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Add-ons

Constructions

Updated 1 April 2016

© 2016 Airline Tariff Publishing Company. All rights reserved.


Add-ons

Table of Contents
Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 3
Mission.......................................................................................................................... 5
Glossary........................................................................................................................ 6
Add-ons: What are they? Where are they? .................................................................. 8
Summary .................................................................................................................... 12
Amending Add-on Records ............................................................................................... 13
Mission........................................................................................................................ 15
Components of an add-on .......................................................................................... 16
Creating an add-ons batch ......................................................................................... 17
Summary .................................................................................................................... 20
Defining Add-on Combinability .......................................................................................... 21
Mission........................................................................................................................ 23
Viewing construction data from the published fare class ........................................... 24
Fare Class Construction Data .................................................................................... 25
Fare Class Summary versus Construction Data pop-up windows ............................. 34
Viewing construction data from the add-on fare class................................................ 35
Summary .................................................................................................................... 39
Zones ................................................................................................................................ 41
Mission........................................................................................................................ 43
Zones defined ............................................................................................................. 44
Where to find zones coded online .............................................................................. 45
Instructing zone definitions ......................................................................................... 47
Summary .................................................................................................................... 48
Add-on Footnotes.............................................................................................................. 49
Mission........................................................................................................................ 51
Directional footnotes ................................................................................................... 52
Summary .................................................................................................................... 55
Constructing Fares ............................................................................................................ 57
Mission........................................................................................................................ 59
The ATPCO Construction Pricing Hierarchy .............................................................. 60
Where is the published fare “looking”? ....................................................................... 62
Using area of applicability........................................................................................... 64
Summary .................................................................................................................... 65
Researching Constructed Fares ....................................................................................... 67
Mission........................................................................................................................ 69
Constructed fares tariffs ............................................................................................. 70
Viewing the Constructed Fares Display ..................................................................... 71
Summary .................................................................................................................... 73
Appendix A: Tariffs Listing ................................................................................................ 75

i
Introduction
Introduction

Mission
After completing this module, you will be able to identify add-on terminology and identify
how add-ons are used to form constructed fares.

Why is this module important?


This module is important because it provides the standard or common language used
when communicating constructed fares issues.
Add-ons present an entirely different vocabulary than the standard language used when
discussing published fares.
To help clarify discussions involving add-ons, it is important to establish a clear basis of
similar understanding to aid further communication regarding add-ons.

Learning objectives
After completing this module, participants will be able to do the following:
1. Use the standard language when discussing constructed fares
2. Identify the steps for looking at add-on fares in the Fares system.

5
Introduction

Glossary
Add-on An amount published for use only in combination with a
published fare. In international tariffs, reflects an amount
for use between two domestic-like points with the
purpose of reaching an international gateway.
Add-on Tariff Tariff under which add-on records are held. Each
published international tariff has at least one associated
add-on tariff.
Constructed Fare (also Through Fare, Unpublished Fare, or Construction)
The add-on and published fare when combined.
Fare Class Specific Add-on Add-on record whose fare class is the same as a
Published Fare record. Both types of records are held in
the International System and are referenced using the
appropriate tariff.
Gateway First city listed in an add-on market pair. Must be one
point of the published fare record. Sideline cities are the
other point of an add-on market pair and are always
listed second.
Generic Add-on Fare Class (also 5-star bucket or 5 splat) A collection of Published
Fare Classes all combinable with a single add-on
amount as designated in the Construction Data screen.
Displayed as X***** (x being any letter).
Published Fare An amount published for use in pricing air transportation
from one city to another. Published fare quote in pricing
systems.
Six-Asterisk or Six-Star Amount (also Negative Bucket or Default Bucket)
An amount combinable with all Published Fare Classes
in a carrier’s database other than those belonging to this
bucket. When there is an instruction not to allow a
Published Fare to construct with this amount, ATPCO
adds the Fare Class to the Six-Asterisk Bucket.
Zone Designator used to define the geographical fares an
add-on can combine. The zone does not define what
area of the world the add-on exists in, but instead
defines at which area of the world the published record
must “end” in order for that add-on amount to be used.

6
Introduction

2-component and 3-component constructions (also 2-part and 3-part constructions)


A published fare and one add-on is a 2-component
construction. An add-on, a published fare, and another
add-on is a 3-component add-on. Example:
Add-on + Published Fare = 2-Component Construction.
Add-on + Published Fare + Add-on = 3-Component
Construction.

Note: There are two important facts to keep in mind when discussing add-ons and
constructions with an ATPCO representative.
First, ATPCO Constructions follow many of the same rules as IATA constructed
fares but are not the same. Most of the IATA terminology not shown in the
glossary above is not used at ATPCO.
Second, Unpublished Fare at ATPCO means Constructed Fares. Some carriers
use the term Unpublished Fare to refer to Private fares. This has the potential to
cause miscommunication between ATPCO and our customers.

7
Introduction

Add-ons: What are they? Where are


they?

What is an add-on?
An add-on is an amount published between two points in a similar domestic area used to
reach an international gateway point.
A carrier might use an add-on to increase travel from internal domestic points without
having to establish a published fare from that market.
Whereas a domestic tariff published fare would require the fare be quotable, an add-on
does not have this requirement.
An add-on cannot be purchased by a consumer because it stands alone. It must be
combined with a published fare in order to be used in priceable travel.
The following example will be built upon throughout this manual. This first illustration is a
simple model of fare class–specific add-ons and their published fare counterparts. What
would the fare amount from RIC to ABZ be for each fare, HPX and HSX?

