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CHAPTER-

I
INTRODUCTION
CHAPTER-I

INTRODUCTION:

Over the past two decades the number of working women in India has increased
tremendously. Even as the demand and consumption for processed and packed food has gone up
we still follow the culture of eating food that is cooked fresh daily at home, unlike homes in the
western world. The Indian women do all their buying freshly. They buy fresh vegetables daily and
cook fresh food daily. They don’t have the habit of cooking and keeping for a whole week.

The taste of the fresh food is definitely better than food cooked and stored. But even though the
practice of cooking daily is very much prevalent, the time devoted to cooking a meal has been
reduced considerably. The purpose of our study is to understand how the change in occupational
status of women has affected their food buying and cooking behaviour.
PROBLEM DEFINITION:
A) BACKGROUND:

Food is an important part of Indian culture, playing a role in everyday life as well as in
festivals. In many families, everyday meals are sit-down affairs consisting of two to three main
course dishes, varied accompaniments such as chutneys and pickles, carbohydrate staples such as
Rice and Roti (bread), as well as desserts. Food is not just important for eating, but it is also a way
of socializing, getting together with family, relatives and friends.
With the rise in number of working women majority of young Indians are moving away from
home-made food, instead buying their packaged, takeaways and snacks from supermarkets and
eating out in restaurants that offer a range of cuisines. Outlets of KFC, Mc Donald’s, Pizza hut,
subways are mushrooming across the country. Food processing industry is on the rise .India’s food
processing sector accounts for about 7 per cent of its gross domestic product, or about $70 billion,
while the restaurant sector’s size is estimated at $20 billion.
Also many people today lack basic cooking skills, which are not being passed on from mother to
child as much as they were in the past. Further globalisation and the need for increased
productivity means that people will work more irregular hours. As flexi-time and home-based
work become more commonplace, food will be consumed at increasingly unconventional times.
It is well documented that factors such as longer working hours, more working women and smaller
households mean that consumers are increasingly turning to meal options that are quicker and
easier to prepare, such as ready meals, cooking aids and takeaway meals.
In the past women were in some ways thought of as being inferior to men. The typical lifestyle
among families was for women to stay at home while men worked, and this was the acknowledged
as a way of life for both parties. Although certain generalisations still exist much of this has
changed, especially over last century.
We are no more in the era where the society is dominated by the alpha males. Women at this time
walk parallel as compared to men. In earlier days men were known to work and women to deal
with the households but now the impression of women as housewives have changed. They have
started earning and so have become self-sufficient. Women these days are no more dependent on
men. And now when women have started working it is quite inevitable that their life would change
and their working status would affect their daily work that they were supposed to do. So here we
want to know if the working status of women alters their habits like cooking buying and in what
way.
Women who work tend to concentrate more on their work and so they behave differently as
compared to the previous times. They don’t really get time to cook and to involve themselves in
household activities like buying, etc. so here by this research we want to see how working status
change lives of women.

B) STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM

The purpose of this study is to discuss the changes that take place in the normal work of
women like cooking buying due to their work lifestyle. Because of working they obviously get less
time for other things so here we want to find out the effect of working status of women on their
cooking and buying habits.

C) OBJECTIVES:

PRIMARY OBJECTIVE:

To understand the effects of occupational status on women cooking and buying behavior.

SECONDARY OBJECTIVE:

 To gauge the time devoted by women to cooking daily

 Understand the buying preferences of working women


 Impact of working schedule on cooking pattern

SCOPE OF THE STUDY:

To achieve the objective it is needed to collect data from customers within the
country. But for time, cost, and other limitations only the Coimbatore city and its
surroundings are considered for collecting data. For achieving the objectives, the study will
be focused on the quality, price, comfort ability, and other criteria of food as well as the
competitive position. While doing so it will also identify the limitations and the weaknesses
of the issue.

NEED OF THE STUDY:

Customer satisfaction survey is a systematic process for collecting consumer data,


analyzing this data to make it into actionable information, driving the results throughout an
organization and implementing satisfaction survey is a management information system
that continuously captures the voice of the customer through the assessment of
performance from the customer’s point of view.

OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY:

The broad objective of the research is to assess the Customer Satisfaction of food in
Coimbatore focusing on Cooking and Buying Behaviour. This has been broken into following
specific objectives:

Specific Objective
 To examine the current state of mind of the women.
 To analyze the impact of Convenient food shop Location in customers’ mind.
 To analyze the impact of Quality of food buying or cooking in customers’ mind.
 To analyze the impact of Comfort of food in customers’ mind.
 To analyze the impact of Knowledge of the food buying and same texture in cooking in
customers’ mind.
 To analyze the impact of Fashionable style offered by the store in customers’ mind.
 To analyze the impact of varieties of food offered by the store in customers’ mind
 To analyze the impact of Selection of colors, taste, quantity of food cooking in
customers’ mind.
 To analyze the impact of Advertising in customers’ mind
 To analyze the impact of Layout and design of food store in customers’ mind
 To identify customer satisfaction level of food buying and compare with other food shop.

LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY

Adequate efforts have been taken to accomplish the research according to the objectives. But
as the research is both time and cost consuming therefore it was not possible to cover more
additional areas, which would obviously give better result.
 The type of the study required a detail interview of consumer at market place. Thereby a
tremendous difficulty was faced in getting access to them as they are very busy. Many times
the respondents were found after answering few questions left the interview, which resulted
in discontinuity in interview and the wastage of time and effort. Also, the interview was
conducted only on the women customers of Coimbatore city for the time limits of internship
periods.
 The respondents’ lack of understanding of the purpose of the study was a major
limitation when conducting the questionnaire survey. It had to explain the nature of the study
and the purpose of a number of questions several times to a number of customers.
In spite of prior sincerity, some mistakes can be occurred. The responsibilities are admitted for
those inadvertent mistakes, if there will any. Also adequate efforts have been taken to
accomplish the project according to the objectives.
BENEFITS OF THE STUDY

To survive in an ever growing industry, it is very important for customers to know its
customers level of satisfaction to the review and service provided by the company. This
research will facilitate Food buying and cooking women to know the present market situation
and what customers wants. It will provide information about customer perception about food
quality, price, customer service etc. This study can help me to understand what level of
consumer satisfaction and awareness they have. This information can help to design future
strategies. Finally, this research study can be considered a general guideline for other
organizations in the industry who hope to do research on customer satisfaction and factors that
affect customer satisfaction.
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

TYPES OF RESEARCH

This research is a quantitative exploratory research, as it is an initial research conducted


to clarify and define the nature of a problem. It is qualitative as the results of this research
focuses on words and observations, instead of numbers and mathematical analysis. At first an
exploratory research has been conducted to define the nature of the problem. Then conclusive
research through qualitative methods has been carried out.

BASIC RESEARCH METHOD

This section has described the basic research plan of the study. It has specified all the
procedure necessary to solve the research questions and hypothesis. The basic research method
in this research will be survey method with a formatted online questionnaire provided. An
observation method will not produce expected result. As experiment study is costly so it will
not be undertaken.

CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

Customer assessment package is conducted by us by considering some factors relevant to


customer satisfaction. These are considered as independent variables whereas customer
satisfaction is dependent variable. The independent variables are product price, product quality,
product made, shop design, salesmen behavior, advertisement, competitors marketing policy,
seasonal variation, product availability, brand loyalty etc. These factors influence the
satisfaction level of customers. From the comparison of different attributes or features the
customer satisfaction will be assessed.
TYPE OF DATA

This research will not be focusing on any secondary data, as no such preview research has
been conducted in context of Customer Satisfaction Assessment. This research will work with
only primary data based on exit interview.

DATA COLLECTION PROCEDURE

Data is collected through survey method. For the survey method, personal interview was
conducted. A questionnaire is kept in hand of the interviewer to aid the interview process. A
personal interview is a form of direct communication in which an interviewer asks respondents
questions in a face-to-face situation. Verbal explanations were provided to the respondents who
faced any problems answering the questionnaires. Informal interviews were also held with
Customers. After collecting primary data we uploaded the real time data into the customer
satisfaction assessment software to generate the analysis.

SAMPLING PLAN FOR THE RESEARCH

Sampling is an important component for a research design. It is the process of using a small
number of parts of a larger population to make conclusions about the total population. For this
research the following steps in the sampling design process was followed:
 Target Population
 Sampling Frame
 Sampling Technique
 Sample Size and
 Execution
TARGET POPULATION

The Target Population of this research is Cooking and Buying women customers of food.
Population is a collection of all possible individuals, objects, or measurements of interest. It is a
set of entities concerning which statistical inferences are to be drawn, often based on a random
sampling taken from the population. All consumers in the country are the concern population.
But due to time and resource constraints the consumers in Coimbatore city are considered as the
population.

SAMPLING FRAME

There is no such sample frame is available for this research. Customers of all ages and
sexes were considered.

SAMPLING METHOD

The study consists of food buying and cooking women’s of Coimbatore city and its
surroundings. Simple random sampling technique was used for sampling.

