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Entertainment The word starts with the start of world. Even all the living creatures of the world
relax by entertainment that lying in several ways. Yet the technology was undeveloped the world
was in dark with the living creatures enjoy their life¶s.

When technology and science develop the media and entertainment develop simultaneously.
Indian cinema based on its culture and reality of life. Bollywood of India is the largest film city
in the world. A city of hopes, dreams, desires and achievements, success and failures. The Indian
cinema over the years has been a great entertainer, recreation medium, motivator, teacher and a
magician who draws a dream world on an empty canvas in front of our eyes.

India is a large country where many languages are spoken with even more consolidation, 114
main languages. These 114 languages are the ones surveyed in the Indian census. Indian and
Western cinemas were established in the early days of film in India itself. Dadasaheb Phalke was
moved to make Raja Harish Chandra after watching the film Life of Christ at P.B. Mehta¶s
American-Indian Cinema. In India at least 80 percent of films shown in the late 1920s were
American the spectacular sets of films like Quo Vadis and Cabira were popular and inspiring
during the World War.

The first feature film made in India was a narrative named Pundalik, by N.G. Chitre and R.G.
Torney. The first full-length Indian feature film was Raja Harish chandra made in 1913 and
released commercially in May that year, by Dadasaheb Phalke. Phalke had attended a screening
of The Life of Christ at P.B. Mehta¶s American-Indian Cinema and was inspired to make films
himself.

In 1916, Universal Pictures set up Hollywood¶s first Indian agency .The first South Indian
feature was Rangaswamy Nataraja Mudaliar¶s Keechaka Vadham, released in 1918. The
following year, he made the film Draupadi Vastrapaharanam, featuring Anglo-Indian actress
Marian Hill who played the role of Draupadi.

Modern Indian cinema

Some filmmakers such as Shyam Benegal continued to produce realistic Parallel Cinema
throughout the 1970s. Alongside Satyajit Ray, Ritwik Ghatak, Mrinal Sen, Buddhadeb Dasgupta
and Gautam Ghose in Bengali cinema; Adoor Gopalakrishnan, John Abraham and G. Aravindan
in Malayalam cinema; and Mani Kaul, Kumar Shahani, Ketan Mehta, Govind Nihalani and
Vijaya Mehta in Hindi cinema.However, the µart film¶ bent of the Film Finance Corporation
came under criticism during a Committee on Public Undertakings investigation in 1976, which
accused the body of not doing enough to encourage commercial cinema.The 1970s did,
nevertheless, see the rise of commercial cinema in form of enduring films such as Sholay (1975),
which solidified Amitabh Bachchan¶s position as a lead actor.The devotional classic Jai Santoshi
Ma was also released in 1975. Another important film from 1975 was Deewar, directed by Yash
Chopra and written by Salim-Javed. A crime film pitting ³a policeman against his brother, a
gang leader based on real-life smuggler Haji Mastan´, portrayed by Amitabh Bachchan, it was
described as being ³absolutely key to Indian cinema´ by Danny Boyle.
Commercial cinema further grew throughout the 1980s and the 1990s with the release of films
such as Mr India (1987), Qayamat Se Qayamat Tak (1988), Tezaab (1988), Chandni (1989),
Maine Pyar Kiya (1989), Baazigar (1993), Darr (1993), Dilwale Dulhaniya Le Jayenge (1995)
and Kuch Kuch Hota Hai (1998), many of which starred Aamir Khan, Salman Khan and
Shahrukh Khan.

