQ: None
Electronic systems; electronic devices and
amplifications; audio and rf circuits; oscillators;
EET103 Fundamentals of Electronics
feedback; electronic power supply systems;
(3 credits)
industrial receivers, transmitters and video
This course introduces the basic concepts,
systems; servo and control systems; pulse
terminology, and applications relating to
and logic circuits; troubleshooting electronic
electronics such as rectification, basic
equipment and systems; logical troubleshooting
semiconductor components, switching devices,
methods; measuring techniques; interpreting
electron tubes, optoelectronics and fiber-optic
data and results. PREREQ: Fundamentals of
components. The course also covers electronic
Electronics
hardware, power supplies, amplifiers, oscillators,
and modulation and demodulation. PREREQ:
EET210 Electric Motors and Controls (3
Fundamentals of Electricity
credits)
Principles of generator and motor operation;
principles of induction motors and synchronous
motors; performance and speed control;
principles of motor control systems; solid-state
drive systems; SCRs as AC to DC converters;
installation and maintenance of drive systems.
PREREQ: Fundamentals of Electricity;
Fundamentals of Electronics

93
EET212 Electrical Equipment (3 credits) EET222 Logic Circuits (3 credits)
Sizing and selecting conductors, raceways, Logic devices and diagrams; logic families;
devices, and controls incorporated in electrical troubleshooting logic circuits.
systems; identifying key characteristics of PREREQ: Fundamentals of Electronics
electrical equipment including circuit protection,
outlets, control devices; creating ladder logic EET233 Telecommunications 1 (3 credits)
relay diagrams. PREREQ: None History and impact of telecommunications
technology; transmission and reception of
EET214 Interpreting the National Electric amplitude modulated signals; frequency
Code® (3 credits) modulation technology; single-sideband
Locating the applicable code section technology; telephone technology; network
to identify specific electrical installation systems; digital communications coding and
requirements; interpreting and transmission. PREREQ: Fundamentals of
applying code specifications during Electronics
the electrical-system design process; evaluating
sample installations to ensure code compliance. EET234 Telecommunications 2 (3 credits)
PREREQ: None Design of transmission lines; wave propagation;
antennas; radar systems; microwave
EET215 Electronic Process Control (3 credits) communications systems; laser communications;
Students will learn the basics of electronic fiber optic technology. PREREQ: Fundamentals
control technology, the fundamentals of of Electronics
motor-control theory, process control and
instrumentation, and applications of sensors, EET235 Digital Electronics (3 credits)
programmable controls, and motion controls. Digital Electronics provides in-depth coverage
PREREQ: Fundamentals of Electricity, of number and logic systems, the essentials of
Fundamentals of Electronics Boolean algebra including OR gate applications,
adders and collections gates, flip-flops and
EET216 Electrical Installations (3 credits) shift registers, counting and timing circuits,
How electricity is generated and distributed; including D/A and A/D conversions and the
interpreting blueprints that represent various application of these concepts to modern circuit
types of electrical systems; evaluating industrial designs. PREREQ: Fundamentals of Electricity;
electrical system requirements; specifying the Fundamentals of Electronics
correct equipment, conductor type and capacity
for electrical systems; the role of each major EET236 Power Plant Operations (3 credits)
component in a utility’s electrical distribution Primary operating systems of coal or natural gas
system; the basic design characteristics of fired steam power plant; fundamental science
underground distribution systems. PREREQ: behind power generation; fuel flow paths; water
Fundamentals of Electricity treatment systems; steam flow paths; boiler,
station electrical power, and
EET218 Basic Industrial Computer Systems other auxiliary equipment. PREREQ:
(3 credits) Fundamentals of Electronics
Programmable controllers found in motor-
control and other industrial systems; EET249 Resident Laboratory (3 credits)
hexadecimal and binary number systems; basic This two-week session includes the use
commands for PLCs; the role of computers in of various measuring instruments for performing
telecommunications systems; an introduction to a series of comprehensive experiments.
common computer network installations, their The experiments are designed to provide
key components and the role they play. familiarization with instrumentation, equipment,
PREREQ: Fundamentals of Electronics preparation of data, and laboratory reporting
techniques. PREREQ: Semester 3
EET221 Pulse Circuits (3 credits)
Pulse Circuits; pulse techniques; pulse
generators; timing and synchronization;
troubleshooting pulse circuits.
PREREQ: Fundamentals of Electronics

94
EET250 Resident Laboratory Training EST200 Fluid Power (3 credits)
(Electronic) (3 credits) This course is a comprehensive overview of
This two-week session includes the use hydraulics and pneumatics, including the basic
of various measuring instruments for performing scientific principles and concepts necessary for
a series of comprehensive experiments. understanding the operation and applications
The experiments are designed to provide of hydraulic and pneumatic components
familiarization with instrumentation, equipment, and systems. Students learn power system
preparation of data, and laboratory reporting controls, system schematics, and essential
techniques. PREREQ: Semester 3 troubleshooting practices. PREREQ: None

EET300 Drafting Electrical and Electronic EST210 AutoCAD® Applications –


Schematics (3 credits) Engineering Technology (3 credits)
In this course you’ll learn basic skills for DC Principles of generator and motor operation;
theory and AC theory related to circuits, learn principles of induction motors and synchronous
the electrical measurement skills needed to motors; performance and speed control;
build a circuit, as well as learn how to create principles of motor control systems; solid-state
schematic drawings using AutoCAD. drive systems; SCRs as AC to DC converters;
installation and maintenance of drive systems.
Engineering Science PREREQ: None

Technology EST220 AutoCAD® Applications –


Electrical/Electronics (3 credits)
EST100 Introduction to Technical Drawings Students are presented with a broad
(3 Credits) introduction into 2-dimensional and
This course provides students with an overview 3-dimensional Computer-Aided Design (CAD)
of visual communication skills necessary to focused on electrical/electronics - specific
successfully complete the wide range of applications. Students will use AutoCad® in
courses in technology programs that require hands-on exercises, assignments, and projects.
learning to read and interpret technical PREREQ: Drafting with AutoCAD®
drawings. Students learn print reading,
interpretation of symbols and abbreviations,
dimensioning, tolerancing, and the application of
English
these skills to actual print reading. The course
ENG100 English Composition (3 credits)
also contains an overview of computer-aided
135 Lecture hours
drawing and its role in modern technology.
This course teaches the skills and techniques
of effectively developing, drafting, and
EST110 Manufacturing Materials and Practices
revising college-level essays toward a specific
(3 credits)
purpose and audience: active reading,
This course covers a comprehensive
prewriting strategies, sentence and paragraph
collection of manufacturing and materials
structure, thesis statements, varied patterns
processing techniques. Students learn the
of development (e.g., illustration, comparison/
historical perspectives and basic science
contrast, classification) critical reading toward
of manufacturing and its related materials,
revision of structure and organization, editing
specific manufacturing methods as they are
for the standard written conventions, use and
applied to specific materials, and the theory
documentation of outside sources. Students
of the automation of today’s manufacturing
submit three essays (process analysis, causal
environment, productivity and quality
analysis, argumentation) and a course journal.
improvement systems. PREREQ: None
PREREQ: None

95
ENG101 Foundation Skills in Writing ENG200 Speech (3 Credits)
(3 Credits) This course provides students with a foundation
This course provides an overview of writing in the basic concepts of public speaking.
styles for technology applications. Students Students will learn how to research, organize,
will review basic grammar, including parts of and write effective speeches; incorporate
speech, active and passive voices, sentence presentation aids; and rehearse and deliver
structure, and paragraph construction. The speeches effectively. Students will prepare,
course also includes practical information on rehearse, record, and submit speeches in
writing memos and emails and organizing a number of rhetorical styles to be graded.
material. PREREQ: None PREREQ: None

ILS103 Information Literacy (formerly ENG300 Advanced Composition (3 Credits)


ENG 103) (1 credit) 45 Lecture hours Course begins with an introduction on how to plan
This course introduces students to the a paper with sources, find sources, take notes,
techniques and strategies necessary to and write a paper; students are guided through
research the processes as they write a literary analysis, an
successfully in a cyber environment. Topics extended definition, an analysis of a short story, an
include the need for information literacy and argumentation essay, and a final paper. PREREQ:
how to formulate a search statement, navigate English Composition
online search engines, cite sources, and
organize and use information honestly and
responsibly. PREREQ: None
Fashion
FSH101 Introduction to the Fashion Industry
ENG115 Introduction to Literature
(3 credits)
(3 credits) 135 Lecture hours
Traces the development of fashion and the
This course will allow you to develop your
fashion industry; shows how consumer demand
critical thinking skills and broaden your
affects fashion marketing; explains fashion
knowledge of the main genres of literature—
change and consumer acceptance; covers
fiction, poetry, and drama. PREREQ: None
market research and analysis; traces the
development, production, and marketing of raw
ENG121 Business and Technical Writing
materials; covers international fashion centers as
(3 credits)
well as retailing, merchandising, and marketing.
This course provides an introduction to the
PREREQ: None
various methods of organizing material for a
professional setting. Students will compose
FSH110 History of Fashion (3 credits)
business documents using the ABC method.
This course presents the history of costume in
These include: memos, emails, outlines, reports
the West. Beginning with ancient times, it covers
and proposals, descriptions, and organizing
the dress of each era in the context of historical
materials. Students also work on honing their
events, societal values, and technology that
grammar skills. PREREQ: None
influenced clothing and its production, how the
organization and function of the fashion industry
ENG122 Technical Writing (3 credits)
changed as it became more complex is also
Specialized training is offered in writing
covered. PREREQ: None
of proposals, reports, instructions, letters,
abstracts, résumés, and more. PREREQ: None
FSH120 Introduction to Textiles (3 credits)
Introduces students to textiles in a non-technical
ENG124 Applied Research Skills (2 credits)
way; covers laws and regulations of the textile
Directed research on topics related to
industry; identifies yarns, fabric formation,
employment searches. Access to the Internet is
coloration, and finishes; examines the properties
required. PREREQ: None
of fibers. PREREQ: Introduction to the Fashion
Industry; Color Theory

96
FSH205 Fashion Promotion (3 credits) FIN310 Corporate Finance (3 Credits)
Students will learn the process of promotion, as This course addresses one of the most
well as the tools available for creating successful important components of every business
campaigns. Emphasis is on the changing nature operation — financial decision making. All
of promotion in a global marketplace; promotion business decisions have some financial
strategies and techniques, personal and non- implications, either directly or indirectly. Many
personal; covers the role and organizational of the financial concepts addressed in this
structure of promotion and advertising and course arise and may be applied to personal
the creative elements involved. PREREQ: financial and economic decisions. It is very
Introduction to the Fashion Industry; Marketing important, therefore, to develop a broad, basic
understanding of the study of finance and
FSH220 Product Development (3 credits) corporate finance. PREREQ: Mathematics for
This course takes the students through the Business and Finance
preproduction processes of apparel product
development. Students will learn how to
coordinate planning, forecasting, fabricating,
Graphic Design
developing silhouettes and specifications,
GRD101 Graphic Design Orientation (1 credit)
pricing, and sourcing. Also covers the evolving
The Graphic Design Orientation course
partnerships among textile suppliers, product
discusses the computer as an artistic medium
developers, manufacturers, and retailers.
and the tools of computer art, as well as the
PREREQ: Introduction to the Fashion Industry
strategies for completing the graphic design
technology course as an independent learner.
Finance PREREQ: None

