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MSM-UNIX

MICRONETICS STANDARD MUMPS FOR UNIX, XENIX, AND AIX SYSTEMS

SYSTEM MANAGER’S GUIDE

Revised April 1, 1993

Version 4.0

COPYRIGHT

1984-1993

DISCLAIMER

Micronetics Design Corporation makes no representations or warranties with respect to this manual. Further, Micronetics Design Corporation reserves the right to make changes in the specification of the product described within this manual and without obligation of Micronetics Design Corporation to notify any person of such revision or changes.

The software described in this document is furnished under a license by Micronetics Design Corporation and may only be used or copied in accordance with the terms of such license.

This manual is copyrighted. All rights are reserved. This document may not, in whole or part, be copied, photocopied,reproduced, translated or reduced to any electronic medium or machine readable form without prior consent, in writing, from Micronetics Design Corporation.

Copyright

1984-1993

Micronetics Design Corporation 1375 Piccard Drive Rockville, Maryland 20850

301-258-2605

Telex 46-9677 Facsimile 301-840-8943

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1 GETTING STARTED

1.1 Contents of Distribution Package

1-1

1.2 Distribution Package Files

1-2

1.3 System Requirements

1-4

1.3.1 Hardware Requirements

1-4

1.3.2 Memory Requirements

1-5

1.3.3 Disk Space Requirements

1-5

1.4 Before You Begin

1-6

1.4.1 Backup the UNIX System

1-6

1.4.2 Review the READ.ME File

1-6

CHAPTER 2 INSTALLING THE MSM SYSTEM

2.1 The MSM Distribution Package

2-1

2.2 The MSM Distribution System

2-2

2.3 The MSM Installation Process

2-3

2.4 The Paper Key

2-4

2.5 Installing the MSM System

2-5

2.6 Sample Installation and Startup Sessions

2-8

2.6.1 Installing MSM-UNIX

2-8

2.6.2 Startup of MSM-UNIX

2-17

2.7 Upgrading MSM to a New Release

2-18

2.8 The CONFIG.MSM Parameter File

2-20

CHAPTER 3 GENERATING THE SYSTEM

3.1 The MSM System Generation

3-1

3.2 The SYSGEN Process

3-2

3.3 Invoking the SYSGEN Utility

3-3

3.4 Display Configuration Parameters

3-4

3.5 Create New Configuration

3-5

3.6 Edit Configuration Parameters

3-6

3.6.1 SYSGEN (Step Through SYSGEN)

3-8

3.6.2 Backspace and Line Delete Characters

3-9

3.6.3 Automounts and Autostarts

3-11

3.6.4 Maximum Partitions

3-17

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

3.6.5 Programmer Access Code

3-18

3.6.6 MSM Disk Usage

3-19

3.6.7 VIEW Command Restriction

3-20

3.6.8 Tied Terminal Table

3-21

3.6.9 Port (Terminal) Definition

3-23

3.6.10 Default Partition Size

3-33

3.6.11 Translation/Replication Table

3-34

3.6.12 DDP and LAT Configuration

3-35

3.6.13 Tape Device Definition

3-36

3.6.14 Global Defaults

3-38

3.6.15 Lock Table Size

3-40

3.6.16 Edit Configuration Comment

3-41

3.6.17 Mode Flags

3-42

3.7

Edit Configuration

3-46

3.8

Delete Configuration

3-47

3.9

Set Default Startup Configuration

3-48

3.10

UCI Management

3-49

3.11

System Configuration Parameters

3-50

3.11.1 Buffer Pool Size

3-51

3.11.2 Stack and Stap Size

3-52

3.11.3 Dynamic Caching Options

3-53

3.11.4 Maximum Open Host Spool Files

3-54

3.11.5 Number of Muserver Processes

3-54

3.12

Database Definition

3-55

3.13

Device Translation Tables

3-57

3.13.1 Table Definition or Edit

3-58

3.13.2 Table List

3-61

3.13.3 Name Definition or Edit

3-62

3.13.4 Name List

3-63

3.14

Mnemonic Namespaces

3-64

3.14.1 List All Defined Namespaces

3-67

3.14.2 Add New Namespace

3-68

3.14.3 Copy Namespace to New Name

3-70

3.14.4 Edit Existing Namespace

3-71

3.14.5 Delete Existing Namespace

3-73

3.14.6 Rename Existing Namespace

3-74

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER 4 MSM SYSTEM OPERATIONS

4.1 System Startup

4-1

4.2 Startup Failures

4-6

4.3 MSM Signon Options

4-9

4.4 Starting Multiple Copies of MSM

4-10

4.5 System Shutdown

4-12

4.6 System Backup

4-12

4.6.1 Complete Backup of Database

4-13

4.6.2 Partial Backup of Database

4-13

4.6.3 Perform Backup Using UNIX Utilities

4-14

4.7 Sample Startup of MSM-UNIX

4-14

CHAPTER 5 RESILIENT SYSTEMS

5.1 Overview

5-1

5.2 Before-Image Journaling

5-2

5.2.1 Getting Started

5-2

5.2.2 The BIJ Utility

5-5

5.2.3 Enable Before-Image Journal

5-6

5.2.4 Disable Before-Image Journal

5-7

5.2.5 Show BIJ Information

5-8

5.2.6 Number of BIJ/OLB Buffers

5-8

5.2.7 Before-Image Journal File Maintenance

5-9

5.2.8 Mount Database With Unreadable BIJ

5-12

5.3 After-Image Journaling

5-13

5.3.1 Invoking the Journal Utility

5-13

5.3.2 Configure Journaling

5-14

5.3.3 Assign Journal Directory

5-14

5.3.4 Create New Journal Space

5-15

5.3.5 Delete Journal Space

5-16

5.3.6 Activate (Start) Journaling

5-17

5.3.7 Show (Display) Journal Spaces

5-17

5.3.8 Switch to New Journal Space

5-18

5.3.9 Deactivate (Stop) Journaling

5-19

5.3.10 Restore (Dejournal) from Journal Space

5-19

5.3.11 Mark Journal Space as Reusable

5-21

5.3.12 Print a Journal

5-21

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

5.4 Cross-System Journaling

5-23

 

5.4.1 Cross-System Journaling Parameters

5-24

5.4.2 Volume Group Table

5-24

5.4.3 Activate Cross-System Journaling

5-25

5.4.4 Deactivate Cross-System Journaling

5-25

5.4.5 Print Cross-System Journaling Log

5-26

5.4.6 Reset Cross-System Journaling Log

5-26

5.5 On-Line Backup

5-27

 

5.5.1 Reasons for Backup

5-27

5.5.2 On-Line Backup Concepts

5-27

5.5.3 Defining Backup Options

5-29

5.5.4 BIJ/OLB Buffers

5-30

5.5.5 The OLBLOG File

5-31

5.5.6 Invoking the OLB Utility

5-32

5.5.7 Full Backup of a Volume Group

5-32

5.5.8 Incremental Backup/Volume Group

5-33

5.5.9 Cancel an Interrupted Backup

5-34

5.5.10 Restore a Volume Group

5-34

5.5.11 Manual Restore Functions

5-36

5.5.12 Define Backup Options

5-41

5.5.13 Number of BIJ/OLB Buffers

5-46

5.6 Database Recovery

5-47

 

5.6.1 Complete Recover from Soft Failure

5-47

5.6.2 Complete Recovery from Hard Failure

5-47

5.6.3 Database Recovery Using BIJ

5-47

5.6.4 Database Recovery/On-Line Backup

5-48

CHAPTER 6 VOLUME GROUPS

6.1

Overview

6-1

6.2

Organization of Volume Groups

6-2

6.3

Location of Volume Groups

6-2

6.4

Mounting a Volume Group

6-3

6.5

Volume Group Characteristics

6-3

6.6

Logging Onto a Volume Group

6-4

6.7

Storing Blocks in a Volume Group

6-4

6.8

Structure of a Disk Block Number

6-4

6.9

Remote Volume Groups

6-4

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER 7 CONFIGURING UNIX

7.1 Overview

7-1

7.2 Testing the IPCS Facility

7-2

7.3 Shared Memory Usage

7-3

7.4 Shared Memory Parameters

7-5

7.5 Semaphore Usage

7-7

7.6 Semaphore Parameters

7-8

7.7 Reconfiguring the UNIX Kernel

7-10

CHAPTER 8 MEMORY MANAGEMENT

8.1 The Buffer Pool

8-1

8.2 The MSM Partition

8-2

8.3 The Partition Stacks

8-2

8.4 Configuring Memory in SYSGEN

8-3

8.4.1 Default Partition Size

8-3

8.4.2 Buffer Pool Size

8-4

CHAPTER 9 TAPE DEVICES

9.1 Overview

9-1

9.2 Tape Naming Conventions

9-1

9.3 Tape Device Restrictions

9-3

CHAPTER 10 MSM-NET SERVICES

10.1 Overview

10-1

10.2 MSM-NET Distribution Package

10-3

10.3 Networking Components in MSM-NET

10-4

10.3.1 Links

10-4

10.3.2 Nodes

10-4

10.3.3 Circuits

10-4

10.4 Operational Considerations for MSM-NET

10-5

10.4.1 DDP Servers

10-5

10.4.2 Automatic Network Configuration

10-6

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

10.4.3 Accessing Globals Through DDP

10-7

10.4.4 Identifying a Node

10-7

10.4.5 Extended Global Notation

10-7

10.4.6 Translation and Replication

10-9

10.4.7 Resolving Global References

10-10

10.5

Installing MSM-NET

10-11

10.5.1 UNIX Software Requirements

10-11

10.5.2 IBM RS/6000 Network Driver

10-12

10.5.3 SCO UNIX LLI Drivers

10-19

10.5.4 DEC ULTRIX Packet Filter

10-19

10.6

Configuring the MSM-NET Software

10-20

10.6.1 DDP System Parameters

10-21

10.6.2 Link Definition

10-24

10.6.3 Ethernet Links

10-24

10.6.4 TCP/IP Links

10-27

10.6.5 UDP/IP Links

10-28

10.6.6 Circuit Definition

10-30

10.6.7 DDP Groups

10-37

10.6.8 Network Security

10-38

10.6.9 OMI Translation Table

10-40

10.6.10 Display Network Configuration

10-42

10.7

The DDP Utility

10-43

10.7.1 Invoking the DDP Utility

10-43

10.7.2 Startup DDP

10-43

10.7.3 Shutdown DDP

10-44

10.7.4 Update Circuit Table

10-44

10.7.5 Verify Circuit Communication

10-44

10.7.6 Link Management

10-45

10.7.7 Circuit Management

10-47

10.8

Communicating with DSM Systems

10-51

10.8.1 Configuring the DSM System

10-51

10.8.2 Accessing 7-Bit Globals

10-52

10.9

Application Considerations

10-53

10.9.1 Asynchronous Errors

10-53

10.9.2 ZSYNC Command

10-54

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER 11 MSM-LAT TERMINAL SERVICES

