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Please read the instructions carefully.

1.) There are three parts for this distanced learning module on IO RE 04 – Living the Christian
Vision in the Contemporary World.

2.) In each part, write your name, course and block, and teacher.

3.) Read all the instructions for each part.

4.) Use blue font color for all of your answers.

5.) Put/write your answers right before each questions.

6.) You may submit it via hard print copy or via email.

6.1) For hard print, you may submit via pick-up centers or personally at the ORA office.

6.2) For email, save your files via pdf format and name it as shown in the examples below:
(UPPERCASE - Block and Couse you belong in your RE subject <space> Surname
<space> First letter of first name/s) Use dash – not slash / in your block and course if
needed.

Examples:

2BSA-2BSTM2 ALBAO M
2MM-2HRM-2ENTREP ABABAT LM
2FM ABARQUEZ HL
2BSHM1 AINZA AM
2BSTM1 ABION LJ
2A ALMAZAN II

6.3) Submit using gmail. Please make a gmail acount.

6.4) Via gmail account access this URL:


https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1E0SVxPOrEJWmGpO8SAZKgAgf7OMS40-l .
Choose your teacher’s name then click. Drop/Drag/Submit your pdf file to submit. Done.

6.5) Submit before the deadline.

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Name:
Course & Block:
Subject: IO RE 04 - Living the Christian Vision in the Contemporary World
Output: #1 Dialogue with Culture
Instructor/Professor:

DIALOGUE with CULTURE


RELIGION and POVERTY
Entering into dialogue with culture, religion, and poverty needs different contexts for the parties
involved. As Legazpi-Thomasians entering to this triple dialogue, these contexts must be
understood in the light of the documents and tradition of the Catholic Church.

Vocabulary:

Dialogue - Firstly, at the purely human level, it means reciprocal communication, leading to a
common goal or, at a deeper level, to interpersonal communion. Secondly, dialogue can be
taken as an attitude of respect and friendship, which permeates or should permeate all those
activities constituting the evangelizing mission of the Church. This can appropriately be called
"the spirit of dialogue". Thirdly, in the context of religious plurality, dialogue means "all positive
and constructive interreligious relations with individuals and communities of other faiths which
are directed at mutual understanding and enrichment"(6), in obedience to truth and respect for
freedom. It includes both witness and the exploration of respective religious convictions. It is in
this third sense that the present document uses the term dialogue for one of the integral
elements of the Church's evangelizing mission. (Dialogue and Proclamation 9)

Culture - in the general sense refers to all those things which go to the refining and developing
of man’s diverse mental and physical endowments. He strives to subdue the earth by his
knowledge and his labor; he humanizes social life both in the family and in the whole civic
community through the improvement of customs and institutions; he expresses through his
works the great spiritual experiences and aspirations of men throughout the ages; he
communicates and preserves them to be an inspiration for the progress of many, even all
mankind. (Gaudium et Spes 53)

- the whole collection of practices beliefs convictions and institutions by which of people
finds and expresses its collective identity. (Bishop Robert Barron on Evangelizing Culture)

Religion - The moral virtue by which a person is disposed to render to God the worship and
service he deserves. It is sometimes identified with the virtue of justice toward God, whose
rights are rooted in his complete dominion over all creation. Religion is also a composite of all

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the virtues that arise from a human being's relationship to God as the author of his or her being,
even as love is a cluster of all the virtues arising from human response to God as the destiny of
his or her being. Religion thus corresponds to the practice of piety toward God as Creator of the
universe. (Etym. probably Latin religare, to tie , fasten, bind, or relegere, to gather up, treat with
care.) (Catholic Dictionary)

Poverty - the state of one who lacks a usual or socially acceptable amount of money or material
possessions. (Merriam-Webster Dictionary)

- based on Republic Act 8425 or the Social Reform and Poverty Alleviation Act
enactedon December 11, 1997, among those considered poor were individuals and families
who earn below the poverty threshold inability to meet basic needs or “minimum basic needs ”to
survive. (National Economic and Development Authority of the Philippines)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dialogue with Culture

I. STUDY (Questio)

Directions: Enlightened by the vocabulary section, share your own definition and experience of
dialogue and culture.

What is Dialogue?

a. Enumerate 3 experiences of dialogue in your life. Classify each according to the level of
dialogue as suggested by the document Dialogue and Proclamation.

b. Why is dialogue important?

What is Culture?

a. Enumerate 4 cultural learnings which is influenced by family, church, friends, and locality.

b. Are all these cultures morally right and easily adaptable?

II. RESEARCH (Objectio)

Directions: Read and explore the notions concerning culture. Answer the questions at the end of
each discussion.

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Globalization offers a great opportunity for people to meet across the globe. It makes the
products and services of other countries available in an international scale. This results to
migrations of people bringing alongside with them different cultures. These human migrations
are commonly caused by leisure and travel, work (such as Overseas Filipino Workers), and
refugee issues (such as Syrian Refugee Crisis). With these in mind, there is the inevitability to
have cultural interactions that paves way to learning or adapting other cultures, enculturation.