SAMPLE SIZE

The sample size of a statistical sample is the number of observations that constitute it. It
is typically denoted by n, a positive integer (natural number). Typically, all else being equal, a
larger sample size leads to increased precision in estimates of various properties of the
population. Here in this research the sample size is n = 269 but for some limitations (time,
recourses, etc.) and convenience, total number of 269 respondents’ data was collected. The
survey was conducted from 11 stores of Bata outlets in Coimbatore city and its surroundings.
EXECUTIONS

Questionnaire survey according to sampling plan through personal interviews with


randomly selected sampling units was conducted. However verbal explanations were provided
to the respondents who faced any problems answering some questions from the questionnaires.
Later Data were uploaded into the customer satisfaction assessment software through real time
data uploading.
CHAPTER –
II
REVIEW OF
LITERATURE

REVIEW OF LITERATURE

1. NEW LIFESTYLE DETERMINANTS OF WOMEN’S FOOD SHOPPING BEHAVIOUR


-Mary Lou Roberts and Lawrence H. Wetzel

ABSTRACT
Women's current high levels of participation in the labour force have focused attention on
changing life-styles and consumption patterns. This study uses life-style variables as predictors of
food shopping behaviour. A set of intervening variables reflecting women's attitudes toward food
preparation explains their food shopping behaviour better than either a working/nonworking
classification or general role orientations.

2. FOOD SHOPPING AND PREPARATION: PSYCHOGRAPHIC DIFFERENCES


BETWEEN WORKING WOMEN AND HOUSEWIVES.
Ralph w. Jackson
Stephen w. Mc Daniel

ABSTRACT
A research study is described which compared the responses of 246 working wives and 181
housewives to several food shopping- and preparation-related psychographic statements. Results
show that working wives tended to have a greater dislike for food shopping and cooking that
seemed to stem primarily from time considerations. Working wives also exhibited a tendency to be
less concerned with the impact of their food shopping and preparation activities on other family
members.
3. The FOOD CONSUMER IN THE 21STCENTURY: NEW RESEARCH PERSPECTIVES
Ben Sneaker

ABSTRACT
A far more complex set of factors are now driving food consumption patterns in high-
Income countries than economists have traditionally analysed in demand studies. Food
Consumers have moved up Maslow’s hierarchy of needs pyramid from satisfying basic
Physiological needs. If the traditional focus was on quantity demands for homogeneous
Commodities, attention needs to increasingly be given to the demand for quality-differentiated
Food products. Although the income elasticity in terms of quantity may be low, the elasticity for
many food attributes, such as nutrition and health, safety, convenience, and diversity, are quite
high. Where people buy food, the form in which they buy it and where they eat it are all Changing.
To simply distinguish between food consumed at home and away from home is no
Longer adequate. Rapid demographic and socioeconomic changes, such as the massive entrance of
women into the workforce and increasing multi-ethnicity, are a fundamental driver of food Buying
and dietary patterns.

4. AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF GROCERY SHOPPING STRESSORS


-Russell Aylett and Vincent Van Mitchell

ABSTRACT
Many factors affect the store patronage decision, e.g. location, service levels, pricing
policies, merchandise assortment, store environment and store image, but very little research has
considered stress as a determinant. This is despite the increase in dual income families and longer
working hours which are making general shopping a more stressful activity for many families
because of time pressure and lack of response by retailers. This exploratory research confirms
grocery shopping to be stressful, but time pressure was mentioned as only one factor causing
shopping stress; other factors included: crowd density, staff attitude and training, store
layout/relocation, impulse purchasing pressure, location, product assortment, music, and lighting.
The article concludes by proposing a shopping stress curve for future examination.

5. BUYING TIME AND SAVING TIME: STRATEGIES FOR MANAGING HOUSEHOLD


PRODUCTION
-Sharon Nichols and Karen Fox

ABSTRACT
Time-buying strategies used more often by employed-wife families than non employed-
wife families were purchase of child care, meals away from home, and disposable diapers. Time-
saving strategies used by employed wives were preparing fewer meals at home, reduced time in
household production, and reduced time in leisure. Wife's employment made no difference in time
spent in household production by other family members.

6. WIFE’S OCCUPATIONAL STATUS AS A CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR CONSTRUCT


Chris T. Allen and Charles M. Schaninger

ABSTRACT
As a summary construct, wife's occupational status is likely to capture the effects of a
number of underlying forces that influence lifestyle and consumption patterns. Significant
differences across wife's occupational-status groups were found for food, beverage and alcohol
consumption, makeup usage, clothing purchases, shopping behaviour and deal proneness, media
usage, and major and minor appliance ownership.

RESEARCH DESIGN
Our research was conducted by using qualitative research method i.e. filling up questionnaires
from respondents. We followed a simple random sampling method (Non-Probability technique) as
it was convenient to us to collect relevant information. After collecting the data, analysis was done
by using various statistical techniques in SPSS software. Following were constraints to our
research:-
LIMITATIONS
 Lack of time
 Research was only pertaining to women
 Geographical constraints
 Unavailability of respondents due to festive season
 Lack of seriousness among respondents

A. DATA COLLECTION

PRIMARY DATA COLLECTION: STRUCTURED SURVEY


A set of questionnaire was devised, reviewed and approved before execution which is
attached in the exhibit.

