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2010

Occupational Health and Safety

P LANT LAYOUT

Amishaa Arora

Disha Khati

Malvika Srivastava

Neha Shokeen

Saluja S.Tirkey
Table of Contents
INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................................................ 5
AREAS OF APPLICABILITY.........................................................................................................................................6
BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES .............................................................................................................................6
CONFINED SPACES ...............................................................................................................................................6
ACCESS ..................................................................................................................................................................6
SIGNAGE ................................................................................................................................................................6
LIGHTING ...............................................................................................................................................................6
INSTALLATIONS, EQUIPMENT, TOOLS AND SUBSTANCES ................................................................................6
VENTILATION AND TEMPERATURES ...................................................................................................................8
FIRE DETECTION AND FIRE FIGHTING ..................................................................................................................9
CLEANING..............................................................................................................................................................9
FIRST-AID...............................................................................................................................................................9
WELFARE FACILITIES.............................................................................................................................................9
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT .................................................................................................................9
DRINKING WATER ............................................................................................................................................... 11
NOISE................................................................................................................................................................... 11
VIBRATION .......................................................................................................................................................... 11
ILLUMINATION, LIGHT RADIATION AND REFLECTIONS .................................................................................... 11
TEMPERATURE .................................................................................................................................................... 12
HAZARDOUS MATERIALS ................................................................................................................................... 13
BIOLOGICAL AGENTS.......................................................................................................................................... 13
IONIZING RADIATION.......................................................................................................................................... 14
TRAINING............................................................................................................................................................. 14
HEALTH & SAFETY POLICY ..................................................................................................................................... 15
LEADERSHIP AND ADMINISTRATION ................................................................................................................. 16
HEALTH and SAFETY POLICY STATEMENT .................................................................................................... 16
SA 8000 ............................................................................................................................................................ 17
INTERNAL RESPONSIBILITY SYSTEM ............................................................................................................. 17
DUE DILIGENCE ............................................................................................................................................... 20
PROGRESSIVE DISCIPLINE PROCESS .............................................................................................................. 21
OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH and SAFETY COMMITTEES and WORKPLACE HEALTH and SAFETY
REPRESENTATIVES ............................................................................................................................................. 22
INFRASTRUCTURE RISK COMMITTEE (IRC) ....................................................................................................22
HEALTH, SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SITE COORDINATORS (HSESC) FORUM .....................................22
SAFE WORK PRACTICES AND PROCEDURES ..................................................................................................... 23
POLICY ............................................................................................................................................................. 23
GENERAL SAFETY RULES ................................................................................................................................ 23
VISITOR GENERAL SAFETY RULES.................................................................................................................. 23
INCIDENT REPORTING..................................................................................................................................... 23
HOUSEKEEPING .............................................................................................................................................. 23
INDUCTION ...................................................................................................................................................... 24
NEW AND EXPECTANT MOTHERS .................................................................................................................. 24
STRESS............................................................................................................................................................. 24
WORKPLACE .................................................................................................................................................... 24
WORK STATIONS............................................................................................................................................. 24
INFIRMARY....................................................................................................................................................... 25
VENTILATION AND HEAT ................................................................................................................................ 25
DRINKING WATER ........................................................................................................................................... 25
SANITATION FACILITIES .................................................................................................................................. 25
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENTS ......................................................................................................... 25
FALL PROTECTION AND HARNESSING........................................................................................................... 28
SAFE WORK PRACTICES AND PROCEDURES..................................................................................................28
HEALTH CARE BENEFITS POLICY ....................................................................................................................29
HAZARD RECOGNITION, EVALUATION AND CONTROL ....................................................................................29
POLICY .............................................................................................................................................................29
HAZARD IDENTIFICATION ...............................................................................................................................29
EMERGENCY ALERT ........................................................................................................................................ 30
FIRST AID ......................................................................................................................................................... 32
ETHICAL MISCONDUCT ................................................................................................................................... 34
HAZARD REPORTING PROCEDURE ................................................................................................................ 34
INSPECTION PROGRAM ...................................................................................................................................... 34
POLICY ............................................................................................................................................................. 35
LEGISLATIVE REQUIREMENTS TO DO INSPECTIONS .................................................................................... 35
FORMAL INSPECTIONS ................................................................................................................................... 35
INFORMAL INSPECTIONS ................................................................................................................................ 35
PRE-OPERATION INSPECTIONS ...................................................................................................................... 35
INSPECTION PROCEDURE ............................................................................................................................... 36
RESPONSIBILITIES ........................................................................................................................................... 36
TRAINING ......................................................................................................................................................... 36
FOLLOW-UP ACTIONS TO HEALTH AND SAFETY INSPECTIONS................................................................... 36
ACCIDENT/INCIDENT INVESTIGATION PROGRAM ............................................................................................. 37
PURPOSE ......................................................................................................................................................... 37
POLICY ............................................................................................................................................................. 37
PROCEDURE .................................................................................................................................................... 38
RESPONSIBILITIES ........................................................................................................................................... 38
ROLE OF SUPERVISOR IN AN ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION ............................................................................. 39
EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS ............................................................................................................................ 39
POLICY ............................................................................................................................................................. 39
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES ............................................................................................................................ 40
EMERGENCY PROCEDURE PLAN .................................................................................................................... 40
EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM ...................................................................................................................... 41
OTHER RELATED SERVICES ................................................................................................................................ 42
DISABILITY MANAGEMENT ............................................................................................................................. 42
CONFLICT MANAGEMENT .............................................................................................................................. 42
HEALTH & SAFETY FORMS and CHECKLISTS ......................................................................................................... 43
List of Safety Concerns .........................................................................................................................................44
Safe Job Procedures ............................................................................................................................................. 45
First Aid Checklist .................................................................................................................................................46
Weekly Inspection Report ..................................................................................................................................... 47
Jobsite Inspection Checklist ..................................................................................................................................48
Hazard Identification & Risk Assessment Form..................................................................................................... 50
Accident Report.................................................................................................................................................... 51
Accident Investigation Report .............................................................................................................................. 52
Corrective Action Form......................................................................................................................................... 53
Witness Statement Form ...................................................................................................................................... 54
Emergency Response Planning Checklist ............................................................................................................. 55
Emergency Numbers ............................................................................................................................................ 57
REFERENCES ........................................................................................................................................................... 58
INTRODUCTION
Occupational health and safety is a cross-disciplinary area concerned with protecting the safety, health and welfare
of people engaged in work or employment. The goal of all occupational health and safety programs is to foster a
safe work environment. As a secondary effect, it may also protect co-workers, family members, employers,
customers, suppliers, nearby communities, and other members of the public who are impacted by the workplace
environment. It may involve interactions among many subject areas, including occupational medicine, occupational
(or industrial) hygiene, public health, safety engineering, chemistry, and health physics.

Since 1950, the International Labour Organization (ILO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have shared a
common definition of occupational health. It was adopted by the Joint ILO/WHO Committee on Occupational
Health at its first session in 1950 and revised at its twelfth session in 1995. The definition reads: "Occupational
health should aim at: the promotion and maintenance of the highest degree of physical, mental and social well-
being of workers in all occupations; the prevention amongst workers of departures from health caused by their
working conditions; the protection of workers in their employment from risks resulting from factors adverse to
health; the placing and maintenance of the worker in an occupational environment adapted to his physiological and
psychological capabilities; and, to summarize, the adaptation of work to man and of each man to his job.".To know
what are the hazards in the working area regarding health and safety is very essential for every one.

Occupational health is the science of fostering health and diminishing illness arising from the individual job
relationship. Put another way, it might be thought of as the science of protecting the health of workers through the
control of the work environment. A worker and his environment are inseparable; they react with each other in the
form of a give and take relationship. Ideally, the worker would move through his environment, moulding it to his
desires. In actual practice, of course, this is not possible. It is more realistic to visualize both the worker and his
environment as being mutually interdependent, each affecting, and being affected by the other. Occupational
Health and Safety Act is implemented in the United states for assuring a safe work environment for the workers.

When considering OHSAS 18001, we're dealing with a safety management standard. These standards don't usurp
any local regulations concerning occupational safety and health issues but have been developed to ensure a system
of managing the organization to reduce or eliminate risks to employees. OHSAS 18001, which is now being audited
around the world, was developed for the many countries that didn't have clearly defined safety management
standards. OHSAS 18001 is the audited standard, and OHSAS 18002 is the guidance document. Together, they
focus on how to prevent accidents to organizational staff within the work environment. With many organizations
already having a global presence, and others striving for that goal, there's continuing customer demand for
recognizable occupational health and safety management system standards that can be applied to plants in many
countries.

At the international level, the International Labor Organization (ILO) published guidance on Occupational Safety
and Health Management Systems in 2001 (ILO-OSH 2001).

ISO 9001:2000 is the standard that provides a set of standardized requirements for a quality management system,
regardless of what the user organization does, its size, or whether it is in the private, or public sector. It is the only
standard in the family against which organizations can be certified – although certification is not a compulsory
requirement of the standard. ISO 14001:2004, which gives the requirements for environmental management
systems, confirms its global relevance for organizations wishing to operate in an environmentally sustainable
manner.

SA8000 is a global social accountability standard for decent working conditions, developed and overseen by Social
Accountability International (SAI). Factories Act is another legal standard to be followed for H&S at work.

All these standards, laws and acts across the globe are set out to provide safe and healthy working environment to
all the employees.
AREAS OF APPLICABILITY

BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES


Building facilities housing installations, activities or sectors not necessitating special labor protection and safety
measures shall comply with the following physical requirements. Where the nature of the activities or the materials
used necessitates particular precautions, they must be designed according to local and internationally recognized
standards as available for specific industries (e.g. mining, petroleum and chemical) and for hazardous materials such
as asbestos.

Permanent and recurrent places of work shall be designed and equipped to protect OHS. Surfaces, structures and
installations shall be easy to clean and maintain, and not allow for accumulation of hazardous compounds. Buildings
must be structurally safe, provide appropriate protection against the climate and have acceptable light and noise
conditions. Fire resistant, noise-absorbing materials should, to the extent feasible, be used for cladding on ceilings
and walls. Floors should be level, even, and non-skid. Heavy oscillating, rotating or alternating equipment should be
located in dedicated buildings or structurally isolated sections.

The space provided for each worker and in total must be adequate for safe execution of all activities including
transport and interim storage of materials and products. Passages to emergency exits must be unobstructed at all
times. The number and capacity of emergency exits must be sufficient for safe and orderly evacuation of the
greatest number of people present at any time.

CONFINED SPACES
Engineering measures must be implemented to eliminate to the degree feasible existence and adverse character of
confined spaces. Unavoidable confined spaces shall, to the extent possible, be provided with permanent safety
measures for venting, monitoring and rescue operations. The area adjoining an access to a confined space shall
provide ample room for emergency and rescue operations.

ACCESS
Passageways for pedestrians and vehicles within and outside buildings should be segregated and provide for easy,
safe and appropriate access. Equipment and installations requiring recurrent servicing and cleaning should have
permanent means of access. Hand, knee and foot railings must be installed on stairs, fixed ladders, platforms,
permanent and interim floor openings, loading bays, ramps, etc. Openings must be sealed by gates or removable
chains. Covers shall if feasible be installed to protect against falling items. Measures to prevent unauthorized access
to dangerous areas must be in place.

SIGNAGE
Hazardous and risky areas, installations, materials, safety measures, emergency exits, etc. shall be appropriately
marked. Signage shall be in accordance with international standards, be well known to, and easily understood by
workers, visitors and the general public as appropriate.

LIGHTING
Workplaces should, to the degree feasible, receive natural light and be supplemented with sufficient artificial
illumination to promote workers’ safety and health. Emergency lighting of adequate intensity must be installed and
automatically activated upon failure of the artificial light source to ensure safe shut-down, evacuation, etc.

INSTALLATIONS, EQUIPMENT, TOOLS AND SUBSTANCES


Installations, equipment, tools and substances shall be suitable for their use and selected to minimize dangers to
safety or health when used correctly. Appropriate shields, guards or railings must be installed and maintained to
eliminate human contact with moving parts, or hot and cold items. Equipment must be provided with adequate
noise and vibration dampers. Electrical installations must be designed, constructed and maintained to eliminate fire
or explosion hazards and risks to employees. Ergonomic risks and hazards shall be minimized by selecting
equipment, tools and furniture appropriate for the assigned worker.

Ergonomic practices that can be applied in the Apparel Industry

Legs on fabric tub carts are lengthened to raise height of Legs adjust to allow surface of table to tilt towards
fabric tub to reduce repetitive bending of the trunk operator to improve Operator posture

Fabric Picking tongs are designed to extend the reach of Weight-calibrated springs are integrated into the cart
the operator, thereby reducing the awkwardness of the mechanism that raises the rolls of fabric for easy lifting.
posture of the shoulder and low back.