FIN101 Financial Management (3 credits) GRD105 Color Theory (3 credits)


This course will introduce students to the Color Theory covers the analysis of the dynamic
world of finance, including financial concepts, interaction of color and its implications for
instruments, and financial decision making. designers and artists. This course also covers
Topics covered include financial assets; the physics of color, colored light, colored
investing in long-term assets; capital structure pigments, and the color wheel. Students are
and dividend policy; financial planning and introduced to basic color principles, industry
working capital management. PREREQ: None terminology, Johannes Itten’s color theory and
applications, with an emphasis on manipulating
FIN210 Personal Financial Management color. PREREQ: Graphic Design Orientation
(3 credits)
This course will introduce students to the GRD110 Introduction to Graphic Design
fundamental concepts and importance of (3 credits)
personal financial management, including Introduction to Graphic Design covers the
analysis and management of personal assets basics of design and what distinguishes good
and financial instruments. PREREQ: None design from poor design. This course focuses
on the different components used in design,
FIN305 Securities and Investments (3 credits) such as the four basic design principles, color
In this course, you’ll gain an understanding of relationships, essential aspects of typography,
the steps in making investment decisions, the including contrasts and categories, and
nature of securities and markets, how technical incorporating proximity, alignment, repetition,
analysis is performed, and how to set up a contrast, color, and type into a design. It also
portfolio. PREREQ: None provides tips and tricks on how to create various
pieces. PREREQ: Graphic Design Orientation

97
GRD115 Graphic Design and Production GRD208 Electronic Publishing Projects
(Illustrator®) (3 credits) (3 credits)
This course places emphasis on the In this advanced-level desktop publishing course,
conceptualization of computer illustration students will examine the page-design tools in
techniques using Illustrator® and its depth, thereby improving their production skills.
implementation in page layout. PREREQ: Students will create content for cross-media
Graphic Design Orientation; Color Theory; publishing as well as create an interactive and
Introduction to Graphic Design dynamic Web page. PREREQ: Graphic Design
and Production; Photo Image Editing 1; Electronic
GRD130 Photo Image Editing 1 Publishing
(Photoshop®) (3 credits)
Photo Image Editing 1 begins coverage of GRD212 Corporate Design (3 credits)
Adobe® Photoshop® in regard to the production Corporate Design explores the development of
of print and Web-based graphics. Students learn corporate communications and identity programs.
how to use Photoshop® software and apply Topics covered are trademarks, branding, logo
smart design principles to multimedia products design, brochure design, and online presence
such as print brochures, dynamic graphics, design. PREREQ: Introduction to Graphic Design;
animation, websites, video, and interactive Color Theory; Photo Image Editing 2; Typography
CD-ROM content. PREREQ: Graphic Design
Orientation; Color Theory; Introduction to GRD220 Web Design (3 credits)
Graphic Design Web Design teaches students about creating
Web graphics using Photoshop.® Students
GRD135 Photo Image Editing 2 (3 credits) create graphics for use in Web design and other
Photo Image Editing 2 focuses on visual Web-based projects by completing hands-on
communication through diverse theme-based and case projects and creating professional-
projects where issues of representation and level Web graphics. PREREQ: Photo Image
meaning production are emphasized. It also Editing 1; HTML Coding
addresses main design notions such as visual
organization, information hierarchy, GRD225 Portfolio Development (3 credits)
and typography. PREREQ: Graphic Design Portfolio Development covers the process
Orientation; Introduction to Graphic Design; of developing and maintaining an electronic
Photo Image Editing 1 portfolio. Topics covered are the preparation
and organization of graphic creations, such as
GRD201 Typography (3 credits) logos, websites and brochures. This course
Typography is an exploration of different culminates in the presentation of an electronic
components of type, typefaces, and their portfolio utilizing graphics created throughout
identification, which are legibility, visual this course. PREREQ: Introduction to Graphic
organization, proportion, and weight. When Design, Photo Image Editing 1, Dreamweaver,
and where, procedures, and methods for use and Electronic Publishing
in print and Web-based graphic creations.
PREREQ: Introduction to Graphic Design; Photo
Image Editing 2

GRD205 Electronic Publishing (3 credits)


The Electronic Publishing course focuses on the
integration of text and graphics using desktop
publishing software. The student develops digital
design skills. PREREQ: Introduction to Graphic
Design; Photo Image Editing 2; Typography

98
Health Information HIT113 Medical Information Management and
Office Practice (3 credits) 135 Lecture hours
Technology This course introduces students to the
management of information within a health
HIT100 Introduction to Allied Health care setting. The course focuses on preparing,
(1 credit) 45 Lecture hours correcting, and filing medical records, as well
This course is designed to provide a discussion as communicating with others inside and
of strategies for completing the Allied Health outside of a medical facility. It also covers
programs as an independent learner. In addition, health care delivery systems; information and
it gives an introduction to health care, the communication technologies; and data storage,
allied health industry, and the role that allied retrieval, and security. PREREQ: Introduction
health professionals play in that industry. Focus to Health Information Management, Medical
is on the different elements and jobs in the Terminology, Law and Ethics in Medicine, The
allied health field. The course also provides Confidentiality of Health Information
an overview of the history of medicine and
documentation, health-care reimbursement, HIT115 Reimbursement Methodologies
technology in health care, important professional (3 credits) 45 Lecture hours
skills, and professional organizations helpful to This course is designed to introduce the
allied health professionals. PREREQ: None health information technology student to major
reimbursement systems in the United States.
HIT105 Law and Ethics in Medicine Focus is on prospective payment system,
(3 credits) 135 Lecture hours third-party payers, and billing and insurance
Legal and ethical issues in the delivery of health procedures. The course also covers additional
care are presented. A grounding in the parts of tort information including prepaid health plans, fee-
and contract law that affect health-care delivery is for-service methodologies, chargemasters, fee
set forth along with broad ideas concerning the schedules, and managed care. PREREQ: None
functioning of the legal system. Special attention is
given to confidentiality, privileged communications, HIT130 Electronic Medical Records
informed consent, the elements of and defenses (3 credits)
against malpractice, legal and practical issues The Electronic Medical Records course provides
commonly encountered by medical assistants, a basic overview on how to successfully
end-of-life and beginning-of-life legal and ethical manage electronic medical records (EMRs) in
issues, and the effect of managed care on ethical different health care settings. Students will learn
issues faced by health-care practitioners. PREREQ: EMR concepts, terminology, regulations, and
None procedures, and receive hands-on training using
electronic medical record software.
HIT107 Medical Terminology (3 credits) PREREQ: None
135 Lecture hours
The development of a vocabulary used in HIT201 Quality (2 credits)
medicine by acquiring skills to pronounce, Management/Performance Improvement
define, and spell word terms. Students will This course is designed to introduce the health
analyze and interpret medical reports related to information technology student to principals of
specific body systems. clinical quality management and performance
PREREQ: None improvement in the health-care industry. Focus
is on standards and implementation of quality
HIT109 Confidentiality of Health Information programs and principals and concepts of
(3 credits) 135 Lecture hours performance improvement. The course also
Ethical and legal rules concerning the covers additional areas such as utilization
confidentiality of health information is presented management, risk management, and tools and
with particular emphasis on the Health Insurance techniques used in performance improvement
Portability and Accountability Act. Background and quality management. PREREQ: Medical
material will include operation of the legal Information Management and Office Practice
system and principles of legal liability.
PREREQ: Law and Ethics in Medicine

99
HIT203 Medical Coding (3 credits) HIT210 Healthcare Statistics (3 credits)
135 Lecture hours This course is designed to introduce the health
This course explores the basics of medical information technology student to the calculation,
coding. You’ll learn how to interpret the ICD- compilation, analysis, and presentation of health-
10, HCPCS Level II, and CPT coding manuals care statistics. Focus is on basic descriptive and
and apply them to coding scenarios. You’ll inferential statistics and the concepts of data
examine specialty areas such as cardiology and validity and reliability. The course also covers
obstetrics/gynecology, radiology, pathology, data collection methods, interpretation of data,
and laboratory work. You’ll learn the steps you calculation of statistical formulas, and uniform
need to take in order to assign correct codes reporting requirements. PREREQ: Mathematics for
to diagnoses and procedures. Finally, you’ll Business and Finance
learn how to use each of the coding manuals in
conjunction with the others to create a full set HIT290 Practicum in Health Information
of codes for a patient visit. PREREQ: Medical Technology (4 credits)
Terminology A comprehensive overview designed to prepare
the student to perform functions and demonstrate
HIT207 Medical Transcription (3 credits) competencies related to health information
135 Lecture hours services in a variety of settings. Students will be
An introduction to the technical and legal tested on health information knowledge, perform
aspects of medical transcription, as well as project and research work, practice skills, and
career opportunities available in the field. The gain clinical workplace experience in a variety of
student will begin to transcribe and format settings under the supervision of a clinical practice
various types of medical records. PREREQ: supervisor. PREREQ: The student must have
Medical Terminology, Anatomy and Physiology 1, completed Semesters 1, 2, and 3 and Medical
Anatomy and Physiology 2 Transcription 2.

HIT208 Medical Transcription 2


(3 credits) 135 Lecture hours
Human Resources
Medical Transcription 2 will direct the student on Management
the use of various types of medical transcription,
with an emphasis on increasing speed, HRM201 Human Resources Management
accuracy, and formatting of reports. This course (3 credits)
bridges the gap between Medical Transcription An overview of Human Resources Management
1, with easy-to-understand dictation, and the (HRM), as it’s understood today. This course
harder-to-understand, difficult dictation of the illustrates the dynamic interaction of the
work environment. Medical Transcription 2 will personnel functions with each other and with
provide the student with the skills necessary the objectives of an organization. PREREQ:
to complete complex reports within the Principles of Management
major medical specialties. PREREQ: Medical
Transcription HRM355 Training Concepts (3 credits)
A synthesis of accepted theory regarding
HIT209 Department Management (2 credits) training and the management of the training
Presents the management and supervisory function in organizations and an examination of
functions and skills of a health information successful and unsuccessful training practices.
management department. Focus is on PREREQ: Principles of Management, Human
fundamentals of management, basic Resources Management
management functions, principals of supervision,
and supervision of specific health information
management functions. The course also
covers organizational structure, human
resources management, staff development, and
management budgeting and finance functions.
PREREQ: Medical Information Management and
Office Practice, Reimbursement Methodologies,
Quality Assurance/Performance Improvement.