Executional Method: Mainly the questionnaire was created in Google forms & circulated through
Email and other social networks. In case if the respondent was unable to use the internet facility,
he/she was called up and his /her responses were recorded. Also, some respondents were
approached in person at their convenient place and responses were taken. The gist of the survey
undertaken is as shown in the figure.
B. SCALING TECHNIQUES

a) Likert Scale: In this survey, this scale was used because we wanted to gauge the impact on women’s
buying and cooking habits because of their occupation status. It was also easier for the respondents to
understand how to use the scale making it suitable for mail, telephone, personal & electronic
interviews.

b) Dichotomy Scale: Yes/ No were the option in two of its critical questions

C. SAMPLING TECHNIQUE:

Non- Probability Sampling Technique: Because there is no ‘chance-selection’ procedures


involved in survey method. It relied on the researchers’ personal judgment & convenience.
Sampling Method: Convenience Sampling
Used because it was least expensive and least time consuming of all sampling techniques. The
sampling units were easier to access, measureable & co-operative.

Necessary Sample Size = (Z-score) ² * StdDev*(1-StdDev) / (margin of error) ²


CHAPTER -III

COMPANY PROFILE
COMPANY PROFILE
CHAPTER IV
DATA ANALYSIS AND
INTERRPRETATION
CHAPTER IV

DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

Data analysis and interpretation about the research is carried out by using tables and Charts like pie
charts and bar charts etc.

ANOVA

1) GROCERY SHOPPING AND WORK DURATION


H0: there is no connection between the grocery shopping and work duration.
H1: there is connection between the grocery shopping and work duration.

Descriptives
Mean Std. Deviation Std. Error 95% Confidence Interval for Minimum
grocery or shopping N
Mean
Lower Bound Upper Bound
part time 32 1.50 .880 .156 1.18 1.82 1
full time 36 1.44 .695 .116 1.21 1.68 1
self employed 20 2.00 .918 .205 1.57 2.43 1
Total 88 1.59 .839 .089 1.41 1.77 1

The ANOVA box shows us the significance value which shows the condition means are relatively
the same or different. If the significance value is higher than 0.05 then, there is no difference
between the conditions.

Here the actual significance value is p= 0.043 which is lower than 0.05, then it can be said that
there is significant difference between the conditions. Therefore H0 is accepted.

ANOVA
grocery or shopping
Sum of Squares DF Mean square F Sig.
Between Groups 4.384 2 2.192 3.275 .043
Within Groups 56.889 85 .669
Total 61.273 87

Conclusion

The result shows that due to varied work timings or job commitments, Women do grocery
shopping accordingly i.e. either they go themselves or take help of their maid/servant.

From the results so far, we know that there are significant differences between the groups as a
whole. The table below, Multiple Comparisons, shows which groups differed from each other. The
Tukey post-hoc test is generally the preferred test for conducting post-hoc tests on a one-way
ANOVA, but there are many others. We can see from the table below that there is a significant
difference in time to complete the problem between the group of full time and self-employed
women (p = 0.044), as well as between the part time and self-employed women (p = 0.034).
However, there were no differences between the full time and part time women (p = 0.958).

Multiple Comparisons

Dependent Variable: grocery or shopping

* The mean difference is significant at the 0.05 level.


2) OCCUPATION AND PREFERENCE OF FOOD STUFF WHILE BUYING
H0: There is no connection between the occupation and preference of food stuff while
Buying

H1: There is connection between the occupation and preference of food stuff while buying

The ANOVA box shows us the significance value which shows the condition means are relatively the
same or different. If the significance value is higher than 0.05 then, there is no difference between the
conditions.

ANOVA

preference while buying

Here the actual significance value is p= 0.03 which is lower than 0.05, then it can be said that there
is significant difference between the conditions. Therefore H0 is accepted.

Conclusion
The result shows that the occupation or the type of work a women has an impact on her
buying behaviour when it comes to getting food stuff for consumption.

2) REGRESSION

This table provides the R and R2 values. The R value represents the simple correlation and
is 0.211 (the "R" Column), which indicates a high degree of correlation. The R2 value (the "R
Square" column) indicates how much of the total variation in the dependent variable, can be
explained by the independent variable. In this case, 45% can be explained.

This table indicates that the regression model predicts the dependent variable significantly
well. How do we know this? Look at the "Regression" row and go to the "Sig." column. This
indicates the statistical significance of the regression model that was run. Here, p < 0.0005, which
is less than 0.05, and indicates that, overall, the regression model statistically significantly predicts
the outcome variable (i.e., it is a good fit for the data).
3) FACTOR ANALYSIS

Interpretation

The descriptive information shows the means and standard deviations for all of the eight variables, as
well as all possible bivariate correlations and their p values. We note that all of the correlations are
positive and significant as might be expected of these variables.