The 1990s also saw a surge in the national popularity of Tamil cinema as films directed by Mani
Ratnam captured India¶s imagination. Such films included Roja (1992) and Bombay (1995).
Ratnam¶s earlier film Nayagan (1987), starring Kamal Haasan, was included in Time magazine¶s
³All-TIME´ 100 best movies, alongside four earlier Indian films: Satyajit Ray¶s The Apu
Trilogy (1955±1959) and Guru Dutt¶s Pyaasa (1957). Another Tamil director S. Shankar also
made waves through his film Kadhalan, famous for its music and actor Prabhu Deva¶s dancing.
The South Indian film industry not only released cinema with national appeal but also featured
multicultural music which found appreciation among the national Indian audience. Some Tamil
filmi composers such as A. R. Rahman and Ilaiyaraaja have since acquired a large national, and
later international, following. Rahman¶s debut soundtrack for Roja was included in Time
Magazine¶s ³10 Best Soundtracks´ of all time, and he would later go on to win two Academy
Awards for his international Slumdog Millionaire (2008) soundtrack. Tabarana Kathe, a
Kannada film, was screened at various film festivals including Tashkent, Nantes, Tokyo, and the
Film Festival of Russia.
Adoor Gopalakrishnan, who is often considered to be Satyajit Ray¶s spiritual heir, directed some
of his most acclaimed films during this period, including Elippathayam (1981) which won the
Sutherland Trophy at the London Film Festival, as well as Mathilukal (1989) which won major
prizes at the Venice Film Festival. Shaji N. Karun¶s debut film Piravi (1989) won the Camera
d¶Or at the 1989 Cannes Film Festival, while his second film Swaham (1994) was in competition
for the achivement Or at the 1994 Cannes Film Festival.

Bhuvan (Aamir Khan) with his cricket team consisting of village-folk, in Ashutosh Gowarikar¶s
Lagaan (2001).

There have generally been six major influences that have shaped the conventions of Indian
popular cinema. The first was the ancient Indian epics of Mahabharata and Ramayana which
have exerted a profound influence on the thought and imagination of Indian popular cinema. The
second influence was the impact of ancient Sanskrit drama, with its highly stylized nature and
emphasis on spectacle, where music, dance and gesture combined ³to create a vibrant artistic unit
with dance and mime being central to the dramatic experience.´ Sanskrit dramas were known as
natya, derived from the root word nrit (dance), characterizing them as spectacular dance-dramas
which has continued in Indian cinema. The Rasa method of performance, dating back to ancient
Sanskrit drama, is one of the fundamental features that differentiate Indian cinema from that of
the Western world.
The third influence was the traditional folk theatre of India, which became popular from around
the 10th century with the decline of Sanskrit theatre. These regional traditions include the Yatra
of Bengal, the Ramlila of Uttar Pradesh, and the Terukkuttu of Tamil Nadu. The fourth influence
was Parsi theatre, which ³blended realism and fantasy, music and dance, narrative and spectacle,
earthy dialogue and ingenuity of stage presentation, integrating them into a dramatic discourse of
melodrama.
The fifth influence was Hollywood, where musicals were popular from the 1920s to the 1950s,
though Indian filmmakers departed from their Hollywood counterparts in several ways. ³For
example, the Hollywood musicals had as their plot the world of entertainment itself. Indian
filmmakers, while enhancing the elements of fantasy so pervasive in Indian popular films, used
song and music as a natural mode of articulation in a given situation in their films.
The final influence was Western musical television, particularly MTV, which has had an
increasing influence since the 1990s, as can be seen in the pace, camera angles, dance sequences
and music of recent Indian films. An early example of this approach was in Mani Ratnam¶s
Bombay (1995).
Like mainstream Indian popular cinema, Indian Parallel Cinema was also influenced also by a
combination of Indian theatre (particularly Sanskrit drama) and Indian literature (particularly
Bengali literature), but differs when it comes to foreign influences, where it is more influenced
by European cinema (particularly Italian neorealism and French poetic realism) rather than
Hollywood. Satyajit Ray cited Italian filmmaker Vittorio De Sica¶s Bicycle Thieves (1948) and
French filmmaker Jean Renoir¶s The River (1951), which he assisted, as influences on his debut
film Pather Panchali (1955). Besides the influence of European cinema and Bengali literature,
Ray is also indebted to the Indian theatrical tradition, particularly the Rasa method of classical
Sanskrit drama. The complicated doctrine of Rasa ³centers predominantly on feeling experienced
not only by the characters but also conveyed in a certain artistic way to the spectator.
Bimal Roy¶s Two Acres of Land (1953) was also influenced by De Sica¶s Bicycle Thieves and in
turn paved the way for the Indian New Wave, which began around the same time as the French
New Wave and the Japanese New Wave.