AUSA TAFP AUSA TAFU


NYC—RIC NYC—LON LON—ABZ RIC—ABZ
HPX +50.00 HPX 1500.00 HPX +50.00 HPX 1600.00
HSX 0.00 HSX 1400.00 HSX 0.00 HSX 1400.00

Fare Class: HPX


Published fare NYC—LON 1500.00
Add-on NYC—RIC 50.00
Add-on LON—ABZ 50.00
Unpublished fare RIC—ABZ 1600.00

Fare Class: HSX


Published fare NYC—LON 1400.00
Add-on NYC—RIC 0.00
Add-on LON—ABZ 0.00
Unpublished fare RIC—ABZ 1400.00

8
Introduction

Where are add-ons?


Just as with published fares, you have the ability to Query add-on markets, Create New
Batches or Search/Action Batches, Enter Transactions or Modify Selection Results, and
perform other similar functions.
When Querying add-on markets, it is important to know what is required to display and
the add-ons you wish to see.
Step 1. Click the Fares link on the FareManager Home page.
Step 2. From Query, you should select Scope: Add-on, Source: Master and then click
on the button Next
Step 3. Enter the Carrier, Tariff, City Pair in the Inclusion Criteria Set and then click the
button.

Figure 1

9
Introduction

In the Add-on Display screen represented in Figure 2, we see the three different formats
in which add-on records can be filed. The first two are a Fare Class–Specific Add-on
format. The next eight are Generic Fare Class Add-ons. The last one displayed is the Six-
Asterisk Amount.

Figure 2

Just as with published fares, you must enter the carrier, tariff, and markets to view add-
ons. In order to determine your Add-on tariff, you must answer two questions:
1. What is my published fares tariff?
2. What are the add-on markets I am researching?

After answering both questions, you can then create a chart similar to the one below to
determine your Add-on Tariff:

Published Tariff Markets Resulting Add-on Tariff


TAFP Area 1 AUSA
Area 2/3 AUSA
WHFP US/CA (Area 1) WUSA
Non US/CA (Area 1) WUSA
TPFP Area 1 PUSA
Area 2/3 PUSA
SAAR2 Area 1 WARBSAT
Area 2/3 AARBSAT
EUROP Area 2 AARBS

Note: This is an example of a chart you can create yourself using the tariffs in which
you publish fares. For more tariffs, see Appendix H – Tariff Reference of the
Rules Subscription document.

10
Introduction

One important and useful fact to keep in mind: Think of add-ons as essentially domestic
fares that cannot be purchased as standalone fares. We can always reference them by
Orig-Ctry/Dest-Ctry with the same country code if we are not sure of the exact markets
we want to view. Note that add-ons can also be international.

11
Introduction

Summary
It is important to have a clear understanding of add-on and constructed fare terminology
so that you can communicate effectively and efficiently with ATPCO analysts.
ATPCO Constructions are not the same as IATA Constructions.
An add-on is an amount published between two points in a similar domestic area used to
reach an international gateway point.
Add-ons will not quote in pricing systems as a standalone.
Add-on fare classes can be filed in three formats: Specific, Generic, and Six Asterisk.
Add-on data can be found in the Fares system and referenced when viewing fares.

12
Amending Add-on Records
Identify the Components of an Add-on
Amending Add-on Records

Mission
After completing this module, you will be able to identify the components of an add-on
record and manage their add-on database.

Why is this module important?


This module is important because it provides participants with the necessary tools to
change their add-on databases. The module will provide you the knowledge to create
new add-ons, increase and reduce add-ons, change footnotes and routings of existing
add-ons, and cancel add-ons.

Learning objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to do the following.
1. Identify the components of an add-on
2. Identify the steps to create an add-on batch

15
Amending Add-on Records

Components of an add-on
Add-ons, like published fares, are made up of various parts or components.
Just as with published fares, one of the best places to find a clear display of these
components is to look at the Add-on display in Selection Results

Column
Headings

Figure 3

The Add-on Display: Basic screen illustrates the components of an add-on record. The
next two pages will allow you to actively follow along as your instructor gives a tour of the
add-on record.

16
Amending Add-on Records

Creating an add-ons batch


Batch work in International for add-ons is generally the same as batch work for published
fares. However, a few differences make coding add-ons unique.
Step 1. Click the Batches tab. The Batches tab can be found on the upper toolbar.
The next screen that appears is the Search/Action Batches screen, as shown
in Figure 4. (In this example, Step 1 has already been completed.)
Step 2. Click the Create New Batch button.

Click Create New


Batch

Figure 4

Step 3. Enter Create New Batch header information. Type Batch header information as
follows:
• Select Scope (default) = Add-on
• Batch ID = your alpha-numeric
• Carrier = carrier code
• Tariff = arbitrary tariff
• Effective Date (pre-filled) = tomorrow’s date
• Comments = (optional)
• Work Unit = (optional)

17
Amending Add-on Records

Figure 5

As soon as we select Add-on as Transaction type and enter the Add-on Tariff
in the Batch Header Maintenance screen, the batch will instantly be formatted
to accept add-on data. The batch will now contain fields that reflect
components of an add-on, as opposed to components of a published fare.

