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Reader's Theater: Read the Script

Reader's Theater: Read the Script

Third Grade

Reading

by Caitlin Hardeman

August 10, 2018

Did you know that Reader's Theater promotes uency and builds students' reading con dence? Use this lesson to inspire your students to practice reading and understanding text in the drama genre.

Learning Objectives

Students will be able to read, understand, and identify the components of dramas.

Materials and preparation

Teacher copy of a Reader's Theater script, such as the Reader's Theater: Casey at the Bat worksheet Reader's Theater: Casey at the Bat worksheet

Class set of the the Reader's Theater: Reader's Theater:

Summertime Blues worksheet

Class set of the Graphic Organizer Template:Concept Web worksheet Graphic Organizer Template:Concept Web worksheet

Attachments

Key terms

scriptTemplate:Concept Web worksheet Attachments Key terms drama scene cast of characters narrator setting dialogue

dramaTemplate:Concept Web worksheet Attachments Key terms script scene cast of characters narrator setting dialogue stage

sceneWeb worksheet Attachments Key terms script drama cast of characters narrator setting dialogue stage

cast of charactersWeb worksheet Attachments Key terms script drama scene narrator setting dialogue stage directions Reader's

narratorAttachments Key terms script drama scene cast of characters setting dialogue stage directions Reader's Theater:

settingKey terms script drama scene cast of characters narrator dialogue stage directions Reader's Theater: Casey at

dialogueterms script drama scene cast of characters narrator setting stage directions Reader's Theater: Casey at the

stage directionsdrama scene cast of characters narrator setting dialogue Reader's Theater: Casey at the Bat (PDF) Graphic

Reader's Theater: Casey at the Bat (PDF)of characters narrator setting dialogue stage directions Graphic Organizer Template: Concept Web (PDF) Reader s

Graphic Organizer Template: Concept Web (PDF)directions Reader's Theater: Casey at the Bat (PDF) Reader s Theater: Summertime Blues (PDF) Introduction (3

Reader s Theater: Summertime Blues (PDF) s Theater: Summertime Blues (PDF)

Introduction (3 minutes)

Ask students to think about how actors and actresses know what to say when they are on stage or lming. lming.

Give students time to think independently, and instruct them to turn and talk to a partner about their thoughts. Call on nonvolunteers to share what they discussed with their partners.know what to say when they are on stage or lming. Write the word script on

Write the word script on the board, and share that a script is the written text of a script on the board, and share that a script is the written text of a play, movie, or television show. Point out that the actors and actresses practice their lines beforehand, and they have them memorized. Ask students to raise their hands if they have ever had to memorize lines for a play.

Go over the learning objective for today's lesson, and tell students that they will be reading scripts, but that they will not need to memorize their words.hands if they have ever had to memorize lines for a play. EL Beginning: Give students

EL

Beginning:

Give students access to reference materials in their home language (L1) to look up terms, such as actor, actress, script, and play.they will not need to memorize their words. EL Beginning: Intermediate: Pair students with a supportive

Intermediate:

Pair students with a supportive peer or an EL with the same home language, if possible.such as actor, actress, script, and play. Intermediate: Get more lesson plans at

Get more lesson plans at https://www.education.com/lesson-plans/

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De ne memorize with a student-friendly de nition, and provide an example of a time when ne memorize with a student-friendly de nition, and provide an example of a time when you would memorize something.

Explicit Instruction/Teacher modeling (10 minutes)

Tell students that a script in a classroom is usually called Reader's Theater. This type of text falls into the genre of drama . Drama is a story written so that it can be acted out for drama. Drama is a story written so that it can be acted out for an audience.

Display a copy of a Reader's Theater Script on the document camera and point out and label the di erent parts of it. Explain that a scene is a part of the play where erent parts of it. Explain that a scene is a part of the play where there are changes to setting, characters, and events.

Share that the cast of characters is a list of characters in the play. Explain that the narrator cast of characters is a list of characters in the play. Explain that the narrator is a person outside the story who tells the story. The setting is listed at the beginning of the script, and it tells where and when the story takes place.

Point out the dialogue , which is the talking that the characters do in the play, and note dialogue, which is the talking that the characters do in the play, and note how it does not have quotation marks around it. Emphasize that dialogue in a Reader's Theater Script is formatted

di erently with the character's name, a colon, and then the words the characters speak.