Enculturation is the process by which an individual learns the traditional content of a culture and
assimilates its practices and values. These enculturation can be subdivided into three levels:
acculturation, assimilation, and amalgamation. Although all three of these words refer to
changes due to contact between different cultures, there are notable differences between them.
(refer to table 1)

Table 1.0
Acculturation is often tied to Assimilation refers to the Amalgamation refers to a
political conquest or process through which blending of cultures, rather
expansion, and is applied to individuals and groups of than one group eliminating
the process of change in differing heritages acquire the another (acculturation) or one
beliefs or traditional practices basic habits, attitudes, and group mixing itself into
that occurs when the cultural mode of life of an embracing another (assimilation).
system of one group culture.
displaces that of another. e.g.OFW and Muslim co-
e.g. OFW and Muslim co- workers eating adobo
e.g. OFW does not eat pork workers eating pork adobo shawarma happily.
adobo anymore and Muslim and shawarma happily.
co-workers eating pork adobo
now.

With the influx of different cultures in one country, such as the USA, it becomes the melting pot
of cultures. Culture, therefore, easily becomes an object of change in order to survive. There are
two extreme attitudes that are born from this: culture-centrism and culture-relativism. Culture-
centrism is when one’s culture is seen as the center of the world, the norm for all cultures. All
cultures are then judged by this norm and are expected to conform to it. And, Culture relativism
is when all cultures are seen as relative, without distinction. This leads to failure to see truly
either one’s own culture or others, and inability to discern possible essential differences
between them.

1. Give one experience of learning a different culture. Were you fully able to accept that culture?
Why?

2. What should be your attitude to people with different culture?

III. ANALYSIS (Sed contra)

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Directions: Study the Catholic Church teachings on Dialogue with Culture. Describe and explain
your understanding as thoroughly as you can by answering the questions below.

The Catholic Church is a universal Church. The task of the Church is to proclaim the Gospel to
the whole world Mark 16:15, Mat 28:19-20. Our Christian faith began in Jerusalem reaching
Samaria, even up to the ends of the earth (Acts 1:8). Crossing boundaries, the Church
embraced even the non-Jews, the Gentiles. It is clear that every human person deserves to be
heard regardless of cultural or religious differences. Reciprocally, as Christians we also
deserves to be heard particularly in our proclamation of the story of Jesus Christ. How do we
proclaim the gospel then to people with different cultures? The Gospel, and therefore
evangelization, are certainly not identical with culture, and they are independent in regard to all
cultures. Nevertheless, the kingdom which the Gospel proclaims is lived by men who are
profoundly linked to a culture, and the building up of the kingdom cannot avoid borrowing the
elements of human culture or cultures. Though independent of cultures, the Gospel and
evangelization are not necessarily incompatible with them; rather they are capable of
permeating them all without becoming subject to any one of them. (Evangelii Nuntiandi 20)

In order to better understand the relationship of the gospel message and culture, one should
keep in mind the concept of borrowing the elements of human culture or cultures in a universal
sense. For example, imagine how the virtue of respect is translated into action in different
cultures. In the Philippines, showing respect is shown through the gesture of pagmamano and
using the words, po at opo. In other cultures, respect is translated into action by bowing,
handshakes, and using of courteous words such as, sir and mam, etc. The same virtue of
respect but different cultural faces. This same thing applies in the relationship of the gospel
message and culture. The gospels message of salvation, love, charity, etc., must be seen into
different cultures independently from its translated action. As Christians this must be our attitude
to ensure that the gospel message is proclaimed and heard to people with different cultures.
This idea is what we call inculturation. The gospel must be inculturated in the people and that
Christ must find a home in the culture of the people. If culture is a way of life one has to be slow
in one’s judgment because culture mirrors the behaviour and belief system of a group of
peoples or community. The Gospel, then, has to purify a culture while culture has to enrich the
Gospel. There must be a mutual enrichment between the Gospel and culture, between faith and
culture. Again, the same gospel message but different manifestation.

However, in a strict sense, inculturation is the term that Catholic leaders and theologians have
used in recent decades to denote a process of engagement between the Christian Gospel and a
particular culture. The term is intended conceptually both to safeguard the integrity of the
Gospel and to encourage sensitivity to various cultural contexts. This applies especially to
liturgy (celebration of mass and sacraments). When the gospel already adapts a specific
tradition in the Catholic Church, inculturation of liturgy applies. It is the process whereby the
texts and rites used in worship by the local church are so inserted in the framework of culture,
that they absorb its thought, language, and ritual patterns — inculturation allows people to
experience in liturgical celebrations a ‘cultural event’ whose language and ritual forms they are

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able to identify as elements of their culture”. You may understand this well by watching how the
celebration of the holy mass in other countries are so similar but not the same in matters of
singing, dancing, etc. Try to see how Africans sing and dance during the mass while maintaining
the essential parts of the mass. This is how the Church safeguard her own culture while
crossing the boundaries of other cultures—through the idea of inculturation.

Now it is fitting to ask this final question especially when we are to dialogue with other cultures.
As Christians what should be our attitude to culturally different people in a multicultural world?

One of the great stories in the Bible is the story of the Tower of Babel, Patten states that, “the
building of the Tower of Babel reflects humanity's pride and is subject to judgment; on the other
the scattering of the nations as a consequence represents the assertion of God that diversity is
within his purpose.” Here is an assurance that diversity is God’s gift to humanity.