The standup/perched sewing workstation reduces the


Workbench has pneumatic height adjustability using a
static stress from being bent over the work while
foot pedal and has a swivel top
sewing. This arrangement allows more mobility and in
some cases improves the posture for lifting tasks
Solid upholstered (ergonomic) seat and backrest, Lifts heavy equipment to dynamic working height. The
laminated polyester fabric, self-extinguish, made of Die Table is designed to reduce back injury and
filament fibers cumulative trauma disorders.

Halogen lamp with transformer and plug Swinging arm for clothing elements hanging up

The Fiskars Rotary Cutter has an ergonomically


Sure Foot System is made up of three separate pieces: a
designed contoured handle and a convenient handle
footrest for the non sewing foot, a non skid pad for the
loop
bottom of the foot pedal, and a non skid mat for the
pedal and footrest to sit on.

VENTILATION AND TEMPERATURES


Sufficient fresh air must be supplied for indoor and confined work spaces. Factors to be considered in ventilation
design include physical activity, substances in use and process related emissions. Mechanical ventilation systems
shall be maintained in good working order. Point-source exhaust systems required for maintaining a safe ambient
environment must have local indicators of correct functioning. Re-circulation of contaminated air is generally not
acceptable. Air inlet filters must be kept clean and free of dust and microorganisms. HVAC and industrial
evaporative cooling systems shall be equipped, maintained and operated so as to prevent growth and spreading of
disease agents (e.g. Legionnella pneumophilia) or breeding of vectors e.g. mosquitoes and flies of public health
concern. Air distribution systems must be designed so as not to expose workers to draughts.

The temperature in work, rest room and other welfare facilities should, during service hours, be maintained at a
level appropriate for the purpose of the facility.
FIRE DETECTION AND FIRE FIGHTING
The workplace must be equipped with fire detectors, alarm systems and fire-fighting equipment. The equipment
shall be maintained in good working order. It must be adequate for the dimensions and use of the premises,
equipment installed, physical and chemical properties of substances present, and the maximum number of people
present. Non-automatic fire fighting equipment must be easily accessible and simple to use. Fire and emergency
alarm systems shall be both audible and visible. The IFC Life and Fire Safety Guideline shall apply to buildings
accessible to the public.

CLEANING
Washbasins with running hot and cold water shall be installed in sufficient numbers where demanded by the
character of the work and when contaminants or pollution must be confined to the place of work. The washbasins
must have soap and/or other appropriate cleaning agents. Places of work, traffic routes and passageways shall be
kept free from waste and spillage, regularly cleaned, and maintained.

FIRST-AID
The employer must ensure that qualified first-aid can be provided at all times. Appropriately equipped first-aid
stations shall be easily accessible throughout the place of work. Eye-wash stations and/or emergency showers shall
be provided close to all workstations where the recommended first-aid response is immediate flushing with water.
Where the scale of work or the type of activity being carried out so requires, dedicated and appropriately equipped
first-aid room(s) must be provided. First aid stations and rooms shall be equipped with gloves, gowns and masks for
protection against direct contact with blood and other body fluids. Remote sites shall have in place written
emergency procedures for dealing with cases of trauma or serious illness up to the point at which care of the patient
can be transferred to an appropriate medical facility.

WELFARE FACILITIES
The scope and comprehensiveness of welfare facilities depend on the number of workers present at any one time
and the activities executed. Welfare facilities must include locker rooms, an adequate number of toilets with
washbasins, and a room dedicated for eating. Separate eating facilities shall be provided for employees wearing
clean and soiled work clothes respectively. Gender-segregated changing rooms with lockers and benches should be
provided when special work-clothes are required. Hot and cold water shower facilities and wash basins should be
available in connection with locker rooms.

Water supplied to areas with food preparation or for the purpose of personal hygiene (washing or bathing) must
meet drinking water quality standards.

If the circumstances (e.g. dirt, dangerous substances, humidity, blood, microorganisms, etc.) so require, separate
lockers must be installed for isolating street- from work-clothes for the exposed employees. Work-clothes that may
be contaminated with dangerous or contagious substances or in any way involve a health hazard to the worker, his
family or the general public shall not leave the premises of work, but be collected on site and adequately cleaned
and disinfected at the employer’s expense. Staff exposed to risk of contamination shall change clothes and undergo
decontamination before entering common facilities such as eating places.

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT


The employer shall identify and provide appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) that will offer adequate
protection to the worker, co-workers and occasional visitors without incurring unnecessary inconvenience. The
employer shall actively enforce use of PPE if alternative technologies, work plans or procedures cannot eliminate or
sufficiently reduce a hazard or exposure. The employer shall ensure that PPE is cleaned when dirty, properly
maintained and replaced when damaged or worn out. Proper use of PPE shall be part of the recurrent training
programs for employees. Table 1 presents selected examples of occupational hazards and types of PPE available for
different purposes.
Eye and face protection Flying particles, molten metal, Glasses, shields, protective
liquid chemicals, gases or shades, etc.
vapors, light radiation.
Head protection Falling objects, inadequate Helmets with or without
height clearance, and overhead electrical protection.
power cords.
Hearing protection Noise, ultra-sound. Hearing protectors.
Foot protection Falling or rolling objects, Safety shoes and boots for
pointed objects. Liquids. protection against liquids and
chemicals.
Hand protection Hazardous materials, cuts or Gloves made of rubber or
lacerations, vibrations, synthetic materials, leather,
extreme temperatures. steel, insulating materials, etc.
Respiratory protection Dust, fogs, fumes, mists, gases, Facemasks with appropriate
smokes, vapors, oxygen filters for dust removal and air
deficiency. purification (chemicals and
gases) or air supply.
Body/leg protection Extreme temperatures, Insulating clothing, body suits,
hazardous materials, biological aprons etc. of appropriate
agents, cutting and laceration. materials.
Table 1: Occupational Hazards — Exposure Examples and Types of PPE Available

PPE used in Garment industry

Helmet Goggles

Rubber Shoes
Ear Plugs

Rubber Gloves Metal Gloves

Cap + Apron Waistcoat


DRINKING WATER
The employer shall ensure an ample supply of drinking water 8 at all places of work. Water supplies shall be
conveniently located especially for areas of elevated temperatures, high physical activity, and cold or dry
environments. Drinking water supplies shall be clearly marked especially where non-drinking water is also available.

NOISE
Noise limits for different working environments are provided in Table 2. No employee may be exposed to a noise
level greater than 85 dB(A) for a duration of more than 8 hours per day. In addition no unprotected ear should be
exposed to a peak sound pressure level (instantaneous) of more than 140 dBC. The use of hearing protection must
be actively enforced when LAeq,8h reaches 85 dB(A), the peak sound levels 140 dB(C) or the LAmax,fast 110dB(A).

Location /activity Equivalent Maximum


level
LAmax,fast
LAeq,8h

Heavy Industry (no demand for oral communication) 85 dB(A) 110 dB(A)

Light industry (decreasing demand for oral communication) 50-65 dB(A) 110 dB(A)

Open offices, control rooms, service counters or similar 45-50 dB(A) -

Individual offices (no disturbing noise) 40-45 dB(A) -

Classrooms, lecture halls 35-40 dB(A) -

Hospitals 30-35 dB(A) 40 dB(A)

Table 2 Noise Limits LAeq,8h and Maximum LAmax,fast

VIBRATION
Exposure to hand-arm vibration from equipment such as hand and power tools or whole-body vibrations from
surfaces on which the worker stands or sits shall be controlled through selection of equipment and limitation of
time of exposure. The limits for vibration and action values, i.e. the level of exposure at which remediation should
be initiated, are provided in Table 3. Exposure levels should be checked on the basis of daily exposure time and data
provided by equipment manufacturers.

Hand-arm vibration Whole-body vibration

11 2 2
Daily exposure limit value standardized to an 8-hours reference period 5 m/s 1.15 m/s or

12 2 2
Daily exposure action value standardized to an 8-hours reference period 2.5 m/s 0.6 m/s or

Table 3 Vibration Exposure and Action Values Limits (acceleration, m/s2)

ILLUMINATION, LIGHT RADIATION AND REFLECTIONS


Work area light intensity must be adequate for the general purpose of the location and type of activity and must be
supplemented with dedicated work station illumination as needed. All light sources should be energy efficient with
minimum heat emission. The employer shall take measures to eliminate reflections and flickering of lights. The
minimum limits for illumination intensity for a range of locations/activities appear in Table 4.

The employer shall take precautions to minimize and control optical radiation including direct sunlight. Exposure to
high intensity UV and IR radiation and high intensity visible light shall also be controlled. Laser hazards shall be
controlled in accordance with equipment specifications, certifications, and recognized safety standards. The lowest
feasible class Laser shall be applied to minimize risks.
Location /activity Light intensity

Emergency light 10 lux

Outdoor non working areas 20 lux

Simple orientation and temporary visits (machine storage, garage, 50 lux


warehouse)

Workspace with occasional visual tasks only (corridors, stairways, lobby, 100 lux
elevator, auditorium, etc.)

Medium precision work (simple assembly, rough machine works, welding, 200 lux
packing, etc.)

Precision work (reading, moderately difficult assembly, sorting, checking, 500 lux
medium bench and machine works, etc.), offices.

High precision work (difficult assembly, sewing, color inspection, fine sorting 1,000 – 3,000 lux
etc.)

Table 4 Minimum illumination intensity on Objects of work

TEMPERATURE
The employer shall maintain indoor temperatures that are reasonable and appropriate for the type of work. Risks of
heat or cold related stress must be adequately addressed and feasible control measures implemented for work in
adverse environments. The wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT) or a nationally recognized method of equal
standing should be used for screening environmental contribution to heat stress. Commonly applied limits used for
WBGT screening appear in Table 5. Additional investigations are required to properly assess the magnitude of the
problem and identify feasible heat stress control measures.

For continuous work in temperatures below -7ºC, the wind-chill temperature should be calculated to assess the
need for cold-stress precautions in addition to protective clothing19. For wind-chill temperatures below –20ºC, a 10-
minute warm-up period should be provided in a heated shelter in the middle of any 4-hour work period. A second
warm-up period of equal duration shall be added if the temperature decreases to -32ºC. Additional warm-up periods
shall be added for every following three degree temperature drop. Below wind chill temperatures of -43ºC non
emergency work should cease.

Level of physical activity - type of work Maximum

WBGT

Minimum to light 29.5°C

Moderate - walking, standing, use of hand tools 27.5°C

High - heavy burdens, intensive use of tools 26°C

Very high – high speed intensive and heavy work 25°C

Table 5 Heat Stress Screening Temperatures WBGT°C


HAZARDOUS MATERIALS
Organizations that produce, handle, store, transport and dispose of hazardous materials (chemicals, gases, vapours,
fumes, dust, fibres, etc.) shall in addition to the present guidelines fulfil the requirements of the IFC Hazardous
Materials Management Guidelines.

The employer shall avoid the use of any hazardous substance by replacing it with a substance that under its normal
conditions of use is not dangerous or less dangerous to the workers, if the nature of the activity so permits.
Precautions must be taken to keep the risk of exposure as low as possible. Work processes, engineering and
administrative control measures must be designed, maintained and operated so as to avoid or minimize the release
of hazardous substances into the working environment. The number of employees exposed or likely to become
exposed must be kept at a minimum and the level of exposure maintained below internationally established or
recognized exposure limits.

When ambient air contains several hazardous compounds with additive effects, the combined exposure is assessed
by summarizing the relative level of exposure to each compound. The resulting level of exposure is considered
acceptable if the outcome is less than or equal to one (≤ 1.0) 20.

The employer must ensure that all chemicals and hazardous materials present are labelled and marked according to
national and internationally recognized requirements and standards. International Chemical Safety Cards (ICSC),
Materials Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) or equivalent data/information in an easily understood language must be
readily available to exposed workers and first-aid personnel. The employer must ensure adequate and competent
supervision of the work, work practices, and the appropriate use of PPE.

BIOLOGICAL AGENTS
The employer shall avoid the use of any harmful biological agent by replacing it with an agent that, under its normal
conditions of use, is not dangerous or less dangerous to the workers, if the nature of the activity so permits.
Precautions must be taken to keep the risk of exposure as low as possible. Work processes, engineering and
administrative controls must be designed, maintained and operated to avoid or minimize release of biological
agents into the working environment. The number of employees exposed or likely to become exposed must be kept
at a minimum. Levels of exposure must be maintained below internationally established/recognized exposure
limits.

The employer shall review and assess known and suspected presence of biological agents at the place of work21 and
implement appropriate safety measures, monitoring and training programs.

Biological agents should be classified into four groups:

1. Biological agents unlikely to cause human disease.

2. Biological agents that can cause human disease but are unlikely to spread to the community.

3. Biological agents that can cause severe human disease and present a serious hazard to workers and may present
a risk of spreading to the community, for which there usually is effective prophylaxis or treatment available.

4. Biological agents that can cause severe human disease are a serious hazard to workers and present a high risk of
spreading to the community, for which there is usually no effective prophylaxis or treatment available.