18
Amending Add-on Records

Step 4. When all required fields are filled, click. Create Batch. A Blank screen will
appear, as shown in Figure 6.

Figure 6

Step 5. Enter add-ons on the data grid. Type Action Code N for new and the
components, or you may use the Get Fares tool by clicking the icon.
The action codes in an add-on batch are the same as actions in a published
fare batch.

Step 6. Click . The system will check the components of the fare to make
sure they are valid in the system.
Step 7. Review Action Request.

Step 8. Click
The next screen that appears is the Status Dashboard. The batch appears on
row 1 with the process name and status Executing.

You should never attempt to publish data that has yet to be validated. If you are using a
new Generic or are using a Six-Asterisk fare class for the first time you must provide the
definition of those fare classes.
Last, remember that you are creating batches. Gateways and Zones can only be
validated by ATPCO. You need to send an instruction to redefine or create zone. These
changes will never become part of your ATPCO database unless you apply the
transactions to the database and then distribute them (by releasing the associated work
units).

19
Amending Add-on Records

Summary
Add-ons comprise eleven components: Bidirectional Markets, Fare Class, OW/RT
Indicator, Amount, Currency Code, Footnote, Routing, Zone, Effective Date, Discontinue
Date, and GFS Date and Number.
Batches will be formatted to accept add-on data when you select Add-on as Transaction
type and enter Add-on Tariff in the batch header.
The actions for add-on batches are the same as they are for published fares batches.
Fare class Specific (type) add-ons that are not validated will cause an Edit error. The fare
class must be validated in the Rules system as a published fare class.

20
Defining Add-on
Combinability
Fare Class Construction Data
Defining Add-on Combinability

Mission
After completing this module, you will understand two different methods of viewing
construction data—the Construction Data screen and the chart format.

Why is this module important?


This module is important because it provides a means to view construction data in two
ways:
1. From the published fare class
2. From the add-on fare class
Using both of these methods will assist you in researching the most critical aspects of
constructed fares.

Learning objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to do the following.
1. Identify the steps to view construction data from the published fare class
2. Identify the steps to view construction data from the add-on fare class

23
Defining Add-on Combinability

Viewing construction data from the


published fare class
When you validate a fare class, you save it in a rule in the Rules system.
Essentially you are placing the published fare’s fare class code in a rule number’s Fare
Class Application record. Fare Class Application defines the relationship between a fare
and its most critical definitive element—the rule.
Simply put, the Fare Class Application attaches the rule to the fare.

International Rules System

Unvalidated fare class in fares Fare Class Application Screen for a rule
batch. number.

Enter fare class information.


Rule attaches to fare, fare class is
validated.

Figure 7

Fare Class Application also allows us to define the add-on fare class or classes with
which a published fare will construct.

24
Defining Add-on Combinability

Fare Class Construction Data


The Fare Class Construction Data controls what add-on fare classes construct with any
given published fare classes.
In the Fare Class Application, there are two ways to view the construction data:
• Construction Data pop-up window
• Fare Class Summary pop-up window
To get to the Fare Class application, you need to access the Rules system first. You can
do so by clicking the link on the Fare Manger home page. The Rules Home
screen will appear.

Figure 8 Rules System Home page

25
Defining Add-on Combinability

Accessing Fare Class Application


In the Find or Create tab, choose Fare Class and then enter the Carrier, Tariff, and Rule

number. Click .

Figure 9 Rules home page: Navigation pane

The Fare Class List screen appears.

Figure 10 Fare Class List screen

26
Defining Add-on Combinability

Accessing the Constructions Data Field


To access the Construction Data pop-up window, right-click a fare class on the Fare
Class List. Select View Construction Data from the right-click menu.

Figure 11 Right-click View Construction data

The Construction Data pop-up window appears.

Figure 12 Construction data pop-up window

27
Defining Add-on Combinability

Construction Data Fields


Identification fields

The ID fields tell you what fare class you are viewing. In this case we are viewing an
01/IPRA DHWAP3 fare class.

Constructions fields
The next section of fields is a very important section of this window. This section reflects
the fare class’s construction data. These fields are divided into at least two parts:


Populate the Constructs with ****** Add-on Field if the fare class can combine with
the ****** add-ons. This is the default value.


This section allows you to identify the Add-on Bucket, and can be coded with the
letter of the Generic Add-on Fare Class with which this published fare combines.
Coding this field is optional.
A second division takes place when the tariff represents travel across two distinct regions
of the world. In our example in Figure 12, we see the division taking place for Area 1 and
Areas 2/3. This makes sense because the tariff in this case is IPRA (TAFP), which
crosses the Atlantic to/from the US.


This field describes whether the fare class is Subject to Neutral Unit of Currency
conversion.
• When this field is populated, it signals the database to run the necessary
conversions to allow a constructed fare to price in one currency. This is the
default value.
• When this field is blank, all fares and add-ons are required to have the same
Currency for a construction to work.


This field indicates if a one-way fare class can be doubled to form Round Trip
travel. You can only update this field when the fare class is validated as one-way.
• When this field is populated, the one-way fares can combine to form Round
Trip travel (Tag 1). This is the default value.
• When this field is blank, the fares cannot be doubled to form round trip travel.
(Tag 3)

28
Defining Add-on Combinability

Accessing the Fare Class Summary pop-up window

To access the Fare Class Summary pop-up window, click and select View
Fare Class Summary from the drop-down menu.