11.1 Overview

11-1

11.2 MSM-LAT Distribution Package

11-3

11.3 Configuring the LAT Software

11-4

 

11.3.1 LAT System Parameters

11-5

11.3.2 LAT Node Management

11-6

11.3.3 LAT HFS Access Control

11-9

11.4

LAT Servers and Devices

11-11

11.4.1 Server and Port Names

11-11

11.4.2 Logging Onto the System

11-12

11.4.3 Printers and Host-Initiated Connects

11-13

11.4.4 Recommended Server Parameters

11-14

11.5

The LAT Utility

11-15

11.5.1 Invoking the LAT Utility

11-15

11.5.2 Startup LAT and DDP

11-16

11.5.3 Shutdown LAT and DDP

11-16

11.5.4 Services Management

11-17

11.5.5 Link Management

11-20

11.5.6 LAT Circuit Management

11-20

11.6 Supported LAT Servers

11-23

11.7 Loading LAT Server Software

11-24

CHAPTER 12 ISSUING UNIX COMMANDS

12.1

Overview

12-1

12.1.1 Terminal Commands

12-1

12.1.2 Foreground Commands

12-2

12.1.3 Background Commands

12-2

12.2 Escaping to the Shell

12-3

12.3 Issuing Commands From a Program

12-5

GLOSSARY

Glossary-1

INDEX

Index-1

ix

LIST OF TABLES

Table 1-1

MSM-UNIX Distribution Package

1-1

Table 1-2

Distribution Package Files

1-2

Table 1-3

Minimum System Requirements

1-5

Table 2-1

Tar Command Device Names

2-6

Table 2-2

The CONFIG.MSM Parameter File

2-20

Table 9-1

Tape Device Names

9-2

Table 10-1

UNIX Ethernet Adapter Names

10-26

Table 11-1

Recommended LAT Server Parameters

11-14

Table 11-2

LAT Terminal Server Suppliers

11-23

Table 12-1

UNIX Command Types

12-5

LIST OF FIGURES

Figure 2-1

MSM System Installation

2-8

Figure 2-2

MSM System Installation - Step 1

2-9

Figure 2-3

MSM System Installation - Step 2

2-10

Figure 2-4

MSM System Installation - Step 3

2-11

Figure 2-5

MSM System Installation - Step 4

2-12

Figure 2-6

MSM System Installation - Step 5

2-13

Figure 2-7

MSM System Installation - Step 6

2-14

x

LIST OF FIGURES

Figure 2-8

MSM System Installation - Step 7

2-15

Figure 2-9

MSM System Installation - Step 8

2-16

Figure 2-10

Sample Startup of MSM-UNIX

2-17

Figure 2-11

Sample Upgrade of MSM-UNIX System

2-19

Figure 4-1

Sample Startup of MSM-UNIX

4-14

Figure 10-1

MSM Network in Mixed Environment

10-2

Figure 10-2

MSM-NET Driver Installation - Step 1

10-12

Figure 10-3

MSM-NET Driver Installation - Step 2

10-13

Figure 10-4

MSM-NET Driver Installation - Step 3

10-14

Figure 10-5

MSM-NET Driver Installation - Step 4

10-15

Figure 10-6

MSM-NET Driver Installation - Step 5

10-16

Figure 10-7

MSM-NET Driver Installation - Step 6

10-17

Figure 11-1

LAT Terminal Server Configuration

11-1

Figure 11-2

Sample Logon From a LAT Terminal

11-12

xi

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xii

xi

Acknowledgment

Micronetics Standard MUMPS (MSM) is a full implementation, with extensions, of the ANSI Standard Specification (X11.1-1990) for the Massachusetts General Hospital Utility Multi-Programming System (MUMPS). MUMPS was developed by the Laboratory of Computer Science at Massachusetts General Hospital under grant number HS00240 from the National Center for Health Services Research and Development. MUMPS is a trademark of Massachusetts General Hospital.

xii

DOCUMENTATION CONVENTIONS

The following describes the various documentation conventions that are used throughout this manual.

Convention

Description

RET
RET

The Carriage Return Key (normally labeled RETURN, RET, ENTER, etc.).

CTRL/x
CTRL/x

The Control key pressed at the same time as the x key where x is any valid key used in combination with the Control key.

<ERROR>

An MSM error message.

’val’

In HELP messages, ’val’ is used to indicate that the user can enter the indicated value. The value is entered without the quotes.

>

The MSM Programmer prompt.

•••

The series of items repeats a user-specified number of times.

Shows a break in a list where consecutive

lines have been omitted.

BOLD

Items in a dialogue are shown in bold to indicate a user response.

xiii

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xiv

CHAPTER 1 GETTING STARTED

This chapter describes the distribution package contents, the hardware and software requirements for MSM-UNIX, the storage requirements, and how to use the provided documentation.

1.1 Contents Of Distribution Package

MSM-UNIX systems are distributed on either 3.5 inch diskettes (1.4MB), 5.25 inch diskettes (1.2MB), cartridge tape (high density or low density as appropriate), or 9-track reel-to-reel tape. Prior to beginning installation of MSM, you should check the Distribution Package to ensure that it includes each of the items that is indicated by a check mark () in Table 1-1 below. A detailed description of each of these items is included in Chapter 2 (System Installation) of this manual.

Table 1-1 - Distribution Package

Description of Item

Tape

Diskette

Distribution

Distribution

MSM-UNIX Distribution Tape

 

MSM-UNIX Distribution Diskette #1

 

MSM-UNIX Distribution Diskette #2

 

MSM-NET Distribution

Optional

Optional

MSM-LAT Distribution

Optional

Optional

MSM-UNIX System Manager’s Guide

MSM User’s Guide

MSM Reference Manual

MSM Utility Manual

MSM Pocket Guide

MSM Release Notes

Getting Started

1-1

1.2 Distribution Package Files

Table 1-2 below provides a general description of each of the files contained on the Distribution Package diskettes or tape. It also includes, where appropriate, the intended use of the file.

Table 1-2 - Distribution Package Files

Distribution File

 

Description of Contents

READ.ME

A

description of the enhancements and

fixes made to the MSM-UNIX system since the last printing of the documentation and release notes.

SETMODES

Invoked by the installation process to set appropriate ownership and access permissions for the distribution files.

UTILS.MGR

System-supplied utility programs that are loaded into the Manager’s UCI.

GLOBALS.MSM

System-supplied global files that are loaded into the Manager’s UCI.

CUAEDIT.MSM

Global files used by the CUA editor.

config.ins

A

file containing system startup

parameters used by the MSM installation

procedure.

install

The shell script that is used to invoke the MSM installation procedure.

install.db

The database used by the MSM installation procedure.

license.msm

Contains licensing information about the MSM system.

msm/MSM

The MSM module invoked to logon to the system.

msmstart/

The UNIX shell script which starts MSM-UNIX.

MSMSTART

1-2

Getting Started

Distribution File

Description of Contents

mubij

Controls all input/output operations to the before-image journal files.

muctrl

The MSM load module responsible for login, logout, and system shutdown.

mudasd

The MSM database supervisor which controls all disk reads and writes to the database.

mudump

Outputs a diagnostic dump of the MSM shared memory segment.

muinit

Invoked by MSMSTART to initialize MSM-UNIX.

muinfo

Displays UNIX kernel settings for shared memory and semaphores. This module is not available on all systems.

mujrnl

Controls all input/output operations to the after-image journal files.

mumsm

The MSM load module which includes the language compiler and operating system monitor.

musave

Writes modified data to disk during system shutdown.

muserver

The UNIX operating system interface module. It includes the Host File Server, tape I/O, and UNIX spooling.

mutio

Controls reads and writes to terminal type devices, including printers and modems.

sumsm

Single user MSM-UNIX. This is used only by the MSM installation process.

Getting Started

1-3

1.3 System Requirements

In order to install MSM properly, certain minimum hardware requirements, software requirements, disk storage requirements, and memory requirements must be met. The following sections outline each of these requirements and the minimum amounts necessary to satisfy them. Table 1-3 below summarizes the minimum hardware requirements. Of course, memory requirements can vary dramatically depending upon the make and model of the computer hardware, the size of the Unix operating system, and the size of the application.

Table 1-3 - Minimum System Requirements

System Requirements

All Systems

Minimum System Memory

4

MB

Floppy Disk (3.5 or 5.25 inch)

Optional

Minimum Hard Disk Space

5

MB

Standard Serial/Parallel Ports

Optional

Cartridge or 9-Track Tape Drive

Optional

LAN Adapter (Ethernet, etc.)

Optional

LAT Terminal Servers

Optional

1.3.1 Hardware Requirements

MSM-UNIX runs on UNIX, XENIX, ULTRIX, AIX, and other types of Unix systems. Hardware manufacturers that are supported include:

IBM, DEC, Data General, Hewlett-Packard, Altos, Motorola, NCR, Unisys, Siemens-Nixdorf, ICL, Sequent, etc. Because of the number of different systems that run UNIX or UNIX-like operating systems, the MSM system has not been tested on all possible types.

Most of these configurations support a full complement of peripheral devices including floppy disks, hard disks, streaming tape, 9-track tape, etc. The minimum system configuration required to run MSM is a processor with 4 megabytes of memory, at least one disk drive, and either a floppy disk, a magnetic tape, or some other type of removable media. Optionally, the system may include additional memory, one or more additional hard disks, and other peripheral devices.

1-4

Getting Started

1.3.2 Memory Requirements

At a minimum, the MSM interpreter, database supervisor, and operating system take approximately 700K bytes of memory. In addition, a minimum of 128K bytes of shared memory is required for terminal buffers, disk buffer pool, and other system tables required by MSM.

In addition to these requirements, MSM needs a minimum of 64K bytes per partition when the default system values are used. One partition is required for the system, one partition for each user that logs onto the system, and one partition for each background job. The MSM system can logically support up to 8192 partitions executing concurrently on the UNIX system.

System memory requirements can change significantly when the system configuration parameters such as stap size and stack size are changed from their default values. This is also true when the default partition size is changed. Refer to Chapter 3 (Generating The System) in this manual for additional information on these and other system configuration parameters.

1.3.3 Disk Space Requirements

The MSM system can operate with virtually any disk drive that is supported by the UNIX host operating system. To install MSM-UNIX requires a minimum of 5MB of disk space for the Manager’s routines and globals. Additional disk space for system applications, user applications, etc., is usually required. The exact amount of space needed can be configured based upon the user’s actual requirements. The maximum disk space supported by MSM is 16GB.

When installing MSM, the user has the option of specifying whether the database should be created as a standard UNIX file or as a raw device. This is also true when additional databases are created using the DBMAINT utility. Refer to Chapter 2 (Installing The MSM System) in this manual for additional information on creating databases during installation. Also, refer to Chapter 10 (Configuration Utilities) in the MSM Utility Manual for additional information on the DBMAINT utility.

Getting Started

1-5

1.4 Before You Begin

Before you begin installing the MSM-UNIX system, youshould perform

a few preparatory tasks.