The KMO statistics varies between 0 and 1. A value of 0 indicates that the sum of partial correlations is
large relative to the sum of correlations, indicating diffusion in the pattern of correlations. A value
close to 1 indicates that patterns of correlations are relatively compact and so factor analysis should
yield distinct and reliable factors. Kaiser has recommended that accepting values greater than 0.5 as
acceptable. Furthermore, values between 0.5 and 0.7 are mediocre, values between 0.7 and 0.8 are
good, values between 0.8 and 0.9 are great and values above 0.9 are superb. For these data the value is
0.500, which is acceptable.

The Principal Component communalities (Extraction, as the Initial are always 1.00) range from .
536 to .872, thus most of the variance of these variables was accounted for by this two dimensional
factor solution. One can see that the corresponding Extraction communalities for the Common
Factor analysis were a bit smaller (as would be expected) but still show the majority of the
variance of all variables represented in the two factor solution. Note that the "Initial" communality
estimates for the SPSS version of a Principal Axis Common Factor
Preference according to Communalities
Occupation
Marital status
Time spend cooking.
Family members
Working
Have you cook or maid
Food Preference
Extraction Method: Principal Component Analysis.
This table shows you the actual factors that were extracted. If you look at the section labelled
“Rotation Sums of Squared Loadings,” it shows you only those factors that met your cut-off
Criterion (extraction method). In this case, there were three factors with eigenvalues greater than

1. SPSS always extracts as many factors initially as there are variables in the dataset, but the rest
Of these didn’t make the grade. The “% of variance” column tells you how much of the total

Variability (in all of the variables together) can be accounted for by each of these summary scales

Or factors. Factor 1 accounts for 29.373% of the variability in all 7 variables, and so on.

4) CHI SQUARE TEST

H0: Work duration and Hiring of cook/maid are independent...

H1: Work duration and Hiring of cook/maid are related.


Since the p-value is greater than .05, we can accept the null hypothesis, and say that Work duration
and Hiring of cook/maid are independent.
2) HOW OFTEN WORKING WOMEN COOK FOOD
H0: Employment status and cooking habits are independent..

H1: Employment status and cooking habits are related.


PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS OF NEW CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR

TABLE 1

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON KIND OF FOOTWEAR DO YOU


PREFER.

NO OF

BRANDS RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

BRANDED 75 75%

UNBRANDED 25 25%

TOTAL 100 100%

INFERENCE:

From the above table it can be inferred that

75% of the respondents are of BRANDED.

25% of the respondents are of UNBRANDED.

INTERPRETATION:

From the above researcher interpret that majority of the respondents are of BRANDED.

GRAPH - 1
PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON KIND OF FOOTWEAR DO YOU
PREFER

80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
BRANDED UNBRANDED
TABLE 2

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON WILLING TO BUY SHOES.

NO OF

WILLINGNESS TO BUY RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

SEASONAL 30 30%

OCCASIONAL 30 30%

CANT SAY 40 40%

TOTAL 100 100%

INFERENCE:

From the above table it can be inferred that 30% of the respondents are of SEASONAL and The
30% is OCCASIONAL AND 40% FOR CANT SAY.

INTERPRETATION:

Further from the inference the researcher the researcher can interpret that majority of the
respondents are CANT SAY.
GRAPH-2

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON WILLING TO BUY SHOES.

CANT SAY

OCCASIONAL

SEASONAL

0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40
TABLE 3

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS PREFER IN SHOES

NO OF

QUALITY PRODUCT RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

QUALITY 25 25%

PRICE 33 33%

RANGE OF PRODUCTS 32 32%

DURABILITY 10 10%

TOTAL 100 100%

INFERENCE:

From the above table it can be inferred that 25% of the respondents are in QUALITY and the other
33% are PRICE and RANGE OF PRODUCTS with 32% and atlast 10% for DURABILITY.

INTERPRETATION:

Further from the inference the researcher the can interpret that majority of the respondents
are in PRICE.
Graph-3

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS PREFER IN SHOES

QUALITY
PRICE
RANGE OF PRODUCTS
DURABILITY
TABLE 4

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON RANGE FOR SELECTING PRODUCTS.

NO OF

RANGE RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

CASUAL 38 38%

FORMAL 22 22%

SPORTS WEAR 50 50%

TOTAL 100 100%

INFERENCE:

From the above table it can be inferred

38% of the respondents are of CASUAL

22% of the respondents are of FORMAL.

50% of the respondents are of SPORTS WEAR.

INTERPRETATION:

From the above researcher interpret it is clear that large no of Behavior are SPORTS
WEAR.
Graph-4

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON RANGE FOR SELECTING PRODUCTS.

50
45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
CASUAL
FORMAL
SPORTS WEAR
TABLE 5

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS TO PURCHASE SHOES.