God’s creation is good and with it comes man’s expression of his freedom in his constant search
for truth. Culture is a synthesis of each of the rays of truth that comes from God. As a Christian,
one must find the source of truth, who is God, in every culture. So he can grasp fully the true
image of the God; that is all that which is good, one, true, and beautiful. Therefore, Christians
must be able to see the light of truth, which that of Jesus Christ, in order to face the challenges
of multiculturality and multireligiousity.

1. Identify a culture. Enumerate what is true, good, and beautiful belonging to that culture.

2. Does this culture corresponds with the true, good, and beautiful that you believe as a human
person?

IV. Action (Respondeo)

Directions: Write a reflection journal answering the question, “As Christians what should be our
attitude to culturally different people in a multicultural world?” See the rubrics after the input.

According to Bishop Robert Barron, each culture is founded in these transcendental realities of
Truth, Goodness, and Beauty. And the unconditioned realities of truth, goodness, and beauty is
found always in God. And this God has a face, which that of Jesus Christ. Jn 14:6 Jesus
answered, “I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through
me.”

Jesus said "I am the Truth" who is God himself. He is not like of the prophets that speak about
God, but instead God himself. This is the pattern that informs humanity in the deepest level, the
end of the search of God in the person of Jesus Christ. Any institution must be ordered finally to
this "search" of truth.

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In goodness, God is the Good itself. He invites Israel, the people of God, to a life of holiness.
Jesus as "the way, and the life" brought the law to fulfillment. Jesus fulfills the law not by
determining what is right from wrong but by exhibiting the spirit of the law, which is to have
goodness. Every culture therefore must promote goodness.

God is beauty itself. Beauty constitutes unity, harmony (consonance), and radiance all at once.
The beauty of humanity and the divine is seen and proven in the, Transfiguration of Jesus
Christ; Jesus as the reflection of the Father.

Jesus is the icon of the invisible of God. So Jesus can be the ground of Culture. Therefore as
Christians, we can find God in these cultures by looking for what are the unconditioned truth,
goodness and beauty through the spirit of dialogue.

Evangelizing culture is done through the spirit of dialogue. By dialogue, one is able to see the
context and beauty of God’s truth manifested in diversity. This is an attitude of respect and
friendship, which permeates or should permeate all those activities constituting the evangelizing
mission of the Church.

With this, a Christian will not compromise his or her faith nor offend one’s culture if done always
in the spirit of dialogue which is to find and share always what is true, good, and beautiful in
one’s culture.

RUBRICS for the REFLECTION JOURNAL

Detailed sharing of an experience Reflection on the presence of God in Helpful tips on what others can learn
(Part I) – 40% the experience (Part II) – 40% from their sharing
(Part III) – 20 %

100 100 100


The sharing was very detailed. The reflection clearly showed how the The tips gave a clear way for the reader
student made sense of God’s presence to learn how to dialogue with culture.
in their action.
Precise and clear words were used to
They were encouraging and convincing.
describe the action. The sharing showed a strong connection The student shared what others can
of the experience to the understanding of learn from his experience and reflection.
The student was very honest in the value of faithfulness in the context of The student gave two specific and
describing his or her feelings. Christian life. concrete actions that others can learn
from their sharing. The tips can also be
The content of the sharing was Insight about the sharing was evident. easily understood by the reader.
EXCEPTIONAL and EXPRESSIVE.
The reflection was EXCEPTIONAL.

95 95 95
The sharing of experience was very The reflection clearly showed how the The tips gave a clear way for the reader
clear. Precise and clear words were students made sense of God’s presence how to dialogue with culture.
in the given action. They were specific and concrete. The
used to describe the action.
tips were well-described.
The sharing showed a connection of the
The student was very honest in experience to the understanding the The student gave two things or actions
describing his feelings. The content of context of how to dialogue with culture. that others can learn from their sharing.
the sharing was EXPRESSIVE.

90 90 90

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The sharing of experience was very The reflection clearly showed how the The tips gave a clear way for the reader
clear. students made sense of God’s presence how to dialogue with culture.
in the given action.
They were specific and concrete. The
The sharing showed a connection of the tips were well-described. A few details
The student was very honest in experience to the understanding the were missing.
describing his feelings. Minimal minor context of how to dialogue with culture.
details were missing. However, the The student gave two things or actions
experience was still clear. Minor lapses or misunderstanding might that others can learn from their sharing.
be present in the reflection, yet the
reflection is still CLEAR.

85 85 85
The sharing was easy to follow and The reflection showed minor difficulties The tips gave a clear way for the reader
understand. or one-two major difficulties in making how to dialogue with culture.
sense of how God is present in the
action. Tips were specific and concrete.
A lot of minor details or one major
detail is missing in the sharing. Some The student tries to draw a connection
details of the action could have been but commits minor misunderstandings or
added to make the sharing more one-two major misunderstanding.
expressive.
Despite these, the reflection is still
ADEQUATELY CLEAR and
The sharing is ADEQUATELY
ACCEPTABLE
CLEAR AND ACCEPTABLE

80 80 80
The sharing was easy to follow and There was a clear attempt to connect the The tips were too general. However,
understand. reflection to the experience. However, a there was an attempt to properly connect
lot of minor or major misunderstandings the tips to the reflection.
were committed.
A lot of minor details or few major The student gave only one thing or
details were missing in the sharing. Despite these, the reflection is still action that others can learn from their
Some details of the action could have ACCEPTABLE. sharing.
been added to make the sharing
more expressive.