Explain that the stage directions are added into the script between bits of dialogue to tell the characters stage directions are added into the script between bits of dialogue to tell the characters how to act and speak. The stage directions are not to be read aloud by the actors and actresses because they are just directions.

Invite a few students to participate in reading aloud the Reader's Theater Script to model the process of taking turns and reading only the dialogue aloud.the actors and actresses because they are just directions. EL Beginning: Give students a copy of

EL

Beginning:

Give students a copy of the Reader's Theater Script example on which to take notes. Provide a word bank of key terms they can use to label the main components.turns and reading only the dialogue aloud. EL Beginning: Intermediate: Allow the students to create vocabulary

Intermediate:

Allow the students to create vocabulary ash cards for the key terms. Have them include both a written and visual de ash cards for the key terms. Have them include both a written and visual de nition for each term, as well as the word in their L1, if applicable.

Guided Practice (15 minutes)

Distribute a copy of the Reader's Theater: Summertime Blues worksheet to each student. As a class, identify the parts of the drama and label them.in their L1, if applicable. Guided Practice (15 minutes) Break the class into groups of four.

Break the class into groups of four. Assign them each a role from the cast of characters. Instruct them to read aloud the Reader's Theater three times together as a group, each time becoming more uent and natural with the reading so that it sounds the same way someone would uent and natural with the reading so that it sounds the same way someone would speak.

Gather the class's attention and ask a series of comprehension questions. Display each question on the board, allow students to discuss in small groups, and call on nonvolunteers to answer and provide evidence:reading so that it sounds the same way someone would speak. What hints does the author

What hints does the author give you about the ending of the drama?and call on nonvolunteers to answer and provide evidence: What problem in the drama is solved?

What problem in the drama is solved?does the author give you about the ending of the drama? How does the last line

How does the last line of dialogue wrap the story up?ending of the drama? What problem in the drama is solved? What role did the narrator

What role did the narrator play in this Reader's Theater?How does the last line of dialogue wrap the story up? EL Beginning: Invite students to

EL

Beginning:

Invite students to work in a small, teacher-led group. Support them as they read aloud and come across words that are di cult to pronounce. cult to pronounce.

Allow students to use reference materials in their L1 or English to look up any unfamiliar words.and come across words that are di cult to pronounce. Intermediate: Get more lesson plans at

Intermediate:

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Pre-teach vocabulary from the Reader's Theater Script.Provide sentence frames for students to use as they answer the comprehension questions in small

Provide sentence frames for students to use as they answer the comprehension questions in small groups.Pre-teach vocabulary from the Reader's Theater Script. Independent working time (15 minutes) Instruct students to

Independent working time (15 minutes)

Instruct students to answer the comprehension questions on the Reader's Theater: Summertime Blues worksheet. Remind them to go back into the text to mark what information helped them arrive at an answer.in small groups. Independent working time (15 minutes) EL Beginning: Have students work in a small,

EL

Beginning:

Have students work in a small, teacher-led group and o er prompting questions. er prompting questions.

Provide a bank of key terms and phrases to support students as they answer the comprehension questions.a small, teacher-led group and o er prompting questions. Intermediate: Allow students extra time to work

Intermediate:

Allow students extra time to work on the assignment by completing it for homework.as they answer the comprehension questions. Intermediate: Di erentiation Support: Use an easier script with simpler

Di erentiation

Support:

Use an easier script with simpler words and concepts for struggling readers.by completing it for homework. Di erentiation Support: Give students extra time to practice their part

Give students extra time to practice their part before reading it in front of the class.with simpler words and concepts for struggling readers. Enrichment: Challenge advanced learners to create their own

Enrichment:

Challenge advanced learners to create their own Reader's Theater Scripts with multiple characters and an involved plot. Remind them to include the essential components of a drama (cast of characters, setting, dialogue, stage directions).part before reading it in front of the class. Enrichment: Assessment (10 minutes) Give each student

Assessment (10 minutes)

Give each student a copy of the Graphic Organizer Template: Concept Web worksheet. Instruct them to write Reader's Theater in the center of it and use everything they learned from today's lesson Reader's Theater in the center of it and use everything they learned from today's lesson to ll in the outer circles.