Figure 13 Actions drop-down: View Fare Class Summary

The Fare Class Summary pop-up window appears.

Figure 14 Fare Class Summary pop-up window

The Fare Class Summary pop-up window allows you to quickly update construction data
for all Fare Classes in the rule on one screen and without a batch.
The Fare Class Summary displays a summary list of all saved Fare Classes in the rule
and allows you to update the following construction data:
• Add-on combinability; defining whether the fare class may construct with the six-
star and five-star buckets
• Whether a one-way fare may double to form round-trip combinations
• NUC
It is important to note that only the construction data fields are updatable; all other data is
for viewing only. Furthermore, if unsaved changes exist on the Fare Class list, the entire
Fare Class Summary window becomes read-only.

29
Defining Add-on Combinability

Note: The Fare Class Summary window is different from the Construction Data pop-up
window accessible from the Fare Class grid or Fare Class Details Actions drop-
down menu. Both allow you to amend construction data, but the Fare Class
Summary window shows all fare classes, while the Construction Data pop-up
window applies only to one fare class.

Updating the Fare Class Summary pop-up window


The Fare Class Summary pop-up window displays a summary list of all saved fare
classes in the rule, along with important construction information. The only updateable
elements are
• Add-on combinability, defining whether the fare class may construct with the six-
star and five-star buckets
• OW to double, indicating whether a one-way fare may double to form round-trip
combinations
• NUC
All other fields in the pop-up window are read-only.

Once you have made all the necessary updates, click either the or
button. The system will apply the changes and automatically update the
necessary directories. Additionally, a message appears indicating the update was
successful and the changes will be sent in the next Subscriptions transmission.

Figure 15

Finally, it is important to note that if unsaved changes exist on the Fare Class List, the
entire Fare Class Summary pop-up window becomes read-only. Therefore, you can
access it only for inquiry purposes.

30
Defining Add-on Combinability

Copy/Paste All Columns


A feature of the Fare Class summary is that you can quickly update construction data for
all fare classes in the rule using the Copy/Paste All Columns feature. For example, you
would like to change your construction data to reflect combination with the Y***** add-ons
within Area 1.
Step 1. Access the Fare Class Summary window.

Step 2. Double-click the cell in Row 1 for the column. Type the letter Y.
Step 3. Right-click the cell where the change just occurred. Select Copy.

Figure 16 Cell level copy

Step 4. Right-click the same cell and select Paste Entire Column

Figure 17 Cell level right-click: Paste Entire Column

31
Defining Add-on Combinability

The system pastes the value to the entire column.

Figure 18 Paste Entire Column

Filter Fare Class Summary


The Fare Class Summary pop-up window allows you to filter data in order to find and
modify data in an easier fashion. Rules can contain thousands of fare classes; filtering
the data is the quickest way to ensure proper construction is met.

Figure 19

Allows you to determine where the list of fare classes on the Summary pop-up window
should start. This will cause the display to start on the requested fare class and it will
show only fare classes that come alphabetically after that one.

Allows you to filter the data by a specific fare class or fare family.

32
Defining Add-on Combinability

Allows you to filter the data by One Way or Round Trip indicator (based on what is coded
in the OW/RT column).

Allows you to filter the data based on whether the OW to Double checkbox is checked or
not (unchecked).

Note: Round Trip fare classes will display if Unchecked is selected and OW/RT filter is
not coded to filter by One Way fare classes only.

Allows you to filter by the ****** (6-star) checkbox and the Letter ***** field.
If the Exact Match checkbox is selected, the system must match the 6-star and letter 5-
star fields exactly in either the Add-on 1 or Add-on 2 fields.
If the Exact Match checkbox is not selected, the system can match the coding in any of
the four add-on fields. The match may be found in Add-on 1 for the 6-star and Add-on 2
for the letter 5-star (or, vice versa).

33
Defining Add-on Combinability

Fare Class Summary versus


Construction Data pop-up windows
Fare Class Summary pop-up window is different from the Construction Data pop-up
window. The Construction Data pop-up window shows construction data for the selected
fare classes. The chart below compares the two.

Summary pop-up window Construction Data pop–up window


Display construction data for the selected
Displays construction data for all save fare classes
fare class

Is accessible via Fare Class List and Fare


Is accessible via the Fare Class List
Class Details
Does not display the user ID that last updated the Displays the user ID that last updated the
construction data construction data

34
Defining Add-on Combinability

Viewing construction data from the


add-on fare class
Now you know how to view add-on data when you know the published fare class and
rule.
But you also need to know how to research all the published fares that have the ability to
construct with an add-on amount.
In order to view data in this way you must first view an add-on market to find an add-on
fare class in the International system.
Step 1. Click the Fares link on the FM Home page.
Step 2. From Query, you should select Scope: Add-on, Source: Master and then click
on the button Next
Step 3. Enter the Carrier, Tariff, City Pair in the Inclusion Criteria Set and then click the
Submit Inquiry button.

Figure 20

35
Defining Add-on Combinability

If the query completes in less than 3 seconds, the Add-on Selection Results
screen will appear
Step 4. Click a row on the grid then click View Details, select Fare Class Text. This will
give you a list of published fare classes with which your add-on will construct.