100
HRM210 Compensation Management (3 credits) HUM106 Interpersonal Communication
The course covers the basic components of a (1 credit) 45 Lecture hours
total compensation package (salary, bonus, and Developing more effective personal
benefits), the development, implementation, communication skills to increase chances for
and maintenance of a program, the impact of professional success; increasing skill levels
internal and external equity, and additional involving the use and selection of words,
factors which must be considered for the gestures, tone of voice, facial expressions,
overall success of a program. listening skills, as well as overall physical
PREREQ: Human Resources Management appearance. PREREQ: None

HRM320 Employee Benefits (3 credits) HUM108 Career Readiness (1 credit)


This course will introduce the many different This course provides an overview of baseline
elements that comprise employee benefits. responsibilities common to most jobs, as well as
The course will not only help the career of personal, people, and workplace skills. Students
the benefit specialist, but it will also cover the will develop an understanding of productivity,
history and many of the governmental issues adaptability, time management, organization,
concerning benefit programs today. Employee prioritization, and goal setting. Students will
Benefits covers the total employee benefit learn effective written and interpersonal
planning process. PREREQ: Human Resources communication skills, decision-making and
Management, Compensation Management problem-solving processes, open-mindedness,
and how to interact with customers in a
HRM350 Labor Relations (3 credits) professional manner with the goal of providing
The study of labor relations examines the customer with a positive experience.
the interactions between organized labor unions Topics include: the importance of teamwork,
and company management. These interactions characteristics of leadership, and strategies for
between unions and management include rights overcoming conflict. PREREQ: None
and responsibilities, negotiations, and collective
bargaining. PREREQ: Human Resources
Management
Industrial Engineering
Technology
Humanities IET105 Introduction to Manufacturing (1 credit)
This course introduces students to the
HUM102 Art Appreciation (3 credits) "who, what, when, how, and why" behind
135 Lecture hours the manufacturing industry. Students will
In this course, the student will gain an become familiar with different manufacturing
understanding of artistic media, historical methods and demonstrate job-specific
periods and artistic movements, the roles of the technical, professional, analytical, and problem
artist and the viewer, and the principles of art solving skills. Students will also be able to
criticism. PREREQ: None identify relevant components, steps of the
manufacturing process and compare different
HUM104 Music Appreciation (3 credits) manufacturing techniques.
135 Lecture hours PREREQ: None
In this course, the student will understand how
to appreciate music and learn about the roles IET110 Manufacturing Processes (4 credits)
of the composer and the listener, the principles Cutting tools; machine tools; welding
of music theory and instrumentation, musically techniques; magneforming; testing of materials;
significant historical periods, and varying styles nondestructive testing techniques; micrometers;
of music. PREREQ: None gauges; basic numerical control. PREREQ:
Foundation Skills in Math

IET121 Engineering Economy (1 credit)


Operating costs; investment methods; interest
tables; engineering valuation.
PREREQ: Foundation Skills in Math

101
IET135 Lean Manufacturing (1 credit)
This course will provide an introduction to
Interior Design
lean manufacturing techniques, the history
BCT101 History of Interior Design (3 credits)
of lean, and continuous improvement (CI)
This introductory course provides a
fundamental principles based upon the Toyota
chronological examination of interior design.
Production System. Students will be able to
Focus is on architectural details, furnishings, and
define the foundation and principles of lean,
decorative objects. PREREQ: None
describe the methods and tools used in lean,
identify continuous-improvement methods and
tools and demonstrate job-specific technical BCT105 Drawing for Interiors (3 credits)
and professional skills. Additional topics: Drawing for Interiors teaches students the
standard work, 5S, the visual workplace, direct simple drawing techniques needed for the
observation, value stream mapping, continuous- preliminary phase of design presentation. Focus
improvement methods and tools, mistake- is on sketching basics—including line, light, and
proofing, and gemba walks. PREREQ: None texture—and perspective drawing. PREREQ:
None
IET235 Operational Analysis (2 credits)
Operation analysis procedures; selection BCT115 Interior Design Fundamentals
of process and tooling; plant layout and material (3 credits)
handling. PREREQ: Foundation Skills in Math Interior Design Fundamentals covers the
basics of the profession for both commercial
IET237 Materials Management and Inventory and residential environments. Topics covered
Control (3 credits) include space planning, environmental
Production scheduling, planning, and MRP; sensitivity, and multicultural design. PREREQ:
capacity management (CRP); production History of Interior Design
activity control; demand forecasting; inventory
processes; warehousing and materials handling; BCT135 Textiles (3 credits)
just-in-time planning; product-quality control; This course provides students with a basic
total-quality management (TQM). knowledge of the production and performance
characteristics of textiles. Topics include fabric
IET243 Industrial Safety (3 credits) development; fibers and their properties;
Procedures for handling various materials; yarn processing and classification; fabrication
operating different kinds of machinery; techniques, such as weaving and knitting; textile
performing job tasks safely; survey of the care and sustainability; and environmental issues
regulations designed to improve industrial associated with the textile industry. PREREQ:
safety. PREREQ: Foundation Skills in Math History of Interior Design; Color Theory; Interior
Design Fundamentals
IET248 CNC Technology (3 credits)
Numerical control basics; how CNC based BCT140 History of Furniture (3 credits)
machine tools operate; basic CNC programming; This course profiles the history of furniture
angular and contour programming; types of development from the ancient world to modern-
CNC equipment; machining centers; future of
day styles. Students will learn about how the
numerical control.
cultural, political, social, and economic factors
of each time period influenced furniture designs
IET260 Resident Laboratory Training
and the creative arts. PREREQ: History of Interior
(Industrial) (3 credits)
Design; Interior Design Fundamentals; Textiles
Students will be required to complete a series
of comprehensive practical experiments using
BCT145 CAD for Interiors (3 credits)
various measuring instruments. Experiments
are designed to provide familiarization with CAD for Interiors uses a step-by-step approach
instrumentation, equipment, preparation of data, to teach beginning interior designers how to
and laboratory reporting techniques. Students create professional floor plans for their design
may earn credit for this by completing the projects. Students will learn how to draw a
course at an approved school or by submitting base plan; add text, dimensions, and layers;
a life/work experience portfolio demonstrating and create interior sections and elevations.
completion of similar skills to those emphasized AutoCAD® software provided with the course.
in the laboratory training. PREREQ: Semester 3 PREREQ: Drawing for Interiors

102
BCT150 Building Systems for Interior Design BCT215 Codes for Interiors (3 credits)
(3 credits) Codes for Interiors covers the breadth of codes
This course explains technical building and standards needed by interior designers.
systems and engineering issues to interior It discusses occupancy classifications;
designers. Topics include heating and air performance codes; fire codes; building and
conditioning systems, environmental issues, finish standards; plumbing, mechanical, and
water and waste, thermal comfort, electricity, electrical codes; energy codes; and Americans
lighting, security and communications systems, with Disabilities standards. PREREQ: Building
fire safety, and transportation systems. Systems for Interior Design; Residential Design;
PREREQ: Interior Design Fundamentals Commercial Design 1

BCT165 Materials for Interiors (3 credits) BCT225 Professional Practice (3 credits)


Materials for Interiors covers the nonstructural Professional Practice covers the legal, financial,
materials used in typical design projects. management, marketing, administrative, and
Topics include paint, wallcoverings, carpet, ethical issues encountered by interior designers.
wood, ceilings, and kitchen and bathroom Topics include establishing personal and
materials. Special attention is paid to professional goals, establishing and growing a
environmental concerns and recycling new design business, marketing and developing
of materials. PREREQ: Interior Design your business, and determining project
Fundamentals; Textiles; History of Furniture compensation and fees. PREREQ: Marketing and
Sales in Interior Design; Codes for Interiors
BCT201 Residential Design (3 credits)
This course teaches the fundamental skills BCT230 Kitchen and Bath Design (3 credits)
needed to create well-designed interior This course covers the fundamental design
spaces of all types—from entryways and principles and planning procedures for kitchens
hallways to kitchens, bathrooms, and living and bathrooms. Design codes and structural
spaces. Focus is on ergonomics and required requirements are covered first, followed by
clearances, organizational flow, building detailed explanations of the components of
codes, electrical and mechanical concerns, each room. Special emphasis is placed on
lighting, fixtures, storage, and appliances in cabinetry, countertops, storage, appliances,
residential spaces. PREREQ: Building Systems plumbing, electrical/mechanical considerations,
for Interior Design; Materials for Interiors and sustainability. PREREQ: Residential Design;
Codes for Interiors
BCT202 Commercial Design 1 (3 credits)
Students in this course will learn about all BCT235 Architectural Lighting Design
aspects of commercial space planning, (3 credits)
including code requirements, design Students enrolled in this course will learn interior
applications, and historical perspectives and exterior lighting techniques for residential
of commercial buildings. Types of facilities and commercial spaces. The concepts of
covered include office spaces, lodging facilities, daylighting, special effect lighting, retrofitting,
and health-care facilities. PREREQ: Building and energy code calculations are introduced.
Systems for Interior Design; Materials for Also discussed are lighting applications
Interiors for specific spaces, including residences,
workspaces, classrooms, health care settings,
BCT205 Marketing and Sales in Interior hospitality settings, and retail settings. PREREQ:
Design (3 credits) Building Systems for Interior Design; Materials
This course teaches beginning interior for Interiors
designers to develop effective marketing
strategies for their businesses. Course topics
include establishing a professional brand
and profile, targeting and qualifying clients,
building strong and lasting client relationships,
creating contracts, handling complaints,
and charging for services. PREREQ: Interior
Design Fundamentals

103
BCT245 Environmentally Responsible Design (3 credits)
(3 credits) Provides a concise introduction to electronic
This course teaches design professionals how commerce with balanced coverage of both
to apply “green” principles to their projects. technology and business topics; contains a
Topics include global sustainability, indoor comprehensive online companion that links the
environmental quality, energy and water concepts in the book to real online examples;
issues, evaluating finishes and furnishings, security, implementation, ethics, and legal issues
evaluation instruments, certification programs, in electronic commerce; case studies of real
and U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) and businesses. PREREQ: Computer Literacy
Environmentally Responsible Interior Design
(ERID) specifications. PREREQ: Building Systems INT120 HTML Coding (3 credits)
for Interior Design; Materials for Interiors; Codes Teaches how to create Web pages with
for Interiors hypertext links, tables, frames, and forms; covers
cascading style sheets, programming with
BCT248 Commercial Design 2 (3 credits) JavaScript,® working with content and layout,
This course is a continuation of Commercial controlling mouse and keyboard events, and
Design 1. Students enrolled in this course will creating new frames and windows. PREREQ:
learn about all aspects of commercial space Computer Applications
planning, including code requirements, design
applications, and historical perspectives INT125 Internet Server Environments
of commercial buildings. Types of facilities (3 credits)
covered include food and beverage facilities, Designed to teach Java™ to those studying
retail spaces, senior living facilities, institutional programming for the first time, but is also
facilities, and cultural/recreational areas. appropriate for those building on experiences
PREREQ: Commercial Design 1 in another programming language. Introduces
object-oriented techniques early; features short
BCT300 Drafting and Engineering code examples built from the bottom up; offers
Mechanics (3 credits) more thorough coverage of the basics with
In this course you’ll learn how to prepare many examples; devotes an entire chapter to
drawings using AutoCAD for the four drafting Swing. PREREQ: Computer Literacy
disciplines: structural drafting, civil drafting,
HVAC/sheet metal drafting, or electrical/ INT128 Network Protocols and
electronic drafting. This course explains how Internetworking (3 credits)
civil drafting correlates with surveying and Covers topics related to how computers
reviews the methods, laws, and procedures communicate with each other, how computers
used in engineering mechanics. are grouped together to form networks,
networking concepts and issues that are key
Internet Technology to the successful implementation of computer
networks, and the different networking
implementation strategies and technologies
INT101 Computer Technology Orientation
currently available. PREREQ: Computer Literacy;
(1 credit)
Internet Server Environments
Overview of Internet technology; role of
technology in society; strategies for completing
INT130 Internet Security (3 credits)
the Internet Technology Program as an
Explores Web security risks and how to minimize
independent learner. PREREQ: None
them; aimed at Web users, administrators, and
content providers, and it covers cryptography,
INT114 Internet Marketing and E-Commerce
SSL, the Public Key Infrastructure, digital
signatures, digital certificates, privacy threats
(cookies, log files, Web logs, Web bugs), hostile
mobile code, and Web publishing (intellectual
property, P3P, digital payments, client-side
digital signatures, code signing, PICS). PREREQ:
Computer Literacy

