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PLACEMENT TEST

WITH MP3 AUDIO

NORTHSTAR FOURTH EDITION


NorthStar Placement Test, Fourth Edition
Copyright © 2015, 2010 by Pearson Education,
Inc. All rights reserved.
The tests in this publication are photocopiable. Pearson Education grants permission to
classroom teachers to reproduce tests for classroom use.
Pearson Education, 10 Bank Street, White Plains, NY 10606
Staff credits: The people who made up the NorthStar Placement Test team,
representing editorial, production, design, and manufacturing, are Tracey
Cataldo, Dave Dickey, Amy McCormick, Mary Rich, Robert Ruvo, and Debbie
Sistino.
Project director: Joan
Jamieson Test development:
Tony Becker Test statistics:
Don Miller
CONTENTS
About the NorthStar Placement Tests.......................................iv
The NorthStar Reading and Writing Placement Test......................................................................iv
Administration.............................................................................iv
Scoring and Placement........................................................ v
Answer Key......................................................................... vi
Scoring Rubric.................................................................... vii
The NorthStar Listening and Speaking Placement Test...............................................................viii
Administration.................................................................. viii
Scoring and Placement........................................................ x
Answer Key......................................................................... xi
Scoring Rubric.................................................................... xii
Audioscript........................................................................ xiii

The NorthStar Reading and Writing Placement Test........................................... 1


Part 1A: Reading..........................................................................2
Part 1B: Reading..........................................................................4
Part 1C: Reading..........................................................................6
Part 2: Vocabulary.......................................................................9
Part 3: Skills for Writing...........................................................12
Part 4: Writing...........................................................................14

The NorthStar Listening and Speaking Placement Test...................................................................1


Part 1A: Listening........................................................................2
Part 1B: Listening................................................................. 3
Part 1C: Listening................................................................. 5
Part 2: Skills for Speaking..........................................................6
Part 3: Vocabulary.......................................................................9
Part 4: Speaking.........................................................................11

Contents iii
ABOUT THE NORTHSTAR PLACEMENT TESTS
The NorthStar Placement Tests help you to place students into one of the five levels of the
NorthStar, Third Edition course.
This booklet includes two photocopiable tests (one for Reading and Writing and one for
Listening and Speaking), detailed instructions for administering the tests, audioscripts,
answer keys, and guidelines for scoring and placement.

The NorthStar Reading and Writing


Placement Test
ADMINISTRATION
The NorthStar Reading and Writing Placement Test is a 90-minute test designed to assess
reading and writing. Specific directions regarding the test parts and scoring are found below. In
order to administer this test, you will need the following materials:
• test
• Answer Key
• extra pencils, erasers, and pencil sharpeners, if possible
When ready to administer the test, copy the appropriate number of tests and pass out one test
per student. Students will not need an answer sheet, as they will write their answers directly
on the test. Have students write their names in the spaces provided.

Part 1. Reading (35 minutes)


The first part of the test assesses reading. Students will read several passages and excerpts and
answer the questions following them.There is a total of 20 items.

Part 2. Vocabulary (15 minutes)


The second part of the test assesses vocabulary.There is a total of 20 items.

Part 3. Skills for Writing (15 minutes)


The third part of the test assesses skills for writing.There is a total of 15 items.

Part 4. Writing (25 minutes)


The fourth part of the placement test assesses writing. Students will read a prompt on page 14 of
the test, and then they will plan and write responses to the prompt in 25 minutes. All responses
should be written on the lines provided on the test pages.

General Directions (to be read to the students after they have been given the test):
“The test will last 90 minutes.There are four parts to the test: Parts 1–3 (65 minutes); Part 4 (25
minutes).There are 15 pages. Read the directions for each section before you answer
questions.Write all answers directly on the test. Make sure that you have written your name on
each page. It is now [give time]. Let’s begin.”

iv The NorthStar Reading and Writing Placement Test


SCORING AND PLACEMENT (75 points possible)

Parts 1–3. Reading, Vocabulary, and Skills for Writing (55 points)
To score these parts of the test, use the Answer Key on page vi. For these parts, there is one
point possible per correct response.

Part 4. Writing (20 points)


Note: There should be two raters for each essay, but if you use only one rater, be sure to
double the score.
To score this part of the test, you should use the NorthStar Reading and Writing Placement
Test Scoring Rubric in the Answer Key; the rubric is found on page vii of the Answer Key.
Please read the rubric carefully before scoring the essay. Before scoring writing in Part 4, read
the story about Tim Stark in Part 1.2 of the reading section. Key points are given on page vi
in the Answer Key to guide your scoring.Your score will range from 0–10.
If you are the first rater, write your score in the upper right corner of the cover page
and fold it over so the second rater cannot see the score.
To score this part of the test, add both raters’ scores if two raters were used or double the
score if only one rater was used.