75 75 75
The sharing of experience was too A general reflection was shared but The tips/s to the reader was/were too
general. The description of the there was a little or no attempt to make general. The student tried to encourage
sense of the action in relation to the how to dialogue with culture.
experience was limited and lacks
context of how to dialogue with culture.
major details.

65 65 65
No experience of doing an action A general reflection was shared but The writer failed to share specific
was shared. The lack of experience there was no attempt to make sense of things or actions that others can learn
the action in relation to the context of from their sharing.
is not given a good reason.
how to dialogue with culture.

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Name:
Course & Block:
Subject: IO RE 04 - Living the Christian Vision in the Contemporary World
Output: #2 Dialogue with Religion
Instructor/Professor:

I. STUDY (Questio)

Directions: Enlightened by the vocabulary section, share your own definition and experience of
religion.

What is Religion?

a. What are your thoughts about your religion?

b. Enumerate challenges/experiences that you may be struggling to follow in your religion?


Why?

II. RESEARCH (Objectio)

Directions: Read and explore the notions concerning religion. Answer the questions at the end
of each discussion.

One can understand that man in his heart has deepest thirst to answer the questions about
God. From ancient times down to the present, there is found among various peoples a certain
perception of that hidden power which hovers over the course of things and over the events of
human history; at times some indeed have come to the recognition of a Supreme Being, or even
of a Father. (Nostra Aetate 2) Looking for answers, man organize and share this restless search
of the divine bringing birth to religion. In fact, all of us have longing in for these questions, “Men
expect from the various religions answers to the unsolved riddles of the human condition, which
today, even as in former times, deeply stir the hearts of men: What is man? What is the
meaning, the aim of our life? What is moral good, what is sin? Whence suffering and what
purpose does it serve? Which is the road to true happiness? What are death, judgment and
retribution after death? What, finally, is that ultimate inexpressible mystery which encompasses
our existence: whence do we come, and where are we going?” (Nostra Aetate 1)

In a broad sense religions in the world can be classify into two categories: monotheism and
polytheism. Today, major religions from the past still dominate the world population. These
religions are Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism. Likewise, other religions
found everywhere try to counter the restlessness of the human heart, each in its own manner,
by proposing "ways," comprising teachings, rules of life, and sacred rites. (Nostra Aetate 2)

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Judaism - the commonality with Christianity is so great. In fact it is the root, as in the inter-
relatedness of the New Testament and Old Testament. Indeed, the Church believes that by His
cross Christ, Our Peace, reconciled Jews and Gentiles. making both one in Himself. All should
see to it, then, that in catechetical work or in the preaching of the word of God they do not teach
anything that does not conform to the truth of the Gospel and the spirit of Christ. (Nostra Aetate
2)

Islam - is an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion teaching that there is only one God, and that
Muhammad is a messenger of God. Commonalities with Christianity are significant importance
of Mary and their way of peace.

Hinduism - men contemplate the divine mystery and express it through an inexhaustible
abundance of myths and through searching philosophical inquiry. They seek freedom from the
anguish of our human condition either through ascetical practices or profound meditation or a
flight to God with love and trust. (Nostra Aetate 2)

Buddhism - in its various forms, realizes the radical insufficiency of this changeable world; it
teaches a way by which men, in a devout and confident spirit, may be able either to acquire the
state of perfect liberation, or attain, by their own efforts or through higher help, supreme
illumination. (Nostra Aetate 2)

This reality of living with different religions is a challenging issue not only for Christians but to all
people who search for God. This may result to conflicting truth-claims of the world’s different
religions. Joseph Runzo outlines six possible responses to the conflicting truth-claims of the
world’s religions:

1. Naturalism holds that all religions are mistaken.

2. Religious Exclusivism maintains that only one world religion is correct and all the
others are mistaken.

3. Religious Inclusivism contends that only one world religion is fully correct but others
contain some of the truth of the one correct religion.

4. Religious Subjectivism claims that each world religion is correct in the sense that it is
good for those who adhere to it.

5. Religious Pluralism asserts that ultimately all world religions are correct, each offering
a different salvific path and partial perspective on a single transcendent reality.

6. Religious Relativism argues that at least one, and probably more than one, world
religion is correct and that the correctness of a religion is relative to the world-view of its
community of adherents.

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1. What is your attitude towards different religion? Explain.

2. Among the Joseph Runzo’s six possible responses to the conflicting truth-claims of the
world’s religions in which category does your religion belong? Why?

III. ANALYSIS (Sed contra)

Directions: Study the Catholic Church teachings on Dialogue with Religion. Describe and
explain your understanding as thoroughly as you can by answering the questions below.

What must we do as Christians? Do we stop preaching out of respect for other religions? How
do we evangelize? These questions are essentially answered by the proper understanding of
Dialogue and Proclamation. If by dialogue we mean, not only reciprocal communication and as
an act of friendship but means all positive and constructive interreligious relations with
individuals and communities of other faiths which are directed at mutual understanding and
enrichment", in obedience to truth and respect for freedom. (Dialogue and Proclamation 9)
Therefore, in interreligious dialogue, the focus is not the differences but the things that can be
agreed upon. For example, A Christian and a Muslim agrees with the idea of monotheism and
the importance of Mary, the mother of Jesus Christ. With this kind of dialogue, a Christian will
not deny his or her faith but even proclaim it with peoples of different religion without conflict.