104
INT201 Web Site Project Management INT220 Programming in CGI/Perl (3 credits)
(3 credits) Teaches how to create common gateway
Provides future developers and designers interface script (CGI) using practical extraction
information on how to think about creating and report language, more commonly known
a successful Website; covers planning and as Perl; covers how to add functionality to
analysis, designing and developing, and web pages using features such as hyperlinks,
marketing. This text is for the programmer forms, data files, and databases; create truly
or developer who is serious about exploring interactive Web applications using subroutines,
the nature of a successful Website. PREREQ: string manipulation, cookies, hidden fields, and
Computer Literacy redirects. PREREQ: HTML Coding; Programming
in Java™
INT205 Introduction to Internet Multimedia
(3 credits) INT225 Introduction to Database Technology
Provides an overview of multimedia on the (3 credits)
Web and multimedia elements such as text Offers an overview of essential database
and graphics, as well as sound, animation, concepts, with a focus on the relational model
and video; describes multimedia-authoring of database management; covers Structured
programs and the development and design of Query Language (SQL) design methodology,
multimedia titles; covers the management and functions of a database management system,
distribution of multi-media titles. and database administration; includes advanced
PREREQ: Computer Applications topics such as object-oriented (OO) databases,
data warehouses, and client server systems.
INT210 Creating Web Pages with PHP PREREQ: Internet Server Environments
(3 credits)
Students will master the basics of coding INT238 Multimedia and Interactive (3 credits)
in PHP by creating web pages, not by spending This course includes instruction in
time wading through manuals; provides step-by- Dreamweaver,® Flash,® and Fireworks,® along
step instructions on how to get MySQL, Apache, with integration of the three applications.
and PHP up and running on a Windows® or Students develop a web page and work
Linux® machine; teaches how to use PHP with text and graphics, links, and tables in
variables; display dynamic content; use cookies; Dreamweaver;® add objects and animation to
create a contact management system; create a web page with Fireworks;® and draw, work
custom logs and reports; authenticate and track with symbols and create interactivity and special
users; display dynamic content. PREREQ: HTML effects with Flash.®
Coding PREREQ: HTML Coding

INT215 Programming in Java™ (3 credits) INT242 Advanced Database


Introduces object-oriented techniques early; Technology-Oracle: SQL (3 credits)
features short code examples built from the Covers the design, implementation, and
bottom up; offers more thorough coverage management of database systems; takes
of the basics, explanations and examples the student clearly and effectively through
using the StringBuffer class; devotes an entire the entire process of database development
chapter to Swing; designed to teach Java™ to and implementation. PREREQ: Introduction to
those studying programming for the first time, Database Technology
but is also appropriate for those building on
experiences in another programming language.
PREREQ: HTML Coding

105
Marketing Mathematics
MKT301 Marketing (3 credits) MAT100 Foundation Skills in Math (3 credits)
This course covers the principles of marketing. Students learn the essential math skills
Topics covered include assessing, analyzing, necessary for future success in an AS
understanding, and targeting the marketplace, technology program. The course of study
as well as the creation, capture, delivery, and includes a review of basic math functions,
communi­cation of value. Students will learn including trades-based examples, the metric
how to develop a marketing plan, use social system, formulas, introductory algebra, applied
and mobile marketing effectively, integrate geometry, and some practical applications of
ethics into marketing strategies, influence trigonometry. PREREQ: None
the consumer decision process, perform
market research, perform SWOT and STP MAT102 Mathematical Applications (3 credits)
analyses, make decisions concerning branding, This course provides a foundation in basic
packaging, and developing new products, price mathematical operations. Subjects covered
products and services fairly, set advertising include percentages, discounts, interest, pricing,
objectives, and more. PREREQ: None depreciation, insurance, symbols and their
applications, equations and formulas, and the
MKT310 Advertising Principles (3 credits) importance of statistics. PREREQ: None
Students will learn about the global effect
of advertising and integrated marketing MAT106 Mathematics for Business and
communications (IMC), as well as how Finance (3 credits) 135 Lecture hours
to use advertising and IMC strategies to This course will provide the student with a
create compelling marketing strategies and foundation in basic mathematical operations.
campaigns. PREREQ: Marketing Topics covered include percentages; discounts;
interest; present worth; sinking funds; installment
MKT320 Consumer Behavior (3 credits) buying; pricing; depreciation; investments;
This course will teach you the principles insurance; use of symbols and their applications,
involved in how and why consumers make equations and formulas; and the importance of
decisions. Topics covered include influencing statistics. PREREQ: None
consumer behavior, consumer decision-
making, effects on research and marketing, MAT110 Technical Mathematics 1 (2 credits)
factors that affect purchasing behavior, and Use of formulas; algebraic operations;
consumer acceptance of products. PREREQ: use of determinants; use of exponents;
Marketing logarithms. PREREQ: None

MKT340 Retail Management (3 credits) MAT115 Intermediate Algebra (3 credits)


This course is designed to introduce students Study basic algebraic concepts. Review the
to retailing in a rapidly changing environment. systems of equations, polynomials, and radicals.
Topics covered include organization of retail Learn how to factor polynomial expressions and
stores, basics of retailing, management of a simplify rational expressions. PREREQ: None
successful retail business, and merchandising
principles. PREREQ: Marketing MAT122 Technical Mathematics 2 (2 credits)
Practical geometry; plane trigonometry;
MKT260 Marketing Research (3 credits) polygons and solids; angles; trigonometric
Nature and scope of marketing research; functions. PREREQ: Technical Mathematics 1
sampling and sampling methods; primary
and secondary data sources; questionnaire MAT140 Medical Mathematics (3 credits)
scales; data analysis; development of summary This course provides a review of basic
statistics. PREREQ: Business Statistics math and then covers medication
administration, systems of measurement, and
calculating medication dosages. PREREQ:
Mathematical Applications

106
MAT210 Business Statistics (3 credits) MAT415 Research and Statistics (3 Credits)
Presentation of data; frequency distribution; Your Research and Statistics course addresses
averages; dispersion and skewness; index the application of scientific methods of inquiry to
numbers; time series analysis; correlation various research goals. You’ll be introduced to
and forecasting; the theory of probability and the research methods used by criminal justice
statistical inference. PREREQ: Mathematics for professionals to prove or disprove criminal
Business and Finance justice theories and to evaluate applications and
policies; Business Statistics
MAT215 Merchandising Math (3 credits)
Students will learn the concepts of profit and
the calculation, interpretation, and analysis
Mechanical Engineering
of the profit-loss statement; pricing factors Technology
used in buying decisions and the calculations
used when pricing and/or repricing retail MET100 Orientation to Engineering
merchandise; the calculations of the various Technology (1 credit)
types of markup; procedure of determining the This course discusses the fundamentals of
total value of the stock-on-hand and shortages; various technologies which are encountered
the planning and control of stocks and in daily life such as smart building, internet and
purchases; as well as invoice mathematics. web, and the traction control system in cars.
You’ll learn how electricity and natural gas is
MAT220 Analytic Geometry and Calculus generated and transported, and you'll explore
(4 credits) the requirements of various types of technician
Rectangular coordinates; graphics of linear jobs. PREREQ: None
equation; average rate of change; applications
of integrals; derivatives and their applications; MET101 Basic Drafting (3 credits)
applications of calculus to shapes and moments. Recognizing and interpreting various types of
PREREQ: Foundation Skills in Math drawings; using drafting equipment; drawing
techniques; creating projections; adding
MAT222 Precalculus (3 credits) dimensions, sections, auxiliary views, and
This course covers precalculus concepts that breaks to drawings; geometric drawing systems.
all college students need as prerequisites to PREREQ: None
calculus and other related courses required in
many undergraduate majors. Specific topics MET123 Engineering Materials (2 credits)
include exponents, logarithms, sequences, Composition and properties of metals, ceramics,
series, trigonometric functions, analytic concrete, glass, graphite, plastics, and wood.
trigonometry, systems of equations and PREREQ: Foundation Skills in Math
inequalities, matrices, conic sections, polar
coordinates, and limits. PREREQ: Intermediate MET126 Mechanics of Materials (2 credits)
Algebra Simple stresses; welded, bolted, and riveted
joints; fixed and moving loads on beams;
MAT245 Applied Mathematics (3 credits) reaction at beam support; theory of column
The practical application of calculus to design; radius of gyration.
electronics; graphic differentiation; partial PREREQ: Engineering Mechanics
derivatives; the application of double integrals
to electrical circuits. PREREQ: Analytic MET170 Engineering Mechanics (3 credits)
Geometry and Calculus Branches of engineering mechanics;
free-body diagrams; kinematics; force-mass
MAT260 Survey of Mathematics (3 credits) acceleration method; impulse momentum;
Designed for liberal arts and business majors. collision of two bodies. PREREQ: Foundation
A sampling of the history of mathematics and Skills in Math
calculations using algebra, geometry, and
trigonometry; problems and exercises that
provide “real life” applications of concepts.
PREREQ: Mathematics for Business and Finance,
Medical Math