Globalization Of Indian Cinema

Due to all the aforesaid efforts, many Indian film personalities have got recognition abroad.
Composer A.R. Rahman gave the music for Andrew Lloyd Webber¶s Bombay Dreams including
the hit single ³Shakalaka Baby´. Earlier, film maker Shekhar Kapoor¶s Elizabeth was nominated
in the best film category at the Academy awards. Many of the Indian actors working abroad are
Om Puri, Anupam Kher, Amrish Puri, and Gulshan Grover along with the popular Aishwarya
Rai. Ash has been a frequent at the film industries abroad. Her Bride and Prejudice and Mistress
of Spices have won her a lot of fame abroad. Film makers who have their roots in India but are
not of Indian origin also have contributed immensely in bringing the beauty of Indian cinema on
the world stage.

Along the same lines, a lot of other efforts were done to give the Global look to Indian movies,
so that it can develop its own market in the west nations. The scripts started to use more of
English words in them and mostly came with English sub-titles like Daag-the fire, Tarzan-the
wonder car, Waqt-the race against time etc. Many of the Indian movies are also dubbed in
foreign languages for the audience convenience. Many of the films are also shot on abroad
locales to get the western look in them and also to popularize the movie through its shooting and
promotional campaign during the initial stages itself.
For promotional purposes, many of the Indian films¶ awards are being organized abroad which
triggers off an instant media coverage and hence, publicity. A step ahead was the concept of
Indian Oscars in the form of Indian International Film Academy awards (IIFA). It is held at a
different country every year. Many of the forthcoming releases are shown in these award shows
to promote those films overseas. Filming cinema overseas broadens the market of Indian cinema.
There is no niche market concept now in Bollywood. Movies which fell flat at the domestic box
office have done wonders abroad like Yaadein and Umrao Jaan recently. Indian film festivals
The three Indian movies nominated for an Oscar in the foreign language category were Mother
India (1957), Salaam Bombay (1988) and Lagaan (2001). Oscar was brought to India by the
legendary film maker Satyajit Ray in the category of Life time Achievement Award (1992).
Ray¶s first film, Pather Panchali (1955), won eleven international prizes, including Best Human
Document at the Cannes film festival. . In 1982, a biographical film on Gandhi won eight
Academy Awards, with director Richard Attenborough and Ben Kingsley as Gandhi. This was
an international co production between India and UK. Both the production houses were not of an
Indian Origin.
The globalization of Indian Film Industry began in the late 20th century. The contact between
India and western cinema was established l when Dadasaheb Phalke inspired the making of
´Raja Harish chandra´ after he watched Life of Christ at Mehta¶s American-Indian cinema. In
India least 80 percent films shown in the late 1920s were American, but today 80 percent of
Indian (mainly Hindi) movies are released worldwide. Bollywood movies include western actors
like Rachel Shelley in Lagaan, Giselli Monteiro in Love kaj Kal, Barbari Mori in Kite and Chris
Patten in Rang De Basanti.

The globalization effect on the industry has resulted in western production standards, usage of
English in the script or incorporation of some element of western-style plots. Bollywood has
produced hits like Dilwale Dulhaniya Le Jayenge and Kal Ho Naa Ho, both dealing with the
overseas Indian culture.
Producers these days fund Indian Filmmakers like Gurinder Chadha (Bride and Prejudice) and
Mira Nair (Monsoon Wedding). Chadha and Nair both are of Indian origin and made their names
in Western Independent Films. A similar filmmaker is Deepa Mehta of Canada, whose films
include Fire, Earth and Water. Indian festivals, traditions, culture have been acknowledged by
people worldwide through the Indian cinema.

Movies of the Tamil Super Star Rajni Kant have a huge market in Japan. Indian films are not just
a part of a region but a part of world cinema today. Therefore film makers now aim at reaching
out to a wider audience. The cinema has contributed a great deal in globalization which has
proved very beneficial to the Indian Film Industry.
INDIAN FILMS have gone beyond the geographical boundaries. They have come out of the
epoch of love and fantasy and learnt to work on experimental plots. The effect of globalization of
Indian cinema is applicable not only to the Bollywood, but also to the regional film industries of
the country. Many Indian films are not only making more money outside the home market but
also attracting foreign producers and directors to the industry.