EL

Beginning:

Allow students to give their answers orally before completing their graphic organizer.lesson to ll in the outer circles. EL Beginning: Intermediate: Provide learners with a bank of

Intermediate:

Provide learners with a bank of key words and phrases to use on their graphic organizer.before completing their graphic organizer. Intermediate: Review and closing (7 minutes) Instruct students to share

Review and closing (7 minutes)

Instruct students to share their information on the Concept Web. Create a teacher copy on chart paper to serve as an anchor chart in the classroom for future reference.on their graphic organizer. Review and closing (7 minutes) Tell students that a Reader's Theater is

Tell students that a Reader's Theater is a fun way of reading a story and practicing uency and comprehension. uency and comprehension.

EL

Beginning:

Get more lesson plans at https://www.education.com/lesson-plans/

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Have students share their Concept Web with a partner in their L1 or English.Intermediate: Display sentence frames for students to use as they share information from their graphic

Intermediate:

Web with a partner in their L1 or English. Intermediate: Display sentence frames for students to

Display sentence frames for students to use as they share information from their graphic organizers. For "

example, "Reader's Theater includes

Get more lesson plans at https://www.education.com/lesson-plans/

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Act it Out:

“Casey at the Bat”

There’s so much drama in “Casey at the Bat.” Acting out the poem is a great way to better understand the poem’s characters and plot. Grab some friends or classmates and put on a show!

Before you start, you may want to set up a small baseball diamond. Use pillows, books, pieces of cardboard, or anything you have on hand as bases. Borrow some baseball caps, gloves, and jerseys for costumes. If you’re outdoors, you can play the game along with the poem.

CAST OF CHARACTERS:

COONEY

BARROWS

FLYNN

BLAKE

PITCHER

UMPIRE

NARRATOR

CROWD

CASEY

BARROWS FLYNN BLAKE PITCHER UMPIRE NARRATOR CROWD CASEY (Tip: If there are a lot of kids,

(Tip: If there are a lot of kids, try breaking up the Narrator’s lines between a few people.)

CASEY AT THE BAT: A Reader’s Theater Script

SETTING: Mudville, USA, 1888.

(CROWD cheers)

NARRATOR:

The outlook wasn't brilliant for the Mudville nine that day:

The score stood four to two, with but one inning more to play. And then when Cooney died at first, and Barrows did the same,

(COONEY and BARROWS run to first base, then leave)

A sickly silence fell upon the patrons of the game.

(CROWD goes quiet)

NARRATOR:

A straggling few got up to go in deep despair. The rest

(Some of the CROWD leaves)

Clung to that hope which springs eternal in the human breast; They thought

hope which springs eternal in the human breast; They thought Copyright © 2014 Education.com LLC All
hope which springs eternal in the human breast; They thought Copyright © 2014 Education.com LLC All

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Act it Out:

“Casey at the Bat”

CROWD:

If only Casey could get but a whack at that - We'd put up even money, now, with Casey at the bat.

- We'd put up even money, now, with Casey at the bat. NARRATOR: But Flynn preceded

NARRATOR:

But Flynn preceded Casey, as did also Jimmy Blake,

(FLYNN and BLAKE go up to bat)

And the former was a lulu and the latter was a cake; So upon that stricken multitude grim melancholy sat, For there seemed but little chance of Casey's getting to the bat.

seemed but little chance of Casey's getting to the bat. NARRATOR: But Flynn let drive a
seemed but little chance of Casey's getting to the bat. NARRATOR: But Flynn let drive a

NARRATOR:

But Flynn let drive a single, to the wonderment of all,

(FLYNN runs to first base)

And Blake, the much despis-ed, tore the cover off the ball;

(BLAKE swings hard)

And when the dust had lifted, and the men saw what had occurred, There was Jimmy safe at second and Flynn a-hugging third.

(FLYNN runs to third base, BLAKE runs to second)

NARRATOR:

Then from 5,000 throats and more there rose a lusty yell;

(CROWD cheers loudly!)

It rumbled through the valley, it rattled in the dell; It knocked upon the mountain and recoiled upon the flat, For Casey, mighty Casey, was advancing to the bat.