107
MET202 Drafting with AutoCAD® (3 credits) MET242 Tool Design 2 (3 credits)
Computer-aided drafting and design systems; This course will introduce the student to the
AutoCAD® menus and features; file and entity various methods used in the design of dies and
creation; drawing organization; displaying, the processes used for the joining of materials.
modifying, and annotating drawings; data We also will cover the use of presses and the
exchange and output methods. PREREQ: uses of forging techniques to form materials.
Introduction to Technical Drawings Finally, the course will cover how computers
are used in the tool and die industry. PREREQ:
MET220 Fluid Mechanics (3 credits) Tool Design 1
Properties of materials; intensity of
pressure; center of pressure; flow of water MET243 Tool Design (3 credits)
in open channels; rate of discharge through In the course, the word tool refers to devices
water. PREREQ: Engineering Mechanics used in manufacturing industries. These
devices, or tools, include cutting tools, jigs,
MET221 Quality Control Systems (3 credits) fixtures, gages, and so on. The specific types
Establishing quality systems; interpreting of tools used in a particular manufacturing plant
conventional and GD&T system drawings; depend on the product the plant produces.
setting up and using inspection tools and Tool design involves the definition of a need
equipment; developing part acceptance for a tool, analysis of that need, collection of
procedures; statistical process control (SPC) data for the design, preliminary design, final
fundamentals and practical applications. design, toolmaking, application, and testing. To
PREREQ: Foundation Skills in Math be a tool designer, a person needs a working
knowledge of the following major subject
MET231 Mechanical Design 1 (3 credits) areas: mathematics (algebra, trigonometry, and
Stress analysis; work, energy and power; geometry), engineering drawing, manufacturing
design stress; moment diagrams; friction; processes, machine tools, and properties of
lubrication systems; ball and roller bearings. engineering materials. Today, tool designers
PREREQ: Mechanics of Materials; Manufacturing use computers to prepare tool drawings and to
Processes design tools. PREREQ: Manufacturing Processes,
Manufacturing Materials and Practices. PREREQ:
MET232 Mechanical Design 2 (3 credits) Manufacturing Processes
Shaft design and seals; fasteners; couplings;
welding and weld designs; belting; power MET245 Geometric Dimensioning and
screws; gears; cams; flywheels; fluid power; Tolerancing (3 credits)
governors; professional registration. This course focuses on the use of the
PREREQ: Mechanical Design 1 geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GDT)
system in the design and manufacture of
MET240 Electro/Mechanical Control detailed parts and assemblies. Students will
Technology (3 credits) learn how to use and interpret GDT drawing
Recognizing control system types; various symbols, how to adjust manufacturing and
types of feedback loops; designing digital inspection processes to meet the requirements
and analog systems; operation of controlled of GDT specifications and evaluate the use of
and sensing devices; system evaluation and the geometric dimensioning and tolerancing
troubleshooting. PREREQ: Foundation Skills in methods and specifications used in modern
Math and Physical Science manufacturing. Students will also be able to
demonstrate effective quantitative skills along
MET241 Tool Design 1 (3 credits) with job-specific technical and professional
This course will introduce the student to the skills. PREREQ: Foundation Skills in Math
fundamentals of designing manufacturing tooling.
The course will cover the basic tooling concepts,
the material used for tooling, and the concepts
of work holders, jigs,and fixtures. The course
will also introduce the student to the process of
geometric dimensioning and tolerancing, and
discuss its relationship to the design of tooling.
PREREQ: Manufacturing Processes
108
MET248 Industrial Plastics (3 credits) MAS205 Clinical Procedures Lab (1 credit)
Students receive an introduction to the basic 45 Lab hours
chemical principles that are relevant to the Students will be initiated into the clinical aspects of
plastics industry. They will understand the medical assisting, vital signs, and medical asepsis.
properties and uses for various types of plastics, Students will receive a clinical skills kit that will
how to test and identify the plastic’s properties, allow them to receive the hands-on training for
and the effects of introducing certain additives. those required skill sets. Students will demonstrate
The course also includes a discussion of competencies in each clinical skill by recording
manufacturing processes, such as molding, themselves performing the skill and performing the
machining, finishing, material selection, process skill under the supervision of an approved proctor.
control and extruding. PREREQ: None Each skill must be successfully demonstrated
and approved by Penn Foster faculty in order
MET249 Resident Laboratory (3 credits) to earn credit for the course and advance to
Students will be required to complete a series the externship. All costs associated with the
of comprehensive practical experiments using procedures lab course are the responsibility of the
various measuring instruments. Experiments student. These costs aren’t included in the tuition.
are designed to provide familiarization with PREREQ: Clinical Procedures
instrumentation, equipment, preparation of data,
and laboratory reporting techniques. Students MAS206 Clinical Procedures Lab 2 (1 credit)
may earn credit for this by completing the 45 Lab hours
course at an approved school or by submitting The students will continue with the clinical
a life/work experience portfolio demonstrating aspects of medical assisting: sterilization and
completion of similar skills to those emphasized disinfection, appropriate site placement for
in the laboratory training. PREREQ: Semester 3 EKG leads, identifying vein for venipuncture,
MET300 Precision Machining collecting a sputum specimen, OSHA, CLIA,
Operations (3 credits) patient education for a mid-stream urine
In this course you’ll learn the basic concepts of specimen, pediatric mensuration, and educating
milling programs, various lathe operations and a patient on metered dose inhaler. Students
safety requirements, and the major components will continue to use the materials required to
of machining centers. complete the skills from the clinical skill kit
provided to the student for Clinical Procedures
Medical Assistant Lab 1. Students will demonstrate competencies
in each clinical skill by recording themselves
performing the skill and performing the skill
MAS204 Clinical Procedures Lab 1 (1 credit)
under the supervision of an approved proctor.
45 Lab hours
Each skill must be successfully demonstrated
Students will be initiated into the clinical aspects
and approved by Penn Foster faculty in order
of medical assisting, vital signs, and medical
to earn credit for the course and advance to
asepsis. Students will receive a clinical skills
the externship. All costs associated with the
kit that will allow them to receive the hands-
procedures lab course are the responsibility of
on training of required skill sets. Students will
the student. These costs are not included in the
demonstrate competencies in each clinical skill
tuition. PREREQ: Clinical Procedures Theory 2
by recording themselves performing the skill
and performing the skill under the supervision
of an approved proctor. Each skill must be
successfully demonstrated and approved by
Penn Foster faculty in order to earn credit for
the course and advance to the externship. All
costs associated with the procedures lab course
are the responsibility of the student. These costs
are not included in the tuition. PREREQ: Clinical
Procedures Theory 1

109
MAS219 Externship 1 (1 credit) MAS225 Externship (3 credits)
45 Externship hours 160 Externship hours
When the student completes all of ALH209 When the student has completed all modules
Clinical Procedures Theory 1 and MAS204 and proctored exams in the semester with a
Clinical Procedures Lab 1, the student would 70% or greater and has met all the externship
be able to begin clinical hours. The student will requirements, he or she may begin clinical hours.
need to complete hours in a health-care setting The student will be required to complete a daily
in order to be able to obtain all of the required journal of his or her experiences and document
skills completed. The student will be required to how he or she is complet¬ing the course
complete a daily journal of his/her experiences objectives. The externship is 160 hours, unpaid.
and document how he/she is completing the Recommended sites in this semester may include
course objectives. Forty clinical hours would cardiology, ambulatory surgery, neurological, OB/
be required in this semester. Sites required in GYN, pediatrics, gastroenterology, family practice,
this semester would include a family practice. and urgent care sites. These would be the
Students would need to have completed every typical sites where the skills that are necessary to
single skill to graduate with no exceptions. develop are performed.
PREREQ: Clinical Procedures Theory 1, Clinical
Procedures Lab 1
Nutrition
MAS220 Externship (4 credits)
NTR203 Sports Nutrition (3 credits)
200 Externship hours
Sport-specific nutrition; aerobic and anaerobic
When the student completes all the academic
metabolism; the onset of fatigue; carbohydrate,
courses and the clinical procedures lab, the
protein, and fat requirements; vitamins and
student will extern in a health-care setting. The
minerals; hydration; the glycemic index; pre-,
student will use his or her knowledge and skills
during-, and post-exercise consumption;
derived from the medical assistant program
ergogenic aids; weight management; and body
and demonstrate competencies in the areas
composition. PREREQ: None
of clinical, administrative, and general medical
assisting. The externship will be for the duration
of 200 hours. PREREQ: Semesters 1-4 Paralegal Studies
MAS221 Externship 2 (2 credits) PLS101 Introduction to Paralegal Studies
160 Externship hours (1 credit)
When the student completes all of ALH211 Occupation of the paralegal; strategies for
Clinical Procedures Theory 2 and MAS206 completing the paralegal studies program as
Clinical Procedures Lab 2, the student would an independent learner; value of the paralegal
be able to begin clinical hours. The student will in the practice of law as it’s conducted in
need to complete hours in a health-care setting the traditional legal community as well as
in order to be able to get all of the required in government, education, and business.
skills completed. The student will be required to PREREQ: None
complete a daily journal of his/her experiences
and document how he/she is completing the PLS105 Legal Terminology (2 credits)
course objectives. One hundred sixty clinical Basic legal terminology needed to embark on a
hours would be required in this second career as a paralegal; avoiding inaccuracies that
semester. PREREQ: Clinical Procedures Theory can give rise to serious legal consequences;
2, Clinical Procedures Lab 2 basics of critical thinking in the drafting of good
legal arguments. PREREQ: None

110
PLS110 Ethics (2 credits) PLS211 Criminal Litigation (3 credits)
Professional responsibilities that apply to Introduction to the practice and theory
paralegals as they assist their employers of criminal law; substantive criminal
and their clients, including maintaining law; criminal procedure; criminal responsibility;
confidentiality and competence; handling fees major felonies recognized in most, if not all,
and funds carefully; and avoiding unauthorized jurisdictions; constitutional dimensions of
practice of law, conflicts of interest, and criminal procedure; practical aspects of the
potential malpractice. PREREQ: None criminal justice process. PREREQ: None

PLS113 Law and the Legal System (2 credits) PLS213 Family Law (3 credits)
How history has shaped the organization Description of the current state of family
and structure of our contemporary courts; law and the role of the attorney-paralegal team
definition of law; moral or value systems from within it; changes in the practice of family law.
which our laws have sprung; how PREREQ: None
the law works. PREREQ: Legal Terminology
PLS215 Real Estate Law (3 credits)
PLS114 Investigations and Interviews (2 Introductory course in real property law;
credits) basics of real property law; areas of a modern
Types of questions that can be used in an real estate practice; preparation for assisting
interview; identification of the objectives of transactional real estate attorneys; legal forms
an interview; ethical considerations about used in real estate law. PREREQ: None
interviewing; summarizing the information
obtained through an interview. PREREQ: PLS217 Wills, Trusts, and Estate
Law and the Legal System Administration (3 credits)
Basic, practical, everyday duties of paralegals
PLS121 Torts (3 credits) working in the fields of wills, trusts, and estate
Principles of tort law that an attorney administration; terminology and general
applies in a personal injury practice; the principles of law that are the basis for drafting
importance of the attorney-paralegal team wills and trusts; planning and administering
in the practice of personal injury law; basics estates. PREREQ: None
of the legal system, and the elements of the
most common intentional and unintentional
torts are discussed. PREREQ: Interpersonal PC Maintenance
Communication; Investigations and Interviews Technology
PLS202 Legal Research and Writing (4 PCM101 Orientation to PC Maintenance
credits) Technology (1 credit)
Provides training in the kind of research and A discussion of strategies for completing
writing that students will actually be doing as the PC support technology program as an
paralegals, including the use of lexis.com, other independent learner. PREREQ: None
online resources, and traditional print sources,
in order to complete three writing and research PCM103 Introduction to PC Repair (2 credits)
projects. PREREQ: None This course provides the student with a
broad view of PC repair, focusing on the
PLS205 Civil Litigation (3 credits) essential elements of hardware and software,
Use of the court system to resolve disputes; as well as the importance of safety. It also
involvement of paralegals in litigation support, explains the essential characteristics of a PC
including discovery; alternative dispute maintenance technician and the various types
resolution methods; how paralegals can of employment available. PREREQ: Computer
develop their skills as arbitrators and/or Literacy
mediators in these methods. PREREQ: None