In particular, the following should be done

before starting installation of MSM.

1.4.1 Backup The UNIX System

As a precaution, you should take a full backup of your UNIX system. Even though the MSM installation process does not damage user files or system files in UNIX, it is still good practice to take a system backup before you begin. That way, you will be able to restore the system to its original status prior to the installation. At a minimum, if you are upgrading to a new version of MSM, you should backup the MSM database and load modules before you begin the upgrade.

1.4.2 Review The READ.ME File

The READ.ME file, contained on the MSM-UNIX distribution media, contains important information about the system that was not available

at the time the documentation was printed. It includes new features, bug

fixes, etc., that have been incorporated since the last minor release of MSM. This documentation can be printed using the standard UNIX lp command.

1-6

Getting Started

CHAPTER 2 INSTALLING THE MSM SYSTEM

This chapter describes the general procedure for installing MSM for the first time and how to upgrade an existing MSM system to a new release of the software.

2.1 The MSM Distribution Package

The MSM distribution package includes all software and documentation necessaryto installMSM on aUNIX basedcomputer. Using the supplied materials, MSM can be installed from floppy disk or magnetic tape. The MSM distribution package includes the following items:

• MSM Distribution Media - Magnetic tape (reel-to-reel or cartridge) or floppy diskettes that contains the MSM system software, the MSM Installation software, and a file (i.e., the READ.ME file) which contains notes on the current MSM release.

• MSM Release Notes - A description of fixes, changes, and enhancements that have been made to the MSM system since the last software release.

• MSM-UNIX System Manager’s Guide - This manual, containing information on features specific to the MSM-UNIX product, installation and configuration information, Networking, LAT, etc.

• MSM User’s Guide - A description of how to use the MSM system including logon and logoff, editing programs, using peripheral devices, etc.

• MSM Reference Manual - A formal description of the MUMPS programming language as it has been implemented in the MSM system.

• MSM Utility Manual - A complete description, with examples, of all utility programs in the MSM system.

• MSM Pocket Guide - A concise summary of the important features of the MSM system.

Installing The MSM System

2-1

Additionally, the distribution package may include optional packages that are available from Micronetics. The optional packages that are available include the following:

• MSM-NET - Provides Remote Volume Group support between MSM systems, Distributed Data Processing (DDP) support between MSM systems and DSM and ISM systems, and Open MUMPS Interconnect (OMI) support.

• MSM-LAT - Provides support for the Local Area Transport (LAT) protocol developed by DEC.

• MSM-GUI - A Graphical User Interface (GUI) for X-Windows and Microsoft Windows.

• MSM-API - An Application Programming Interface (API) that allows non-MUMPS programs to access the MSM database.

• MSM-XCALL - A toolkit for developing non-MUMPS programs that can be called from MSM.

Refer to the documentation included with each of these packages for instructions on installing and using the software. For application packages supplied with the distribution, refer to Appendix D (Loading Application Packages) in the MSM User’s Guide for information on how to install them.

2.2 The MSM Distribution System

The MSM Distribution System is a group of MUMPS routines that performs all steps necessary to install a new or upgrade an existing MSM system. One common distribution system is used to create the system regardless of the hardware type or configuration being created.

The actual installation of the MSM system is accomplished using an interactive dialogue. At each step along the way, the user is prompted for any information that is required. To complete the installation process requires only a few minutes. Instructions for upgrading an existing system to a new release of MSM are contained in section 2.7 (Upgrading MSM to a New Release) of this manual.

2-2

Installing The MSM System

2.3 The MSM Installation Process

Installation of the MSM system is performed using an interactive dialogue and consists of the following basic steps:

Location For Database -- You must tell the system where the MSM database is to be created. The database may be a UNIX file, or it may reside on a UNIX raw device. When specifying a UNIX file name, a fully-qualified path name (i.e., multiple directory levels) may be specified. For a UNIX raw device, the name must begin with a /dev/ prefix.

MSM Database Size -- When MSM is installed on a UNIX system, you must indicate the amount of space that MSM is to allocate for the database. As a minimum, you should allocate 5 Megabytes of space. This allows all of the routines and globals supplied with the system to be loaded and still provides some space for user routines and data.

System Name -- Each MSM system has a 3 letter name which is used to identify the system in a networked environment. The system name is equivalent to the name of the first volume group.

System Generation -- The last step of the installation process is to configure the new system to meet site-specific needs. As part of the installation procedure, the Distribution System creates a default (DFLT) configuration that allows you to boot the new system. To configure the system for your installation-specific requirements, use the SYSGEN utility. Refer to Chapter 3 (Generating the System) of this manual for a complete description of the SYSGEN process.

Prior to beginning the installation process, carefully review the complete installation procedure. A sample terminal session can be found in Section 2.6 (Sample Installation and Startup Sessions) at the end of this Chapter. Also, you should pay careful attention to the system generation process described in Chapter 3 (Generating the System) in this manual.

When upgrading an existing MSM system to a new release, be sure to prepare a complete backup copy (i.e., MSM software modules and MSM database) of the current system before beginning the installation process. Refer to Chapter 4 (MSM System Operation) in this manual for detailed information on how to perform a complete system backup.

Installing The MSM System

2-3

2.4 The Paper Key

When installing an MSM system, the MSM software must be activated for use through a Paper Key. The key consists of an activation code, the name of the supplier from whom the software was purchased, and an end-user name. The activation code is computed by an algorithm and includes the software serial number, license number, options purchased by the user, machine type, etc. This sequence of numbers and letters is provided on a self-adhesive label and must be entered exactly as it appears in order to enable the software.

If the user moves the Micronetics programs to another computer or replaces the hard disk, the Paper Key will be needed to activate the MSM software on the new system. The Paper Key should be retained and is designed to be inserted into the MSM System Manager’s Guide for safekeeping. Alternatively, the Paper Key can be affixed to the front or side of your computer for easy reference, if needed.

Prior to Version 4.0, the MSM system serial number and the software options purchased by the customer were stamped into the software itself and were contained on the system diskettes. As of Version 4.0, all optional software, such as MSM-NET and MSM-LAT, is included in every software package, but is only enabled by the activation code if the customer purchased the option.

When installing MSM, you will be asked to enter the information from the Paper Key. Simply enter the information, and the installation process will continue. The Paper Key can be updated if necessary via the MSMKEY utility, or the /key startup option, which is discussed in Chapter 4 (MSM System Operations) in this manual.

2-4

Installing The MSM System

2.5 Installing the MSM System

To install the MSM system, boot the computer in the normal manner following the instructions supplied by the manufacturer. Then, login to the root userid. If necessary, use the make directory command (i.e., mkdir) to create a sub-directory where the MSM software and database will reside. Use the change directory command (i.e., cd) to change to the directory where MSM is to be installed.

Once you are in the proper directory, use the UNIX ’tar’ command to copy the distribution system into the directory. The format of the ’tar’ command will vary depending on the hardware configuration that you are using and the version of UNIX that is installed. The following are examples of typical ’tar’ commands that could be used to load the distribution system software. The first example uses the default tape device, while the second example specifically names the tape device that is to be used.

tar xv

or

tar xvf /dev/rct0

In the first example shown above, the distribution software is read from thedefault device thatis assigned to the tar command by the Unix system. In the second example, the distribution software is read in raw mode from magnetic cartridge tape device 0. For all systems, the distribution files are always stored in tar format independently whether the distribution is on floppy disk, cartridge tape, or 9-track magnetic tape.

When loading the MSM distribution files from floppy diskettes, you may need to load each diskette separately (i.e., issue a separate tar command for each diskette). On some systems, the tar utility allows the distribution files to span multiple diskettes. In this case, the tar utility itself will prompt the user to insert the second diskette at the appropriate time.

On other systems, the tar utility does not allows files to span across multiple diskettes. On these systems, the tar command will terminate without any message after the last file on the first diskette has been loaded. The user must then put the second diskette in the drive and repeat the same tar command used for the first diskette.

Installing The MSM System

2-5

Table 2-1 below shows common tar device names for many of the systems supported by MSM-UNIX. Refer to the UNIX documentation suppliedwith the systemfor additional information on the’tar’ command and the appropriate device name for the system being used. Also, refer to Chapter 9 (Tape Devices) in this manual for additional information on magnetic tape device names (cartridge and 9-track) for systems that are supported by MSM.

Table 2-1 - Tar Command Device Names

Model Name

Tar Device Name

Media Type

Altos 1000/2000

/dev/rfd096ds15

5.25" HD Floppy

Altos 3068

/dev/rfd096ds15

5.25" HD Floppy

Bull XPS100

/dev/rct/c0d0 (Default)

Cartridge Tape

Bull DPX/2

/dev/rct/c0d0 (Default)

Cartridge Tape

DG AViiON

/dev/rmt/0 (Default)

Cartridge Tape

DEC 3000/5000

/dev/rmt0h (Default)

TK50 Cartridge Tape

HP 9000/800 Series

/dev/rmt/0m (Default)

9 Track Tape

IBM PS/2 AIX

/dev/rfd0

3.5" HD Floppy

IBM RS/6000

/dev/rfd0

3.5" HD Floppy

IBM RTPC

/dev/rfd0

5.25" HD Floppy

Motorola Delta 3000

/dev/rmt0

Cartridge Tape

Motorola Delta 8000

(default)

Cartridge Tape

NCR Tower Series

/dev/rmt/0

Cartridge Tape

MIPS

(default)

Cartridge Tape

Sequent

/dev/rmt/tm0

Cartridge Tape

Siemens MX300/MX500

/dev/rmt/rts0 (Default)

Cartridge Tape

SCO UNIX Or XENIX

/dev/rfd096ds15

5.25" HD Floppy 3.5" HD Floppy

/dev/rfd0135ds18

Unisys 6000 Series

/dev/rmt0

Cartridge Tape

Texas Instruments 1500

/dev/rqt/0

Cartridge Tape

2-6

Installing The MSM System

After the distribution files have been restored, invoke the install command (i.e., enter ’./install’) to begin the installation procedure. You will be asked for the location of the database, its size, and the system name. After you have answered all of the questions, you will be given the opportunity to verify that the information you supplied is correct. If you indicate that it is not, the installation process will be terminated and you may start the ’./install’ again.

After the installation process begins, you will not be asked any further questions. The system will automatically perform all of the steps necessary to install MSM. The installation process generally will take from a few minutes to several hours to complete. The actual length of time required to complete the installation is directly proportional to the size of the database being created.

Upon completion of the installation process, the SYSGEN program should be used to tailor the system to specific installation requirements. Refer to Chapter 3 (Generating The System) in this manual for information about the SYSGEN process. Upon completion of the installation process, the system will contain the Manager’s UCI (i.e., MGR) and a default programmer access code of XXX will have been assigned.

Installing The MSM System

2-7

2.6 Sample Installation and Startup Sessions

Thefollowing sections show examples of how to installMSM on aUNIX system. User responses are shown in Bold print.