As Christians, we share the mission of spreading the good news, the story of Jesus, to the
world, to other people of different culture and religion. This is what we called, Proclamation.
Proclamation is the communication of the Gospel message, the mystery of salvation realized by
God for all in Jesus Christ by the power of the Spirit. It is an invitation to a commitment of faith
in Jesus Christ and to entry through baptism into the community of believers which is the
Church. This proclamation can be solemn and public, as for instance on the day of Pentecost
(cf. Ac 2:5-41), or a simple private conversation (cf. Ac 8:30-38). It leads naturally to catechesis
which aims at deepening this faith. Proclamation is the foundation, centre, and summit of
evangelization. (Dialogue and Proclamation 10). When we speak of the story of Jesus, either in
dialogue or proclamation, we fulfill our mission, the mission of the Church to preach the gospel
to the world. But in a strict sense, the idea of dialogue limits proclamation in order to avoid
becoming imposing to other people with different background than ours. Rather, in the spirit of
dialogue, we are able to proclaim the good news to the world by becoming welcoming and being
welcomed by other religions and cultures.

Interreligious dialogue and proclamation, though not on the same level, are both authentic
elements of the Church's evangelizing mission. Both are legitimate and necessary. They are
intimately related, but not interchangeable: true interreligious dialogue on the part of the
Christian supposes the desire to make Jesus Christ better known, recognized and loved;
proclaiming Jesus Christ is to be carried out in the Gospel spirit of dialogue. The two activities

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remain distinct but, as experience shows, one and the same local Church, one and the same
person, can be diversely engaged in both. (Dialogue and Proclamation 77)

What is, therefore, teaching of the Church in regards to the conflicting truth-claims of different
religions? In the document Declaration on the Relation of the Church to Non-Christian
Religions, Nostra Aetate, the Church is doing her duty to evangelize and dialogue focusing on
what men have in common and what draws them to fellowship. The document is living out the
spirit of dialogue in its fullest sense. Therefore, the Church stands is this, the Catholic Church
rejects nothing that is true and holy in these religions. She regards with sincere reverence those
ways of conduct and of life, those precepts and teachings which, though differing in many
aspects from the ones she holds and sets forth, nonetheless often reflect a ray of that Truth
which enlightens all men. Indeed, she (the Church) proclaims, and ever must proclaim Christ
"the way, the truth, and the life" (John 14:6), in whom men may find the fullness of religious life,
in whom God has reconciled all things to Himself. (Nostra Aetate 2) It falls under the religious
inclusivism category of Joseph Runzo six possible responses to the conflicting truth-claims of
the world’s religions in a broad sense.

1. What is the Catholic Church stand on conflicting truth-claims among world religions? Explain.

2. What is the relationship of Dialogue and Proclamation? Explain.

IV. Action (Respondeo)

Directions: Write a reflection journal answering the question, “As Christians, how should we
proclaim our faith towards people of other religion?” See the rubrics after the input.

There exist different forms of interreligious dialogue. It may be useful to recall those mentioned
by the 1984 document of the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue(17). It spoke of four
forms, without claiming to establish among them any order of priority:

a) The dialogue of life, where people strive to live in an open and neighbourly spirit, sharing
their joys and sorrows, their human problems and preoccupations.

b) The dialogue of action, in which Christians and others collaborate for the integral
development and liberation of people.

c) The dialogue of theological exchange, where specialists seek to deepen their understanding
of their respective religious heritages, and to appreciate each other's spiritual values.

d) The dialogue of religious experience, where persons, rooted in their own religious traditions,
share their spiritual riches, for instance with regard to prayer and contemplation, faith and ways
of searching for God or the Absolute.

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Dialogue, therefore, happens in all aspects of life. After all, we all have our human joys and
pains, progress and freedom, existential questions, and spiritual experiences to share with. With
these in common, there is always a room and chance for dialogue and proclamation of our
Christian faith.

Howevere, there also exists obstacles to interreligious dialogue that is found in both parties (the
Christian and the non Christian). This is according to the document Dialogue and Proclamation
51:

a) Insufficient grounding in one's own faith.

b) Insufficient knowledge and understanding of the belief and practices of other religions,
leading to a lack of appreciation for their significance and even at times to misrepresentation.

d) Socio-political factors or some burdens of the past.

e) Wrong understanding of the meaning of terms such as conversion, baptism, dialogue, etc.

f) Self-sufficiency, lack of openness leading to defensive or aggressive attitudes.

g) A lack of conviction with regard to the value of interreligious dialogue, which some may see
as a task reserved to specialists, and others as a sign of weakness or even a betrayal of the
faith.

h) Suspicion about the other's motives in dialogue.

i) A polemical spirit when expressing religious convictions.

j) Intolerance, which is often aggravated by association with political, economic, racial and
ethnic factors, a lack, of reciprocity in dialogue which can lead to frustration.

k) Certain features of the present religious climate, e.g., growing materialism, religious
indifference, and the multiplication of religious sects which creates confusion and raises new
problems.