111
PCM105 PC Hardware 1 (3 credits) SCI136 Anatomy and Physiology 2 (3 credits)
Defines and describes the elements and 135 Lecture hours
function of hardware devices that are part of a A continuation of Anatomy and Physiology
modern personal computer system. PREREQ: 1. Topics include the cardiovascular system,
Introduction to PC Repair the lymphatic system, immunity and infection
control, respiration, digestion, nutrition, the
PCM106 PC Hardware 2 (3 credits) urinary system, reproduction, and genetics.
This course provides the student with more PREREQ: Anatomy and Physiology 1
sophisticated techniques in PC repair,
including external i/o devices, printers, SCI140 Nutrition (3 credits)
notebooks/laptops/PDAs, purchasing and 135 Lecture hours
building PCs, troubleshooting, support, virus Personal decision making about nutrition;
protection, data protection, and recovery. nutrition science; water; exercise; human
PREREQ: PC Hardware 1 growth and aging; safety of the food supply; the
global view. PREREQ: None
PCM107 PC Operating Systems (3 credits)
This course provides a systematic overview SCI162 Physics (3 credits)
of operating systems, including Windows® Heat; electricity; light; sound; the nature
operating systems as well as Mac operating and properties of each; circuits; infrasonics and
systems. The course also describes the use of ultrasonics. PREREQ: Foundation Skills in Math
software for virus protection, data protection
and recovery. PREREQ: PC Hardware 2 SCI165 Technical Science (2 credits)
Use of metrics; nature of heat; expansion
Science of gases; fundamental laws of chemistry;
organic chemistry. PREREQ: Foundation Skills
in Math
SCI110 Earth Science (3 credits)
Surveys a broad range of topics within
SCI167 Physical Science (3 credits)
the fields of geology, meteorology,
Principles that define and govern the physical
oceanography, and astronomy. PREREQ: None
universe as we know it; chemistry; physics,
earth and space sciences. PREREQ: Foundation
SCI120 Introduction to Biology (3 credits)
Skills in Math
135 Lecture hours
An introductory course that explains the origin
of life and the relationships between all living Social Science
things. It describes how a significant number
of organisms are structured and how they SSC105 World Civilizations (3 credits)
work, in order to enable students to discuss This course serves as an introduction to many
intelligently the various forms of life and their of the major events of the fifteenth through
processes. PREREQ: None twenty-first centuries and examines the causal
relationships between events and trends.
SCI135 Anatomy and Physiology 1 PREREQ: None
(3 credits) 135 Lecture hours
The anatomy and physiology of the human SSC125 Introduction to Sociology (3 Credits)
body is presented as an integrated science. Course begins with an introduction to the field
Each major body system is described and of sociology; discusses social structure and
analyzed to illustrate normal function as well as social interaction through groups, networks,
pathology. Topics include basic biochemical and organizations; also discusses deviance,
elements, skin, bone, muscles, the nervous crime, and social control; describes the effects
system, the senses, and the endocrine system. of stratification, racial and ethnic inequality,
PREREQ: None sex, gender, and sexuality; discusses the role
of health, family, education, and religion in
sociology; concludes with the topics of politics,
the economy, population, social movements,
technology, and social change. PREREQ: None

112
SSC130 Essentials of Psychology (3 credits)
135 Lecture hours
Veterinary Technology
This course covers biology and behavior, VET101 Orientation to Veterinary Technology
consciousness, memory, thought and language, (1 credit)
intelligence, personality and gender, stress, and Overview of veterinary medicine and veterinary
community influences. PREREQ: None technology; roles of the various members of the
veterinary health care team; professional ethics
SSC200 History of Labor in the United States and legal aspects of veterinary practice; aspects
(3 credits) of distance education in veterinary technology
This course introduces students to the and strategies for success. PREREQ: None
labor movement in the United States using
readings, online discussion, research and VET102 Introduction to Veterinary Technology
writing. Students will examine critical aspects (2 credits)
of the past, present and future of the U.S. Introduction to animal science and an orientation
labor movement. This course is appropriate to career opportunities in the field of animal
for students with some knowledge of the care; typical behavior characteristics of animal
labor movement who want to reflect upon the species with regard to humane restraint and
workings, history, and challenges of organized handling; the veterinary technician’s role in
labor activities specific to the U.S. workforce. patient history, physical exam, grief counseling,
PREREQ: None and client education; introduction to medical
terminology. PREREQ: None
SSC260 Adolescence and Adulthood
(3 Credits) VET105 Veterinary Office Management
This course will explore the lives and diverse (2 credits)
experiences of young people focusing on Veterinary technician’s role in practice
biological & cognitive foundations, cultural management; accounting basics; personnel
contexts and the media, gender, identity, management; leadership skills; stress
family relationships, peers and friends, dating/ management; customer relations; practice
love/sexuality, school, work, and the future. ethics. PREREQ: None
Problems such as drug use, violence, eating
disorders, suicide, and teen pregnancy will be VET106 Veterinary Office Management and
discussed. PREREQ: None Skill with People (3 credits)
This course will introduce students to the
SSC265 Introduction to Public Policy various support staff positions within a veterinary
(3 Credits) practice. Students will discover how the
This course examines the aspects and veterinary practice operates in terms of bringing
institutions involved in the development in clients, facility care and maintenance, as well
of public policy. The course is a survey of as recordkeeping and filing. Students will learn
issues in American public policy as will aid the art of communication between the staff and
the student’s ability to formulate, assess, and the clients, from improving speech, managing
evaluate public policy. Students will also obtain telephone calls, to making appointments and
knowledge of substantive policy issues being greeting clients. Students will acquire skills
discussed and debated in government today. for finding a job, including where to look for
PREREQ: None a job, creating a résumé, and preparing for
an interview. Also presented in this course is
SSC310 Sociology of Diversity (3 Credits) information about personal growth, including
This course examines minority groups and the importance of continuing education, time
diverse heritages in contemporary society and money management, as well as managing
from a sociological perspective and explores stress. PREREQ: None
the current trends and issues in contemporary
society such as immigration, assimilation,
and acculturation. PREREQ: Introduction to
Sociology

113
VET110 Medical Nursing for Veterinary VET124 Pharmacology for Veterinary
Technicians (3 credits) Technicians (3 credits)
Veterinary emergency care, first aid, Use of drugs in veterinary medicine;
wound and bandage management, dental introduction to drug testing methodology and
prophylaxis, general nursing care, and sample the use/handling of prescriptions; calculation of
collection and treatment techniques. PREREQ: dosages and administration techniques; drug
Introduction to Veterinary Technology, Animal actions, interactions, and adverse reactions.
Anatomy and Physiology 1 and 2 PREREQ: Introduction to Biology, Medical
Mathematics, Medical Nursing for Veterinary
VET113 Animal Anatomy and Physiology 1 Technicians
(4 credits)
Structures and function of the animal body with VET130 Practicum 1 (4 credits)
emphasis on the similarities and differences The first of two clinical practicums at a
of domestic animals. Principles of biology, veterinary hospital, be part of the working
body organization and metabolism of cells, veterinary team and practice the knowledge
tissues, and organ systems, including the and skills acquired from semesters 1 and 2.
respiratory, digestive, skeletal, muscular, and PREREQ: Semesters 1 and 2
cardiovascular systems. PREREQ: Introduction
to Biology VET131 Clinical Externship 1 (4 credits)
The first of two clinical externships at a
VET114 Animal Anatomy and Physiology 2 veterinary hospital, be part of the working
(4 credits) veterinary team and practice the knowledge
Continuation of Anatomy and Physiology 1; and skills acquired from semesters 1 and 2.
integumentary, urinary, and endocrine systems; PREREQ: Semesters 1 and 2
nervous system and sensory organs.
PREREQ: Introduction to Biology, Animal VET200 Animal Care and Management
Anatomy and Physiology 1 (3 credits)
Veterinary emergency care, first aid,
VET120 Diagnostic Imaging (3 credits) wound and bandage management, dental
Radiation and ultrasound; x-ray production, prophylaxis, general nursing care, and sample
film types and development, equipment collection and treatment techniques. PREREQ:
operation and care, darkroom and developing Introduction to Veterinary Technology, Animal
procedures; radiation safety and preventative Anatomy and Physiology 1 and 2
measures; positioning the animal for radiograph
production. VET201 Clinical Pathology 1 (3 credits)
PREREQ: Introduction to Veterinary Microbiology, histology, cytology, and urinalysis;
Technology, Animal Anatomy and Physiology basics of microbiology; microorganisms
1 and 2 and their effect on humans, animals, and
the world around us; study of morphology,
VET123 Veterinary Pharmacology (3 credits) genetics, virology, and immunology. PREREQ:
Use of drugs in veterinary medicine; Introduction to Biology, Animal Anatomy and
introduction to drug testing methodology and Physiology 1 and 2, Medical Mathematics
the use/handling of prescriptions; calculation of
dosages and administration techniques; drug VET202 Clinical Pathology 2 (3 credits)
actions, interactions, and adverse reactions. Hematology, clinical chemistry, and immunology;
PREREQ: Introduction to Biology, Medical theoretical basis for analysis of body chemicals,
Mathematics urinalysis, hematologic, serologic, and cytologic
evaluations; familiarization of equipment,
reagents, and techniques required to utilize
blood as a diagnostic aid; clinical laboratory
safety, record keeping, quality control, necropsy
sample collection, and storage. PREREQ:
Introduction to Biology, Animal Anatomy and
Physiology 1 and 2, Medical Mathematics,
Clinical Pathology 1
114
VET211 Surgical Procedures (3 credits) VET220 Radiography for Veterinary
Principles and practices of surgical nursing; Technicians (3 credits)
methods and mechanics of the process of Radiation and ultrasound; x-ray production,
sterilization; identification, use and maintenance film types and development, equipment
of surgical instruments; common surgical operation and care, darkroom and developing
procedures. PREREQ: Animal Anatomy and procedures; radiation safety and preventative
Physiology 1 and 2 measures; positioning the animal for
radiograph production. PREREQ: Introduction
VET212 Anesthesia for Veterinary to Veterinary Technology, Animal Anatomy
Technicians (3 credits) and Physiology 1 and 2, Medical Nursing for
Pharmacology of commonly used anesthetic Veterinary Technicians
agents, patient induction, monitoring,
and recovery, anesthetic equipment and VET222 Clinical Parasitology for Veterinary
procedures, dose calculations, and anesthetic Technicians (3 credits)
emergencies. Common endo- and ectoparasites, their life
PREREQ: Medical Mathematics, Animal cycle, identification, treatment, prevention, and
Anatomy and Physiology 1 and 2, Pharmacology effects on animals; zoonotic and public health
for Veterinary Technicians concerns and how they relate to parasites;
fecal examinations. PREREQ: Introduction
VET213 Anesthesiology (3 credits) to Biology, Animal Anatomy and Physiology
Pharmacology of commonly used anesthetic 1 and 2, Medical Nursing for Veterinary
agents, patient induction, monitoring, Technicians
and recovery, anesthetic equipment and
procedures, dose calculations, and anesthetic VET223 Animal Diseases, Pathology,
emergencies. and Immunology (3 credits)
PREREQ: Medical Mathematics, Animal Basic disease processes as they relate
Anatomy and Physiology 1 and 2, Veterinary to various body systems; transmission
Pharmacology, Surgical Procedures diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of
diseases that affect domestic animals; healing
VET214 Surgical Nursing for Veterinary processes; immunological responses and
Technicians (3 credits) vaccination types and techniques; zoonosis
Principles and practices of surgical nursing; and preventative measures. PREREQ:
methods and mechanics of the process of Introduction to Biology, Animal Anatomy and
sterilization, identification, use and maintenance Physiology 1 and 2
of surgical instruments; common surgical
procedures. PREREQ: Animal Anatomy and VET224 Small and Large Animal Medicine
Physiology 1 and 2, Medical Nursing for (3 credits)
Veterinary Technicians Basic disease processes as they relate to
various body systems; transmission diagnosis,
VET221 Animal Parasitology (3 credits) treatment, and prevention of diseases that
Common endo- and ectoparasites, their life affect domestic animals; healing processes;
cycle, identification, treatment, prevention, and immunological responses and vaccination
effects on animals; zoonotic and public health types and techniques; zoonosis and
concerns and how they relate to parasites; fecal preventative measures. PREREQ: Introduction
examinations. PREREQ: Introduction to Biology, to Biology, Animal Anatomy and Physiology
Animal Anatomy and Physiology 1 and 2 1 and 2, Medical Nursing for Veterinary
Technicians, Clinical Parasitology for
Veterinary Technicians