2.6.1 Installation of MSM-UNIX

In the following, the MSM-UNIX distribution tape is assumed to be loadedin thedefaulttapedrive. If this isnot thecase,use the’f’ parameter on the tar command in order to specify the appropriate tape device name.

Figure 2-1 - MSM System Installation

#

tar xv

x

ANSI.NAM, 5420 bytes, 11 media blocks.

x

CUAEDIT.MSM, 194724 bytes, 381 media blocks.

x

GLOBALS.MSM, 150630 bytes, 295 media blocks.

x

MSM, 32305 bytes, 64 media blocks.

x

MSMSTART, 2511 bytes, 5 media blocks.

x

READ.ME, 560 bytes, 2 media blocks.

x

SETMODES, 253 bytes, 1 media blocks.

x

UTILS.MSM, 1563992 bytes, 3055 media blocks.

x

config.ins, 25 bytes, 1 media blocks.

x

install, 1467 bytes, 3 media blocks.

x

mudasd, 28680 bytes, 57 media blocks.

x

mudump, 32487 bytes, 64 media blocks.

x

muinit, 49994 bytes, 98 media blocks.

x

mujrnl, 24100 bytes, 48 media blocks.

x

mumsm, 1058827 bytes, 2069 media blocks.

x

musave, 17551 bytes, 35 media blocks.

x

muserver, 61545 bytes, 121 media blocks.

x

mutio, 53452 bytes, 105 media blocks.

x

sumsm, 771743 bytes, 1508 media blocks.

#

Note: This screen shows an example of the tar command that is used to load the distribution files. The files are loaded from the default device that has been assigned to the tar command by the system. The actual file names and number of files may vary from release to release.

2-8

Installing The MSM System

Figure 2-2 - MSM System Installation - Step 1

#

# ./install

----------------------------------------------------------------

---

---

---

---

---

/\

---

---

//\\

 

---

---

//

\\

M

S

M

-

U N I X

 

---

--- //

 

\\

---

---

!!

!!

D

I

S

T

R

I

B

U

T

I

O

N

---

---

!!

!!

---

---

!!

!!

V

4

.

0

---

--- !!!!!!

 

---

---

---

---

---

---

Please review the READ.ME file included with this

---

---

distribution

---

---

---

---

Copyright Micronetics Design Corp. @1993

 

---

----------------------------------------------------------------

MSM-UNIX, Version 4.0.0 Copyright (C) 1984-1993, Micronetics Design Corporation

Note: This screen shows how the distribution process is invoked. After this screen is displayed, the system will automatically proceed to the next step of the installation process.

Installing The MSM System

2-9

Figure 2-3 - MSM System Installation - Step 2

--- !!!!!!

---

---

---

---

---

---

Please review the READ.ME file included with this

---

---

distribution

---

---

---

---

Copyright Micronetics Design Corp. @1993

---

----------------------------------------------------------------

MSM-UNIX, Version 4.0.0 Copyright (C) 1984-1993, Micronetics Design Corporation

Activation Code: GB1H;19UK;FHJ;M;IF;EB;NMCD;BGR;J;F

Supplier: Micronetics Design Corporation

End-User: John Q. Customer

Please verify:

Activation Code

Supplier

End-User

:

:

:

GB1H;19UK;FHJ;M;IF;EB;NMCD;BGR;J;F

Micronetics Design Corporation John Q. Customer

OK to apply <Y>: [RET] done

Note: The user is prompted to enter the Activation Code, Supplier Name, and End-User Name on this screen. This information is provided on the Paper Key described in Section 2.4 (The Paper Key) in this chapter. The user must verify that the information entered is correct before the installation can proceed.

2-10

Installing The MSM System

Figure 2-4 - MSM System Installation - Step 3

MSM-UNIX, Version 4.0.0 Installation

This is the Micronetics Standard MUMPS (MSM) installation program.

You will be asked a series of questions about the MSM system you are creating or upgrading. Afterwards, you will be asked to verify that your answers are correct, or terminate the installation procedure (before making any changes to your system) if you have made a mistake.

Enter <RETURN> to continue

Note: This screen indicates that the installation process has begun and provides a brief overview of the steps that will be followed during the installation process.

Installing The MSM System

2-11

Figure 2-5 - MSM System Installation - Step 4

MSM-UNIX, Version 4.0.0 Installation

Enter the UNIX Path Name for your database.

The MSM-UNIX database file is called ’database.msm’. Enter the UNIX

Path Name ONLY which will be prepended to ’database.msm’ to form the

actual database name.

entire UNIX name for the device beginning with ’/dev’. For example:

If you use a raw device, it must be the

/usr/myname

/mumps

/dev/rdsk01

etc

Enter Path Name ONLY for database=’database.msm’: /mumps

Note: This screen is used to determine where the MSM-UNIX database will be created. Normally, the MSM database is placed in its own file system, but it can be created in any directory on any file system. If a raw device is specified, there must not be a UNIX file system mounted on that device.

It is important to point out that raw databases are not supported on all UNIX systems. The READ.ME file included on the distribution media includes a list of UNIX systems that do not support raw devices.

2-12

Installing The MSM System

Figure 2-6 - MSM System Installation - Step 5

MSM-UNIX, Version 4.0.0 Installation

Enter the size of the MSM-UNIX database to be created.

The minimum acceptable size is 5120k (5 megabytes). The size must be entered as a number followed by the letter ’k’ (or ’K’) for kilobytes, or ’m’ (or ’M’) for megabytes (1 megabyte equals 1024 kilobytes). For example:

5m

6000K

92M

8.25M

8250k

If you are unsure how large your database should be, we suggest starting with ten megabytes (10M) and expanding later if necessary.

Enter the size of the MSM-UNIX system to be created: 10M

Note: This screen is used to determine the size of the MSM database that is to be created as part of the installation process. The minimum acceptable size is 5MB. For most applications, a much larger database is usually required.

Installing The MSM System

2-13

Figure 2-7 - MSM System Installation - Step 6

MSM-UNIX, Version 4.0.0 Installation

Enter the system name

Each MSM system has its own name consisting of three uppercase letters. The system name is used to identify the system when it is connected to other systems via a communications network. Two systems with the same system name cannot be networked. The system name can be changed later if desired.

Enter a 3 letter name for your system: SYS

Note: This screen is used to determine the system or node name for the MSM system being installed. The name can be any three alphabetic characters (upper-case or lower-case) that the user chooses. Numeric characters, special characters and punctuation characters are not allowed.

It is important to point out that when networking is to be used, the system name that you supply must be unique across the entire network. This means that no two nodes on the network can have the same system name. It is also beneficial if the system name has some meaning so that nodes can be easily identified in a network configuration.

2-14

Installing The MSM System

Figure 2-8 - MSM System Installation - Step 7

MSM-UNIX, Version 4.0.0 Installation

Please verify the information you have entered.

Database Installation Option

:

Installing

:

Path name for database.msm

:

/mumps/

System name Size of MSM-UNIX system

:

SYS 10240k (10 megabytes)

Installation will take several minutes. Enter ’Y’ to install MUMPS. Enter ’N’ to terminate the install procedure.

OK to proceed? Y Beginning MSM installation

100% done

Creating MSM database

100% done

Loading utility routines

100% done

Loading utility globals Loading editor global

100% done

Note: This screen is used to verify that the information the user has entered is correct. If any of the information was entered incorrectly, then the user should respond with N to terminate the installation procedure. If Y is entered, then the system will begin the installation process.

Installing The MSM System

2-15

Figure 2-9 - MSM System Installation - Step 8

MSM-UNIX, Version 4.0.0 Installation

Installation of MSM-UNIX, Version 4.0.0 is complete. The following system definitions have been set up for MSM-UNIX:

Default startup configuration

:

DFLT

System manager’s UCI

:

MGR

:

XXX

Programmer access code for DFLT configuration Maximum number of MUMPS partitions

:

8

Exit

#

Note: This screen is used to indicate that the installation process is complete. It also lists important default information that was established by the installation process. After displaying this information, the system returns to a UNIX prompt (i.e., the # character).

2-16

Installing The MSM System

2.6.2 Startup of MSM-UNIX

In the following example, it is assumed that the MSM system has been installed in the /mumps directory. If this is not the case on the system that is being used, substitute the appropriate directory name where the MSM-UNIX database has been installed.

Figure 2-10 - Sample Startup Of MSM-UNIX

#

# ./msmstart

MSM-UNIX, Version 4.0.0 Copyright (C) 1984-1993, Micronetics Design Corporation

License

:

Serial# 1400000, 128 Users

Supplier

:

Micronetics Design Corporation

End-User

:

Options

:

John Q. Customer NET, LAT

Enter startup configuration <DFLT> DFLT

MSM-UNIX, Version 4.0.0 is being initialized

MSM-UNIX, Version 4.0.0 is up and running.

Exit

MSM session terminated

MSM startup is complete.

#

Note: The MSM-UNIX system is now ready for users to login. Each time that the msm command is entered, the login prompt will appear. To login to the system manager’s UCI in programmer mode, enter the UCI name and the programmer access code (i.e., MGR:XXX) in uppercase. After you enter this information, the system displays the job number and prompts you with the > symbol. You are now logged into MUMPS in programmer mode.

Installing The MSM System

2-17

2.7 Upgrading MSM to a New Release

From time to time, you will receive new releases of the MSM system. New releases are generally supplied whenever enhancements, new utilities, or corrections for errors are made to the system. This typically occurs one or two times a year.

A new Paper Key is not needed to activate a new maintenance release (i.e., version 4.01, 4.02, etc.). However, a new key will be supplied to the customer when a new MSM version is released (i.e., version 4.0, 5.1, etc.).

The procedure for upgrading to a new release of MSM is virtually identical to the installation process described in the previous sections. To perform an upgrade, use the following steps. Begin by taking a complete backup of the MSM database and distribution files. Next, use the UNIX ’tar’ command to load the new MSM distribution system into the directory where you originally restored them. To invoke the installation process, type ’./install’. You will then be asked the same questions described in the installation sections above.

The only difference is that when you specify the UNIX path name, the installation process detects that the MUMPS database already exists. Be sure you specify the same directory name that you supplied when you did the initial install that created the MUMPS database. When you enter the path name, the system displays the information shown in Figure 2-10 on the following page.

Note: It is important that the %RELOAD utility be run after completing the upgrade procedure. Failure to do so may result in <PLDER> errors when routines are accessed. Refer to the MSM Utility Manual for additional information on the %RELOAD utility.

2-18

Installing The MSM System

Figure 2-11 - Sample Upgrade Of An MSM-UNIX System

MSM-UNIX, Version 4.0.0 Installation

The database you have entered already exists on your system.

If you want to update your MSM software without losing any data, then enter ’N’ to avoid recreating your database.

If you want to install a completely new database on top of the old one, then answer ’Y’ to recreate the database.

Do you wish to recreate the database? N

Note: When you upgrade a system, information in the existing database is retained. Only the new utilities are installed. After you have answered all of the questions, you are given the opportunity to verify that the information you supplied is correct. If you indicate that it is not, the upgrade process is terminated.