Number Correct Placement in NorthStar Reading and Writing


0–9 Too Low
10–25 NorthStar Reading and Writing 1
26–35 NorthStar Reading and Writing 2
36–50 NorthStar Reading and Writing 3
51–60 NorthStar Reading and Writing 4
61–70 NorthStar Reading and Writing 5
71–75 Too High

The NorthStar Reading and Writing Placement Test


v
The NorthStar Reading and Writing Placement Test
ANswer Key and ruBrIC

PArT 1A. reADING 2.4 (3 points—must be spelled correctly)


1.1 (1 point) 1. astonish or astonished or astonishes
1. B 2. astonishing or astonished
1.2 (2 points) 3. suspiciously
1. C 2. C 2.5 (5 points—must be spelled correctly)
1. determined or inspired
1.3 (4 points)
2. admiration
1. Scott Halley 3. Both men
3. inspired
2. Both men 4. Tim Stark 4. propose or determine or challenge
5. inspiration or determination
PArT 1B. reADING
1.4 (3 points) PArT 3: sKILLs FOr wrITING
1. C 2. D 3. B 3.1 (3 points)
1.5 (4 points) 1. tried 2. ate 3. was not or wasn’t
1. These include countries that signed the 3.2 (3 points)
Kyoto 1. more frequently than
Protocol.
2. less competitively than
2. They say there is no evidence carbon dioxide
causes global warming. or 3. as patiently as
They think the Earth may be going through a 3.3 (3 points)—Full credit is given to responses that
natural heating cycle. include at least 3 of 4.
3. They think the Earth may be going through a that the fish could hear or
natural heating cycle. or where he couldn’t hear the music or
They say there is no evidence carbon dioxide that got the music before his feedings or
causes
global warming.
2. It could hurt U.S. carmakers, for example. that saw food at the surface
3.4 (3 points)
PArT 1C. reADING 1. B 2. D 3. F
1.6 (1 point) 3.5 (3 points)
1. A 1. B 2. A 3. C
1.7 (5 points)
1. D 2. B 3. B 4. A 5. C PArT 4.wrITING
(20 points)—See scoring rubric on page vii. Multiply the
PArT 2: VOCABuLAry
score by 2.
2.1 (3 points) List of key points from reading for rater; some ideas
1. game pieces 2. opponent 3. take turns from before and after should be included for a score
of 8 or above.
2.2 (3 points)
1. predicted 2. concepts 3. attributed
2.3 (6 points—must be spelled correctly)
1. blood
2. burglar or burglary
3. heal or heals or healed
4. natural
5. depend or depends or depended
6. courage
Before Tim started farming After Tim started farming
• management consultant • still has stress
• a lot of stress • back still hurts
• back hurt • physical work
• farming has advantages

vi The NorthStar Reading and Writing Placement Test: Answer Key and Rubric
score Description

10 A response at this level includes most of the following:


• relevant information from the reading passage that describes Tim’s life (see key points) in writer’s own words
• well-developed opinions about the effects of stress and about Tim’s decision with examples
• clearly identifiable and very adequate introduction and conclusion
• clear main idea and multiple supporting sentences per paragraph
• good organization: rhetorical devices and numerous transitions to display unity/progression of information
• consistent, correct use of complex grammatical structures
• generally correct use of sophisticated vocabulary
• very few language errors throughout

8 A response at this level includes most of the following:


• relevant information from the reading passage that describes Tim’s life (see key points) in writer’s own words
• opinions about the effects of stress and about Tim’s decision with some examples/development
• identifiable and adequate introduction and conclusion
• main idea and multiple supporting sentences per paragraph
• good organization: rhetorical devices and numerous transitions to display unity/progression of information
• several attempts (with many correct) at complex grammatical structures
• some use of sophisticated vocabulary; simple vocabulary used correctly
• some language errors throughout

6 A response at this level includes most of the following:


• some information from the reading passage that describes Tim’s life (see key points) mostly in writer’s own words
• opinions about the effects of stress and about Tim’s decision
• more than one paragraph and an introduction
• main idea and some supporting sentences per paragraph but with uneven development
• inconsistent transitions to display unity/progression of information resulting in lack of coherence and organization
• good control of simple sentences but few attempts (often incorrect) at complex grammatical structures
• correct use of simple vocabulary; little evidence of sophisticated vocabulary
• several language errors throughout