Measures to eliminate and control hazards from known and suspected biological agents at the place of work shall
be designed, implemented and maintained in close co-operation with the local health authorities and according to
recognized international standards. The employer shall at all times encourage and enforce the highest level of
hygiene and personal protection especially for activities employing biological agents of group 3 and 4 above.
IONIZING RADIATION
Places of work involving occupational24 and/or natural25 exposure to ionizing radiation shall be established and
operated in accordance with the, “International Basic Safety Standard for protection against Ionizing Radiation and
for the Safety of Radiation Sources,”26 and its three interrelated Safety Guides. The acceptable effective dose limits
appear in Table 6.

Exposure Workers Apprentices and students

(min.19 years of age) (16-18 years of age)

Five consecutive year average 20 mSv/year

– effective dose

Single year exposure 50 mSv/year 6 mSv/year

– effective dose

Equivalent dose to the lens of the 150 mSv/year 50 mSv/year


eye

Equivalent dose to the extremities 500 mSv/year 150 mSv/year


(hands, feet) or the skin

Table 6 Effective Dose Limits For Occupational Ionizing Radiation Exposure [mSv/year]

TRAINING
The employer shall ensure that workers prior to commencement of new assignments have received adequate
training and information enabling them to understand the hazards of work and to protect their health from
hazardous ambient factors that may be present. The training must adequately cover: a) knowledge of materials,
equipment, and tools; b) known hazards in the operations and how they are controlled; c) potential risks to health;
d) precautions to prevent exposure; e) hygiene requirements; f) wearing and use of protective equipment and
clothing; and g) appropriate response to operation extremes, incidents and accidents.

A basic occupational training program and specialty courses shall be provided as needed to ensure that workers are
oriented to the specific hazards of individual work assignments. Training shall generally be provided to
management, supervisors, workers, and occasional visitors to areas of risks and hazards. Training shall also be
provided to account for new or changed risks whenever procedures are altered or new materials/equipment
introduced. Training should be repeated periodically and supported by feasible incentives. Workers with rescue and
first-aid duties shall receive dedicated training so as not to inadvertently aggravate exposures and health hazards to
themselves or their co-workers. The latter training would include the risks of becoming infected with blood–borne
pathogens through contact with bodily fluids and tissue. The employer shall through appropriate contract
specifications and monitoring ensure that service providers, as well as contracted and subcontracted labor is
appropriately trained before start of their assignments.
HEALTH & SAFETY POLICY
The Occupational Health and Safety Act places many duties on employers. One of the duties is to have a written
health and safety policy. Section 25(2)(j) of the Act requires employers (with more than 5 employees) to prepare a
policy, review the program and sign the policy at least once a year and set up a program to implement the policy.

A health and safety policy is a written statement of principles and goals embodying the company's commitment to
workplace health and safety. Senior management must be committed to carrying out that policy consistently and
completely. Health and safety must enjoy the same high priority as the organization's other major goals. The health
and safety policy should be a straightforward statement of senior management's commitment to workplace safety
and health. It should be broad enough to cover all aspects of the company's activities. There are no hard and fast
rules about what to include in a policy. Create one that suits the company and the views on health and safety.

The policy statement should:

1) contain a written statement of principles and goals


2) be signed by the chief executive officer
3) be dated
4) recognize the need to comply with the Occupational Health and Safety Act and construction
regulations
5) acknowledge the right of every employee to work in a safe and healthy environment
6) spell out management's commitment to providing a safe and healthy work environment by eliminating
or minimizing the hazards that can cause accidents and injuries
7) recognize the priority of safety in relation to other organizational goals and policies
8) encourage cooperation with unions and workers to involve all employees in putting the health and
safety policy into practice.

As well, the policy should be

 clearly stated in terms that are easily understood and explained to all employees

 reviewed annually to keep it up-to-date and in tune with current activities of the organization and with
the latest legislation.

STRUCTURE of HEALTH and SAFETY POLICY

A sample health and safety policy has been compiled by us for a manufacturing plant. There are four elements to
this Health and Safety Policy. These are the:

(a) Statement of Intent – this describes Accenture’s philosophy in relation to health and safety in broad terms;

(b) General section – this sets out the general objectives, explains the structure of the policy and describes the
procedures in place to ensure appropriate consultation with Employees regarding health and safety issues takes
place;

(c) Responsibilities and Organisation – this sets the duties of people within Accenture;

(d) Procedures – this sets out the procedures in place which support the Health and Safety Policy, and assist
compliance with it. The Company is committed to the protection of all Employees and people who work for it,
whether temporary or permanent and as such, this Health and Safety Policy applies equally to Employees and to
temporary workers unless specifically stated otherwise. All Employees must comply with this Health and Safety
Policy.
LEADERSHIP AND ADMINISTRATION

HEALTH and SAFETY POLICY STATEMENT

Our Goal: “To achieve high standards of occupational health and safety throughout the organisation”

The Management of XYZ s is committed to the health and safety of its employees and for all who are involved in our
functioning. Protection of employees from injury or occupational disease is a major continuing objective. We are
committed to continuing improvement toward an accident-free workplace through effective administration,
education and training. All supervisors and workers must be dedicated to the continuing objectives of eliminating
the “near misses” which will greatly reduce the risk of injuries.

Our philosophy is that the well-being of our company and clients is dependent on the health and safety or our
workforce. The Directors and Officers of this organisation promise that every precaution reasonable in all
circumstances will be taken for the protection of all workers. No job is to be regarded so urgent that time cannot be
taken to do it in a safe manner. The welfare of the individual is our greatest concern.

Supervisors will be responsible for the health and safety of workers under their supervision. Supervisors are
responsible to ensure that machinery and equipment required for use by each worker are safe and that each worker
works in compliance with established safe work practices and procedures for each piece of equipment. Workers
must receive adequate training in their specific work tasks to protect their health and safety.

All supervisors, employees and subcontractors must protect their own and fellow workers’ health and safety by
working in compliance with the Occupational Health and Safety Act and all applicable regulations and safe work
practices and procedures established by our company.

We recognize that a safe work environment can be established and sustained only through a united effort by all
employees and subcontractors and that the assistance of each person is required. Your attitude and cooperation in
promoting accident prevention will assist in achieving our goal and make our company the best place to work, one
where employees share in collective growth and success.

Everyone from the President to new workers has the responsibility to ensure a safe and healthy workplace. Let’s all
work together to prevent incidents from creating unwanted losses and personal injuries or illnesses.

XYZ recognises that a number of the activities undertaken directly by the Company, or which are undertaken on its
behalf, could involve risk to the health and safety of its Employees and others. XYZ s therefore fully endorses the
Health and Safety Policy, which details the Company's occupational health and safety objectives, responsibilities
and organisation, arrangements and the procedures for implementation, together with the goal of continuous
improvement deriving from best practice and actual experience.

This policy will be reviewed periodically as required

[President’s Signature]

[Date]
SA 8000
The intent of SA8000 is to provide a standard based on international human rights norms and national labour laws
that will protect and empower all personnel within a company’s scope of control and influence, who produce
products or provide services for that company, including personnel employed by the company itself, as well as by its
suppliers/subcontractors, sub-suppliers, and home workers.

SA8000 is verifiable through an evidenced-based process. Its requirements apply universally, regardless of a
company’s size, geographic location, or industry sector. Complying with the requirements for social accountability
of this standard will enable a company to:

a) Develop, maintain, and enforce policies and procedures in order to manage those issues which it can control or
influence;

b) Credibly demonstrate to interested parties that existing company policies, procedures, and practices conform to
the requirements of this standard.

Health and Safety

Criteria:

 The company shall provide a safe and healthy workplace environment and shall take effective steps to prevent
potential accidents and injury to workers’ health arising out of, associated with, or occurring in the course of
work, by minimising, so far as is reasonably practicable, the causes of hazards inherent in the workplace
environment, and bearing in mind the prevailing knowledge of the industry and of any specific hazards.
 The company shall appoint a senior management representative to be responsible for ensuring a safe and
healthy workplace environment for all personnel, and for implementing the Health and Safety elements of this
standard.
 The company shall provide to personnel on a regular basis effective health and safety instructions, including on-
site instruction and, where needed, job-specific instructions. Such instructions shall be repeated for new and
reassigned personnel and in cases where accidents have occurred.
 The company shall establish systems to detect, avoid, or respond to potential threats to the health and safety of
personnel. The company shall maintain written records of all accidents that occur in the workplace and in
company-controlled residences and property. The company shall provide at its expense appropriate personal
protective equipment personnel. In the event of a work related injure the company shall provide first aid and
assist the worker in obtaining follow-up medical treatment.
 The company shall undertake to assess all the risks to new and expectant mothers arising out of their work
activity and to ensure that all reasonable steps are taken to remove or reduce any risks to their health and
safety.
 The company shall provide, for use by all personnel, access to clean toilet facilities, access to potable water,
and, where applicable, sanitary facilities for food storage.
 The company shall ensure that any dormitory facilities provided for personnel are clean, safe, and meet the
basic needs of the personnel.
 All personnel shall have the right to remove themselves from imminent serious danger without seeking
permission from the company.

INTERNAL RESPONSIBILITY SYSTEM


Managing Director
The Managing Director has overall responsibility for all aspects of occupational health and safety for
Employees at work under this Health and Safety Policy and must:
 Help ensure that adequate financial resources are made available to meet the organization’s legal
obligations in relation to health and safety
 Identify and appoint individuals to help develop and implement this policy
 Monitor and review the organization’s overall health and safety performance, with assistance from the
other organizations and individuals referenced
 Give the necessary priority to health and safety matters which are brought to their attention
 Help ensure that employees and all other workers have access to, and receive, sufficient training to enable
them to fulfil their responsibilities so far as is reasonably practicable, in relation to health and safety matters
 Ensure that occupational health and safety management systems are in place and remain effective
 Ensure that the Company has appointed one or more competent persons to assist in undertaking measures
to comply with health and safety requirements
 Ensure the health and safety policy for the Company is reviewed periodically or changed as per requirement

Infrastructure Risk Committee (IRC)


Meetings of the IRC are generally held annually, or at such other interval as may be reasonably determined by the
IRC. Health and safety for Employees will be an agenda item. The committee comprises of the various
departmental heads and the managing director. Quarterly meetings are also held department wise headed by the
H.O.D. and the respective supervisors.

Risk Management Team (RM)


The RM team is responsible for the management of XYZ ’s safety management systems. The team comprises of:

Health and Safety Advisor (part of RM)


The Health and Safety Advisor is the “competent person” for the purposes of the Management of Health and Safety
at Work Regulations 1999. This individual has appropriate knowledge, skills and experience to fulfil this role.
The Health and Safety Advisor role under this Health and Safety Policy is to:
 Advise the Company on health and safety policy development and implementation
 Develop, monitor and review the occupational health and safety management system of the organization
 Advise the Company and Employees on matters relating to occupational health and safety
 Coordinate, monitor and review the organization’s generic risk assessment programme. The programme
comprises an annual review of all the administrative offices, Factory Premises and Sub-contracting
premises (where appropriate) generic risk assessments
 Monitor the application of the occupational health and safety standards as far as reasonably practicable
 Help ensure health and safety audits are carried out at as appropriate
 Have overall responsibility for accident reporting to the Health & Safety Enforcing Authorities, carrying out
accident investigations and maintaining and reviewing the Accident Book
 Escalate health and safety issues to the RM lead for the attention of the IRC
 Perform functions of a “competent person” for the purposes of the Management of Health and Safety at
Work Regulations
 Conduct safety tours and inspections and reporting the findings to the IRC
 Identifying Employee occupational health and safety training needs and organizing and assisting with its
delivery to all staff including new joiners.
 Ensure that all appropriate safety signage and information is displayed on the local health and safety notice
boards

Risk Advisor
The Risk Advisor is responsible for advising the Company and Employees on matters relating to Risk Management,
including bomb threat, emergency planning, business continuity and security.
Head of the Department
The head of the departments have day-to-day responsibility and accountability for ensuring implementation of the
Health and Safety Policy and associated procedures by Employees. The H.O.D.s’ responsibilities under this Health
and Safety Policy are to:
 Consult with the Legal group during the Request For Proposal (‘RFP’) process for guidance and approval
regarding health and safety matters prior to submitting any documentation to HR for further submission to
Clients
 Consult with the Risk Advisor and Health and Safety Advisor during deal set-up to minimize health and
safety risks and to help ensure compliance with health and safety legislative requirements
 Consult with staff on health and safety matters and risk assessments, as appropriate
 Refer identified issues in occupational health, safety and welfare matters to RM
 Demonstrate commitment and support for occupational health and safety by taking reasonable care for
their own and others’ health and safety
 Implement XYZ ’s occupational Health and Safety Policy arrangements and procedures, where appropriate

Supervisors
Under this Health and Safety Policy, supervisors have day-to-day responsibility for:
 Reading and understanding the XYZ Health and Safety Guide for XYZ Executives which outlines their
health and safety responsibilities
 Taking reasonable care of their own health and safety and that of others who may be affected by their acts
and omissions
 Implementing, and complying with the organization’s Health and Safety Policy arrangements and
procedures, where appropriate
 Consulting with Employees on health and safety matters and referring identified issues in occupational
health, safety and welfare matters to the Risk Management Team, where appropriate
 Helping to ensure adequate health and safety information and supervision is provided for Employees who
report into them, and their visitors.