Installing The MSM System

2-19

2.8 The CONFIG.MSM Parameter File

As part of installation, MSM creates a CONFIG.MSM file in the directory from which the install program was run. This file contains information about the MSM system you are running. Whenever MSM is started, this file is examined to determine how MSM is to be set up. The following table describes each entry and the functions associated with them.

Table 2-2 - The CONFIG.MSM Parameter File

LINE

 

DESCRIPTION

1

The fully-qualified UNIX file name of the first volume of the first Volume Group that is to be mounted at system startup. For example, database.msm is the name that is used by the installation process for the first volume of the initial volume group. Therefore, assuming that the MSM database was created in the /mumps directory, this line will contain /mumps/database.msm as the name.

2

The following configuration parameters are all contained on a single line. Each parameter is separated from the previous parameter by one or more spaces.

MemorySize

Shared memory area in K bytes.

Partitions

Maximum number allowed.

NumDevices

Maximum number of terminals.

Stack

Size of stack in K bytes.

Stap

Size of stap in K bytes.

DDP Links

Number of DDP links

DDP Circuits

Maximum Number of DDP circuits

DDP Buffers

Number of DDP buffers

DDP Nakeds

 

Host Spool

Maximum concurrently open files

Muserver

Number of muserver processes

Bij Buffers

Number of bij/olb buffers

2-20

Installing The MSM System

LINE

DESCRIPTION

 

For example, 128 4 5 12 12 2 4 10 20 8 6 3 would indicate 128K shared memory, maximum of 4 partitions, maximum of 5 terminal devices, 12K stack, 12K stap, 2 DDP links, maximum of 4 DDP circuits, 10 DDP buffers, and 20 DDP naked references, maximum of 8 concurrently open host spools, 6 muserver processes, and 3 buffers for before-image journal (and online) backup. Note: These parameters are updated by the MSM SYSGEN utility and should not be changed with the UNIX editor. The one exception to this is the stack and stap sizes which need to be edited manually. Refer to Chapter 6 (Memory Management) for additional information on the stap and stack sizes.

3

Reserved for Future Use

4

Reserved for Future Use

5

Reserved for Future Use

Lines that begin with a semicolon (i.e., ;) in column 1 are treated as comment lines and ignored by the MSM system during startup.

At system startup time, MSM will attempt to access the CONFIG.MSM file in the directory from which the msmstart command was invoked. If it does not find it there, then MSM will look in the /etc directory. If the file is not found in either location, an error message is issued and the startup is terminated.

Installing The MSM System

2-21

This page is intentionally left blank.

2-22

Installing The MSM System

CHAPTER 3 GENERATING THE SYSTEM

This chapter describes the process for generating the MSM system and tailoring it to the specific hardware configuration and operating environment where it will be installed.

3.1 The MSM System Generation

The System Generation process (SYSGEN) allows the System Manager at a site to define one or more hardware and software configurations to be used by MSM-UNIX. A configuration is the collection of attributes (e.g., device types, terminal port definitions, tied terminal indexes, number of partitions, etc.) that describe the operating environment for MSM. Multiple configurations can be created with each definition having its own unique name associated with it.

The basic elements of a configuration include: definitions for tied terminals, disk devices, terminal ports, basic system parameters, etc. The result of the SYSGEN process is a configuration definition stored in the SYS global in the manager’s UCI. Configuration descriptions are used by the system startup routine (i.e., STU) to initialize the system and configure it with the defined parameters. Refer to Chapter 4 (MSM System Operation) in this manual for additional information on how the SYSGENconfigurationis usedduring systemstartup and howindividual parameters can be overridden on the startup command.

Prior to beginning the SYSGEN process for a new system, the System Manager should define a list of the UCIs to be created. Disk information associated with the UCIs (e.g., location for routine and global directory, expansion area for pointer blocks, expansion area for data blocks, etc.) should also be determined.

Also, hardware-specific information for the configuration should be determined, including information such as tape device names, network adapter device names, and UNIX tty device names which are to be defined in MSM. Finally, system parameters for options such as backspace character, line delete character, number of partitions, etc., need to be determined.

Generating The System

3-1

3.2 The SYSGEN Process

The SYSGEN is performed as an interactive dialogue with the system. Whenever information is required, the system prompts the user for the

value. The user can respond to any prompt with a question mark (?) to receive HELP information. Also, the user can respond with ^L to obtain

a list of the current values that are defined for the prompt. If a null

response is entered (i.e., a carriage return), then the original value is left

unchanged. Thus, you can use null responses and ^L to display items within a particular configuration without changing any of them. Finally,

it is possible to return to the previous question at any time during the

SYSGEN by entering a circumflex (^) in response to any prompt.

In the SYSGEN process, the order in which the configuration is specified

is important because of inter-relationships between elements in the configuration. In particular, the following configuration elements are related:

UCI Definitions

Tied Terminal Table Definitions

Port (Terminal) Definitions

In the case of ports (terminals), the definition for the port includes the index into the tied terminal table for the routine to be executed at logon. Similarly,thetiedterminal definition includes thenameof theUCI where the routine to be executed at logon is stored. Thus, the port definition requires the tied terminal index to be previously defined and the tied terminal index requires the UCI index to be previously defined. Therefore, to properly define a system configuration that uses tied terminals, the following steps must be performed:

1. Create the Volume Group on which the UCI is to reside

2. Create the new UCI

3. Define the tied terminal entries

4. Define the ports

If the UCI to be created is to reside on a Volume Group that is not the

one used to boot the system, then the Volume Group must be created and mounted before the UCI can be created.

3-2

Generating The System

3.3 Invoking The SYSGEN Utility

To perform the SYSGEN process, you must be logged on to the manager’s UCI in programmer mode. When performing a SYSGEN in

a multi-user environment, other users may be logged onto the system.

Because most SYSGEN parameters are acted upon by the STU (system startup) routine, MSM must be shutdown (via SSD) and restarted for most of the new values to take effect.

Somenew values (e.g., newUCIs) are available withoutrestarting MSM. The following shows how the SYSGEN utility is invoked and the high level menu that is displayed. All user responses are shown in BOLD,

key even though

it is not shown.

and responses are assumed to be ended with the

RET
RET

>D ^SYSGEN

Select SYSGEN Option:

1

- Display Configuration Parameters

2

- Create New Configuration

3

- Edit Configuration Parameters

4

- Edit Configuration Name/Comment

5

- Delete Configuration

6

- Set Default Startup Configuration

7

- UCI Management

9

- System Configuration Parameters

10

- Database Definition

12

- Device Translation Tables

13

- Mnemonic Namespaces

14

- Journaling Management

Select Option: ?

Select option by specifying the option number or supplying enough characters to identify the option, To get help information specific to an option, enter ’?’ followed by the option number, Enter <RETURN> or ’^’ to exit with no action, Enter ’^L’ to get a list of options.

Select Option:

RET
RET

>

Once the SYSGEN process begins, the system prompts the user for all necessary information. The following sections describe the highest level menu options that are available. With each menu option, a sample terminal session is provided.

Generating The System

3-3

3.4 Display Configuration Parameters

The Display Configuration Parameters option displays all of the parameters that have been specified for a particular configuration. The user is prompted for the name of the configuration to be displayed. If no configuration name is supplied, the system returns to the main option menu. The user is also prompted for an output device. The default device is the current terminal device.

Select Option: 1 - Display Configuration Parameters

Select Configuration <DFLT>:

Enter Output Device <1>:

RET
RET
RET
RET

------------------------------------------------------------------

Backspace, Line Delete Character

Current Backspace Character: Ctrl-H Current Line Delete Character: Ctrl-X

------------------------------------------------------------------

Maximum Partitions

Maximum Partition Limit: 8

------------------------------------------------------------------

.

.

.

Additional Configuration Parameters

.

.

.

------------------------------------------------------------------

VIEW Command Restriction:

VIEW Command Is NOT Restricted

------------------------------------------------------------------

LOCK Table Size

Maximum LOCK Table Size: 2K

------------------------------------------------------------------

Select Option:

3-4

Generating The System

3.5 Create New Configuration

This option is used to create a new system configuration and to initialize the configuration with a set of default values. The user is prompted for the name of the configuration to be created, a descriptive comment, and the name of the configuration from which the default values will be copied. Once a new configuration has been created, the Edit Configuration Parameters option from the SYSGEN main menu is used to update the values. If the user enters a null response to the configuration name question, the system will return to the main option menu.

Select Option: 2 - Create New Configuration

Enter name of new configuration: ?

Select a configuration to be edited (or created) by specifying its full name. A configuration name may be any combination of letters and/or numbers with a maximum length of 14 characters. Enter ’^L’ to list the names of current configurations.

Enter name of new configuration: TEST Enter comment: Test Configuration Enter name of configuration to copy from: ?

If you want the new configuration to be a duplicate of an existing configuration, enter the name of the configuration. All entries will be copied to the new configuration. If you do not enter a name here, the new configuration will contain only a minimum set of default values. Enter ’^L’ to list the names of existing configurations.

Enter name of configuration to copy from: ^L

Current Configuration: MDC Available Configurations:

Id: DFLT

02/14/93:

DEFAULT CONFIGURATION

Id: MDC

02/23/93:

Production System

Enter name of configuration to copy from: DFLT

The new configuration is defined as follows:

Backspace, Line Delete Character

Current Backspace Character: Ctrl-H Current Line Delete Character: Ctrl-X

------------------------------------------------------------------

.

.

.

Additional Configuration Parameters

Select Option:

Generating The System

3-5

3.6 Edit Configuration Parameters

For ease of use, the system manager does not need to do a complete SYSGEN to change individual system parameters. The Edit Configuration Parameters option allows individual parameters for an existing configuration to be displayed, modified, or deleted; also, new entries can be added to the configuration.

The basic system parameters are divided into logical groupings. Each group appears as an entry on the Edit Configuration Parameters menu. Some groups contain sub-menus that allow multiple functions (e.g., edit, list, delete, etc.) to be performed. Following is a list of these groupings.

Full SYSGEN

Backspace And Line Delete Character *

Automounts And Autostarts *

Maximum Partitions *

Programmer Access Code

MSM Disk Usage *

VIEW Command Restriction

Tied Terminal Table

Port (Terminal) Definition *

External Call Configuration *

Default Partition Size

Translation/Replication Table

DDP and LAT Configuration *

Tape Device Definition *

Global Defaults *

LOCK Table Size *

Display Configuration Parameters

Mode Flags *

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Generating The System

When any parameter marked with an asterisk (*) in the list above is modified, the change does not take effect until the STU routine is run. Therefore, the system should be shutdown and restarted after changing these parameters. Refer to Chapter 4 (MSM System Operation) in this manual for additional information on system startup and shutdown.