Figure 21

The definition for a specified or generic add-on will be displayed from GFS text.

Figure 22

Figure 22 is a chart representation of an add-on fare class. It lists the published fares that
will construct with the add-on fare class we are researching.
In this example the Geographic Applicability tells us that the A***** fare class is within
Area 1/2/3, and it will construct with the published fares listed from the GFS Text Display.

36
Defining Add-on Combinability

Chart representation of Six-asterisk add-on fare


class
The Six-asterisk add-on is sometimes referred to as the Negative Bucket because of the
way its chart is defined.
The chart for the Six-asterisk add-on contains only those fare classes that do not
construct with the Six-asterisk amount.
Right-click the row of a ****** fare and then select the View Fare Class Text command to
open the Fare Text Details with construction information in view.

Figure 23

37
Defining Add-on Combinability

Figure 24

One way to avoid being confused is to think of the Six-asterisk amount as the default
amount. You should assume that published fare classes in your database will construct
with the Six-asterisk amount, except the fare classes that are listed when you click on the
six asterisks (******).
In Figure 24, the Geographic Applicability tells us that the ****** is within Area 1/2/3, and
it will not construct with the published fares listed from the GFS Text Display.

38
Defining Add-on Combinability

Summary
There are two ways to view add-on related data: from the published fare class and from
the add-on fare class.
In order to view add-on data from the published fare class you must go to the Rules
system, Fare Class Application.
The Six-asterisk (******) will be coded with a ‘Yes’ if they allow constructions, a ‘No’ if they
do not. The section will be coded with the letter of the add-on with which
amount they construct.
You can view add-on data from the add-on fare class by clicking on the fare class in the
International Fares system.
Data is displayed by what is “contained” within the add-on bucket.

Data contained within a are published fare classes that will combine with that
add-on. Data in the ****** are published fare classes that will not combine with the ******
amount.

39
Zones
Understanding, Researching, and Instructing
Zone Changes
Zones

Mission
After completing this module, you will understand what a zone is and how its coded
information affects add-on constructions. You will also learn how to identify their zones
online and the best methods for instructing changes to their zones.

Why is this module important?


This module is important because zones are a critical component of add-ons. Without
knowledge of what zones are and what they do, managing an add-on database would be
difficult.

Learning objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to do the following:
1. Recognize the relation between the Tariff’s Origin/Destination and the zone
definition.
2. Identify the steps for instructing a zone definition.

43
Zones

Zones defined
When we discuss add-ons, a zone refers to the area of applicability placed on an add-on.
This is not to be confused with an IATA zone, which is defined by IATA and is consistent
across all carriers in the industry.
Add-on zones are carrier-specific. You define your own zones and attach them to your
own add-ons. A zone restricts an add-on by defining where the “other side” of the
construction must take place.
In other words, when we are on the Origin side of our tariff, the zone restricts the
Destination. When we are on the Destination side of our tariff, the zone restricts the
Origin. The graphic below illustrates this point:

AUSA AUSA
Area 1 Area 2/3

TAFP
Add-ons on this “side” will have Add-ons on this “side” will have
zones that describe Area 2/3 zones that describe US points.
points.

Figure 25

Typical examples of Area 1 zones would be defined as “Anywhere in Europe, Spain, or


Amsterdam.”
Typical Area 2/3 add-on zones might be defined as “Anywhere in the United States, or
Miami.”

44
Zones

Where to find zones coded online


The tools ATPCO uses for updating zones are not yet available for use by customers.
One way to look up zone definitions is to select Add-on Zone Text from Fare Details.
In order to view zone definitions from a fare, you must first submit a Query including the
add-on market in the Fares system.
From the Add-on Selection Results, click a row on the grid, then click View Details and
select Add-on Zone Text.

Figure 26

Note the tariff and markets. Our tariff is AUSA, its associated with fares tariff TAFP. Our
markets are MAN—EDI. This is the Area 2/3 side of AUSA. You can then assume that
the Zone Number 010 must at its broadest be defined as “Anywhere in Area 1,” and is
probably defined as “Any point in the United States.”

45
Zones

Right-click the row of a fare and then select the View Add-on Zone Text command to
open the Fare Text Detail pop-up window with the Add-on Zone Text tab open.

Figure 27

46
Zones

Instructing zone definitions


The most important part of defining zones is that you indicate the appropriate geographic
information for each zone.
Remember, a zone is defined by the points on the other side of the associated published
tariff.
Another critical aspect of zone instructing is that if the zone appears in the system in text,
your ATPCO analyst will likely know how to get it in that format.
The format for instructing zones is shown in Figure 28:

ZONE DEFINITION

-----------------------------------------------------------------

263 ANY POINT IN EUROPE EXCEPT NORWAY/SWEDEN/LON.

Positive Statement Negative Statement

Figure 28

Generally, the instruction should indicate to ATPCO the zone number you are updating,
the positive part of the definition and the negative part of the definition (if one exists).
If you instruct using a similar format to the text you see when you display Text from a
Fare, your analyst will know how to code to match your intent.