Operators
Operators are under a legal obligation to take reasonable care for their own health and safety and for that of others
who may be affected by their actions.
Operators are required under this Health and Safety Policy to:
 Promptly report health and safety risks and issues including all accidents and near misses to their Location
Manager or Line Manager
 Co-operate, so far as is necessary, to enable the organization to meet relevant statutory and regulatory
requirements, including attending/participating in health and safety training
 Take reasonable care of their own health and safety and that of others who may be affected by their acts
and omissions
 Comply with XYZ ’s Health and Safety Policy Arrangements and procedures
 Carry out work in accordance with the safe systems of work, training and/or instruction; and
 Not intentionally or recklessly interfere with, or misuse anything provided in the interests of health, safety
or welfare;

Health Safety and Environmental Site Coordinator (HSESC)


HSESC’s are responsible for coordinating local health, safety and environmental matters on a day to day basis at
their place of work. The HSESC role in relation to health and safety is to:
 Liaise with the Client and Risk Management Team on local health, safety and environmental matters
 Monitor compliance by XYZ with Health and Safety Policy and Environmental Policy and procedures at
their place of work
 Help ensure communication of the Health and Safety Policy and Environmental Policy Statement to
Employees, as appropriate
 Monitor timely completion of remedial actions regarding health and safety risks to Employees (following
XYZ generic risk assessments) at Contractual sites
 Carry out health and safety audits of various health and safety issues as appropriate
 Co-ordinate training and ensure there is sufficient provision of XYZ fire-in-charges (when required)
 Co-ordinate training and ensure there is sufficient provision of first-aid-in-charge (when required)
 Co-ordinate incident/accident reporting, using the Accident Book and “Incident & Investigation Report”
 Ensure housekeeping standards are maintained at a reasonable level

HSESC, Contractors, Fire Wardens and First Aiders receive specialized training from XYZ for their responsibilities

DUE DILIGENCE
Supervisor’s Duties
 Make every reasonable effort to ensure the safety of employees and operators under your control and make
their workplace free of recognized hazards. For those hazards that are not within your ability to correct,
notify your supervisor about the condition(s).
 Evaluate the physical capability of potential new operators to perform the tasks required. This is not
discrimination. It is an expected responsibility to make a reasonable determination of a potential
employee's skills and physical ability to perform the tasks required by the position.
 Provide job training in work area safety procedures for all your operators, especially for new and reassigned
recruits with new job activities.
 Conduct regular work area safety inspections with assistance from of Environmental Health and Safety, if
needed, to discover and correct unsafe conditions and work practices.
 Investigate injury accidents, not to find fault, but to determine cause and to pursue the correction of any
safety deficiencies.
 Report all injuries on a Report of Accident form and send it to Human Resources. If an injury to an employee
requires physician's treatment or will result in lost work, a SAIF 801 claim form should also be completed
and sent with the Report of Accident form.
 Promote safe practices and attitudes among employees and students. If protective equipment must be
used, promote its use by example.
 Consider safe work habits and attitude toward the job as a part of all performance ratings.
 Respond to employees' concerns for safety in a positive manner and take appropriate corrective action.

Employee’s Responsibilities
Employees of the organization must have a common goal of keeping accidents to a minimum. Most accidental
injuries in the work environment are caused by unsafe work habits. Therefore, all employees should continually
strive to develop habits and procedures that will reduce exposure to potential injury. Employees are urged to make
safe performance an essential element of every task. As part of their safety responsibilities, employees are expected
to do the following:
 Conduct their work safely and try to maintain their work areas hazard-free.
 Wear personal protective equipment as prescribed by their supervisors; such equipment will be provided by
the organization.
 Report hazards or unsafe work practices to supervisors or to Environmental Health and Safety
 Maintain reasonable physical body conditioning for the tasks of the work environment.
 Cooperate fully with supervisors in conducting investigations of accidents so that unsafe conditions or work
procedures may be corrected.
 Participate in physical restoration or vocational programs following lost-time injuries to achieve an early
return to work.
 Follow all safety rules and report all injuries to their supervisor.

PROGRESSIVE DISCIPLINE PROCESS


Objectives
The overall objectives for this Health and Safety Policy are :
 To implement cohesive and complementary health and safety strategies and standards for all activities and
premises
 To monitor occupational health and safety standards and methods of work through hazard spotting
workplace inspections, 6 month audits and an annual generic risk assessment of XYZ operated offices and
Service Sites by the Health & Safety Advisor / an appointed delegate
 To progressively eliminate known hazards and control risks that may pose a risk to Employees, Clients and
the public, equipment, property, reputation or services
 To complete and maintain the appropriate occupational health and safety records as required by relevant
statutory provisions, policy, procedures and standards
 To develop and maintain effective communication systems that inform and consult with Employees on
relevant occupational health and safety matters
 To provide adequate occupational health and safety information, instruction, and training to ensure
Employees can work safely and effectively.

Safety Training and Communications


Supervisors are responsible for establishing, implementing, and maintaining a system for communicating with
employees and students about health and safety matters. Information must be presented in a manner readily
understood by the affected employees and students. Attention must be given to levels of literacy and language
barriers. Verbal communications should be supplemented with written materials or postings. Whenever
appropriate, statutes and policies affecting employees shall be available in the workplace.
Operators, Staff, and Visitors who may come in contact with hazardous substances or practices in the workplace
shall be provided information concerning the particular hazards which may be posed, and the methods by which
they may deal with such hazards in a safe and healthful manner. In areas where hazardous chemicals are used,
handled, or stored, communications about these hazards shall conform to the Chemical Hazard Communication
policy set forth in the OSU Safety Handbook. (See OSU Administrative Policies and Procedures manual)

Record Keeping and Documentation


Records of inspections, including who conducted the inspections, dates, any unsafe conditions or practices found,
and corrective actions taken, must be maintained for three years.
Supervisors must also document training and communications, whether conducted in classes, safety meetings, or
one-on-one job safety training sessions. Specifically, the supervisor must keep records of who was trained, who did
the training, when the training occurred, and what was taught. Training records will be kept in a training file, and
training records for individual employees should be kept in each employee’s file. Documentation should include
safety meeting and/or training session agendas, signup sheets with signatures of attendees, and copies of any
written communications.

Recognition of Hazards
In addition to regular inspection, employees need to be responsible for maintaining a safe, orderly workplace.
Employees should be encouraged to let management know of unsafe or hazardous conditions. Employees are also
encouraged to offer solutions for safety problems or concerns.

Working with Contractors


Contractors are required to complete a ‘Request for Information’ questionnaire should they wish to be considered
for selection as an approved contractor. The questionnaire requires the contractor to provide details of their health
and safety policy, health and safety procedures and technical knowledge, experience and training for the work to be
performed in order that XYZ can assess whether there is a health and safety risk associated with engaging them.
Work to be carried out for the Company should be planned and controlled by the contractor in accordance with the
XYZ Contractors Policy. Prior to carrying out work, contractors are required to demonstrate compliance with the
provisions of the XYZ Contractors Policy, including provision of the following information to XYZ regarding:
 The competence of their workforce, i.e. confirm operatives are suitably qualified and have adequate
technical knowledge, skills and experience for the work to be performed. Competent contractor employees
will help reduce any risk of damage to property and also reduce any risk of injury to persons.
 The planning of building work, including construction (design and management)
 Risk assessments carried out by the contractor which should evaluate risks and determine how they can be
controlled to reduce the risk of injury to persons
 Their method statements which outline in sequential detail as to how potentially hazardous work will be
carried out safely
 Their permit to work system which allows contractor management to suitably plan and control any
potential hazardous work etc. required on the Organization’s site. XYZ may additionally operate its own
permit to work system where applicable, and the contractor may be required to comply with the same. The
permit to work system (the contractor’s and, as the case may be, XYZ ’s will help prevent any risk of damage
to property and risk of injury to persons
 Contractors will be required to supervise work being carried out by their employees, agents and
subcontractors.

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH and SAFETY COMMITTEES and WORKPLACE HEALTH and


SAFETY REPRESENTATIVES

INFRASTRUCTURE RISK COMMITTEE (IRC)


This committee is made up of a number of Employee representatives, including from Different departments, Legal
& Liaison, Human Resources, the General Manager and the Managing Director. The IRC provides strategic direction
on Risk Issues regarding the Employees. The committee is involved in :
 Determining strategies to mitigate and manage risk for Employees
 Identifying the areas of risk and:
o Assigning ownership;
o Determining priorities;
o Allocating required resources;
o Tracking progress of mitigating strategies against the objectives;
 Signing-off of policies and procedures that have been reviewed by risk area owners to ensure that they are
suitable and effective with regards to health and safety matters
 Coordinating infrastructure risk policy
 Communicating infrastructure risk management issues to appropriate clients
The frequency of IRC meetings is generally annually, or as is otherwise deemed appropriate by the IRC.

HEALTH, SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SITE COORDINATORS (HSESC) FORUM


This forum is made up of a number of Employee representatives, who have been nominated by the unit lead at each
relevant location to assist the Risk Management team These representatives are at varying levels/operating units.
The HSESC acts as a coordinator for each shop floor; contractor site and Client site, where required, and meet
quarterly to share and discuss health and safety issues. The Risk Management team chair meetings of the HSESC
and will escalate any health and safety issues to the IRC, where appropriate.
SAFE WORK PRACTICES AND PROCEDURES

POLICY
XYZ s is committed to providing a safe workplace for all its workers. We recognize that all workers have the right to
work in a safe and healthy environment consisted with the Occupational health and safety act and any other
applicable legislation.

We follow safe work practices and procedures in order to eliminate the hazards that cause accidents and injuries.

GENERAL SAFETY RULES


a. Alcohol and Substance Use
Employees should not be under the influence of alcohol or illegal substances during working hours.

b. Electrical Safety
The repair of electrical circuits and components, together with the removal of any access covers which may
expose Employees to the hazard of ‘live’ electrical circuits or components is strictly prohibited. The removal of
access covers may result in the risk of electrocution or death.

c. Emergency Procedures
The fire alarm is not generally activated in operated sites or in Service Site when an emergency alert is received.
In the event of an emergency alert Employees will be advised by the Emergency Management Team, Local
Emergency Action Team, Location Manager/Coordinator, HSESC, Fire Wardens or Security of what action to
take, their instructions must be followed.

VISITOR GENERAL SAFETY RULES


 Wear Protective Equipments wherever required
 Always wear the badge provided for identification purposes
 Maintain safe distance from hazardous areas
 Any kind of tobacco, alcohol or any other illegal substance in its any form is banned inside the factory
premises.
 No arms or combustible substances are allowed inside the factory premises
 Should be always escorted by any factory employee
 No food or beverages are allowed inside the shop floor.

INCIDENT REPORTING
If an accident, injury, work related injury or incident where no one is injured, but which could have been more
serious (a ‘near-miss’), Employees must report the details to prevent it happening to someone else. Employees
must immediately report the incident to the Supervisor, HSESC or HR. It is essential to report any accident as
quickly as possible in order to:
 Help prevent the recurrence of similar incidents;
 Comply with the Company's legal obligations.
Employees working at sites where no HSESC has been appointed should contact the Risk Administrator, to report
any incident.

HOUSEKEEPING
Employees have a responsibility to ensure their work area is kept clean and free from hazards including those which
may cause slips and trips. All waste should be deposited in suitable bins. If an Employee discovers any problems
with housekeeping, they must promptly contact the immediate supervisor, the HSESC or the nearest available
housekeeping staff.
A clean workplace is a safer workplace. All employees, contractors and subcontractors are required to:
1. Keep the work area clean, free of oil, grease, mud, unnecessary tools/equipment, scrap metal and
other materials.
2. Clean-up spills promptly with proper absorbing materials and agents.
3. Place all garbage and waste materials in appropriate containers.
4. Store all oily rags in appropriate fire-approved steel containers.
5. Keep exterior walkways and stairways free of snow, ice and obstacles.
6. Keep interior hallways, stairwells and other traffic areas clear.
7. Mark wet areas to avoid tripping.
8. Watch for hazards such as nails, pieces of scrap metal, grease and oil.

INDUCTION
All new joiners to the Company should receive a copy of the Induction Pack from Human Resources. The induction
training includes information in relation to health and safety, including a copy of the Health and Safety Policy. New
joiners are explained this policy.
Manual Handling
Manual handling should be avoided where reasonably practicable, and Employees must not move, drag, push, and
lift, etc., any items that are beyond their own capabilities. Employees are not permitted to undertake manual
handling that involves a risk of injury without having first undertaken appropriate training and risk assessment.