There are giants interested to invest in the entertainment industry in India that will raise the
standard of the Indian Motion Pictures. French, British and American films have influenced our
movie makers to a greet extent.

The Indian entertainment and media industry today has a lot of support ± be it regulations that
allow foreign investment, the impetus from the economy, digital lifestyle and consumers¶
spending habits, and also many opportunities the advancements in technology have to offer. All
the industry has to do is to cash in on its growth potential and opportunities. The government
needs to play a more active role in sorting out policy-related impediments for growth. The
industry needs to remove all roadblocks, such as piracy in a concerted manner and at the same
time produce high-quality world class end products. The entertainment and media industry has
all that it takes to become the star of Indian economy

India has announced ambitious plans to double its share in the global film industry by the end of
this year. This signals the country¶s determination to establish itself as a cultural as well as
economic powerhouse.

India has announced ambitious plans to double its share in the global film industry by the end of
this year. This signals the country¶s determination to establish itself as a cultural as well as
economic powerhouse. There are numerous reasons why we should believe that.

Firstly, the government, which intends on using Bollywood to buildup India as a µsoft power¶,
believes the Indian film industry is capable of capturing five percent of the global market.

Secondly, in terms of capital, the Indian Hindi movie industry keeps receiving capital from
abroad. For example, Indian film companies like Eros, Adlabs, India Film Company and U TV
have raised hundreds of millions of pounds from hungry institutional investors on the aim facility
of the London Stock Exchange.

Thirdly, in terms of technology, the Indian Hindi movie industry has therefore started with the
import of technology from abroad as shown in table 1. For the past few years numerous Indian
producers have been using special effects technology and training from abroad, particularly from
Hollywood.

INDIAN FILMS have gone beyond the geographical boundaries. They have come out of the
epoch of love and fantasy and learnt to work on experimental plots. The effect of globalization of
Indian cinema is applicable not only to the Bollywood, but also to the regional film industries of
the country. Many Indian films are not only making more money outside the home market but
also attracting foreign producers and directors to the industry.

There are giants interested to invest in the entertainment industry in India that will raise the
standard of the Indian Motion Pictures.French, British and American films have influenced our
movie makers to a gret extent.

The three Indian movies nominated for an Oscar in the foreign language category were Mother
India (1957), Salaam Bombay (1988) and Lagaan (2001). Oscar was brought to India by the
legendary film maker Satyajit Ray in the category of Life time Achievement Award (1992).
Ray's first film, Pather Panchali (1955), won eleven international prizes, including Best Human
Document at the Cannes film festival. . In 1982, a biographical film on Gandhi won eight
Academy Awards, with director Richard Attenborough and Ben Kingsley as Gandhi. This was
an international co production between India and UK. Both the production houses were not of an
Indian Origin.

The globalization of Indian Film Industry began in the late 20th century. The contact between
India and western cinema was established l when Dadasaheb Phalke inspired the making of
"Raja Harishchandra" after he watched Life of Christ at Mehta's American-Indian cinema. In
India least 80 percent films shown in the late 1920s were American, but today 80 percent of
Indian (mainly hindi ) movies are released worldwide. Bollywood movies include western actors
like Rachel Shelley in Lagaan, Giselli Monteiro in Love kaj Kal, Barbari Mori in Kite and Chris
Patten in Rang De Basanti.

The globalization effect on the industry has resulted in western production standards, usage of
English in the script or incorporation of some element of western-style plots. Bollywood has
produced hits like Dilwale Dulhaniya Le Jayenge and Kal Ho Naa Ho, both dealing with the
overseas Indian culture.
Producers these days fund Indian Filmmakers like Gurinder Chadha (Bride and Prejudice) and
Mira Nair (Monsoon Wedding). Chadha and Nair both are of Indian origin and made their names
in Western Independent Films. A similar filmmaker is Deepa Mehta of Canada, whose films
include Fire, Earth and Water. Indan festivals,traditions,culture have been acknowledged by
people worldwide through the Indian cinema.

Movies of the Tamil Super Star Rajni Kant have a huge market in Japan. Indian films are not
just a part of a region but a part of world cinema today. Therefore film makers now aim at
reaching out to a wider audience.The cinema has contributed a great deal in globalisation which
has proved very beneficial to the the Indian Film Industry.