NO OF

PURCHASE PRODUCT RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

MALLS 45 45%

DEPARTMENTAL STORES 20 20%

RETAILERS 25 25%

CANT SAY 10 10%

TOTAL 100 100%

INFERENCE:

From the above table it can be inferred that 45% of the respondents are in MALLS and the other
20% are DEPARTMENTAL STORES and 25% are RETAILERS final remaining 10% CANT
SAY.

INTERPRETATION:

Further from the inference the researcher the can interpret that majority of the respondents
MALLS.
Graph-5

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS TO PURCHASE SHOES.

CANT SAY

RETAILERS

DEPARTMENTAL STORES

MALLS

0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45
TABLE 6

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS ARE YOU PRICING CONSCIOUS

NO OF

INCOME RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

YES 50 50%

NO 50 50%

TOTAL 100 100%

INFERENCE:

From the above table it can be inferred that 50% of the respondents are YES and 50% are NO.

INTERPRETATION:

Further from the inference the researcher the can interpret that majority of the respondents are
BOTH YES AND NO.
Graph-6

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS ARE YOU PRICING CONSCIOUS

50
45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
YES

NO
TABLE 7

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS ON PRICE RANGE DOES BATA OFFER YOU

NO OF

USAGE OF SHAMPOO RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

LOW 5 5%

MEDIUM 40 40%

HIGH 55 55%

TOTAL 100 100%

INFERENCE:

From the above table it can be inferred that 40% of the respondents are MEDIUM and the other
5% are LOW and 55% are HIGH consolidated.

INTERPRETATION:

Further from the inference the researcher the can interpret that majority of the respondents
are HIGH.
Graph-7

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS ON PRICE RANGE DOES BATA OFFER YOU

HIGH

MEDIUM

LOW

0 10 20 30 40 50 60
TABLE 8

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS TO HAVE YOU HEARD ABOUT BATA QUALITY

NO OF

SELECTION RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

YES 54 54%

NO 46 46%

TOTAL 100 100%

INFERENCE:

From the above table it can be inferred that 46% of the respondents are NO and the other 54% are
YES.

INTERPRETATION:

Further from the inference the researcher the can interpret that majority of the respondents
YES.
Graph-8

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS TO HAVE YOU HEARD ABOUT BATA

54

52

50

48

46

44

42
YES NO
TABLE 9

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS FROM WHERE DID YOU COME TO


KNOW?

NO OF

DIFFERENT SHAMPOO RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

FRIENDS 10 10%

FAMILY 15 15%

ADS 75 75%

TOTAL 100 100%

INFERENCE:

From the above table it can be inferred that 10% of the respondents to FRIENDS and the other
15% are FAMILY and the remaining 75% are ADS.

INTERPRETATION:

Further from the inference the researcher the can interpret that majority of the respondents
was ADS.
Graph-9

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS FROM WHERE DID YOU COME TO KNOW

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

0
FRIENDS FAMILY ADS
TABLE 10

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS HAVE YOU USED BATA

NO OF

DECISION RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

YES 65 65%

NO 35 35%

TOTAL 100 100%

INFERENCE:

From the above table it can be inferred that 65% of the respondents are YES, NO FOR 35%.
INTERPRETATION:

Further from the inference the researcher the can interpret that majority of the respondents was
YES.

Graph-10

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS HAVE YOU USED BATA

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

0
YES NO
TABLE 11

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON WHAT DID YOU LIKED IN


BATA.

NO OF

SPECIAL THING RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

QUALITY 35 35%

PRICE 25 25%

BRAND NAME 20 20%

RANGE OF PRODUCTS 20 20%

TOTAL 100 100%

INFERENCE:

From the above table it can be inferred that


25% of the respondents are of PRICE.

35% of the respondents are of QUALITY.

20% of the respondents are of BRAND NAME.

20% of the respondents are of RANGE OF PRODUCTS.

INTERPRETATION:

From the above researcher interpret that majority of the respondents are of QUALITY.

Graph-11

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON WHAT DID YOU LIKED IN


BATA.
QUALITY
PRICE
BRAND NAME
RANGE OF PRODUCTS

TABLE 12

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON ARE YOU SATISFIED WITH THE


BRAND

NO OF

SATISFACTION RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

Yes 65 65%

No 35 35%

TOTAL 100 100%

INFERENCE:
From the above table it can be inferred that 65% of the respondents are of Yes and The Less 35%
is No

INTERPRETATION:

Further from the inference the researcher the researcher can interpret that majority of the
respondents are YES.

Graph-12

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON ARE YOU SATISFIED WITH THE


BRAND
YES
NO

TABLE 13

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS DOES ARE THE PRICES OF BATA SHOES


CAPABLE TO ATTRACT CUSTOMERS?
NO OF

CUSTOMER RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE


ATTRACTION

YES 75 75%

NO 10 10%

CANT SAY 15 15%

TOTAL 100 100%

INFERENCE:

From the above table it can be inferred that 75% of the respondents are in YES and the other 10%
are NO and 15% on CAN’T SAY.