4 A response at this level includes most of the following:


• some information that describes Tim’s life (see list of key points), but some is copied from reading passage
• undeveloped opinions about stress and about Tim’s decision but probably not both
• only one or two paragraphs but with main idea and some supporting sentences
• ineffective transitions to display progression of information resulting in an overall lack of coherence and organization
• some control of simple sentences and attempts at using grammar forms such as past tense and prepositional phrases
• correct use of some simple vocabulary
• several language errors throughout

2 A response at this level includes most of the following:


• some information that describes Tim’s life (see key points), but most is copied from reading passage
• undeveloped opinions about either stress or about Tim’s decision
• almost no organization of information
• several complete and incomplete sentences
• vague use of some simple vocabulary words
• several language errors per sentence/phrase

0 A response at this level includes some of the following:


• is copied from prompt and/or reading passage
• is written in a foreign language
• is completely off-topic
• is blank

Note to Teachers: Give scores of 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 for in-between responses.


The NorthStar Listening and Speaking
Placement Test
ADMINISTRATION
The NorthStar Listening and Speaking Placement Test is a 50-minute test, plus five minutes for
speaking, designed to assess listening and speaking. Specific directions regarding the test parts
and scoring are found below. In order to administer this test, you will need the following
materials:
• a CD player
• audio CD
• test
• Answer Key
• extra pencils, erasers, and pencil sharpeners, if possible
When ready to administer the test, copy the appropriate number of tests and pass out one test
per student. Students will not need an answer sheet, as they will write their answers directly
on the test. Have students write their names in the spaces provided.

Part 1. Listening (20 minutes)


Students will listen to several passages and excerpts and answer the questions following them.
Students can use any notes they have written to complete the integrated listening questions.
There is a total of 20 items.

Part 2. Skills for Speaking (15 minutes)


The second part of the test assesses skills for speaking. Students will need to complete 15 items.

Part 3. Vocabulary (15 minutes)


The third part of the test assesses skills for vocabulary.There is a total of 20 test items.

Part 4. Speaking (5 minutes for each student)


The fourth part of the placement test assesses speaking. Students will need the test pages.
One or two teachers can work with individual students “live,” or each student could be
recorded using technology (such as a computer with recording capabilities for files or CDs)
and be scored later by one or two teachers.
There are three questions.Two questions are short-answer responses checking on
comprehension of material. One question requires an extended response in which students
react to information from the listening passage and then give their opinions.
Students will read the prompt on page 11 of the test.They will listen to the listening from part
1.5 of the test, and then they will plan and speak their responses in five minutes. Students may
use notes for their responses.

General Directions (to be read to the students after they have been given the test):
“The test will last 50 minutes.Then each person will speak for about five minutes.There are four
parts to the test: Parts 1–3 (50 minutes); Part 4 (5 minutes).There are 11 pages. Read the
directions for each section before you answer questions.Write all answers directly on the test.
Make sure that you have written your name on each page. It is now [give time]. Let’s begin.”

viii The NorthStar Listening and Speaking Placement Test


Specific Directions
Part 1. Listening (20 minutes)
Turn the CD player on and insert the test CD. Play instructions and have students read along on
their test papers.Ask about volume level.Adjust as needed. Press pause. Make sure everyone
is ready to begin.Then press play.
The CD includes the listening passages followed by time to respond (20 seconds is allotted for
each question).
Once you begin, do not stop the CD until you hear the message “This is the end of the
Placement Test audio CD.” The CD also includes the first question for Part 2.

Part 2. Skills for Speaking


Continue using the CD from Part 1.
The first question is on the audio CD. Once the CD has ended, instruct the students to
continue the test.Tell them that they have 25 more minutes.

Part 3. Vocabulary
The students work on their own during this part.After 25 minutes have elapsed since students
began working on their own, say “This is the end of Parts 1 to 3.We will need to prepare for the
speaking section.”

Part 4. Speaking
Continue using the CD. Remind each student that he/she may write notes. Play instructions
and have the student read along on the test papers. Once the student has heard the listening
passage (the discussion from 1.5), press stop and announce:“You will now have about three
minutes to plan and say your three responses.”
At the end of 5 minutes, announce to the student:“This is the end of the test. Please make sure
that your name is on the first and last pages of the test.” Then, collect the test.
SCORING AND PLACEMENT (75 points possible)

Parts 1–3. Listening, Skills for Speaking, and Vocabulary (55 points)
To score these parts of the test, use the Answer Key on page xi. For these parts, there is one
point possible per correct response.
Correct spelling must be used if required in the Answer Key.

Part 4. Speaking (20 points)


Three responses were spoken for each test. Suggested answers can be found on page xi in the
Answer Key to guide your scoring.The scoring rubric for the extended response and key ideas
can be found on page xi in the Answer Key and Rubric. Your score will range from 0–1 for
both of the two short answer responses and 0–8 for the extended responses.
Two teachers should score Part 4, but if only one teacher scores, be sure to double the score.