NEW AND EXPECTANT MOTHERS


Employees should complete the Maternity notification form accessed via the XYZ Portal as soon as is practicable to
confirm they are pregnant. The Risk Management team will contact the individual to schedule a “New and
Expectant Mothers at Work” risk assessment. For further information regarding new and expectant mothers,
contact the Health and Safety Advisor.
Smoking at work
XYZ s operates a no smoking policy in the workplace. Smoking is prohibited in any XYZ operated premises.
Smoking is only permitted in designated outdoor areas.
Mobile Phones:
No mobile phones are allowed inside the Factory premises while working. However, they can be used by the
employees when not engaged with any kind of operation.

STRESS
XYZ recognizes that individuals may suffer from stress in both their working and personal lives. XYZ recognizes
work-induced stress as a hazard and is committed to managing and mitigating it wherever possible. Further
information on stress is available from the Health and Safety Advisor and a confidential counselling and employee
support service is provided.

WORKPLACE
Every workplace should have suitable and sufficient lighting, a comfortable working temperature and a suitable and
sufficient workspace. An adequate supply of drinking water, facilities to eat meals and suitable and sufficient
sanitary conveniences and washing facilities should also be provided. Employees should contact the HR or HSESC if
they have any concerns regarding their workplace provision

WORK STATIONS
The following steps are recommended to be taken by Employees in order to minimize any risk to Employees while
working at workstations:
 Use adjustments on chairs to improve comfort;
 Ensure feet are rested on the floor/footrest, with the backs of knees at an approximate 90° angle;
 Sit well back in the chair and ensure the small of the back (lumbar region) is supported by the backrest,
adjusting it accordingly;
 Ensure that wrists and hands are as straight as possible while stitching
Employees must highlight any medical symptoms, pain or discomfort with your Executive, your Human Resources
Representative. This should be followed by an appointment with a General Practitioner.
Work Station Assessment
If an Employee is a designated display screen equipment user they must complete workstation safety training and
assessment. The assessment will enable Employees to safely set up a workstation in order to help to avoid
discomfort and pain. An Employee should complete the risk assessment when there is a change in there working
environment.

INFIRMARY
Employers employing at least 50 workers must set up a permanent infirmary at the workplace. The infirmary must
be run by a doctor assisted by one or more nurses, depending upon the number of workers. During working hours,
including overtime, at least one nurse must always be present. The employer must supply the infirmary with
sufficient medicine and medical equipment to provide emergency care to workers who are injured or sick during
work. If the factory employs more than 200 workers, the infirmary must include beds for hospitalising the injured
and sick. The infirmary must be able to handle 2 percent of the factory’s personnel at one time, up to a maximum of
20 beds

VENTILATION AND HEAT


XYZ s ensures that the heat in the factory does not affect a worker’s health, or impair their ability to work.
 Improved air circulation and ventilation in the workplace
 Introduced dust reduction measures
 Keep fans and other ventilation systems in good repair

DRINKING WATER
Employees are provided with sufficient hygienic drinking water. The drinking water tank must be periodically
cleaned and should be covered.. The drinking water station must be located near the workplace. Management must
provide cups, glasses or other sanitary means for drinking water to the workers. Employers should not unreasonably
restrict workers’ access to drinking water.

SANITATION FACILITIES
Employers should set up functioning toilets for workers. The number of toilets required depends upon the number
of workers in the factory. Toilets must have waterproof floors and walls, a door with a latch, appropriate lighting,
and adequate drainage. Toilets should be marked for separate use by men and women, and cleaned at least once a
day. Employers should also consider providing washing facility near the toilets. Employers should not unreasonably
restrict workers’ access to the toilets.

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENTS


Personal protective equipment (PPE) refers to protective clothing, helmets, goggles, or other garment designed to
protect the wearer's body from injury by blunt impacts, electrical hazards, heat, chemicals, and infection, for job-
related occupational safety and health purposes.
PPE includes equipment such as safety footwear, hard hats, waistcoats, goggles, respirators and safety harnesses.
Waterproof, weatherproof, or insulated clothing is subject to the regulations only if its use is necessary to protect
employees against adverse climatic conditions that could otherwise affect their health and safety.

Personal Protective Equipment Responsibilities

Employer

1. Ensure safety kits and all required PPE is provided for all workers.

2. Ensure supplies are replenished as required.


Supervisor

1. Ensure PPE is worn by all workers whenever necessary.

2. Ensure PPE is used properly whenever necessary by all workers on a project.

3. Ensure PPE is stored, cleaned and maintained properly.

4. Familiarize project personnel with all hazards to which they may not be aware.

5. Review PPE compliance problems and requirements in safety meetings with all workers.

Worker

1. Participate in PPE training when applicable (respirators, hearing, fall protection, etc).

2. Be informed of all hazards and potential hazards on a project.

3. Bring all hazards to the attention of the health and safety representative, project supervisor and other workers
on the project.

4. Not to remove or make ineffective any protective device required by the regulations or by the employer.

Training
It is the responsibility of supervisors to provide training to their employees on identifying when the selected
personal protective equipment is necessary, on how to use the equipment, and on proper care and maintenance of
it.

Foot Protection
Appropriate footwear that is effective in preventing or limiting injury shall be worn where employees are exposed to
conditions which may cause foot injuries. As a general rule, low-heeled, closed-toe shoes shall be worn in all
laboratory operations where there is a likelihood of exposure to spilled chemicals.

Eye Protection
Eye injuries can translate into pain, loss of time, money and even your eyesight. Even a slight loss or impairment of
your vision is a tremendous price to pay for a moment of carelessness. It is a dreadful reminder of what taking a risk
can mean. Wear proper eye protection where eye protection hazards are apparent and use common sense. Become
acquainted with proper first aid treatment for eye injuries and seek medical attention if there is an eye injury.
Basic First Aid (Eye Injuries)
Proper first aid for eye injuries is critical. The method of first aid needed depends upon the type of injury sustained.
Let natural tears wash out specks or particles in the eye. Try not to rub the eyes if possible. If this does not work, see
a physician. For blows to the eye, apply cold compresses for 15 minutes and again each hour as needed to reduce
pain and swelling. If the blow was hard enough to cause discoloration, see a physician. Internal damage could have
occurred. For cuts and punctures to the eye, do not do anything to the eye but bandage it lightly and seek a
physician at once. Chemical burns on the eyes can be minor to very serious. Fresh water should be available for
irrigating eyes anywhere chemicals are used. If the eye comes in contact with any chemical, it should be
continuously flooded with water for at least 15 minutes. Do not put anything else in the eye. See a physician and
take the label or container of the chemical involved.
Hearing Protectors
Hearing protectors come in two forms: plugs and muffs. Both are designed to reduce the noise to an acceptable
level, although this ability is based on the level and type of noise and on the type of hearing protector.
Hearing protection is available at no cost to all employees exposed to an 8-hour time weighted average (TWA) of 85
dBA (decibels, A-weighted). Employees exposed at 90 dB or greater must wear hearing protectors. Hearing
protectors worn where noise is above this permissible level (90 dBA) must reduce the noise to a time-weighted
average of 85 dBA or less. It is the responsibility of supervisors to investigate whether their work environments
expose employees to noise above the permissible level.
Nothing shall prevent the employee from wearing hearing protectors for reduction of annoyance noise or high-
level noise of short duration. Hearing protectors should always be considered “personal” equipment and should not
be used by other individuals, except for muffs that are adequately cleaned and sanitized.
75 dB(A) for 32 hours 100dB(A) for 1 hour
80 dB(A) for 16 hours 105dB(A) for 0.5 hour
85 dB(A) for 8 hours 110dB(A) for 0.25 hour
90 dB(A) for 4 hours 115 dB(A) for 0.125 hour
95 dB(A) for 2 hours

Helmets
Employees working in areas like transportation, logistics and company related construction workers, where there is
possible danger of head injury from impact, falling or flying objects, or electrical shock and burns must wear
protective helmets. The typical “hard hat” is the protective helmet of choice in most situations.

PPE Provided In Washing Department


1. Goggles – To prevent eyes from the dust during sand washing

2. Apron - To prevent the clothes from getting dirty or wet during washing

3. Gloves – To access the chemicals and acids in protective way

PPE Provided In Spreading Department


Dust Respirator- To prevent Breathing problem - In case of piled, Fleece, flocked fabrics

PPE Provided In Cutting Department


Steel Gloves – To protect hands from band knife and straight knife cutting

Head Caps- To cover head from dust

Face masks- To protect face from fly

Heat protective Gloves- To prevent the hands from the heated rollers in fusing machines
PPE Provided In Sewing Department
Separator – Extra extended steel wire on sewing machines at sewing area to prevent the finger to get a contact with
running needle

Ear buds- Buds used to prevent ears and counter the noise pollution

Facial masks – provided to over-edging and flat-lock machine operators

PPE Provided In Finishing Department


Glass - Glass on the bartacking machine and button sewing machine to prevent eyes in case of needle breakage

Hair cap- To prevent hairs from dust


Respirator Mask – For any easy breathe and prevent white petroleum to get inside the body while breathing during
spotting
Soft Gloves – To prevent hands from getting damaged by the spotting and washing chemicals
Apron – To be used by the operator during washing

PPE Used In Packing Department


Soft Gloves – To pack the material without hand marks on white clothes

FALL PROTECTION AND HARNESSING


General Fall Protection Recommendations:
The following items are highly recommended to provide maximum protection of workers and ensure compliance
with regulations and standards.

Warnings: Always read all instructions and warnings contained on and in the product packaging before using any fall
protection equipment.
Inspection: All fall protection equipment should be inspected prior to use by following procedures outlined in the
manufacturer’s brochure.
Training: All workers shall be trained by a competent person in the proper use of fall protection products.
Rescue Pre-Planning: Minimizing the time between a fall occurrence and medical attention of the workers is vitally
important. A thorough rescue program should be established prior to using fall protection equipment. Employers
should provide for a prompt rescue should a fall occur. Rescue procedures should be reviewed on a regular basis as
part of the company's overall safety training program.

SAFE WORK PRACTICES AND PROCEDURES


1. Watch your fingers. Take special care when operating so that you stitch\cut the object, not your fingers.
2. Keep your mind on your work. Avoid horseplay and loud talk. Loud talking as well as pushing, running, and
scuffling while working with hand tools can cause serious accidents. Be alert and work defensively.
3. Keep work area and tools clean. Dirty, greasy, and oily tools and floors can cause accidents. Clean and put away
all unneeded tools and materials. Clean up spills and scraps from the floor and equipment. Keep paths to exits
clear. If conditions are dusty, use a respirator.
4. Use tools properly. Always use proper-sized tools and equipment for the job. Use each tool only for the job for
which it was intended. Forcing a small tool to do the job of a large one may result in injury or tool damage.
5. Keep cutting tools sharp. Dull cutting tools are dangerous, as they require excessive pressure to make them cut.
When cutting always cut away from the body.
6. Carry and store tools properly. All sharp-edge tools and chisels should be carried with the cutting edge down.
Never carry sharp tools in a pocket. Store all sharp-edge cutting tools with the sharp edges down.
7. Inspect tools before using. Avoid using damaged tools. Tools that appear to be damaged or have broken
handles should be marked unsafe. Do not use them until they have been repaired.
8. Grip tools firmly. Hold hand tools securely so that they do not slip and hit someone
9. The seats of the workers and the tables should be well aligned in height so that there is no musculoskeletal
strain.
10. There should be proper lighting at the place of work so that eye strain can be avoided.
11. Machinery should be well maintained in order to reduce the level of noise. If necessary, certain parts of
machines can be replaced.
12. In case the noise level cannot be controlled, workers should be provided with earplugs so that exposure to noise
can be reduced.
13. Workers can be rotated within jobs so that they are not faced with continuous noise exposure for a long period
of time.
14. There should be proper ventilation at the place of work.
15. In order to reduce the exposure to dust, workers should be provided with masks.
16. Trained medical personnel and first aid facilities as well as safety equipments such as fire -extinguishers and fire
alarms should be available at the place of work.
17. In units where there is heavy exposure to dangerous chemicals, workers should be provided with safety gloves.
18. Medical examinations should be conducted by the employers for the workers from time to time. If significant
occupational health problems are observed, appropriate measures should be taken by the management.

HEALTH CARE BENEFITS POLICY


The employee is entitled for sick leave and health care benefits as per the company HR policies.

HAZARD RECOGNITION, EVALUATION AND CONTROL


A workplace hazard can be any activity, condition or substance that has the potential to harm a worker. Hazards are
generally divided into two categories: safety hazards and; health hazards.

POLICY
XYZ s is committed to identifying and removing or controlling hazards. The hazard reporting system is a worker-
oriented process. Workers are in the best position to identify the hazards in the workplace because they are the
ones who perform the work. Workers act as a second set of eyes for supervisors.