47
Zones

Summary
A zone restricts an add-on by where the “other side” of the construction must take place.
There are two ways for customers to view zone definitions, Text from a Fare (Add-on
Display: Basic screen) and Text Menu. All instructions containing a zone update should
indicate the zone number being updated, the positive part of the definition, and the
negative part of the definition (if one exists).

48
Add-on Footnotes
How Footnotes Apply to Add-ons
Add-on Footnotes

Mission
After completing this module, you will be able to identify the use of directional footnotes
and how their coded information affects add-on constructions.

Why is this module important?


This module provides knowledge that will assist you in tailoring your add-on database to
accurately reflect the intent of your pricing system, and offers greater flexibility in
arranging competitive pricing schemes.

Learning objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to do the following:
1. Identify the definition of Footnote F
2. Identify the definition of Footnote T
3. Use footnotes to define add-on directionality

51
Add-on Footnotes

Directional footnotes
Add-ons are bidirectional.
The first city of an add-on market is always the Gateway.
What if you want add-ons that price at different amounts or that have different restrictions
depending on direction of travel?
Footnotes F and T provide directionality and allow for that flexibility. The definitions of
add-on footnotes F and T are fixed and therefore have the same application to all
carriers.
Footnote F is defined as the following:
MISCELLANEOUS
UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED

NOTE -
APPLIES ONLY FOR TRANSPORTATION FROM THE FIRST
CITY SHOWN - AND RETURN WHERE SHOWN IN CONNECTION
WITH PUBLISHED ROUND TRIP FARES.

If a fare is a one-way fare and its associated add-on has footnote F attached, then you
must assume that the add-on can only be used to combine when traveling from the
gateway to an internal point.
The opposite is true for the T footnote, defined as applying for travel on the add-on only
to the gateway. Its fixed definition:
MISCELLANEOUS
UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED

NOTE -
APPLIES ONLY FOR TRANSPORTATION TO THE FIRST CITY
SHOWN - AND RETURN WHERE SHOWN IN CONNECTION WITH
PUBLISHED ROUND TRIP FARES.

52
Add-on Footnotes

NYC LON

RIC

The illustration above demonstrates how an add-on with no footnotes might behave.
There are published fares filed from LON to NYC, and from NYC to LON. There are also
add-ons published between NYC and RIC, constructing with both sets of published fares.

NYC LON
F

RIC

Now an F footnote is appended to the add-ons in the NYC—RIC market.


If there is an attempt to create a LON—RIC constructed fare, the construction will
succeed.
If there is an attempt to create a RIC—LON constructed fare, there will be a problem. The
add-ons in this market now only apply from New York to Richmond and have lost their
bidirectionality.

NYC LON
T

RIC

Now a T footnote is appended to the add-ons between NYC and RIC.


This will prevent a fare construction from LON—RIC. They will now only construct with
the directionally RIC—LON.
Round-trip published fares when constructing will allow add-ons with footnotes F and T to
construct with the return to the journey origin. However, the direction of travel must still
take place either to the Gateway and return, or from the Gateway and return.
The use of directional footnotes gives carriers flexibility to make add-on amounts and
restrictions differ based on the direction of travel.

53
Add-on Footnotes

Example
AUSA TAFP AUSA
NYC—MKC (a) NYC—MAD MAD—ACE
(b) MAD—NYC
HPX (a) HPX HPX
Zone 200 1500.00 USD Zone 300
FN = T FN = F
+0.00 USD +5000. ESP
HPX (b) HPX HPX
Zone 200 21500. ESP Zone 300
FN = F FN = T
+150.00 USD +2500. ESP
HSX (a) HSX HSX
Zone 200 1750.00 USD Zone 300
FN = T FN = F
+0.00 USD +5000. ESP
HSX (b) HSX HSX
Zone 200 21750. ESP Zone 300
FN = F FN = T
+200.00 USD +2700. ESP

Zone 200 = Any point in Spain.


Zone 300 = Any point in the USA.
HPX constructed fare MKC—ACE: From MKC To NYC = +0.00 USD
From NYC To MAD = 1500.00 USD
From MAD to ACE = +5000. ESP

54
Add-on Footnotes

Summary
Footnote F and Footnote T are directional footnotes.
Attaching Footnote F makes the add-on apply from the Gateway.
Attaching Footnote T makes the add-on apply to the Gateway.
When constructing with round-trip published fares, add-ons with F and T footnotes will
allow the return trip.

55
Constructing Fares
Methodology for Constructing Unpublished Fares
Constructing Fares

Mission
After completing this module, you will be able to identify the ATPCO Construction Pricing
Hierarchy. You will also learn a procedure for identifying which add-ons will combine with
a published fare.

Why is this module important?


This module is important because it presents the tools to enhance your ability to
determine pricing solutions through the use and analysis of constructed fares.

Learning objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to do the following:
1. Recognize the steps of the ATPCO Construction Pricing Hierarchy process
2. Relate the Zone Check process with the Construction Pricing Hierarchy

59
Constructing Fares

The ATPCO Construction Pricing


Hierarchy
As stated earlier in this workbook, there are three different add-on fare class formats:
Specific, Generic, and Six-Asterisk.
An add-on market could contain all three of these formats that allow construction with the
same published fare!
In order to prevent multiple add-ons from attempting to construct with one published fare,
ATPCO uses a three-step Construction Pricing Hierarchy.
Step 1. A published fare always “looks” to construct with a Specified Add-on first. It
does this until all possible matches are found. Once all matches are found or if
no matches are found, the process continues to Step 2.
Step 2. At the second step the published fare “looks” to construct with Generic Fare
Classes, . It does this until all possible matches are found. Once all
matches are found or if no matches are found, the process continues to Step 3.
Step 3. When it cannot “find” any more Generic Add-ons it can construct with, it “looks”
to see if there is anything preventing it from constructing with the Six-Asterisk,
******. It does this until all possible matches are found, and then stops the
process.
If a published fare does not find an add-on with which it can construct, it will not construct
at all.
This process continues for any given published fare until all possible combinations are
found.