When the Edit Configuration Parameters option is selected, a sub-menu is displayed. The sub-menu provides access to each logical group of system parameters associated with a configuration. In the sections that follow, there is an example of how the menu is invoked and a detailed description of each parameter. Note that when this option is selected, the user is prompted for the name of the configuration to edit. If no configuration name is supplied, the system returns to the main menu.

Select Option: 3 - Edit Configuration Parameters

Select Configuration <DFLT>: ?

Select a configuration to be edited/created by specifying its full name. A configuration name may be a combination of letters and/or numbers with a max length of 14 characters. Enter ’^L’ to list the names of current configurations.

Select Configuration <DFLT> ^L

Available Configurations:

Id: DFLT

01/04/93:

DEFAULT CONFIGURATION

Select Configuration <DFLT>: DFLT

Select SYSGEN Option:

1

- SYSGEN (step through full SYSGEN)

2

- Backspace, Line Delete Character

3

- Automounts And Autostarts

4

- Maximum Partitions

5

- Programmer Access Code

6

- MSM Disk Usage

7

- VIEW Command Restriction

8

- Tied Terminal Table

9

- Port (Terminal) Definition

10

- Multi-Port I/O Card Definition

11

- External Calls Configuration

12

- Default Partition Size

13

- Translation/Replication Table Maintenance

15

- DDP and LAT Configuration

16

- Tape Device Definition

17

- Global Defaults

18

- LOCK Table Size

19

- Display Configuration Parameters

20

- Mode Flags

Select Option:

Generating The System

3-7

3.6.1 SYSGEN (Step Through Full SYSGEN)

This option is used to perform a complete SYSGEN. Following is an example of the text that will be displayed.

Select Option: 1 - SYSGEN (step through full SYSGEN)

Would you like an explanation of the SYSGEN <N>: Y

The SYSGEN process allows you to define specific configuration to be used by MSM. The configuration includes definitions for character delete (backspace) and line delete, and ports.

You will be prompted for each definition. Respond with a ’?’ to any of the prompts for help information. A response of ’^L’ displays current values when multiple definitions are possible.

Note: A <RETURN> response will exit the current question with no other action being performed. Thus you may use the <RETURN> and ’^L’ to display the current configuration without redefining it. The <RETURN> is also used to back up to the previous prompt whenever you are in the middle of redefining a specific element of the configuration.

The order of specifying a configuration is important due to the inter-relationships between elements of a configuration. The following are the inter-related elements of a configuration:

- Port definitions

- UCI definitions

- Tied Terminal Table

The definition of a port includes the specification of a routine to be invoked as part of the logon (via Tied Terminal Table). The Tied Terminal definition in turn specifies the UCI name for logging on. The Port definition requires that the corresponding Tied Terminal Index be already defined. The Tied Terminal definition requires that the UCI be defined to the system. Thus the order of configuring the system must be:

1 - Define the volume group on which the UCI is to reside

2 - Create the UCI (if needed)

3 - Define the Tied Terminal Table entries

4 - Define the ports

Note: If the UCI(s) to be created will reside on a volume which was not defined when the system was booted, you will need to:

1 - Create the database volume

2 - Shut down the system (DO ^SSD)

3 - Reboot

4 - Repeat the SYSGEN process (DO ^SYSGEN)

At this point, the system will begin to step through the entire SYSGEN process. Options will be presented in the order shown in the sample text above. For additional information on each of the options that you will be prompted for, refer to the sections that follow.

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Generating The System

3.6.2 Backspace And Line Delete Characters

The backspace character is used to indicate to MSM-UNIX that the previously entered character is to be discarded (i.e., thrown away and not passed on to the program issuing the READ operation). When entered in response to a READ command, MSM erases the character from the terminal if it is a CRT. If it is not a CRT, then MSM will echo a slash (i.e., ’/’) character.

Similar to the backspace character, the line delete character is used to indicate to MSM-UNIX that all previously entered characters are to be discarded (i.e., all characters entered in response to the READ operation are thrown away). When entered in response to a READ command, MSM erases the characters that have been entered so far and waits for the user to re-enter the entire line. Note that the line delete function is inhibited during single character reads (i.e., READ *X).

MSM allows either the ASCII backspace (i.e., $CHAR(8)), the ASCII delete (i.e., $CHAR(127)), or both to be the system backspace character. MSM handles the line delete character in much the same way as the backspace character; there are two valid characters, CTRL/X and CTRL/U, or both.

Thus, in a mixed terminal environment, one need not be concerned with which character is generated by a given terminal. In response to the backspace character prompt and the line delete prompt, enter the actual character that is to represent the function, or the letter B to indicate that both characters are to be recognized.

Also, whenever the defined backspace character is the DEL character, the system treats the true ASCII backspace character as an ordinary character. In this case, even though the cursor is physically moved back one space, the previous character is retained. This feature is useful for over-striking purposes.

The backspace and line delete characters are treated as normal characters during single character READ (i.e., READ *X) operations. This means that no special action is taken by the system when either the backspace or line delete character is entered. On single character READs, the system returns the actual ASCII value of the character that is entered.

Generating The System

3-9

Select Option: 2 - Backspace, Line Delete Character

Current Backspace Character(s): Ctrl-H

New Backspace Character: ?

Enter the actual character you want to be recognized as the ’backspace’ character, either backspace (Ctrl-H) or DEL (rubout) or ’B’ for both.

Current Backspace Character(s): Ctrl-H

New Backspace Character: B

Ctrl-H, DEL

Current Line Delete Character: Ctrl-X

New Line Delete Character: ?

Enter the actual character you want to be recognized as the ’line delete’ character, either Ctrl-U or Ctrl-X or ’B’ for both.

Current Line Delete Character: Ctrl-X

New Line Delete Character: B

Select Option:

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Generating The System

Ctrl-U, Ctrl-X

3.6.3 Automounts And Autostarts

This option allows the system manager to specify the Volume Groups to be automatically mounted by MSM and whether or not the spooling and journaling jobs are to be automatically started. When this option is selected, a sub-menu of automount and automatic startup options is displayed.

The first option, Volume Group Automounts, provides a mechanism for up to seven additional volume groups to be mounted automatically. Automatic mounting is controlled by a table of volume group indexes created by this function. Each index entry contains a file name that identifies the first volume of the volume group to be mounted. During startup, the STU routine reads this table and mounts each volume group identified.

Indexes can be from 1 to 31, and can be added in any order; however, volume groups are mounted in numerical order beginning with 1. Assume that indexes 1 through 4 are added to the table; later, index 1 and index 3 are deleted. At system startup, the volume group associated with index 2 will be mounted as volume group 1, and the volume group associated with index 4 will be mounted as volume group 2.

The Spooling Autostart option allows the MSM spool facility to be automatically started during system startup. The MSM system starts the despooler job using the specified despool device for output. If spooling is not automatically started, it can be manually started using the SPL utility. Refer to the MSM Utility Manual for additional information.

Third, journaling can be automatically started. At system startup, MSM determines the name of the current journal area (i.e., the one that was being journaled to when the system was last shutdown), and restarts journaling at the location in the journal file where it previously left off.

The fourth menu option controls the startup of Cross-System Journaling. The startup utility automatically determines the name of the journal file that was being read from when the system was shutdown. Cross-System Journaling resumes at the precise location in the journal file where it previously left off.

If not automatically restarted, journaling and/or Cross-System Journaling can be manually started using the JRNL utility. Refer to Chapter 5 (Resilient Systems) for additional information.

Generating The System

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Invoking The Automounts And Autostarts Option

When this option is selected, the system displays a sub-menu of automount and autostart options. The following shows the menu that is displayed when this option is selected. The sections that follow show sample terminal sessions for each option.

Select Option: 3 - Automounts And Autostarts

Select Autostart Options

1 - Volume Group Automount

2 - Spooling Autostart

3 - Journal Autostart

4 - Cross-System Journal Autostart

5 - Automatic Partition Startup

Select Option:

Volume Group Automount

This option allows the system manager to specify which Volume Groups will be mounted when the MSM system is started. Following is a sample terminal session showing the Volume Group Automount function.

Select Option: 1 - Volume Group Automount

Enter Index Number: ?

Enter an index number in the automount table (1 to 31) which will define a volume group to be mounted during startup. These volume groups will be mounted in the order in which they appear in this table. Enter ^L to list the current automount table.

Enter Index Number: ^L

Index Type

----- ------ ------ --- ---------------------------

Host File Name or Remote Id

Access LAT

1 Local

-

-

/msmjrnl/journal.msm

2 Local

-

-

/usr/msm/dmstest.msm

Enter Index Number: 3

Host File Name: /disk2/mumps/account.db

Volume Group Type <Local>: ?

Enter ’LOCAL’ if the volume group is local to this system. Enter ’REMOTE’ if the volume group is mounted on a remote system. Enter ’^’ to return to the previous question.

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Generating The System

Volume Group Type <Local>:

RET
RET

Enter Index Number: 4

Volume Group Type <Local>: REMOTE

System,Volume Group: ?

Enter the remote system name, and the volume group name, separated by a comma. All names must be 3 uppercase letters. Enter ’^’ to return to the previous question. Enter ’^L’ to list the current automount entries.

System,Volume Group: FSA,FDA

Override default access <N>: ?

Enter NO to use the default access taken from the volume group characteristics. Enter YES to specify the access (i.e., READ/WRITE access, and LAT availability) requested for this mount.

Override default access <N>:

Enter Index Number:

RET
RET

Select Option:

RET
RET

Generating The System

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Spooling Autostart

This option allows the system manager to specify whether or not the Spooling function is to be automatically invoked when the MSM system is started. Following is a sample terminal session showing the Spooling Autostart function.

Select Option: 2 - Spooling Autostart

Auto Enable Spooling <N> ?

Enter Y or N to autostart spooling. The spool area must be defined for this option to work.

Auto Enable Spooling <N> Y

Enter a spool device: ?

Select a device to be used as the virtual spool device. Any output to this device will not print immediately, but will create a spool file to be printed in turn by the despooler. If you do not enter a number, device 2 (actual spool device) is the only device which can be used to create spool files. Enter ’^’ to return to the previous question. Enter ’^Q’ to exit this utility.

Enter a spool device: 3

Do you want to start the despooler <YES> ?

Enter ’YES’ to start the despooler Enter ’^’ for previous question, ’^Q’ to quit.

Do you want to start the despooler <YES> YES

Enter the device to despool to <3> ?

Enter the number of the device to despool to. Enter ’^’ to return to the previous question. Enter ’^Q’ to exit this utility.

Enter the device to despool to <3>

Select Option:

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Generating The System

RET
RET

Journal Autostart

This option allows the system manager to specify whether or not the Journaling function is to be automatically invoked when the MSM system is started. Following is a sample terminal session showing the Journaling Autostart function.

Select Option: 3 - Journal Autostart

Autostart Journaling <N>: ?

Enter Y or N to Autostart Journaling. You must have available journal spaces before Journaling can be automatically started.