HAZARD IDENTIFICATION
A hazard may be defined as a condition, practice, or behavior that has the potential to cause injury, illness, or
property damage. Occupational hazards are divided into two broad categories: (1) safety hazards, and (2) health
hazards. Generally, health hazards cause occupational illnesses, such as noise induced hearing loss. Safety hazards
cause physical harm, such as cuts or broken bones. Hazards exist in all workplaces. It is the duty of employees at the
workplace to identify them and control or eliminate them once identified.

Safety Hazards

Safety hazards are anything in the workplace that could cause an injury. Careful workplace inspections are an
effective means of identifying safety hazards.

Following is a general list of the types of safety hazards that might occur on the shop floor or elsewhere in and
around the organization premises:

Machine Hazards - moving parts, hot parts, absence of guards, poor maintenance.

Energy Hazards

 Electricity - overloaded circuits;

 Steam - boilers

 Heat - hot parts of equipment or tools;

 Pressure - valves, boilers;

 Gravity - falling objects, fabric rolls;

 Mechanical - machines with moving parts;

 Chemical - mixing solvents;

 Kinetic - slip and fall; and

 Potential - hydraulic lift


Confined Space Hazards

 Not intended for human occupancy

 With restricted entry or exit

 Where hazardous atmospheres exist (e.g. methane, hydrogen sulfide, oxygen deficient or oxygen enriched

Materials Handling Hazards

 Mechanical materials handling - includes lifting, lowering, carrying, pushing, pulling and shoveling items

 Handling hazardous materials - involves handling flammable, reactive, explosive and/or corrosive
substances.

Work Practice Hazards

 Failure to develop or follow safe work practices/procedures

 Poor housekeeping

Health Hazards

A health hazard may produce serious and immediate (acute) effects or it may cause long term (chronic) problems.

Health hazards are categorized as one of four different types:

Biological hazards – bacteria, parasites etc

Physical health hazards – noise, heat, vibration etc

Ergonomic demands and stress - caused by poor work design, Incorrect Posture, Poor Work Station design, physical
condition of the worker, work place harassment

Chemical hazards - fumes, steam, etc

EMERGENCY ALERT
The fire alarm is not generally activated in operated sites or in Service Site when an emergency alert is received. In
the event of an emergency alert Employees will be advised by the Emergency Management Team, Local
Emergency Action Team, Location Manager/Coordinator, HSESC, Fire Wardens or Security of what action to take,
their instructions must be followed.

Fire Safety

Fire prevention requires special attention.

1. Keep all entrances and exits clear of obstructions such as vehicles, equipment and general clutter at all times.

2. Correct poor housekeeping practices.

3. Use appropriate shielding of flammable surfaces when performing hot work.

4. Remember that grinders are capable of throwing red hot particles approximately 30 feet.

5. Keep your work area free of unnecessary combustible materials.

6. Use proper degreasing agents. Never use gasoline or other “flammable liquids” for degreasing or cleaning.
7. All fire doors are to be kept closed when the shop is vacant.

Fire Fighting Equipment

1. All workers should know the location of the firefighting equipment in their area.

2. Fire extinguishers are to be checked monthly.

3. Never return an empty extinguisher to its fire station. Clearly mark it “MT” with chalk and exchange it for a
charged unit.

4. All fire extinguishers will be inspected on an annual basis by a certified company.

5. All workers must receive training before using fire extinguishing equipment.

Good housekeeping is essential in the prevention of fires. Fires can start anywhere and at any time. This is why it is
important to know the type of fire extinguisher to use and how to use it.

Always keep fire extinguishers visible with easy access. Fire extinguishers have to be properly maintained. Where
temperature is a factor, ensure that care is taken in selecting the right extinguisher.

Workers must receive training before using fire extinguishing equipment.

Types of Fires

Class A: Wood, paper, rags, rubbish and other ordinary combustible materials.

a. Recommended Extinguishers: Water from a hose, pump type water can, pressurized extinguisher, or soda
acid.

b. Fighting the Fire: Soak the fire completely – even the smoking embers.

Class B: Flammable liquids, oil and grease.

c. Recommended Extinguishers: ABC units, dry chemical, foam and carbon dioxide.

d. Fighting the Fire: Start at the base of the fire and use a swinging motion from side to side, always keeping
the fire in front of you.

Class C: Electrical equipment.

e. Recommended extinguishers: Carbon dioxide and dry chemical (ABC units).

f. Fighting the Fire: Use short bursts on the fire. When the electrical current is shut off on a Class C fire, it can
become a Class A fire if materials around the electrical fire are ignited.

Discovering a fire

 Sound the fire alarm by breaking the glass on any red manual fire alarm call point

 Do not attempt to extinguish any fires; and

 Employees should not put themselves, or their colleagues, at personal risk of injury.

Hearing a fire evacuation alarm

 Evacuate the building immediately by using the nearest available exit and\or fire Exits.
 Do not use the lifts – use the stairs;

 Assemble at the nearest fire assembly point;

 Do not re-enter the building unless advised it is safe to do so;

 Follow the Fire Warden's instructions at all times;

 If Employees have visitors with them, advise those individuals of what action to take; and

 Do not stop to collect coats, bags or other personal possessions.

Fire precautions, alarm testing and fire drills

 Employees should familiarize themselves with fire safety information (escape routes, assembly points) provided
on fire action notices/ notice boards;

 Fire alarms are tested once a week in each building;

 The same procedures must be followed during a fire drill as though a real evacuation; and

 Executives should ensure disabled persons have an able bodied “buddy” appointed to assist them during an
emergency evacuation. Any disabled Employee, and their appointed buddy, should receive information and
training on emergency evacuation procedures. A risk assessment should be completed for any wheelchair user.

FIRST AID
In the event of an accident and the need for medical attention, the nearest First Aider should be contacted by
either:

 Calling the Factory Manager

 Dialing Reception

 Referring to the list of First Aiders displayed on local notice boards. (If these details are not displayed or

 Appear to be out of date, please contact the local HSESC as soon as possible)

 First Aid boxes are generally located in vending areas

First Aid Procedures

1. The supervisor shall ensure compliance with all applicable Health and Safety Legislation and Workers
Compensation or Insurance Board requirements regarding first aid in all work places under their
supervision.

2. Should an injury occur, it is essential that first aid be administered immediately followed by proper
medical treatment if necessary.

3. A first aid kit with the required contents will be available at each workplace

4. There will be a certified first aider conveniently available at each workplace.

5. There will be a certified first aider conveniently available on each shift.

6. The first aider will ensure that an injury treatment record has been completed.
7. Transportation of an injured worker to a hospital, doctor’s office or worker’s home will be provided by a
supervisor when necessary.

First Aid-Transportation

The company will provide transportation to the hospital, doctor’s office or worker’s home, when necessary,
following an injury or illness. The preferred method of transportation, if required, is an ambulance.

Should this method of transportation not be appropriate, then the company will call for a taxi. The injured worker
will be accompanied by first aid attendant or designate.

Should the employee refuse the transportation, the company will attempt to:

1. Identify any other transportation methods that the worker would prefer.

2. Reiterate the importance of accepting the transportation to the hospital, doctor’s office or worker’s
home.

3. Call 911 and get the ambulance attendant to administer medical attention on site.

4. The worker will not be allowed to continue work until medical clearance is provided.

Responsibilities of the individual travelling with the injured worker:

1. Continue to administer first aid, if required.

2. Ensure an injury package is taken, containing the Functional Abilities Form and Material Safety Data
Sheet (if necessary), to the medical facility.

3. Maintain contact with the company providing updates when the worker has reached their destination.

4. Return to the company to provide additional follow-up and complete the injury/incident
documentation.

Additional duties may be added based on each individual circumstance

Bomb Threat

Please be vigilant about unusual packages and report anything suspicious to Customer Services / HSESC.

If a bomb threat is received by an Employee then that Employee should gain as much information from the caller as
is possible, e.g. location of the bomb, time that it has been set to detonate, any code given, any background noises,
male or female and their accent. This information should be immediately provided to Customer Services or the
HSESC, who will in turn contact senior management/Emergency Management Team.

Structural collapse

In case of any structural collapse, the floor manager is responsible for the safety of the operators. Routine quarterly
checks need to be carried out of the infrastructure including the pipeline, boilers etc to prevent any hazards. Any
new joiner should ensure that there is a clearance certificate from the organization of the infrastructure and
equipments of the particular area he\she is responsible for.

Disabled Elevator

In case of disabled elevator, the main switch should be switched off immediately. The first-aider and the supervisor
are responsible for the safekeeping of the operator.
ETHICAL MISCONDUCT
Any ethical misconduct will attract a warning and\or suspension\job termination depending upon the gravity of the
complaint. Committee constituting the immediate head, HOD and the General Manager will be the deciding factor.

Work Place Harassment

Verbal\Mental Abuse:

Any kind of verbal\mental abuse will not be tolerated. A first time offence can be treated with a warning. However,
a repeat may cause suspension for a week or even to termination depending on the nature of abuse. The victim can
report to the Supervisor or to the HSESC or to the counselor. After the due course, if not satisfied, the employee can
go to the higher authority if required.

Physical Abuse:

Depending upon the gravity of the situation the offender may attract financial penalty, Suspension or termination.
The victim can report to the Supervisor or to the HSESC or to the counselor. After the due course, if not satisfied,
the employee can go to the higher authority if required.

Sexual Abuse:

No such abuse will be tolerated in the workplace. The offender,, if found guilty will be terminated. The victim can
report to the Supervisor or to the HSESC or to the counselor or to the HR. After the due course, if not satisfied, the
employee can go to the higher authority if required.

HAZARD REPORTING PROCEDURE


Worker Responsibilities

1. Report any perceived hazard verbally to the site supervisor.

2. Provide recommendations to the supervisor on how to eliminate or control the hazard.

3. If the supervisor does not respond to your concern you are to inform management.

Supervisor Responsibilities

1. Discuss the hazard and controls with the worker and complete the Hazard Identification Form.

2. Respond to the worker’s concern by the next shift.

3. Ensure that the form details the action or non-action which will be taken.

4. Provide a copy of the completed Hazard Identification Form to middle management.

Middle Management Responsibilities

1. Ensure action is taken to address the hazard identified.

2. Initialize and date the Hazard Identification Form.

INSPECTION PROGRAM
Inspecting work floor to ensure that appropriate controls are in place is another key element of an effective health
and safety program. Informal inspections should be done by all supervisors whenever they are out on the work floor
or in office. Formal documented inspections must be done weekly by supervisors and monthly by health and safety
representatives.
POLICY
XYZ s will conduct weekly documented workplace inspections for the purpose of identifying and correcting unsafe
conditions and behavior. The inspections will cover premises, buildings, temporary structures, tools, equipment,
machinery and work methods and practices. The work place safety inspection form is to be used as a guideline since
specific environments may have unique situations and potential hazards that may not be covered by this list.
All members of the department have a role in conducting workplace inspections.
• All employees are required to participate in the Inspection Program through informal inspections of their
workplaces. As part of their daily routine, employees are expected to maintain a practiced awareness which
identifies potential hazards. Employees have a duty to report all hazards to their supervisors.
• Supervisors are responsible for conducting informal inspections of all their workplaces and for directing formal
inspections of workplaces under their control. They ensure the Occupational Health and Safety committee is
involved in formal inspections.
• Occupational Health and Safety committee shall participate in inspections, record and analyze results, make
recommendations for corrective action and follow up to ensure proper actions have been taken.

LEGISLATIVE REQUIREMENTS TO DO INSPECTIONS


The Occupational Health and Safety Act and regulations require workplace inspections be conducted as often as
necessary to ensure safe workplaces. According to the Act, the department’s management at each workplace have
a duty to consult with the Occupational Health and Safety committee regarding the scheduling of inspections and
must ensure Occupational Health and Safety committee participate in the inspections. The purpose of workplace
inspections is to identify existing and potential hazards with people, equipment, materials and environment so that
the hazards will be controlled or eliminated. It is expected that the inspection team will make recommendations to
the workplace management for appropriate corrective actions.
The recommendations may be made formally or informally. Where the inspection team believes it is necessary to
make a formal recommendation, it will be documented and sent to the management. Management, in turn, are
required to respond to the formal recommendation in writing within 30 days. Informal recommendations may be
made verbally although possibly recorded in inspection
notes and meeting minutes. The written response from management must indicate agreement or disagreement
with a formal recommendation. Where agreement is indicated, the matter of scheduling the implementation of the
corrective action must be outlined. If the implementation cannot be scheduled for a significant period of time, the
matter of temporary hazard controls must be discussed and periodic updates must be provided on the progress of
the implementation. Where management disagrees with the recommendation, it must state its reason for
disagreement. Occupational Health and Safety committees and Workplace Health and Safety representatives
should keep records of their inspection activities. They may utilize a checklist developed specifically for their
workplace and their inspections should generate a report of their findings.

FORMAL INSPECTIONS
1. The IRC will conduct monthly inspections of the workplace and document the recordings of the same.
2. Supervisors of each department are responsible for conducting weekly inspections an the recordings of the
same should be documented in the weekly inspection report.