60
Constructing Fares

Here is a graphic representation of the Construction Pricing Hierarchy:

Published Fare

Step 1 Step 2 Step 3


Specified Fare Generic Fare Class Six Asterisk
System looks to match System looks to match System looks to match
Published Fare Class Published Fare with Published Fare with
with Specified Add-on appropriate _***** ****** if possible No Matches

All Matches All Matches All Matches

Constructed Does not


Fares construct

Figure 29

The process always begins with the published fare.


The published fare first attempts to construct with the specified Add-on amount.
Then, it looks for the Generic Fare Classes.
Next, it looks for the Six-Asterisk. At every point in the process, any match is considered
valid for construction purposes.
Finally, if the process finds no matches, the published fare cannot construct.

61
Constructing Fares

Where is the published fare “looking”?


The published fare is first looking in the Construction Data screen to see what type of
add-ons with which it can construct, then it looks in the market for that type.

Figure 30

Here is an example of an Add-on market for 01/AUSA:

Figure 31

Following the Pricing Hierarchy, first the FW7AP published fare is looking to construct
with a FW7AP Specified Add-on. There is none in the market. Next, the Pricing Hierarchy
requires the published fare to look for a Generic Add-on with which it can construct.
We need to determine what Generic Fare Class to use, Area 1 or Area 2/3. Our markets
exist in Area 2, so that is what the system will attempt to construct. In the Construction
Data screen the Area 2 entry for is F, so we will look to construct in our

62
Constructing Fares

market with the F*****. We must also continue looking to see if the ****** will construct.
The ****** Construction Data screen shows the following.

Figure 32

We know that the Six Asterisk will not construct with this published fare.
The add-on the published FW7AP fare can construct with are the F*****add-ons. It will
apply the appropriate F***** amount. It has found a suitable construction.

63
Constructing Fares

Using area of applicability


There are two F***** entries in our market. We know the FW7AP is a round-trip fare
because it does not have the Can This Fare Be Doubled for Round-Trip Journeys? field
in the Construction Data screen. Our FW7AP published fare will construct with the round-
trip F***** add-on amount.
We must also look at the zone to make sure our published fare and “other side” add-ons
can be used to construct with our add-on market at all. This is referred to as the Zone
Check.
If we click Add-on Zone Text, it will display the definition for Zone 010.

Figure 33

If the published FW7AP fare you are researching has one point in the United States other
than LAX/LAS, we can be reasonably certain that the published fare will add GBP
+160.00 when traveling from MAN—EDI. If not, these add-ons are not combinable.
Here is a visual representation of incorporating zones into the Fare Class Combinability
hierarchy:

64
Constructing Fares

Specified Generic Six Asterisk


Matches Matches Matches

Zone Check

Zone No Match: Zone Match:


Do Not Constructions
Construct

Figure 34

Summary
Published fares “look” for add-ons with which they are capable of constructing. They first
look for Specified, then Generic, then Six-Asterisk.
Published fares “look” first at their own Construction Data screens and at then the add-on
market to see if a construction is possible.
The construction process does not stop when one match is found.
Zones, routings, and footnotes can all play a part when determining whether an add-on
can construct with a published fare.

65
Researching Constructed
Fares
Determine the Construction of Published and Add-on
Fares
Researching Constructed Fares

Mission
After completing this module, you will understand how to research online the
constructions that are taking place with their published and add-on components.

Why is this module important?


This module is important because it provides the final tool for performing in-depth
research of add-ons and how they construct with published fares in the ATPCO
database.

Learning objectives
After completing this module, you will be able to do the following:
1. Identify the steps to research constructions as they currently exist in the ATPCO
database
2. Recognize all the components of a constructed fare.

69
Researching Constructed Fares

Constructed fares tariffs


Constructed fares, or unpublished fares, are the combination of an add-on and published
fare.
Just as with add-ons and published fares, constructed fares have their own tariffs. We
research all three using the same ATPCO application, International View Fares mode.
If you know the published fares tariff, you can easily find the constructed fares tariff using
a tariff table like the one in Appendix A of this manual.
Here is an example of a table containing some of the more common tariffs that you can
set up for the tariffs in which you publish fares and add-ons:

TAFP AUSA TAFU


WHFP WUSA WHFU
TPFP PUSA TPFU
EUROP AARBS EUROPU
SAAR2 AARBSAT SAAR2U
WARBSAT

Note: This chart is not comprehensive. For a more accurate account of all constructed
fares tariffs please see Appendix A of this manual. For a complete list of tariffs,
access the Documentation Center from the FareManager Help tool. Go to
Appendix H of the Rules Subscription document.