Autostart Journaling <N>: Y

Cross-System Journal Autostart

This option allows the system manager to specify whether or not the Cross-System Journaling feature of MSM is to be automatically started when the system is started. Following is a sample terminal session showing the Cross-System Journaling Autostart function.

Select Option: 4 - Cross-System Journal Autostart

Autostart Cross-System Journaling <N>: ?

Enter YES to automatically start Cross-System Journaling during system startup.

Autostart Cross-System Journaling <N>: Y

Automatic Partition Startup

Partitions may be automatically activated as part of the system startup process. The entries in the partition startup table are used as operands of the JOB command. Each entry consists of a numeric index (which need not be sequential), an entry reference (i.e., a routine name or a line reference with a routine name), a UCI name where the routine is to be started, and as an option, the partition size required for the job. The partitions are started in the order of the numeric indexes.

Generating The System

3-15

Select Option: 5 - Automatic Partition Startup

Current Automatic Startup List:

Entry reference

----- ------- ------ ---------------

Index

UCI

Psize

1

MGR

10

^MALL

Select index: ?

Specify the index number of an entry to be added or changed. Partitions are started in numeric order according to the index.

To delete an entry, specify a ’-’ in front of the number.

To list existing entries, enter ’^L’.

Select index: 2

Enter UCI name: ?

Specify the UCI name under which the partition will execute. A UCI name consists of 3 uppercase letters. If the UCI is on a secondary volume group, then enter UCN,VGN, where UCN is the UCI name and VGN is the volume group name.

Enter ’^L’ for a list of UCIs on all mounted volume groups.

Enter UCI name: MGR

Enter Entry Reference: ?

Specify an entry reference of where execution should begin.

Valid syntax for an entry reference is:

^routine name +offset^routine name label^routine name label+offset^routine name

Enter Entry Reference: ^%ZTM

Enter partition size <SYSTEM>: ?

Specify the partition size for the job, or ’SYSTEM’ if the job should use the system default partition size.

The maximum value for a partition size is 256.

Enter partition size <SYSTEM>:

Select index:

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Generating The System

RET
RET

3.6.4 Maximum Partitions

The Maximum Partitions option is used to indicate to MSM the number of concurrent tasks that can be active on the system. The actual number that can be specified varies depending on the hardware configuration. Once the maximum number of active partitions has been reached, no more users are allowed to logon and no more background jobs can be started. When MSM is first installed, this option is set to the maximum number of partitions that the license will support.

The number of partitions that can be active at one time is also limited by the amount of system memory that is available to the MSM system. If there is insufficient memory to create a new partition, then new users will be prevented from logging onto the system. Also, any attempts to create a background job will hang until memory becomes available. In addition, overall system performance could be drastically affected if the system is memory-constrained and UNIX begins to swap memory to disk.

Insufficient memory can occur if the system itself does not have enough memory or if the memory that is available to MSM becomes fragmented. Fragmentation generally is not a problem unless the overall amount of system memory size is marginal for the application being run. Refer to Chapter 8 (Memory Management) for additional information on how memory is used by the MSM system.

Select Option: 4 - Maximum Partitions

Maximum Partition Limit: 4

New Maximum Partitions Limit: ?

Enter the maximum number of simultaneously active partitions allowed for this configuration.

Value must be numeric between 1 and 1024.

Maximum Partition Limit: 4

New Maximum Partitions Limit: 24

Select Option:

Generating The System

3-17

3.6.5 Programmer Access Code

The Programmer Access Code (PAC) is used to control access to programmer mode in MSM. Whenever a user attempts to logon to the system in programmer mode, the correct PAC must be specified. If the correct PAC is not specified, then the user is denied access to the system.

In response to the programmer access code prompt, the user enters the actual value of the code. The code may be from 1 to 12 characters in length and may include any valid ASCII character except the reserved control characters, the colon (:) character, and the comma character. Refer to Chapter 3 (Using Peripheral Devices) in the MSM User’s Guide for a list of the reserved control characters. A default code of XXX (three upper-case X’s) is created by the installation process.

Select Option: 5 - Programmer Access Code

Current Programmer Access Code: XXX

New Programmer Access Code: ?

Enter the actual Program Access Code (1-12 characters) you wish MSM to recognize for logging on to UCI’s.

Current Programmer Access Code: XXX

New Programmer Access Code: VGH

Select Option:

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Generating The System

3.6.6 MSM Disk Usage

Every computer system has a maximum rate at which disk I/O (i.e., read and write) operations can be performed. In order to optimize disk I/O, MSM must know if it is the primary user of disk resources (in terms of throughput, not storage space). This option is used to indicate to MSM if the system is shared with non-MSM applications or not.

If MSM is to share the system is with non-MSM applications, then it will give up control of the disk subsystem for a percentage of the time to allow other applications access to the disk. Otherwise, MSM will make full use of the disk subsystem at all times.

Select Option: 6 - MSM Disk Usage

Is the system shared with non-MSM applications? <NO>: ?

Enter YES if non-MSM applications will be running concurrently with MSM on this system. Enter NO if this system is dedicated to MSM.

Is the system shared with non-MSM applications? <NO>:

RET
RET

Generating The System

3-19

3.6.7 VIEW Command Restriction

The VIEW command allows the user to modify the contents of memory or data blocks contained in the MSM database. Use of this command is potentially dangerous if it is used incorrectly or if the user is not well versed in the internal structure of MSM control blocks or disk blocks. Therefore, the system provides a feature where the VIEW command and $VIEW function can be restricted to the Manager’s UCI.

When this option is selected, the VIEW command can only be used within a program executing in the Manager’s UCI, or a percent routine, or a routine that is called from a percent routine. Any other use of the VIEW command or $VIEW function results in a <PROT> error. Note that % routines are stored in the Manager’s UCI but can be invoked from any UCI.

Select Option: 7 - VIEW Command Restriction

Restrict use of VIEW command to Manager’s UCI? <NO>: ?

Enter YES to restrict use of the VIEW command to the Manager’s

UCI and ’%’ routines only.

VIEW command which is encountered outside of the Manager’s

If this option is turned on, any

UCI which is not a part of a ’%’ routine will generate a <PROT > error. Enter NO to allow the VIEW command from any UCI. Enter ’^’ or ’^Q’ to exit this option."

Restrict use of VIEW command to Manager’s UCI? <NO>:

Select Option:

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Generating The System

RET
RET

3.6.8 Tied Terminal Table

The tied terminal table is used in MSM to link a specific terminal device to a particular application routine. Once a terminal has been tied to a particular application routine, it can only access that routine or routines called by the original routine. The terminal cannot be logged on to the system in programmer mode and in the event of programming errors or interrupts, which are not trapped by the application, the terminal is automatically logged off the system.

Before a terminal can be tied to an application routine, an entry must be created in the tied terminal table. Each entry in the tied terminal table is numbered (i.e., it has an arbitrary index value associated with it) and contains the name of the routine, the UCI where it is stored, and the partition size required by the routine. Whenever a user attempts to logon to the system, a test is made to see if the terminal is tied to an application.

If the terminal is tied to a specific routine (i.e., an application), then that routine is invoked. If the terminal is not tied, then the standard logon routine (i.e., %LOGON in the Manager’s UCI) is invoked.

Select Option: 8 - Tied Terminal Table

Current Tied Terminal Table List:

Index Routine Reference UCI,VGP Partition Size Tied Ports ----- ----------------- ------- -------------- ------------

1 MENU^PATIENT

MDC,SYS

48

5, 7, 11, 15

2 ^GENESIS

PRD,SYS

48

Enter Tied Terminal Index: 2

Enter Routine Name <^GENESIS>: ?

Enter the name of a routine to be automatically invoked when a login is initiated from a port with a tied terminal index of this entry and the terminal is not presently logged on.

A routine name, or a full entry reference (i.e., LABEL^RTN) must be entered.

Enter Routine Name <^GENESIS>:

RET
RET

Select UCI <PRD>: ?

Enter the UCI and volume group in which the selected routine is to be invoked. If the volume group is omitted, volume group 0 will be used. The UCI and volume group name must be separated by a comma.

UCI and volume group names must be 3 upper case letters.

Generating The System

3-21

Select UCI <PRD>:

RET
RET

Enter Partition Size for ^GENESIS <48>: ?

Enter a positive integer corresponding to the partition size in 1K blocks of the partition in which this routine will run.

Partition sizes may range from 12K to 256K.

Enter Partition Size for ^GENESIS <48>:

RET
RET

Do you wish to tie any ports to this entry <N>: ?

You may link this entry to an existing port definition, or the linkage may be done when the port definition is created/edited.

Do you wish to tie any ports to this entry <N>: Y

Enter Port Number to be Tied, or "D" to Tie Dynamic Ports: ?

Enter the port number which will be tied to this entry. Enter "D" to tie all dynamic ports to this entry. Enter "-D" to untie dynamic ports to this entry.

Dynamic ports are those which are not defined in SYSGEN, but are nevertheless allowed to login via LAT by virtue of an available Device Descriptor Block (DDB). Dynamic LAT DDBs are created whenever the maximum number of LAT ports exceed the number of LAT ports defined in SYSGEN. Note that port 1 is never considered a Dynamic device, even if it is not defined.

Enter Port Number to be Tied, or "D" to Tie Dynamic Ports: 64

Enter Port Number to be Tied, or "D" to Tie Dynamic Ports: 65

Enter Port Number to be Tied, or "D" to Tie Dynamic Ports: 66

Enter Port Number to be Tied, or "D" to Tie Dynamic Ports:

Current Tied Terminal Table List:

RET
RET

Index Routine Reference UCI,VGP Partition Size Tied Ports

----- ----------------- ------- -------------- ------------

1 MENU^PATIENT

MDC,SYS

48

5, 7, 11, 15

2 ^GENESIS

PRD,SYS

48

64, 65, 66

Enter Tied Terminal Index:

Select Option:

RET
RET

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Generating The System

3.6.9 Port (Terminal) Definition

This option allows the user to create, display, or modify the parameters that define terminal devices to the system. The system prompts the user for the following information:

Port Number

Enter the port number to be added to the configuration or the number of an existing port to edit its parameters. Or, enter an existing port number preceded by a minus sign to delete an entry. Port numbers can range from 1 through 19 (excluding 2), 64 through 199, and 256 and up. Port number 1 is assumed to be the main console device.

Port Type

Every port that is defined to MSM has a type associated with it. MSM-UNIX port types include MSM (i.e., dedicated to MSM and can not be used for login), UNIX (i.e., shared by MSM and UNIX), Parallel (i.e., for parallel printers), and LAT (i.e., for LAT terminal devices). The Port Type that is selected depends upon the type of device to be accessed and its intended use.

Terminals that will be used to login to MSM-UNIX are generally defined as UNIX Shared Devices. When a device is defined in this manner, the user must first login to UNIX. Then, the msm command is entered to actually login to MSM-UNIX. The MSM-UNIX login can be avoided by using the tied terminal facility. Note that UNIX Shared Devices cannot be OPENed from a user partition (i.e., they behave as if they are always in use, even when they are not in use by MSM).