INTERPRETATION:

Further from the inference the researcher the can interpret that majority of the respondents are in
YES.
Graph-13

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS DOES ARE THE PRICES OF BATA SHOES


CAPABLE TO ATTRACT CUSTOMERS

CANT SAY

NO

YES

0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80

TABLE 14

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON WHAT ARE THE OPTIONS YOU GET
IN BATA.
NO OF

BUY RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

FORMALS 38 38%

CASUALS 52 52%

SPORTSWEAR 10 10%

TOTAL 100 100%

INFERENCE:

From the above table it can be inferred

38% of the respondents are of FORMALS

52% of the respondents are of CASUALS

10% of the respondents are of SPORTS WEAR

INTERPRETATION:

From the above researcher interpret it is clear that large no of Behavior are CASUALS.

Graph-14
PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS BASED ON WHAT ARE THE OPTIONS YOU GET
IN BATA.

60

50

40

30

20

10

0
FORMALS CASUALS SPORTSWEAR

TABLE 15
PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS WHETHER ALL THE PRODUCT RANGE
AVAILABLE IN ONE SINGLE SHOWROOM.

NO OF

AVAILABILITY RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

YES 60 60%

NO 40 40%

TOTAL 100 100%

INFERENCE:

From the above table it can be inferred that 40% of the respondents are in NO and the other 60%
are YES.

INTERPRETATION:

Further from the inference the researcher the can interpret that majority of the respondents
YES.

Graph-15

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS WHETHER ALL THE PRODUCT RANGE


AVAILABLE IN ONE SINGLE SHOWROOM.
YES
NO

TABLE 16

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS DO YOU FIND VALUE FOR MONEY IN BATA.

NO OF
VALUE RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

YES 35 35%

NO 24 24%

CAN’T SAY 41 41%

TOTAL 100 100%

INFERENCE:

From the above table it can be inferred that 35% of the respondents are YES and 41% are CANT
SAY and 24% are NO.

INTERPRETATION:

Further from the inference the researcher the can interpret that majority of the respondents
are CANT SAY.

Graph-16

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS DO YOU FIND VALUE FOR MONEY IN BATA.


45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
YES NO CAN’T SAY

TABLE 17
PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS WHAT KIND OF RANGE YOU FIND IN
BATA IN PAST

NO OF

RANGE RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

MANY 25 25%

FEW 75 75%

TOTAL 100 100%

INFERENCE:

From the above table it can be inferred that 25% of the respondents are MANY and the 75% on
FEW.

INTERPRETATION:

Further from the inference the researcher the can interpret that majority of the respondents
are FEW.

Graph-17
PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS WHAT KIND OF RANGE YOU FIND IN
BATA IN PAST

80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
MANY FEW
TABLE 18

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS ARE THE PRODUCTS & ITS RANGE OF OTHER
COMPANIES ARE GOOD THAN BATA

COMPARITIVE NO OF

RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

YES 45 45%

NO 55 55%

TOTAL 100 100%

INFERENCE:

From the above table it can be inferred that 45% of the respondents are YES and the other 55% are
NO.

INTERPRETATION:

Further from the inference the researcher the can interpret that majority of the respondents
NO.
Graph-18

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS ARE THE PRODUCTS & ITS RANGE OF OTHER
COMPANIES ARE GOOD THAN BATA

YES
NO
TABLE 19

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS DO THEY PROVIDE QUALITY


PRODUCTS?

NO OF

QUALITY PRODUCT RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

Yes 87 87%

No 13 13%

TOTAL 100 100%

INFERENCE:

From the above table it can be inferred that 87% of the respondents to YES and the other 13% are
NO.

INTERPRETATION:

Further from the inference the researcher the can interpret that majority of the respondents
was YES.
Graph-19

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS DO THEY PROVIDE QUALITY PRODUCTS

90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
Yes No
TABLE 20

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS WHICH ACCORDING TO YOU IS THE BIGGEST


COMPETITOR TO BATA.

NO OF

COMPETITOR RESPONDENTS PERCENTAGE

NIKE 67 67%

REEBOK 33 33%

TOTAL 100 100%

INFERENCE:

From the above table it can be inferred that 67% of the respondents are NIKE AND 33% for
REEBOK.
INTERPRETATION:

Further from the inference the researcher the can interpret that majority of the respondents
was NIKE.

Graph-20

PROFILE OF THE RESPONDENTS WHICH ACCORDING TO YOU IS THE BIGGEST


COMPETITOR TO BATA.

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

0
YES NO
CHAPTER V

FINDINGS &
CONCLUSION

CHAPTER 5

FINDINGS

 Most of the women are neutral about cooking; they do not really have any extreme
thoughts about cooking though some are dissatisfied.

 Working women prefer executive meals majorly over any other meals and prefer frozen
food the least.