(CASEY steps up to bat)

NARRATOR:

There was ease in Casey's manner as he stepped into his place; There was pride in Casey's bearing and a smile on Casey's face. And when, responding to the cheers, he lightly doffed his hat,

(CASEY takes off his hat)

cheers, he lightly doffed his hat, (CASEY takes off his hat) Copyright © 2014 Education.com LLC

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Act it Out:

“Casey at the Bat”

No stranger in the crowd could doubt 'twas Casey at the bat.

in the crowd could doubt 'twas Casey at the bat. NARRATOR: Ten thousand eyes were on

NARRATOR:

Ten thousand eyes were on him as he rubbed his hands with dirt;

(CASEY leans down and pretends to rub dirt on his hands)

Five thousand tongues applauded when he wiped them on his shirt.

(CASEY wipes his hands on his shirt)

Then while the writhing pitcher ground the ball into his hip,

(PITCHER pretends to hold the ball to his hip)

Defiance gleamed in Casey's eye, a sneer curled Casey's lip.

NARRATOR:

And now the leather-covered sphere came hurtling through the air,

(PITCHER pretends to throw the ball)

through the air, (PITCHER pretends to throw the ball) And Casey stood a-watching it in haughty

And Casey stood a-watching it in haughty grandeur there. Close by the sturdy batsman the ball unheeded sped-

CASEY:

That ain't my style

NARRATOR:

said Casey

UMPIRE:

Strike one!

NARRATOR:

the umpire said.

said Casey UMPIRE: Strike one! NARRATOR: the umpire said. NARRATOR: From the benches, black with people,
said Casey UMPIRE: Strike one! NARRATOR: the umpire said. NARRATOR: From the benches, black with people,

NARRATOR:

From the benches, black with people, there went up a muffled roar, Like the beating of the storm-waves on a stern and distant shore.

CROWD:

Kill him! Kill the umpire!

a stern and distant shore. CROWD: Kill him! Kill the umpire! Copyright © 2014 Education.com LLC

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Act it Out:

“Casey at the Bat”

NARRATOR:

shouted someone on the stand; And it’s likely they'd a-killed him had not Casey raised his hand.

they'd a-killed him had not Casey raised his hand. (CASEY raises his hand) NARRATOR: With a

(CASEY raises his hand)

NARRATOR:

With a smile of Christian charity great Casey's visage shone; He stilled the rising tumult; he bade the game go on; He signaled to the pitcher, and once more the spheroid flew; But Casey still ignored it, and the umpire said

flew; But Casey still ignored it, and the umpire said UMPIRE: Strike two! CROWD: Fraud! NARRATOR:

UMPIRE:

Strike two!

CROWD:

Fraud!

NARRATOR:

Cried the maddened thousands, and echo answered fraud; But one scornful look from Casey and the audience was awed. They saw his face grow stern and cold, they saw his muscles strain, And they knew that Casey wouldn't let that ball go by again.

NARRATOR:

The sneer is gone from Casey's lip, his teeth are clenched in hate; He pounds with cruel violence his bat upon the plate.

(CASEY pounds the bat on the ground)

And now the pitcher holds the ball, and now he lets it go,

(PITCHER throws the ball)

And now the air is shattered by the force of Casey's blow.

(CASEY swings. ALL freeze in place except the narrator)

(CASEY swings. ALL freeze in place except the narrator) NARRATOR: Oh, somewhere in this favored land

NARRATOR:

Oh, somewhere in this favored land the sun is shining bright; The band is playing somewhere, and somewhere hearts are light, And somewhere men are laughing, and somewhere children shout; But there is no joy in Mudville - mighty Casey has struck out.

there is no joy in Mudville - mighty Casey has struck out. Copyright © 2014 Education.com

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Name

Concept Web
Concept Web

D

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Nam e

D a t e

Reader’s Theater: Summertime Blues

Nam e D a t e Reader’s Theater: Summertime Blues Cast of Characters Narrator Floyd Mom

Cast of Characters Narrator Floyd Mom Cuz-Cuz

On a hot summer day, a boy named Floyd is bored. His friend comes over to help nd some fun.

Mom: Hey, Floyd! It looks like you’ve been busy this morning. You did some work in the garage with your uncle, you played with your dolls, you pretended to go to outer space, and you read books. That’s a lot! What else are you going to do today?

Floyd: I don’t know, Mom. I’m out of ideas!