Many of these obstacles arise from a lack of understanding of the true nature and goal of
interreligious dialogue. These need therefore to be constantly explained. Much patience is
required. It must be remembered that the Church's commitment to dialogue is not dependent on
success in achieving mutual understanding and enrichment; rather it flows from God's initiative
in entering into a dialogue with humankind and from the example of Jesus Christ whose life,
death and resurrection gave to that dialogue its ultimate expression. (Dialogue and
Proclamation 53)

RUBRICS for the REFLECTION JOURNAL


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Detailed sharing of an experience Reflection on the presence of God in Helpful tips on what others can learn
(Part I) – 40% the experience (Part II) – 40% from their sharing
(Part III) – 20 %

100 100 100


The sharing was very detailed. The reflection clearly showed how the The tips gave a clear way for the reader
student made sense of God’s presence to learn how to dialogue with religion.
in their action.
Precise and clear words were used to
They were encouraging and convincing.
describe the action. The sharing showed a strong connection The student shared what others can
of the experience to the understanding of learn from his experience and reflection.
The student was very honest in the value of faithfulness in the context of The student gave two specific and
describing his or her feelings. Christian life. concrete actions that others can learn
from their sharing. The tips can also be
The content of the sharing was Insight about the sharing was evident. easily understood by the reader.
EXCEPTIONAL and EXPRESSIVE.
The reflection was EXCEPTIONAL.

95 95 95
The sharing of experience was very The reflection clearly showed how the The tips gave a clear way for the reader
clear. Precise and clear words were students made sense of God’s presence how to dialogue with religion.
in the given action. They were specific and concrete. The
used to describe the action.
tips were well-described.
The sharing showed a connection of the
The student was very honest in experience to the understanding of the The student gave two things or actions
describing his feelings. The content of context of how to dialogue with religion. that others can learn from their sharing.
the sharing was EXPRESSIVE.

90 90 90
The sharing of experience was very The reflection clearly showed how the The tips gave a clear way for the reader
clear. students made sense of God’s presence how to dialogue with religion.
in the given action.
They were specific and concrete. The
The sharing showed a connection of the tips were well-described. A few details
The student was very honest in experience to the understanding of the were missing.
describing his feelings. Minimal minor context of how to dialogue with religion.
details were missing. However, the The student gave two things or actions
experience was still clear. Minor lapses or misunderstanding might that others can learn from their sharing.
be present in the reflection, yet the
reflection is still CLEAR.

85 85 85
The sharing was easy to follow and The reflection showed minor difficulties The tips gave a clear way for the reader
understand. or one-two major difficulties in making how to dialogue with culture.
sense of how God is present in the
action. Tips were specific and concrete.
A lot of minor details or one major
detail is missing in the sharing. Some The student tries to draw a connection
details of the action could have been but commits minor misunderstandings or
added to make the sharing more one-two major misunderstanding.
expressive.
Despite these, the reflection is still
ADEQUATELY CLEAR and
The sharing is ADEQUATELY
ACCEPTABLE
CLEAR AND ACCEPTABLE

80 80 80
The sharing was easy to follow and There was a clear attempt to connect the The tips were too general. However,
understand. reflection to the experience. However, a there was an attempt to properly connect
lot of minor or major misunderstandings the tips to the reflection.
were committed.
A lot of minor details or few major The student gave only one thing or
details were missing in the sharing. Despite these, the reflection is still action that others can learn from their
Some details of the action could have ACCEPTABLE. sharing.

page 14
been added to make the sharing
more expressive.

75 75 75
The sharing of experience was too A general reflection was shared but The tips/s to the reader was/were too
general. The description of the there was a little or no attempt to make general. The student tried to encourage
sense of the action in relation to the how to dialogue with culture.
experience was limited and lacks
context of how to dialogue with religion.
major details.

65 65 65
No experience of doing an action A general reflection was shared but The writer failed to share specific
was shared. The lack of experience there was no attempt to make sense of things or actions that others can learn
the action in relation to the context of from their sharing.
is not given a good reason.
how to dialogue with religion.

page 15
Name:
Course & Block:
Subject: IO RE 04 - Living the Christian Vision in the Contemporary World
Output: #3 Dialogue with Poverty
Instructor/Professor:

I. STUDY (Questio)

Directions: Enlightened by the vocabulary section, share your own definition and experience of
poverty.

What is Poverty?

a. What are your experiences of poverty? Give three.

b. What are your plans to alleviate your experiences of poverty?

II. RESEARCH (Objectio)

Directions: Read and explore the notions concerning poverty. Answer the questions at the end
of the discussion.

Poverty is multifaceted. It pertains to something that one must essentially have in order to
function holistically as a human person. It may assume the common face of material poverty. Or
the rapid cases of spiritual poverty among teenagers resulting to suicide.

The most easily spotted face of poverty is the material or economical poverty. Based on
Republic Act 8425 or the Social Reform and Poverty Alleviation Act enacted on December 11,
1997, among those considered poor were individuals and families who earn below the poverty
threshold inability to meet basic needs or “minimum basic needs to survive.” In order to be
determined economically poor a poverty threshold is determined by the government.

How is poverty measured? The poverty threshold is the amount of income that can best meet
the minimum food and other needs of an individual or family. Included that includes clothing,
light, water, home or rent, transportation and communications, health and education costs, and
much more. It is not a prescribed budget, but it simply describes or describes this amount the
money can buy the minimum basic needs. The government also uses it to estimate the number
of the poor and to assess the effectiveness of anti-poverty measures. In the Philippines, the
National Poverty Threshold in the first half of the year 2018, or January to June2018, is
PHP12,577 per Filipino or PHP2,096.20 per person per month PHP69.87 per person per day.