70
Researching Constructed Fares

Viewing the Constructed Fares Display


You can research Constructed Fares in the ATPCO system from the Fares system,
Step 1. From FareManager Home, you should select Scope: Constructed, Source:
Master and then click on the button Next
Step 2. In your Criteria Set enter Carrier, Constructed fares tariff and city pair.

Step 3. Click button to submit your Query.

Constructed
Fares Tariff

Remember:
You cannot
reference
constructed fares
by Country code

Figure 35

Here we are referencing a constructed tariff from ORL to GVA.

71
Researching Constructed Fares

The Constructed Fare Selection Results display will appear.

Figure 36

The constructed fares display is the end result of the construction process.
The constructed amount is listed at the top of the display. The constructed amount is then
followed by the published fare, then the Area 1 add-on amount, and finally the Area 2/3
add-on amount. There are some important final aspects of the constructed fare to
consider:
• First, notice how the constructed fare “takes” the fare class and rule from the
Published fare. This is very important. The restrictions related to that fare class and
its associated rule now apply against the entire constructed fare.
• It is also important to notice that the OW/RT indicator applies to the entire
constructed fare. The entire constructed fare is round-trip in this case.
• Finally, there is no method to access the applicable text from a fare from this
display. We must look up each individual component of the construction to view the
text of each, such as the footnotes, the zones, or the rule.

72
Researching Constructed Fares

Summary
To research constructed fares, we use the Fares system Submit Inquiry mode
To research Constructed fares you need an origin, a destination city, and the constructed
fares tariff.
The constructed fare display reports the Total Construction, the Published fare, the Origin
Add-on, and the Destination Add-on.
The constructed fare applies the fare class and the rule number from the published fare
that is used to create the construction.

73
Appendix A: Tariffs Listing
Appendix A: Tariffs Listing

INTERNATIONAL TARIFFS: FILED

FARES RULES ADD-ON ROUTING UNPUBLISHED AREA DESCRIPTION


AATCP IPRAI ACAN TARP AATCU AT Transatlantic Canada
CT1 CTR1 N/A CTRG N/A CT Circle Trip
PATCP IPRPI PUSAP TPRG PATCU EH Micronesia - Area 3
RW1 RWR1 N/A RWRG N/A RW Round the world
TAFP IPRA AUSA TARG TAFU AT Transatlantic U.S.
TPFP IPRP PUSA TPRG TPFU PA Transpacific U.S./CA
TPFPJ IPRPJ PUSAJ TPRGJ TPFJU PA Transpacific DOJ fares
WHFP IPRW WUSA WHRG WHFU WH Western Hemisphere - U.S./CA

INTERNATIONAL TARIFFS: ALLFARES

FARES RULES ADD-ON ROUTING UNPUBLISHED AREA DESCRIPTION


AFAS IPRAFAS AARBAAS/PARBAAS AFRG AFASU EH Africa - Area 3
AFRIC IPRAFRIC AARBAF AFRG AFRICU EH Within Africa - International
AFRICD IPRAFRD N/A AFRG N/A EH Within Africa - Domestic
APFARES IPRAP AARBSAP/PARBSAP EURG APFAREU AP Between Ar 2 and Ar 3 via Atl and Pac
CT2 CTR2 N/A CTRG1 N/A CT Circle Trip
EUAF IPREUAF AARBAEU EURG EUAFU EH Europe - Africa
EUAS IPREUAS AARBEAS/PARBEAS EURG EUASU EH Europe - Asia
EUME IPREUME AARBMEU EURG EUMEU EH Europe - Middle East
EUROP IPREURP AARBS EURG EUROPU EH Within Europe - International
EUROPD IPREURD N/A EURG N/A EH Within Europe - Domestic
FEFARES IPRFE AARBSFE/PARBSFE EURG FEFAREU FE Russia/Ukraine - Area 3

77
Appendix A: Tariffs Listing

FARES RULES ADD-ON ROUTING UNPUBLISHED AREA DESCRIPTION


MEAF IPRMEAF AARBMAF MERG MEAFU EH Middle East - Africa
MEAS IPRMEAS ARBMAS/PARBMAS MERG MEASU EH Middle East - Area 3
MIDEA IPRMIDE AARBME MERG N/A EH Within Middle East - International
MIDEAD IPRMIDD N/A MERG N/A EH Within Middle East - Domestic
RW2 RWR2 N/A RWRG1 N/A RW Round the World fares
SAAR2 IPRSAA2 AARBSAT/WARBSAT SAARG SAAR2U AT Transatlantic WH (non U.S./CA) - Area 2
SAAR3 IPRSAA3 PARBSAT/WARB3AT SAARG SAAR3U AT Transatlantic WH (non U.S./CA) - Area 3
SAAS IPRSAAS PARBSPA/WARBSPA SARG SAASU PA Transpacific WH (non U.S./CA) - Area 3
TPFD IPRTPFD N/A TGRG N/A EH Within Area 3 - domestic
TPFG IPRPG PARBS TGRG TPFGU EH Within Area 3 - international
TSFARES IPRTS AARBSTS/PARBSTS EURG TSFAREU TS Trans - Siberian - Area 2/3
WHFD IPRWD N/A WDRG N/A WH Within West. Hem (non U.S./CA) - domestic
WHFI IPRWI WARBS WDRG WHFIU WH Within West. Hem (non U.S./CA) - intnl

78