INFORMAL INSPECTIONS
1. Ongoing inspections should be continually conducted by supervisors and workers as part of their job
responsibilities.
2. Hazardous conditions are to be noted and either corrected immediately or reported for corrective action.
3. The informal inspection is to be done on a daily basis; no written report is to be generated.

PRE-OPERATION INSPECTIONS
1. Inspection of equipment is to be done before it is put in operation.
2. This inspection should be a part of work routine.
3. Any posed threats or problems should be reported to the concerned authority, in order to ensure timely
corrective measures.

INSPECTION PROCEDURE
1. Review previous inspection records and note any commonly reported hazards.
2. Familiarize yourself with the type of workplace and unique hazards.
3. Use your eyes, ears and other senses to identify actual or potential problems as you go about your inspection.
Record the hazards on the Site Safety Inspection Form.
4. When unsafe conditions are noted requiring immediate action, correct the situation immediately.
5. Look for basic causes of sub-standard conditions, practices and procedures.
6. Keep a copy of the inspection form.
7. Review items with the Health and Safety representative and during management meetings.

RESPONSIBILITIES
Senior Management
1. Conduct a formal inspection of the workplace once every year using the workplace inspection checklist. Ensure
corrective action is taken to address hazards identified.
2. Review middle management’s inspections. Initialize and date the inspection report.
Middle Management
1. Conduct formal inspections semi-annually using the Workplace Inspection Checklist. Ensure corrective action is
taken to address hazards identified. Provide a copy of your inspection to senior management.
2. Review site supervisor’s weekly inspections. Ensure appropriate corrective actions are taken. Initialize and date
the inspection report and file it in job file.
3. Review and comment on quality of supervisor’s inspection reports.
4. Review semi-annually with senior management the status of supervisor’s inspection.
Supervisor
1. Conduct formal inspections weekly using the Workplace Inspection Checklist. Ensure corrective action is taken
to address hazards identified. Provide a copy of your inspection to middle management at the end of the week.
All Workplace Parties
1. All workplace parties must conduct daily informal inspections of their workplace and take action to correct
hazards.

All identified hazardous conditions should be eliminated or controlled immediately. When this is not possible:
1. Interim control measures should be implemented immediately.
2. Warning signs should be posted at the location of the hazard.
3. All affected employees should be informed of the location of the hazard and the required interim controls.
4. Permanent control measures should be implemented as soon as possible.

TRAINING
All parties who conduct formal workplace inspections will be trained on their responsibilities and on how to
complete the Workplace Inspection Checklist.

FOLLOW-UP ACTIONS TO HEALTH AND SAFETY INSPECTIONS


Where unsafe conditions, practices or procedures are noted:

 Take action immediately to rectify the problem if possible.

 Place warning signs and barricades to keep workers away. Use verbal warnings if applicable.

 Notify management to rectify conditions, record conditions, actions taken and the date on the inspection form.
 Record and complete the site health and safety inspection form and file it with safety documentation.

When a worker is noted performing an unsafe act, advise as follows:

 Inform him/her of the unsafe situation

 Discuss the unsafe condition with him/her

 Advise on how to correct the unsafe condition

 Re-visit the area to ensure the safe practice is being followed

 Discuss with the supervisor

ACCIDENT/INCIDENT INVESTIGATION PROGRAM

PURPOSE
To explain why and how an accident happened, investigators must collect information on the events that took place
before and during the event. Investigators can then determine accident conditions by examining physical evidence
and interviewing witnesses. Both of these steps are of equal importance and should be done as soon as possible to
ensure complete accident investigation. Equally important is the need to document the steps that were taken
immediately after the accident to deal with the emergency and to begin the investigation. It also identifies the
forms to be used and the procedures to be followed within specified time frames.

In order for an investigation to be a valuable tool in accident prevention, three things must take place:

1. the information gathered must be analyzed;

2. corrective action must be taken; and

3. the action must be monitored for effectiveness.

POLICY
XYZ s requires all employees to immediately report to their supervisor all accidents and incidents that result in
injury or property damage, and all near misses with the potential for serious injury or property damage. Supervisors
will report the accident promptly to management to ensure timely submission to Health and safety committee.
Each incident will be analyzed to determine causes and contributing factors and the analysis will be used to reduce
or eliminate the risk of further incident.

The following types of incidents/accidents shall be fully investigated:

1. Accidents that result in injuries requiring medical aid,

2. Accidents that cause property damage or interrupt operation with potential loss,

3. Incidents that have the potential to result in (1) or (2) above, and

4. All incidents that, by regulation, must be reported to regulatory agencies.

An Accident is defined as an unplanned event that causes harm to people or damage to property. Accidents are
categorized as one of the following:

 Lost Time Injury (LTI) refers to any injury that prevents a worker from coming to work on the day following the
day of the injury.

 Medical Aid refers to any injury not severe enough to warrant more than the day of injury off, but where
medical treatment by a doctor is given.
 First Aid refers only to injuries that can be treated on the job without any days lost.

 An Incident is defined as property damage but with no injury to workers.

 A Near Miss is a situation in which no injury or damage occurred but might have if conditions had been slightly
different.

 Occupational Illness is defined as a condition resulting from a worker’s exposure to chemical, biological or
physical agents in the workplace to the extent that the health of the worker is impaired.

 Critical Injury is defined as an injury of a serious nature that:

a) Places life in jeopardy;

b) Produces unconsciousness;

c) Results in substantial loss of blood;

d) Involves the fracture of a leg or arm but not a finger or toe;

e) Involves the amputation of a leg, arm, hand or foot but not a finger or toe;

f) Consists of burns to a major portion of the body; or

g) Causes the loss of sight to an eye.

PROCEDURE
1. The employee reports a work related accident

2. Administer first aid as required

3. Arrange for transportation for injured employee to medical treatment if required

4. Ensure Return to Work package accompanies worker

5. Eliminate the hazard if possible or guard the accident scene if worker is critically injured

6. Investigate the cause of the accident and report findings in the Accident/Incident Report form. Ensure all areas
of the form are completed.

7. Send copy of the form to Health and Safety Department

8. Report all accidents/incidents as follows:

 Lost Time Injuries

 Medical Aid

 First Aid

 Incidents and Near Misses

RESPONSIBILITIES
1. All employees shall report all incidents/accidents to their immediate supervisor.

2. Supervisors shall conduct initial investigations and submit their reports using the Accident Investigation Form
promptly to management.
3. Superintendents shall determine the need for and, if necessary, carry out detailed investigations. They shall also
determine causes, recommend corrective action, and report to the manager.

4. The manager shall review all superintendents' reports, determine corrective action to be taken, and ensure that
such action is implemented.

ROLE OF SUPERVISOR IN AN ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION


The Supervisor and the Health and Safety Coordinator must investigate all accidents and incidents that involve
workers. This includes completing the Accident Investigation Report, taking statements from witnesses and
collecting any other pertinent information and ensuring the injured worker has received the necessary medical
assistance.

The supervisor is responsible for ensuring that all accident reports are transmitted to the Health and Safety
Department as described below. If a worker sustaining a First Aid later seeks medical aid, the supervisor must advise
the Health and Safety Department and have the treating practitioner complete a Functional Abilities Form.

The supervisor should contact the injured worker as frequently as the injury deems, or at least once a week. If you
require assistance, contact the Health and Safety Committee.

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS

POLICY
XYZ s will have each of its workplaces achieve a level of emergency preparedness so that immediate and
appropriate response is taken in the event of a local emergency.

Emergency preparedness will:

 prevent, or at least minimize, harm coming to any employee from a foreseeable emergency;

 minimize damage to equipment, facilities and the environment; and

 minimize the time required to restore full services after the disruption caused by an emergency.

The supervisor is responsible for ensuring that each department and floor has developed and implemented
emergency preparedness and response procedures specific to the workplace. Supervisors are responsible to ensure
that: individuals are designated and trained; response procedures are developed; employees are trained in
emergency procedures; hazard assessments are regularly conducted; and concerns raised are addressed.

The HR team should appoint Safety representatives who play a key role in developing emergency preparedness
plans for their workplace as well as ensuring the plan is effective. The functions performed by the team are:

 monitoring the adequacy of training and instruction given to employees at the workplace,

 ensuring the availability and functioning of necessary equipment, supplies and emergency devices;

 ensuring the plan is exercised on a regular basis, including at least bi-annual evacuation drills; and

 ensuring the plan is reviewed and updated on an annual basis to accommodate new processes, systems,
equipment or facility modifications.

XYZ s must provide all the departments with an Emergency Evacuation Procedure Manual which is a guide for
developing an evacuation procedure. The Safety representatives developing an emergency preparedness plan must
incorporate the evacuation procedures as outlined in the Manual into their plan. The Manual describes the basic
requirements for a safe and orderly evacuation in the event of a fire, hazardous material incident, bomb threat, or
other serious emergency.
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
Bomb Threat

Please be vigilant about unusual packages and report anything suspicious to HSESC/wardens/floor incharge.

If a bomb threat is received by an Employee then that Employee should gain as much information from the caller as
is possible, e.g. location of the bomb, time that it has been set to detonate, any code given, any background noises,
male or female and their accent. This information should be immediately provided to Customer Services or the
HSESC, who will in turn contact senior management/Emergency Management Team.

Emergency Alert

The fire alarm is not generally activated when an emergency alert is received. In the event of an emergency alert
Employees will be advised by the HSESC, managers, Fire Wardens or Security of what action to take and their
instructions must be followed.

Fire Safety

On discovering a fire Sound the fire alarm by breaking the glass on any red manual fire alarm call point. Do not
attempt to extinguish any fires; and employees should not put themselves, or their colleagues, at personal risk of
injury.

Hearing a fire evacuation alarm

• Evacuate the building immediately by using the nearest available exit. Do not use the lifts use the stairs;

• Assemble at the nearest fire assembly point;

• Do not re-enter the building unless advised it is safe to do so;

• Follow the Warden's instructions at all times;

• If Employees have visitors with them, advise those individuals of what action to take; and

• Do not stop to collect coats, bags or other personal possessions.

Fire precautions, alarm testing and fire drills

• Employees should familiarise themselves with fire safety information (escape routes, assembly points) provided
on fire action notices/ notice boards;

• Fire alarms are tested once a week in each building;

• The same procedures must be followed during a fire drill as though a real evacuation; and

• Executives should ensure disabled persons have an able bodied “buddy” appointed to assist them during an
emergency evacuation. Any disabled Employee, and their appointed buddy, should receive information and training
on emergency evacuation procedures. A risk assessment should be completed for any wheelchair user.

EMERGENCY PROCEDURE PLAN


Follow these steps in developing the plan for emergency procedures.

1. List possible areas where emergencies such as fire, explosion, structural collapse, or chemical spills might
occur.

2. For each type of hazard, identify the possible results – fatalities, injuries, structural or environmental damage.
3. Determine the required response, such as rescue, fire fighting, or evacuation. The response plan must include
step-by-step procedures and control measures for each type of emergency.

4. Determine what resources, including rescue equipment and medical supplies, should be on hand to deal with
specific emergencies.

5. Determine the training required for effective response to emergencies.

EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM


It includes Safety representatives which comprises the department heads and floor managers and the floor
supervisors.

Safety Representatives (Occupational Health and Safety Committee)

 Review the Emergency Response Plan to ensure it is current and up to date.

 Ensure all necessary Emergency Response Team positions are filled with competent people.

 Maintain a list of emergency phone numbers.

 Maintain a list of locations of emergency equipment and devices.

 Maintain a list of locations of first aid kits and its inventories.

 Ensures the Availability of these phone number: Fire, Police, Ambulance, Poison Center, Environmental
Emergency:

Supervisors

 Ensures all persons are out, everything is put away, locked, turned off, anything suspicious or any other
concerns noted. In the event of a fire evacuation he/she shall ensure all or as many windows and doors as
possible are closed before leaving the area. In the event of a bomb threat evacuation, he/she shall ensure
that all or as many windows as possible are opened and all cabinets are unlocked before leaving the area.

 Reports the status in their area to the Chief Emergency Response Officer.

 Responsible for blowing the alarm.

 Assembles all staff at the designated (fire) exit before vacating the building. Escorts staff to their respective
assembly area. Ensures assembly area poses no harm or hazards to the staff. Remains with the staff and
maintains order.

 Accounts for all staff and visitors and provides this information to the Chief Emergency officer.

 Know the location of

o all pull stations

o all fire extinguishers

o the nearest fire hose cabinet

o the nearest first aid kit

The training of operators, particularly those with dedicated roles and responsibilities within the scope of the plan, is
the most important part of emergency preparedness. Each of the department with have either an Occupational
Health and Safety committee or a Workplace Health and Safety representative who will be responsible for
developing the emergency response plan.. Workplace Health and Safety representative must consult with their
supervisor regarding plan development. The plan must identify an "Emergency Response Team", which will consist
of those individuals in the department who are best capable of dealing with the emergency. One of the senior
managers of the workplace is designated as having the authority to activate the plan. The names of these
individuals are posted on the list of emergency phone numbers.