How many therefore is the poor in the Philippines? The number of poor corresponds to the data
of poverty incidence which refers to the share of the total population or the total number of
page 16
families earning less than the poverty threshold. In the Philippines the National Poverty
Incidence is in 2018 was 16.1 percent or four millions of Filipino families. Poverty incidence of
the whole population is 21 percent or 23.1 million individual Filipinos.

But Poverty is more than these poverty threshold and incidence statistics. Here are the six faces
of poverty:

Social Poverty - includes people groups that are undervalued and have few rights. Oftentimes,
social poverty is easiest to spot when we look for people who have been silenced—they have
no say and their rights are minimized. They are often oppressed and thought of as insignificant.

Educational Poverty - Hundreds of millions of children lack education and that creates lack of
options. Education equals knowledge, skills, and training, so when education is not available,
families get trapped in the cycle of poverty for generations. Steady employment and income can
be difficult to find and a person’s basic needs can’t be met. Lack of education also makes
children more vulnerable to exploitation or abuse.

Health Poverty - may sound strange, but when a person is unhealthy it is difficult to hold down a
job and develop positive relationships. Physical and emotional health is the basis for our ability
to work, play and be in relationship with others.

Spiritual Poverty - can be summed up by the word “hopelessness.” Oftentimes, people in


poverty struggle with feelings of worthlessness and despair. Children are especially vulnerable
to these emotions and the message of despair poverty sends.

Environmental Poverty - physical surroundings play a large role in a person’s wellbeing.


Environmental factors include climate, housing options, land availability, water supply, insects
that carry disease, water-born illnesses, weather, drought, and much more.

Economic Poverty - half the world lives with a household income of less than $2.50 a day. This
level of poverty is the equal of slavery. People need an income level which allows them to
purchase what they cannot make or grow.

1. Based from the six faces/types of poverty, rate your own experience of poverty by making a
graph ranging from 0-10. 0 as lowest poverty experienced and 10 as highest poverty
experienced.

2. Below your graph, answer the question, in what type of poverty you are most poor now?
Why? What should you do to rise from this poverty?

III. ANALYSIS (Sed contra)

page 17
Directions: Study the Catholic Church teachings on Dialogue with Poverty. Describe and explain
your understanding as thoroughly as you can by answering the question below.

In economics, poverty simply means not crossing the poverty threshold line. And people above
it are not poor. If this is the case being poor has only one face but we all know that poverty
being multi-faceted is a bigger reality than that.

Saint Pope John Paul II said, “No one is so poor that he cannot give. No one is so rich that he
cannot receive.” Rich or poor, both are human beings, therefore has dignity. Its [the Church’s]
desire is that the poor should rise above poverty and wretchedness, and should better their
condition in life; and for this it strives. (Rerum Novarum 23)

Catholic Social Teaching on poverty has its foundation laid on human dignity not on its
economic nor social sphere. In RE 01 & 03, human dignity is something that can’t be taken
away. Catholic Social Teaching states that each and every person has value, are worthy of
great respect and must be free from slavery, manipulation and exploitation. We are created in
the image and likeness of God, Imago Dei.

St. Ambrose said, “It is not from your own possessions that you are bestowing aims on the poor,
you are but restoring to them what is theirs by right. For what was given to everyone for the use
of all, you have taken for your exclusive use. The earth belongs not to the rich, but to everyone.
Thus, far from giving lavishly, you are but paying part of your debt.” This idea echoes the
Catholic Social Teaching Principle of Universal Destination of Goods.

The Church preaches for us to be poor in spirit. Does this mean that the Church supports
material poverty? Of course not. It means simplicity in one’s actions towards material
possessions in order to better share the goods of the earth; and to live in excess and living
outside one’s means. “The Church’s love for the poor … is a part of her constant tradition.”
(CCC2444) This love is inspired by the Gospel of the Beatitudes, of the poverty of Jesus, and of
his concern for the poor. CCC 2444 “The Church’s love for the poor … is a part of her constant
tradition.” This love is inspired by the Gospel of the Beatitudes, of the poverty of Jesus, and of
his concern for the poor. In dialogue with poverty, material poverty is being addressed. On the
other hand, we aim to be poor spiritually (the beatitudes) in the sense that we should depend on
the providence of God, as he is the source of everything. And not act as if we do not need God
in our lives.

1. What is your understanding of the phrase, “It is not wrong to want to live better; what is wrong
is a style of life, which is presumed to be better when it is directed towards ‘having’ rather than
‘being’.” (Centissimus Annus 36 ?)

IV. ACTION (Respondeo)

page 18
Directions: Write a reflection journal answering the question, “As a Christian, how must one
dialogue with the poor?” See the rubrics after the input.

The joys and the hopes, the griefs and the anxieties of the men of this age, especially those
who are poor or in any way afflicted, these are the joys and hopes, the griefs and anxieties of
the followers of Christ. (Gaudium et Spes 1) This speaks of the mystical body of Church as
discussed in our discussion of the Spirituality of Communion. This means that these sufferings
(especially poverty) are also the pain of the Church. And by the virtue of the Principles of
Solidarity and Participation, we, the church, must walk together in alleviating our brothers and
sisters from poverty.