Mom: Tell me about the books you read this morning.

Narrator: Floyd thought back to the books he read that morning, and he remembered one about being outside in nature. It reminded him of his teacher, Miss Stacy. She had told him to play outside on summer break and use his imagination!

Floyd: I read a book about nature that was really interesting. Let me show it to you.

Narrator: Floyd picked up his nature book and showed his mom the pictures. He ipped through the pages and saw owers, bees, plants, and trees.

Floyd: That looks fun! Those kids are playing outside, and those kids are making forts with sticks! And here, kids are building sand castles with sand.

Mom: Those kids sure are having a lot of fun in nature! There’s so much to do when we explore outside.

Floyd: (walking over to the window) Why should I sit inside all day? Today is the perfect day to play outside!

Mom: That sounds like a great plan, Floyd.

Floyd: That squirrel runs pretty quickly! Do you see that bird in the sky? Those animals seem to be having a lot of fun! I want to get a closer look.

Narrator: Floyd told his mom he was going outside, and he skipped through the door to his backyard. Everywhere he looked, he saw interesting animals. Birds, squirrels, butter ies, and dragon ies were enjoying nature right at his ngertips. All of a sudden, he heard a familiar voice!

Cuz-Cuz: Hi Floyd! My dad wanted me to nd something to do and he said I could come over to play!

Floyd: (smiling) Thanks for coming over! I just came outside because I couldn’t nd anything else to do either.

Narrator: Floyd and Cuz-Cuz started playing right away.

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Nam e

D a t e

Reader’s Theater: Summertime Blues

Nam e D a t e Reader’s Theater: Summertime Blues Floyd: I wish it wasn’t so

Floyd: I wish it wasn’t so hot outside, but I’m happy you are here!

Narrator: First, the friends decided to build a sand castle in the sandbox. They made the bottom of the castle by putting wet sand in a round cake pan and ipping the pan over.

Floyd: Oh, I just remembered that my mom asked me to water the plants. Can you help me?

Cuz-Cuz: (holding a water can in one hand and handing Floyd a water can) Sure! I’ll use this water can and you can use that one.

Floyd: Thanks! Hey, do you see those bees?

Cuz-Cuz: Those bees sure are busy.

Floyd: Just like us! Did you know that bees have ve eyes? I learned that in my nature book this morning!

Narrator: After Floyd and Cuz-Cuz nished watering the plants, they decided to play another game. They pretended to be buzzing bees. They imagined that they could y around the yard and suck the sweet nectar from the owers. They ran fast and made buzzing noises in between their giggles.

Cuz-Cuz: Let’s take a break. I’m one tired bee!

Floyd: (breathing heavily) Me too! Worker bees must be tired after a long day of collecting nectar.

Narrator: The good friends found a cool spot under a tree in Floyd’s yard. They laid on the grass and looked up at the sky.

Cuz-Cuz: Wasn’t it nice playing outside?

Floyd: It was! I had so much fun!

Cuz-Cuz: Floyd, can we get something to drink? I’m as thirsty as a camel!

Floyd: Sure! Let’s go inside and get a cold drink of water.

Narrator: The boys enjoyed their cool glasses of water. Floyd and Cuz-Cuz relaxed at the kitchen table and talked about the fun they had that day.

Floyd: Thanks again for coming over. Today was really boring until we went outside and used our imaginations. Today is de nitely a day to remember!

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Nam e

D a t e

Reader’s Theater: Summertime Blues

Directions: Answer the questions below.

1. Put the events of the drama in the correct order below. Label each event with a number from 1-5.

The rst event has been done for you.

Cuz-Cuz came over to play with Floyd.

The friends went inside to get a drink of water.

1 Floyd shows his mom the books he read this morning.

Floyd and Cuz-Cuz pretended to be busy bees.

Floyd looks out the window to look at nature.

2. The stage directions for the play help the reader to

3. How does Floyd feel about nature at the end of the story?

.

 

.

4. What words best describe Floyd? Circle two.

boring

tired

creative

interested

bossy

5.

What words best describe Cuz-Cuz? Circle two.

 

shy

sad

playful

cheerful

boring

6. Draw a scene from the drama in the space below. Then, write one sentence on the lines about what

is happening in the scene.

sentence on the lines about what is happening in the scene. Get more lesson plans at