OTHER RELATED SERVICES

DISABILITY MANAGEMENT
If the operator has not fully recovered from an injury/illness but is able to return to work in some limited capacity,
the company will make every reasonable effort to find suitable workt for that operator.

The job or operation is changed on a temporary basis to suit the employee/operator capabilities with further
reduction in hours of work.

Assistive devices, such as aids and attachments are provided to the operator.

If the operator is not able to perform at the required skill level after returning training must be provided.

Employee may be provided help for personal problems that are either affecting, or have the potential to affect,
work performance. Problems may be marital, family, financial, emotional or those associated with substance abuse,
or gambling.

CONFLICT MANAGEMENT
Coaching & Consultations

Provide managers and employees with confidential advice and support on how to constructively respond to
situations of conflict and / or explore available avenues of recourse.

Mediation

To be conducted by a trained and impartial mediator who assists two or more parties to reach a resolution to their
differences in a respectful manner.

Facilitations

Operators can access impartial facilitation services for meetings and other problem solving sessions which aims at
building interpersonal relationships rather than resolving labour relations disputes.

Training

Operators can receive a range of training services which can include short presentations, awareness sessions, team
building workshops and skills training.
HEALTH & SAFETY FORMS and CHECKLISTS
List of Safety Concerns
For review at the next Health and Safety meeting to be held:_____________________________

Problem/ Date signed


What did you, Lead Date
Date off by
Concern/ Hand, do to correct completed
identified
the problem? by Lead Hand Construction
Suggestion Manager

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.
Safe Job Procedures
Annual Review

Safe Development Review Review


Job Date Date Date
By By By
Procedures M D Y Whom M D Y Whom M D Y Whom
First Aid Checklist
General Contractor
No. of workers First Aid Kit Requirements  or 
Responsibilities
Provide and maintain a first aid A current First Aid manual 
station with a first aid box.
1 card of safety pins 
Ensure that the first aid station is at 12 adhesive dressings individually wrapped 
all times in the charge of a worker
1-5 who, 4 sterile 3” square gauze pads 

 Has a valid emergency first aid 2 rolls of 2" gauze bandage 


certificate and 2 field dressings, 4" square or 2x4" 
 Works in the immediate vicinity
of the station. 1 triangular bandage 

A current First Aid manual 

1 card of safety pins 


Provide and maintain a first aid
station with a first aid box. 24 adhesive dressings individually wrapped 

12 sterile 3" square gauze pads 


Ensure that the first aid station is at
all times in the charge of a worker 4 rolls of 2" gauze bandage 
5 - 15 who,
4 rolls of 4" gauze bandage 
 Has a valid emergency first aid
4 sterile surgical pads suitable for pressure dressings 
certificate and
 Works in the immediate vicinity 6 triangular bandages 
of the station.
2 rolls of splint padding 

1 roll-up splint 

A current First Aid manual 

24 safety pins 

1 basin, preferably stainless steel 


Provide and maintain a first aid
48 adhesive dressings individually wrapped 
station with a first aid box, 1
stretcher and 2 blankets. 2 rolls of 1” adhesive tape 

Ensure that the first aid station is at 12 rolls of 1” gauze bandage 


all times in the charge of a worker
15 - 200 48 sterile 3" square gauze pads 
who,
8 rolls of 2" gauze bandage 
 Has a valid emergency first aid
certificate and 8 rolls of 4" gauze bandage 
 Works in the immediate vicinity
6 sterile surgical pads suitable for pressure dressings 
of the station.
12 triangular bandages 

Splints of assorted sizes 

2 rolls of splint padding 


Weekly Inspection Report

Completed by: Work Place:

Accompanied by: Date: Last insp:

Item Comment Area Contractor Action taken

1. Housekeeping

2. Storage

3. PPE

4. Ladders

5 Fire protection

6. Electrical

7. Stairs

8. Lighting

9. Machine guards

10. Material handling

11. Ventilation

12. Traffic control

13.Sanitation

14.

15.

Copies provided to:

Inspected by:

Unit/Department:

Number of Employees: Copies to:

Date:
Jobsite Inspection Checklist

1. SITE ACCESS OK Not OK ACTION TAKEN


Adequate stairs
Adequate ladders

2. PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT OK Not OK ACTION TAKEN


Skin protection: Worn
Available
Eye & face protection: Worn
Available
Hearing protection: Worn
Available
Foot protection: Worn
Available
3. LADDERS OK Not OK ACTION TAKEN
Secured
Proper size and type
Safe, usable condition

4. FIRE PROTECTION OK Not OK ACTION TAKEN


Extinguishers where required
Fully charged
Adequately identified
Master emergency plan

5. HOUSEKEEPING OK Not OK ACTION TAKEN


Clear walkways
Clear work areas
Clear access

6. POWER TOOLS, EQUIPMENT OK Not OK ACTION TAKEN


General condition
Proper guards, cords, PPE
Tagging as DEFECTIVE

7. EXTENSION CORDS OK Not OK ACTION TAKEN


Outdoor-type, rated over 300 volts
Condition of casing, ends, connections

8. WORKER EDUCATION OK Not OK ACTION TAKEN


WHMIS training
Company safety policy & program
Injury reporting
Hazard reporting
OH&S Act and Regulations
Personal H&S responsibilities

9. FIRST AID REQUIRMENTS OK Not OK ACTION TAKEN


Adequate qualified first aiders on jobsite
First aid kits: Adequate number
Adequate contents

10. TEMPORARY POWER SUPPLY OK Not OK ACTION TAKEN


Properly identified
Overhead lines flagged & secured
Surface cables buried or protected

11. SIGNS & PRINT MATERIAL OK Not OK ACTION TAKEN


OH&S Act and regulations
MSDSs
Warning signs
Emergency phone list
Report forms

12. MATERIALS STORAGE OK Not OK ACTION TAKEN


Properly located
Safely piled, stacked, bundled
Properly moved or lifted
Properly labeled (WHMIS)

13. HYGIENE OK Not OK ACTION TAKEN


Cleanliness of facilities
Hazard Identification & Risk Assessment Form
Potential Risk Assessment Controls Required
Identified Hazard or Unsafe Work
Activity
Medical Eliminate, Contain, Revise Procedure, Reduce
Fatality Injury Damage
Aid Exposure
Accident Report
Injured Worker’s Last Name First Name Occupation

Location where injury/accident occurred First Aid Provider

Hospital or Clinic Attended for Medical Aid Treating Physician's Name

Nature of Injury Location of Accident/Injury

Person who transported employee

Will this be a lost time injury? No  Yes  Is injury work-related? No  Yes 

Were any subcontractors involved? No  Yes 

Injury Details

Date and Hour of Injury Date and Hour Reported to Employer

Day Month Year Time Day Month Year Time

a.m. a.m.

p.m. p.m.

Date and Hour Last Worked Normal Working Hours

Day Month Year Time from to

a.m. a.m. a.m.

p.m. p.m. p.m.

Who was the injury reported to?

What caused the injury? Describe the injury, the body part involved and specify left or right side
(use back of sheet if necessary).

Describe the worker's activities at the time of the injury. Include details of equipment or materials
used (use back of sheet if necessary).

Did anyone else witness the accident or know more about the injury?
Accident Investigation Report
Date of investigation Investigator

Date of injury Injured worker

Project location Project Supervisor

M.O.L. notified? No  Yes  Joint H & S Committee in place? No  Yes 

Injured worker’s
address:

Nature of injury reported (injured body


part):

Factors that led up to


accident:

Project Safety Representative:

Comments:

Names and addresses of witnesses and their comments (please use back for additional
comments):

Recommendations for corrective


measures:

Corrective measures taken? N/A  Yes  To follow up on (Date) 

Investigator Signature President


Corrective Action Form
Date of injury/incident: Injury/incident number:

Date:

Corrective action taken (as indicated on the Accident/Investigation Form):

Recommendations:

Date assigned:

Responsibility assigned to:

Details of what has to be done:

Who has completed it?

When was it completed?


Witness Statement Form
Date of injury/incident: Injury/incident number:

Name of witness:

Date:

Name of interviewer:

Details of interview:

Signature of witness:

Signature of interviewer:
Emergency Response Planning Checklist
Unit:______________________ Date:______________________
Completed by:______________ Site :______________________

In Progress Completed Date

Program Administration (Who is responsible for implementing the plan?)

Emergency Response Standard Developed

Develop Site Emergency Plan

 Identify emergency access routes

 Indicate location of first aid stations/boxes and fire


extinguishers

 Show job office(s) and storage facilities. (Blankets and special


rescue equipment storage)

 Ensure specialized PPE equipment is on site (indicate location)

 Ensure sufficient medical aid supplies are available on site


(splints, stretchers etc.) & location

 Locate other firefighting equipment (Standpipes, Siamese


connections and hydrants)

 Locate main power supply to project

 Identify the location of emergency phones (Post emergency


list)

 Identify nearest hospital or medical center

 Identify worker evacuation route(s) and assembly area(s)

 Contact local fire, police and ambulance and provide them with
your site plan and list of potential emergencies.

 Locate services to the project (both above ground and


underground)

 Develop onsite traffic routes

 Locate outside materials storage and fabricating areas

 Locate cranes man/material hoists and unloading docks

 Locate flammable/combustible materials and cylinder storage

In Progress Completed Date

 Locate garbage dumpsters and recycling bins


 Complete Hazard Identification and Emergency Response
checklist.

 Identify if “high Level” rescue is a possibility.

 Develop Emergency Response procedures for items


identified in your hazard assessment

 Ensure that all trades on site keep daily personnel lists. (In
the event of a major emergency check names against
personnel gathered in the assembly area)

 Include requirements for written notices. (What’s


required? When? Completed by whom? Who does it go
to?) See legal obligations.

 Identify the emergency response team & alternates (Post


names)

 Provide specialized training for ER Team members.

 Designate a contact person to call necessary emergency


services and MOL, MOEE etc.

 Select member of ER Team to meet and direct emergency


services vehicles to accident scene

 Select team member to deal with Media, MOL, MOEE etc.

 Ensure all required rescue equipment/materials are readily


available on site.

 Provide for emergency traffic control person (Properly


trained)

 Make provisions for cordoning off the accident scene to


protect workers

 Ensure someone on the ER team documents where the


injured worker has been taken. (Hospital, medical center
etc.)

 Set out method of communicating the plan


Emergency Numbers
Date: Location:

Ambulance:

Police:

Fire Department:

Municipal Water Dept:

Municipal Electrical Dept:

Occupational Health & Safety:

Other:

Emergency Response Team

Coordinator:

Communication:

Gate:

First Aiders:

Site Location:

Other:

Prime Contractor (Owner):

Office Phone:

Home Phone:

Sub-Contractor:

Office Phone:

Home Phone:
REFERENCES
 Denton, M. J., and P. N. Daniels. 2002. Textile Terms and Definitions.
Cambridge: Woodhead Publishing Ltd.
 Environmental, Health, and Safety Guidelines
TEXTILE MANUFACTURING. IFC
 Safety and Health Issues in the Textile Insutry
 Fibre2fashion.com
 www.osha.gov
 www.inchem.org
 www.indmedica.com
 www.fibre2fashion.com
 www.apparelonline.com
 Accenture Health and Safety Policy 773
 Voluntary Ergonomics Guideline (American Furniture Manufacturers Association)
 www.tedthorsen.com
 www.strima.com
 WISHA Services Division, Washington State Department of Labor and Industries
 Basic Applied Science, Module:Ergonomics, Rajesh Patel
 Diploma Project on Improvement in the health and safety of sewing workers through an exercise
programme – Pooja Nanda, 2004-06
 Ergonomic Handbook for the Clothing Industry, Jennifer Gunning and others
 The Sewing Machine Workstation, Preventex, Vol. 20
 Diploma Project on Ergonomics in Apparel Industry, Dipti Soodh & Devesh Kushwal, 2002
 Voluntary Ergonomics Guideline, American Furniture Manufacturers Association
 International Labour Organisation. Encyclopedia of Occupational Health and Safety 4th Edition, 1998.
Geneva. 2 : 50.7 – 50.12.
 Layanun P. Health Promotion for Thai Garment Factory workers. [monograph on the Internet]
Washington: Organizing for Developmnt An International Institute [cited 2004, Jul 28]. Available from :
http://www.odii.com/Papers/Thai-case-complete_full _ summary-web.htm
 Ondcrzoek S. Multinationale Ondernemingen (Centre for Research on Multinationals) (homepage on
the Internet) Report on Conditions for Garment Factory Workers in Sri Lanka [cited 2004, Jul 28].
Available from : http://www.somo.nl/monitoring/reports/sri_lanka.htm
 Puliani S. The Factories Act, 1948 along with Karnataka Factories Rules 1969 and allied laws, 4th
Edition Bangalore. Karnataka Law Journal Publications 2000.