Living out the authentic mercy and compassion, the church must become, “a church bruised,
hurting and dirty because it has been out on the streets, rather than a church which is unhealthy
from being confined and from clinging to its own security.” (Evangeli Gaudium 49) This means
living out what Jesus Christ did. He does not only preach in his comfort zone but lived and
became one of us, in joys and hopes and in griefs and anxieties.

When doing outreach program to poor communities, do we feel like we are some kind of super
heroes that lifts them out of their sufferings? Is it all about me? Is it all about them? Remember
what Dialogue is all about. It does not only about one person, but the people who are engaging
in listening and speaking with each other. Therefore in your outreach programs as Legazpi-
Thomasians, go there and listen, care, talk, immerse, and learn? Dialogue with poverty is about
the “us”, the helper and the beneficiary; and the God who lets us remember that He is one with
the poor.

In engaging our dialogue with the poor, we must:

1. Our faith in Christ, who became poor and was always close to the poor and the outcast, is the
basis of our concern for the integral development of society’s most neglected members.
(Evangeli Gaudium 186)

We imitate his preferential option for the poor. But not only that there must be the elements of
immersion, mercy, compassion, and empowerment.

2. We are the image and likeness of God. We are able to see God with the poor and they can
see God in us. Mt 25:35-36 For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty
and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in,I needed clothes
and you clothed me, I was sick and you looked after me, I was in prison and you came to visit
me.’

Truly I tell you, whatever you did for one of the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you
did for me.’

page 19
3. We are to welcome them in our lives and let them welcome us. This shows friendship amidst
all the conditions of material poverty. Pope Francis: "Dialogue cannot be made in a laboratory. It
must be human, and if it’s human, it is with the mind, the heart and the hands."

RUBRICS for the REFLECTION JOURNAL

Detailed sharing of an experience Reflection on the presence of God in Helpful tips on what others can learn
(Part I) – 40% the experience (Part II) – 40% from their sharing
(Part III) – 20 %

100 100 100


The sharing was very detailed. The reflection clearly showed how the The tips gave a clear way for the reader
student made sense of God’s presence to learn how to dialogue with the poor.
in their action.
Precise and clear words were used to
They were encouraging and convincing.
describe the action. The sharing showed a strong connection The student shared what others can
of the experience to the understanding of learn from his experience and reflection.
The student was very honest in the context of how to dialogue with the The student gave two specific and
describing his or her feelings. poor concrete actions that others can learn
from their sharing. The tips can also be
The content of the sharing was Insight about the sharing was evident. easily understood by the reader.
EXCEPTIONAL and EXPRESSIVE.
The reflection was EXCEPTIONAL.

95 95 95
The sharing of experience was very The reflection clearly showed how the The tips gave a clear way for the reader
clear. Precise and clear words were students made sense of God’s presence how to dialogue with the poor.
in the given action. They were specific and concrete. The
used to describe the action.
tips were well-described.
The sharing showed a connection of the
The student was very honest in experience to the understanding of the The student gave two things or actions
describing his feelings. The content of context of how to dialogue with the poor that others can learn from their sharing.
the sharing was EXPRESSIVE.

90 90 90
The sharing of experience was very The reflection clearly showed how the The tips gave a clear way for the reader
clear. students made sense of God’s presence how to dialogue with the poor.
in the given action.
They were specific and concrete. The
The sharing showed a connection of the tips were well-described. A few details
The student was very honest in experience to the understanding of the were missing.
describing his feelings. Minimal minor context of how to dialogue with the poor
details were missing. However, the The student gave two things or actions
experience was still clear. Minor lapses or misunderstanding might that others can learn from their sharing.
be present in the reflection, yet the
reflection is still CLEAR.

The sharing was easy to follow and 85 85


understand. The reflection showed minor difficulties The tips gave a clear way for the reader
or one-two major difficulties in making how to dialogue with the poor.
sense of how God is present in the
A lot of minor details or one major
action. Tips were specific and concrete.
detail is missing in the sharing. Some
details of the action could have been The student tries to draw a connection
added to make the sharing more but commits minor misunderstandings or
expressive. one-two major misunderstanding.

The sharing is ADEQUATELY Despite these, the reflection is still


ADEQUATELY CLEAR and
CLEAR AND ACCEPTABLE

page 20
ACCEPTABLE

80 80 80
The sharing was easy to follow and There was a clear attempt to connect the The tips were too general. However,
understand. reflection to the experience. However, a there was an attempt to properly connect
lot of minor or major misunderstandings the tips to the reflection.
were committed.
A lot of minor details or few major The student gave only one thing or
details were missing in the sharing. Despite these, the reflection is still action that others can learn from their
Some details of the action could have ACCEPTABLE. sharing.
been added to make the sharing
more expressive.

75 75 75
The sharing of experience was too A general reflection was shared but The tips/s to the reader was/were too
general. The description of the there was a little or no attempt to make general. The student tried to encourage
sense of the action in relation to the how to dialogue with.the poor
experience was limited and lacks
context of how to dialogue with the poor
major details.

65 65 65
No experience of doing an action A general reflection was shared but The writer failed to share specific
was shared. The lack of experience there was no attempt to make sense of things or actions that others can learn
the action in relation to the context of from their sharing.
is not given a good reason.
how to dialogue with the poor

page 21