Printer type devices can be defined as either MSM Dedicated Devices or Parallel Devices. In either case, the device is locked by MSM when it is in use (i.e., it has been OPENed), and released back to UNIX when it is CLOSEd. MSM Dedicated Devices must be disabled for UNIX login (i.e., there can be no getty assigned to the port). If it is necessary for a printer device to be shared by MSM-UNIX with other applications on the machine, it is more appropriate to use the Host System Spool Device in MSM. Refer to Chapter 3 (Using Peripheral Devices) in the MSM User’s Guide for more information on printing through the UNIX Print Spooler.

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3-23

Modems and other types of serial communications devices can be defined as login devices or non-login devices. If login is to be allowed from the device, it must be defined as a UNIX Shared Device, and must be enabled for login in UNIX (i.e., a getty must be present for the device). Otherwise, it must be defined as an MSM Dedicated Device, and must be disabled for login in UNIX (i.e., no getty).

When the optional MSM-LAT product is installed with MSM-UNIX, a device type of LAT Port may also be specified. The device type allows applications to create Host Initiated Connects (HIC connects) for terminals, printers, or modems attached to the system through LAT terminal servers. Refer to Chapter 11 (MSM-LAT Services) in this manual for additional information on LAT devices.

Port Address

Every communications port that is attached to the system has a unique device name assigned to it by UNIX. A device name (or device node as it is sometimes referred to in UNIX) is used to identify the information whichdescribes thephysical address and characteristicsof the associated device. In MSM-UNIX, the Port Address is actually the UNIX device name (except for LAT ports when running in an Ultrix system, see below). The port address typically is in the format of /dev/ttynnn, where nnn is a decimal or hexadecimal number.

Some UNIX systems do not follow the normal naming conventions for identifying terminal ports. However, all UNIX system device names do begin with the /dev/ prefix. It is highly recommended that the UNIX console device (e.g., /dev/console) be assigned a device number of 1 in MSM-UNIX. This is important since MSM system error messages will typically be sent to this device. Refer to the UNIX documentation supplied with the system for additional information on terminal device names.

The port address can have special meaning when using LAT under the Ultrix operating system. When MSM-UNIX is installed under Ultrix, no support for LAT is actually implemented in MSM. Rather, MSM is able to access LAT ports through the DEC LAT services already available in Ultrix (assuming LAT is installed). In order for MSM to return a fixed value for the $IO special variable for LAT ports, MSM must know the LAT port name. Therefore, MSM allows the LAT port name to be entered as the device address. The LAT port name is entered in the form, Port_number@Servername.

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Generating The System

Tied Terminal Index

This option allows terminals to be automatically connected to specific application routines. An index in the tied terminal table indicating the name, location, and partition size of the application must have been previously defined. If no index is specified, the standard logon routine (i.e., %LOGON) supplied with the system is invoked. This option is ignored for single-user MSM systems.

Translate Name

The Translate Name is an entry in the Device Translation Tables which specifies input and output tables for translating 8-bit ASCII characters from different non-US character sets to a common set of characters.

Terminal Line Width

This option specifies the maximum number of characters that can be displayed on a single line by the terminal. If the next character to be displayed would force the $X Special Variable to exceed this number, the system automatically inserts a carriage return and a line feed character, and the character is displayed on the next line. Line sizes may range from 0 to 255 characters.

A value of 0 or 256 inhibits the automatic insertion of a carriage return and line feed sequence. The value of this option can be changed through the OPEN or USE commands. Note that when escape sequences are being used to control a device, the line width should be set to zero (0) so that a carriage return/line feed sequence is not inserted into the escape sequence.

Echo

This option controls whether or not MSM echoes characters back to the terminal as they are received. If automatic echo is desired, enter YES, otherwise enter NO. The value of this option can be changed through the OPEN or USE commands.

Note that unless ECHO is turned off in SYSGEN, it is turned on immediately prior to each system prompt (i.e., the ’>’ programmer prompt). Refer to Chapter 3 (Using Peripheral Devices) in the MSM User’s Guide for additional information.

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3-25

Escape

This option controls how MSM is to interpret an ASCII Escape character when it is received. If escape processing is OFF, then the system treats the escape character just as if a carriage return had been entered, as long as Escape has not been explicitly removed from being a read terminator.

If escape processing is ON, then the system reads one or more additional characters from the terminal and then terminates the READ operation. The value of this option can be changed through the OPEN or USE commands. Refer to Chapter 3 (Using Peripheral Devices) in the MSM User’s Guide for additional information.

8-Bit Mode

This option controls how MSM treats ASCII characters received from the terminal. If 8-bit mode is OFF, the system treats all input characters as 7-bit ASCII and forces the high-order bit to zero. If 8-bit mode is ON, the system accepts full 8-bit ASCII characters. Note that if the port is set to receive only 7-bit data (see Data, Parity, and Stop Bits below), then 8-bit characters can not be received even if this option is on.

Care should be taken when using 8-bit mode since characters with an ASCIIvalue greater than 127are outside of the MUMPS ANSI Standard. If they are used as input to MUMPS commands and functions, they may produce unexpected results. This value can be changed through the OPEN or USE commands. Refer to Chapter 3 (Using Peripheral Devices) in the MSM User’s Guide for additional information.

Pass All

This option controls how MSM treats control characters received from the terminal. If pass all mode is OFF, then the system interprets each control character according to the meaning assigned to it by MSM. If the pass all mode is ON, then no interpretation of control characters, other than the read terminator (i.e., carriage return) is performed.

One can also disable the read terminator by using device-specific options of the USE command, thus treating the carriage return as data. Refer to Chapter 2 (Using The MSM System) in the MSM User’s Guide for additional information on the control characters that have been defined for MSM. The value of this option can be changed through the OPEN and USE commands. Refer to Chapter 4 (Using Peripheral Devices) in the MSM User’s Guide for additional information.

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Generating The System

Line Feed Suppression

This option controls what output MSM generates when it encounters an exclamation point (!) as a format control in a READ or WRITE command. If line feed suppression is OFF, the system generates a carriage return and line feed sequence. If line feed suppression is ON, the system generates a carriage return only.

This feature is used with devices that generate their own carriage return uponline feed detection. The valueof this option can be changed through

the OPEN or USE commands.

Devices) in the MSM User’s Guide for additional information.

Refer to Chapter 3 (Using Peripheral

Modem Control

This option defines how MSM handles modem devices. If this option is OFF, then the port is handled just like a terminal device. In this case, the DTR signal is ignored by MSM, even though it may be required by the hardware. If it is required by the hardware, the signal must be supplied externally.

If the Modem Control option is ON, then bit 9 and bit 11 in Opt5 of the OPEN and USE commands are honored. Refer to Chapter 3 (Using Peripheral Devices) in the MSM User’s Guide for additional information on modem control. Note that this option can not be changed through the OPEN and USE command parameters.

Uppercase Setup

This option is used to control how MSM will handle lower-case characters found in a string that is input from a terminal. If upper-case setup is OFF, the system accepts the lower-case characters without change. If upper-case setup is ON, the system converts the characters to upper-case when they are received from the terminal. The value of this option can be changed through the OPEN or USE commands. Refer to Chapter 3 (Using Peripheral Devices) in the MSM User’s Guide for additional information.

Output Only Mode

This option controls what MSM does if a READ is directed to the terminal. If output only mode is OFF, normal READs are allowed from the terminal. If the output only mode is ON, then a READ command directed to the terminal generates a <MODER> error.

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Login Prohibited

This option is used to indicate to the system whether or not the terminal device being defined is allowed to logon to the system. If this option is ON, the terminal is not allowed to logon to MSM. If this option is OFF, the terminal is allowed to logon to MSM. The value of this option can not be changed through the OPEN and USE commands. Refer to Chapter 3 (Using Peripheral Devices) in the MSM User’s Guide for additional information.

CRT Mode

This option is used to indicate to the system whether or not the terminal being defined is a CRT type device. If this option is ON, the device is known to be a CRT. If this option is OFF, the type of the device is not known by the system. The value of this option can be changed through the OPEN and USE commands. Refer to Chapter 3 (Using Peripheral Devices) in the MSM User’s Guide for additional information.

Data, Parity, And Stop Bits

This option is used to specify the Data bit, Parity, and Stop bit configuration that has been set up for the device. The system supports 7 or 8 data bits, even or odd parity, and 0, 1, or 2 stop bits. Any of the possible combinations of Data bits, Parity bits, and Stop bits can be specified. Refer to the hardware reference manuals supplied with the adapter boards or terminal device for information on the options that are available. The value of this option can be changed through the OPEN and USE commands. Refer to Chapter 3 (Using Peripheral Devices) in the MSM User’s Guide for additional information.

Baud Rate

This option specifies the speed the terminal uses to transmit and receive information. Baud rates may range from 110 up to 38400, but baud rates above 9600 are not necessarily supported by all serial devices. Refer to the hardware reference manuals supplied with the system for additional information on available baud rates. The value of this option can be changed through the OPEN and USE commands. Refer to Chapter 3 (Using Peripheral Devices) in the MSM User’s Guide for additional information.

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Select Option: 9 - Port (Terminal) Definition

Terminal Configuration:

Port

Port

Port

Tied

Line

Initial

Initial

Number Type

Addr

Status

------ ----

-----

Index Width Parms ----- ----- ------

-------

1

UNIX

/dev/console

80

/Echo/CRT

3

PARALLEL /dev/tty2

 

132

Parallel

/OutDev

4

MSM

/dev/tty6

80

1200,8B+1S

/CRT

Select Port Number: 5

Port Type:

1 - MSM - MSM Dedicated Device

2 - UNIX - UNIX Shared Device

3 - Parallel Printer Port

Select Option: 1 - MSM Dedicated Device

Port Address: ?

Enter the address of the serial port (1 through 8 where 1=COM1, etc.) that will be defined on Port #5

Port Address: /dev/tty7

Tied Terminal Index <>:

RET
RET

Translate Name <>: ?

Enter the translate name which defines special translation tables to be used for this device. If no table is defined, the standard system tables will be used (no translation will be done for ASCII devices). Enter ’-’ to remove the current translate name. Enter ’^L’ for a list of currently defined translate names.

Translate Name <>: ^L

Table Name Input Output Description

---------- ----- ------ -----------

VT220

3

4

Translate Table for VT220 crts

CONSOLE

1

2

Translate Table for System Console

Translate Name <>: VT220

Terminal Line Width <80>: ?

Specify the maximum number of characters to be displayed per line of output after which MSM will output a Carriage Return and a Line Feed to automatically wrap lines around.

Terminal Line Width <80>: 132

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Select Echo Option:

1 - ON

2 - OFF

Select Option <ON>: 2 - OFF

Escape Processing Mode:

1 - OFF

2 - ON

Select Option <OFF>:

RET
RET

OFF

8-bit Mode:

1 - OFF

2 - ON

Select Option <OFF>:

RET
RET

OFF

Pass All Mode:

1 - OFF