115
VET225 Animal Nutrition, Reproduction, VET231 Clinical Externship 2 (4 credits)
Genetics, and Aging (3 credits) The second clinical externship at a veterinary
Science of nutrition and its application to hospital; be part of the working veterinary team
feeding practices of domestic, farm, and and practice the knowledge and skills acquired
companion animals; basic nutrients and from semesters 1 – 4. PREREQ: Clinical
nutritional requirements of individual species, Externship 1 and Semesters 3 and 4
approximate food analysis, interpretation of
food and feed labels, and types of animal VET250 Veterinary Practice Management
foods; physiology of reproduction, aging, and (3 credits)
genetics. Students will learn the importance of
PREREQ: Medical Mathematics, Animal Anatomy understanding and implementing laws and
and Physiology 1 and 2 requirements in a veterinary practice. Students
will also learn the benefits of developing a
VET227 Laboratory Animal Science (3 credits) professional, efficient, and knowledgeable
Biomedical research and the ethical team that provides exceptional customer
considerations centering on the use of service to their clients. Additionally, the course
laboratory animals in research; state, federal, will provide students with instructions and
and local animal welfare regulations; biology, information on how to help their practice to
care, utilization, and diseases of commonly grow financially. PREREQ: None
used laboratory animals. PREREQ: Introduction
to Biology, Animal Anatomy and Physiology 1 VET304 Advanced Animal Medicine and
and 2, Animal Parasitology Domestic Animal Species Nursing
(3 credits)
VET228 Laboratory Animal Medicine and This course will take an in-depth look at many
Nursing (3 credits) of the common diseases found in companion
Biomedical research and the ethical animal species. One of the major topics in this
considerations centering on the use of course is medical and surgical intervention
laboratory animals in research; state, federal, when preventative health strategies didn't
and local animal welfare regulations; biology, work to prevent an animal disease. Another
care, utilization, and diseases of commonly major topic covered is the role of the veterinary
used laboratory animals. PREREQ: Introduction technician in assisting the veterinarian in the
to Biology, Animal Anatomy and Physiology medical and surgical management of disease.
1 and 2, Clinical Parasitology for Veterinary Discussion of diseases will focus on dogs and
Technicians, Small and Large Animal Medicine cats and be organized according to organ
systems. Prerequisites: Vet302, SCI300,
VET229 Veterinary Technician National VET305
Examination Review (1 credit)
Comprehensive review to assist the student VET306 Safety and Regulatory Compliance
in preparation for state and national certifying in Veterinary Medicine
examinations for the veterinary technician; (1 credit)
reviews basic science, clinical practices, In this course students will learn about specific
diagnostics, and ethical concerns; covers birds, workplace safety and regulatory compliance
reptiles, laboratory animals, and large and small topics applicable to veterinary technicians
animal species. PREREQ: Semesters 1–4 and related to the wider veterinary team.
Topics include personal safety hazards, patient
VET230 Practicum 2 (4 credits) safety hazards, building or institutional safety
The second clinical practicum at a veterinary hazards, and current Occupational and Safety
hospital; be part of the working veterinary team Health Administration (OSHA) regulations.
and practice the knowledge and skills acquired Prerequisites: VET250, VET302, VET303,
from semesters 1 – 4. PREREQ: Practicum 1 and VET304, VET305
Semesters 3 and 4

116
VET402 Veterinary Emergency and Critical VET450 Veterinary Technology Capstone
Care (4 credits)
(3 credits) This course gives the student the opportunity
In this course, students will take an in-depth to explore a Veterinary Technician Specialist
look at emergency cases presented in both (VTS) career pathway or a Certified Veterinary
after-hours emergency practices as well as in Practice Manager career after graduation from
daytime practices. Critical care fundamentals the Program. Information learned throughout
and techniques will be discussed. Specific this program will assist the student in
types of animal emergencies will also be developing this Capstone Project. Prerequisites:
looked at in detail. Prerequisites: VET302, VET250, VET302, VET303, VET304, VET305,
VET304, VET305, VET306 VET306, VET307, VET402, VET403

VET403 Advanced Animal Anesthesia and


Surgical Nursing
(3 credits)
This course integrates surgical anesthesia
fundamentals and techniques that allow for
humane surgery to be performed on all animal
species. A major topic to be discussed is the
role of veterinary anesthesia and surgical
nursing in working closely with a veterinary
surgeon. Other topics to be covered include
effective anesthesia protocols for a variety of
cases, use of advanced medical and surgical
nursing skills preoperatively as well as peri- and
post- operatively, and advanced monitoring
techniques. VET302, VET304, VET306

117
Ownership, Governance,
Administration, and Faculty
OWNERSHIP Mark Sargent
Penn Foster, Inc.* Vice-President Digital Learning Product
M.S., Educational Technology, Harvard
BOARD OF DIRECTORS University
Frank Britt M.B.A., Babson College
Thomas Blesso
Stephanie Schroeder
OFFICERS Registrar
Frank Britt B.B.A., South University
Chief Executive Officer
Mark Slayton
Thomas Blesso Senior Vice President,
Chief Financial Officer Student Success

Heather McAllister Dara Warn


General Counsel Chief Operating Officer
Corporate Secretary B.A., University of Pennsylvania

ADMINISTRATION Rachel Wexler


Pat Gaffey Vice-President - Product Management
Vice President - Admissions and Content
B.S., Penn State University B.A., Dartmouth College
M.B.A., Northwestern University - Kellogg
Paula Robert-Hunt School Management
Vice President - Solutions Engineering
B.S., Indiana University - Kelley Ranjan Bhattacharya
School of Business Vice President, Product Engineering
B.S., Electrical Engineering, and MS Computer
Kate Mosteller Science, Indian Institute of Technology,
Vice President - Marketing Kharagpur, India
B.A., Simmons College
Joshua Budway
Lisa Rutsky Sr. VP of People
Vice President of Education and Academic Dean M.B.A., Harvard Business School
M.Ed. in School Psychology
B.S., Psychology, Georgia State University Nial McLoughlin
SVP of Technology
M.S. Georgia State University
B.S., University of Florida-Gainesville

*  Penn Foster, Inc. is wholly owned by Penn Foster Education Group, Inc.

118
Faculty
Lizanne Acevedo Rosemary Cook
Adjunct Instructor, Veterinary Academy Instructor, Biology
A.A.S., Veterinary Technology Ph.D., Microbiology, SUNY at Buffalo
Northampton County Area Community B.S., Liberal Arts, Medaille College
College, Certified Veterinary Technician A.S., Veterinary Technology, Medaille College

Eric Ashman Rose Coupland


Senior Instructor, Business Instructor, Allied Health
B.S., Secondary Math Education, LPN, Mercedian School of Practical Nursing
Penn State University
M.B.A., University of Scranton Jon DeEsch
Instructor, Engineering Technology
Jennifer Bernat M.S., Education - Curriculum & Instruction,
Adjunct Instructor, Veterinary Academy University of Scranton
Clinical Counseling, LaSalle University B.S., Political Science, University of Scranton
B.A., Psychology, Susquehanna University OCA Certification for Vocational Instruction,
A.S., Veterinary Technology, Lehigh Carbon Carpentry Certification, Home Inspection
Community College Certification
Certified Veterinary Technician
Tricia DeGrazia
Jonathan Boyson Adjunct Instructor, Veterinary Academy
Instructor, Computer Science B.S., Business Management, University
B.S., Computer Science, Bloomsburg University of Scranton
A.S., Veterinary Technology, Johnson, College
Melinda Buckingham Certified Veterinary Technician
Teaching Assistant & Externship Evaluator,
Veterinary Academy Chandel DeLucca
A.S., Veterinary Technology, Johnson College Adjunct Instructor, Veterinary Academy
Certified Veterinary Technician A.S., Veterinary Technology, Johnson College
A.S.,General Studies, Luzerne County
James Burcicki Community College
Instructor, Accounting Certified Veterinary Technician
B.S., Accounting, Kings College
Donna Evans
Joseph Burruano Adjunct Instructor, Business
Program Director, Criminal Justice M.B.A., Wilkes University
Juris Doctorate, St. Johns University B.S., Business Administration, Wilkes University
Law School A.S., Business Administration, Penn State
B.A., English, C.W. Post College/L.I. University University
A.S., Computer Science, Penn State University
Tyra Casbon
Adjunct Instructor, Veterinary Technician Mary Kay Farrand
A.A.S., Veterinary Technology, Delgado Adjunct Instructor, Allied Health
Community College B.S., Education, Pennsylvania State University
Registered Veterinary Technician Certified Professional Coder (CPC-A), American
Academy of Professional Coders Professional
Thomas Chairge Healthcare Instructor Certification (PHIC),
Grader, Business American Medical Certification Association
M.B.A., Kettering University
B.A., Business Administration, Marywood
University

119
Suzanne Fauver Rianna Karalunas
Associate Clinical Coordinator, Veterinary Instructor, English
Academy M.S., Publication Management, Drexel
A.S., Veterinary Technology, Johnson College University
Certified Veterinary Technician B.A., English, Misericordia University

Melissa Fazio Kathryn Walsh Keenan


Adjunct Instructor, Allied Health Instructor, Early Childhood Education
B.A., Health Services Administration B.S., Elementary Education,
Marywood University Elizabethtown College