 Due to time constraint most of the women prefer to shop their grocery from the local shops
that might be near their house
CONCLUSION

CONCLUSION

Women, particularly women workforce are vital part of buying behavior. It has been found
that working women are more involved with the purchasing activities. They are less time
conscious as compared to the cooking women. It has also been found that buying women are more
brand loyal than cooking women. Women are apt to be more involved with purchasing than men,
since women have traditionally been the family purchasing agents and perceive purchasing as
being associated with their role in the family. Woman's role as the family purchasing agent,
however, seems to be changing, due primarily to the large increase in the number of cooking
women in recent decades.

Therefore, buying women has developed as an important segment for the marketers. Therefore,
marketers should consider them with utmost importance.
BIBLIOGRAPH
Y

BIBLIOGRAPHY

1.  Zaichkowsky, J. (1985), “Measuring the involvement construct.” Journal of Consumer


Research, 12 (3), 341-352. [12]

2. Zelezny, L.C., Chua, P.P. and Aldrich, C. (2000), “Elaborating on gender differences in
environmentalism,” Journal of social issues, 56(3), 443-457

3. Fairhurst, A., Good, L. and Gentry, J. (1989), “Fashion involvement: an instrument


validation procedure.” Clothing and Textiles Research Journal 7 (3), 10-14. Fenigstein, A.,
Scheier, M., and Buss A. (1975), “Public and private self-consciousness”
4. O’Cass, A. (2001), “Consumer self-monitoring, materialism and involvement in fashion
clothing”. Australian Marketing Journal 9 (1), 46-60

5. Solomon, M. and Rabolt, N. (2004), “Consumer Behavior in Fashion.” NJ, Prentice Hall.
Zaichkowsky, J. (1986), “Conceptualizing involvement.” Journal of Advertising, 15 (2), 4-
34

6. Guha, S. (2013). The changing perception and buying behavior of women consumer in
Urban India. IOSR Journal of Business and Management, 11(6), 34-39.

7. Huddleston, P., Whipple, J., Mattick, R.N. and Lee S.J. (2009). Customer satisfaction in
food retailing: comparing specialty and conventional grocery stores. International Journal
of Retail & Distribution Management. 37(1): 63-80

8. Kotler P. and Armstrong, G. (2014). Principles of Marketing. 9th edition. Prentice Hall.

9. Kotler, Keller, Koshy and Jha (2012). Marketing Management, 13th edition, Pearson
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10. Kotler, P. (1973). Atmospherics as a marketing tool. Journal of Retailing. 6(4): 48-64

“A STUDY ON EFFECT OF OCCUPATIONAL STATUS TOWARDS


BUYING FOOD AND COOKING BEHAVIOUR”
QUESTIONNAIRE

Market Survey

NAME :

AGE :

SEX :

ADDRESS :

STATE :

CONTACT :

1. What is your Marital Status? *

o Married
o Unmarried

2. How many members are there in your family? *

o1
o2
o3
o more than 3

3. Are you working? *

o yes
o no
4. Occupation *

o Student
o Business
o Job
o professional
o none

5. Income per Annum:

o less than 150000/-


o more than 150000/-

6. What is your approximate work duration?

o part time
o full time
o self employed

7. How often do you cook food? *

o once in a day

o twice a day
o never
o depends on work schedule

8. How much time do you generally spend cooking? *

o less than 1 hour


o between 1-2 hour
o more than 2 hour

9. What is your satisfaction level while cooking *

1 2 3 4 5
Highly satisfied Highly Dissatisfied
10. What is preferable *

o Take away food


o cooking

11. Have you hired any cook or maid? *

o yes
o no

12. Who does the grocery shopping? *

o yourself
o maid/servant
o other

13. Which type of food do you prefer while buying? *

o street food
o Frozen food packets
o snacks/fast food

o executive meal

14. Which places do you generally prefer for buying grocery items?

o shopping malls
o local grocery stores
o Home delivery(order through phone/online)

15. Does your work schedule affect your cooking and buying habits? Please brief-Age
group *

o 18 to 25
o 26 to 35
o 36 to 45
o 45 or above

16. How often do you buy food?

o Daily
o Weekly once
o According to Situation

17. Why do you buy food?

o For a change
o No time to cook
o Occasionally
o Don’t know to cook

18. How you buy food?

o In person
o Online
o Mobile App

19. Which food do you like?

o Cooking Food

o Buying Food

20. Which type of food you cook often?


o South Indian
o Chinese
o Continental

21. As per your opinion which food you prefer/like the most?

o Cooking of your own


o Buying outside

22. Health issues you faced while buying food outside


___________________________________

23. While travelling, you prefer

o Homemade cooking
o Buying outside

24. Which food is Affordable?

o Homemade cooking
o Buying Food

25. What is your opinion to other ______________________________

______________________________________________________________