Amy Fors David Kostiak


Instructor, Veterinary Academy Adjunct Instructor, Criminal Justice
A.S., Veterinary Technology, State University of M.S., Criminal Justice, Columbia College
New York at Delhi B.S., Criminal Justice, Penn State University
Licensed Veterinary Technician
Tina Krawcyk
William T. Gallagher Adjunct Instructor, Music
Instructor, Electronics M.A., Music Education, Marywood University
Electronics Technology, Star Technical Institute B.S., Music Education, West Chester University
A.S.T., Electrical Engineering Technology, A.A., Music, Onondaga Community College
Education Direct
A.S.B., Business Management, Education Direct Tracey Lasslett
Adjunct Instructor, Veterinary Academy
Natalie Gallo A.A.S., Animal Science Technology,
Adjunct Instructor, Veterinary Technician Camden County College
A.A.S., Veterinary Technology Certified International Wildlife Rehabilitation
Delgado Community College
Registered Veterinary Technician Megan Leonard
Department Chair, Veterinary Academy
James Hadsell A.S., Veterinary Technology, Johnson College
Grader, Biology B.S., Business Management and Marketing,
M.S., Medical Education Leadership Penn State University
New England University Medical College Certified Veterinary Technician
M.S., Biotechnology, Marywood University
B.S., Neuroscience, Psychology Minor, Lauren Levish
King’s College Instructor, Veterinary Academy
A.S., Veterinary Technician, Johnson College
Rachel Ann Harb Certified Veterinary Technician
Adjunct Instructor, Veterinary Technician
Associate in Applied Science / Veterinary Kristin Lewan
Technology, Delgado Community College Adjunct Instructor, Veterinary Academy
Registered Veterinary Technician A.S., Veterinary Technology, Johnson College
Certified Veterinary Technician
Dr. Jim Hurrell
Director, Veterinary Academy Shanna Lizardi
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, Senior Instructor, Allied Health
Michigan State University B.S., Clinical Psychology, Marywood University
B.S., Biology, Michigan State University A.A., Administrative Health Care,
University of Phoenix
Brianna Ives, CVT Certified Medical Assistant
Externship Evaluator
A.S. Veterinary Technology, Johnson College

120
Marissa Lyman, CVT Liza Rudolph
Externship Evaluator, Veterinary Academy Adjunct Instructor, Veterinary Technician
B.B.A., Entrepreneurship, Wilkes University B.A.S., Veterinary Technology, St. Petersburg
A.S., Applied Science Veterinary Technician, College
Lehigh County Community College A.S., Veterinary Technology, St. Petersburg
College
Rachel Mackie VTS (CP; Canine/Feline SAIM)
Externship Evaluator, Veterinary Academy Certified Veterinary Technician
A.S., Veterinary Technology, Vet Tech Institute
Certified Veterinary Technician Ashley Ruckman, CVT
Externship Evaluator, Veterinary Academy
Ann Marie Mahoney A.S., Veterinary Technology, Johnson College
Senior Instructor, Computer Science
B.S., Computer Science, University of Scranton Christa Scott
M.S., Information Systems, Marywood University Externship Evaluator, Veterinary Academy
A.S. Veterinary Technology, Johnson College
Robert Messina Certified Veterinary Technician
Instructor, Business
B.S., Accounting, University of Dayton
Tessa Scrobola
Instructor, Biology
Sarah Owens
M.S., Secondary Education,
Instructor, Early Childhood Education
University of Scranton
B.S., Early Childhood Education,
B.S., Biology, King’s College
Marywood University
B.S., Special Education, Marywood University
Robert B. Shafer
Department Chair, Mechanical/Engineering
Pamela Parsnik
Technology
Adjunct Instructor, Human Resources
B.S.M.E., Pennsylvania State University
Management
M.S., Human Resources Administration,
Jennifer Sterling
University of Scranton
Adjunct Instructor, Veterinary Technician
B.S.,Business Administration, King’s College
B.S. Veterinary Science, University of Arizona
A.S. Veterinary Technology, Penn Foster
Christine Piazzi
College
Adjunct Instructor, Art Appreciation & Interior
Design
Ann Swartz
B.F.A., Art, Stroudsburg University
Instructor, Allied Health
Coursework in Architecture and Interior Design,
M.S., Foods and Nutrition, Marywood University
Philadelphia College of Textile & Science
B.S, Nutrition, Marywood University
Linda Rathbone
Cyndi Ticktin
Externship Evaluator, Veterinary Academy
Adjunct Instructor, Veterinary Academy
A.A., Veterinary Technology, Suffolk County
B.S., Biology and Animal Behavior, Millersville
Community College
University
A.A., Liberal Arts, Nassau Community College
A.S., Veterinary Technology, Lehigh Carbon
Registered Veterinary Technician
Community College
Kathy Ruane
Diane Trama
Clinical Coordinator, Veterinary Academy
Adjunct Instructor, Allied Health
B.A., Biology, Wilkes University
B.S., Chemistry, Marywood University
A.S., Animal Health Technology,
Medical Technology Certificate,
Harcum College
Robert Packer Hospital
Certified Veterinary Technician
Laboratory Animal Technician (LAT)

121
Katherine Valerio Amy Waterhouse
Adjunct Instructor, Veterinary Academy Instructor
B.S., Biology/Minor in Chemistry, A.A.S., Medical Assistant Fortis Institute
Marywood University
A.S., Veterinary Technology, Johnson College Mandy Zachgo
Evaluator
Certified Veterinary Technician
A.S. Veterinary Technician, Penn Foster
College
Lisa Walsh
Adjunct Instructor, Allied Health
Masters in Cardiac Rehabilitation and Exercise
Science, East Stroudsburg University
B.S., HPE/Fitness Management,
Lock Haven University

Advisory Council
Veterinary Technician Lynn E. Johnson-Harris, LVT, RVT
A.A.S., Veterinary Technology,
Julie Legred Michigan State University
Certified Veterinary Technician (CVT)
AAS – University of Minnesota Anjele Campo, RVT
A.A.S., Veterinary Technology,
Dr. Dennis McCurnin Delgado Community College
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM)
DVM – Iowa State University David Wright, DVM
MS – Iowa State University DVM, Texas A&M University

Lori VanValkenburg Elaine Hammel, VMD


MAEd, BAS-VT, LVT VMD, University of Pennsylvania

Lynne E. Johnson-Harris Nicholas Leonard, VMD


LVT, RVT, AAS – Michigan State University VMD, University of Pennsylvania

Lori Renda-Francis Elizabeth Exline


PhD, LVT, AAS – Macomb Community College A.S., Veterinary Technician,
Bachelors in Business Administration, Penn Foster College
Rochester College
Masters in Education, Central Michigan Amanda Fraley
University Penn Foster College - 3rd Semester
PhD in Organizational Management with Student, Veterinary Technician
a specialization in Leadership – Capella
University Ariel Neves
Penn Foster College - 2nd Semester
Libby Yeager Student, Veterinary Technician
MEd Educational Leadership,
Norwich University Jessica Kutsch, CVT
B.S. Biology, King’s College A.S., Veterinary Technology,
A.S. Science, Luzerne County St. Petersburg College
Community College
Sharon Novak, LVT
A.S., Veterinary Technician,
Penn Foster College

122
Wilma Abbott, LVT Raymond Haden
A.A.S., Veterinary Technology, MBA. Bloomsburg University
Camden County College

Allied Health Academy Legal Studies/


Criminal Justice
Dr. Jill Buban
PhD, Lesley University Leonard Bogart
M.S., Curriculum and Instruction, SUNY MPA, Marywood University
B.A., History, University of New Hampshire B.S. Law Enforcement, University of Scranton

Michelle Low
Dr. Sarah E. Gabua
Bachelor of Science of General Studies
Doctorate in Nursing Practice, Walden Westfield State College
University Paralegal Certificate
Bunker Hill Community College
Carol Green
Registered Nurse, Mercy Hospital of Nursing, Timothy Fulk
Registered Nurse Program, Scranton, PA Master of Science, Criminal Justice/Public
Administration, Trine University
Linda Joanna Thomas-Hemak, MD Bachelor of Science, Criminal Justice,
Doctor of Medicine, Baylor Tri-State University
College of Medicine

Joseph Kishel
Early Childhood
M.S., Healthcare Administration, Dr. Tywanda Jiles
University of Scranton Ed.D., Teacher Leadership, Walden University
B.S., Biology, University of Scranton M.S., Early Childhood Education,
Diploma Nursing, Mercy Hospital School of Special Education, Dominican University
Nursing B.S., Liberal Arts, Governors State University
Susan Lutchko Dr. William Strader
A.S., Business Administration Ed.D., Early Childhood Education,
Penn State University, Scranton, PA University of Massachusetts
M.Ed., Early Childhood Education,
Sonia Cotto-Moreno William Paterson College
Registered Dietician Nutritionist, B.A., Psychology, Hope College
University of Texas
Linda Bryant
Karen Novak A.S., Early Childhood Education,
EKG/Phlebotomy/Lab Assistant Diploma, Fortis Penn Foster College
Institute
Marsha Miller
Medical Assistant Diploma, Lackawanna
M.Ed., Early Childhood Education,
County Area Vocational Grand Valley State University
B.S., Elementary Education, University
Darlisa White of Michigan
Certified Medical Assistant
B.A., Education, Moraine Valley College Susan Billingsley
M.S., Human Development and
Family Studies, Iowa State University
Business Studies B.S., Child and Family Studies, Iowa State
University
John Schroeder
MBA, South University Dr. Lisa Wright
Ph.D., Early Childhood, University of Missouri
Brighid Bauer
M.Ed., Early Childhood, University of Missouri
Master of Public Administration,
B.H.S., Physical Therapy University of Missouri
Marywood University

123
Alan Guttman
M.A., Early Childhood, New York University
Technology
B.A., English, New York University Jim Casteel
B.S. Data Analytics, Western Governors
Derry Koralek University
M.S., English, Boston University
B.S., Education, University of Massachusetts Yuquan Holloway
Bachelor of Civil Engineering, Georgia Institute
Hilda Skrzysowski of Technology
M.S., Child Development, University of PA MBA, Georgia State University
B.S., Sociology, Marywood University
John I. McSwain, III
Jessica Koomson MBA, Georgia Institute of Technology
A.S., Early Childhood Education, Penn Foster M.S. Human Computer Interaction, Iowa State
College University
B.G.S. Web Technologies, University of
Dr. Valora Washington Connecticut
Ph.D., Leadership Studies, Indiana University A.S. Computer Science, Georgia Perimeter
Bloomington College
B.S., Early Childhood, Michigan A.A. Mathematics, Georgia Perimeter College
State University
Brandon Nolta
M.F.A., English, Boise State University
B.S., Mathematics, University of Idaho

William J. Scannella
Masters in Technical & Scientific
Communication, Miami University

124
Administrative Office
14300 N. Northsight Blvd, Suite 125, Scottsdale, AZ 85260 • Tel. 480-947-6644
Student Service Center
925 Oak Street, Scranton, PA 18515 • Tel. 1-888-427-1000 • www.PennFosterCollege.edu

© 2019 Penn Foster, Inc. Printed in the U.S.A. PFCBK1-1908