Number Correct Placement in NorthStar Listening and Speaking


0–9 Too Low
10–25 NorthStar Listening and Speaking 1
26–35 NorthStar Listening and Speaking 2
36–50 NorthStar Listening and Speaking 3
51–60 NorthStar Listening and Speaking 4
61–70 NorthStar Listening and Speaking 5
71–75 Too High

x The NorthStar Listening and Speaking Placement Test


The NorthStar Listening and Speaking Placement Test
ANswer Key and ruBrIC

PArT 1A. LIsTeNING 2.6 (2 points)


1.1 (1 point) 1. W 2. S
1. A 2.7 (2 points)
1.2 (4 points) 1. C 2. E
1. D 2. C 3. A 4. D
PArT 3.VOCABuLAry
1.3 (2 points)
1. Not sure 3.1 (6 points; spelling must be correct)
2. Agree 1. prevent 4. promote
2. healthy 5. ashamed
PArT 1B. LIsTeNING 3. fatigue 6. addicted to
1.4 (1 point) 3.2 (3 points)
1. D 1. B 2. A 3. A
1.5 (4 points) 3.3 (6 points; spelling must be correct)
1. B 2. C 3. C 4. B 1. powerful or powerless
2. inform(s) or informed
PArT IC. LIsTeNING 3. product(s) or producer(s) or production(s)
1.6 (4 points) 4. color(s)
5. harmful or harmless
1. C 2. D 3. B 4. C
6. organize(s) or organized
1.7 (4 points)
3.4 (5 points)
1. C 2. D 3. E 4. B
1. C 2. D 3. D 4. C 5. A
PArT 2. sKILLs FOr sPeAKING
PArT 4. sPeAKING
2.1 (1 point) 1. Student’s response should reflect one of
1. 2 the professor’s ideas below:
2.2 (2 points) •what we mean by accent
1. was •accent refers to pronunciation, not dialect
2. got •children develop own identities
2.3 (3 points) On topic—1 point
1. to tell Off topic or not understandable—0 points
2. is shaking 2. Student’s response should reflect one of Maria’s
3. is introducing ideas below:
2.4 (3 points) •kids decide what slang to use
•use cool words so not to be thought of as uncool
sentence 2: had sleep slept
sentence 3: can get could •can’t believe parents allow teens to use those
get sentence 5: stop stopped words
On topic—1 point
2.5 (2 points)
Off topic or not understandable—0 points
1. Maybe you should
2. That’s a good idea 3. See scoring rubric on page xii for speaking
task. Key ideas:
•Paul’s friend Bern doesn’t speak with an accent,
but his parents (from Germany) do.
•The professor would probably disagree because
he says that kids want to separate from their
parents and fit in with other kids.

The NorthStar Listening and Speaking Placement Test: Answer Key and Rubric
xi
score Description

8 A response at this level demonstrates most of the following:


• clear and fluid speech, although it might include pauses as student thinks of ideas or has minor difficulties
with pronunciation, pacing, or intonation
• information from the listening that is relevant to the task
• in some detail why student thinks professor would agree or disagree with statement
• ability to give personal opinion, supported with examples
• ability to use complex grammar and sophisticated vocabulary
• language errors that do not really interfere with meaning

6 A response at this level demonstrates most of the following:


• generally clear, fluid speech, although it might include pauses as student searches for right words or has minor
difficulties with pronunciation, pacing, or intonation
• information from the listening that is relevant to the task
• in less detail than a response at score 8 why student thinks the professor would agree or disagree with statement
• ability to give personal opinion, supported with examples
• ability to try some complex grammar and sophisticated vocabulary
• occasional language errors that might interfere with meaning

4 A response at this level demonstrates most of the following:


• somewhat fluid speech, although it includes pauses and hesitations and difficulties with pronunciation or pacing or
little use of intonation
• little information from the listening that is relevant to the task
• agreement/disagreement of the statement by the professor but does not explain why
• ability to give personal opinion but rather weakly supported
• general ability to use simple grammar and vocabulary correctly
• several language errors that interfere with meaning

2 A response at this level demonstrates most of the following:


• very little speech that is clear and fluid as a result of long pauses
• very choppy pace and little intonation
• very little information from the listening that is relevant to the task
• ability to give personal opinion but weakly supported if at all
• very little ability to use grammar and vocabulary correctly beyond simple structures and words
• numerous language errors throughout

0 A response at this level demonstrates one or more of the following:


• attempts to address the prompt in English but includes speech that is not intelligible beyond isolated words
• mere repetition of sentences from the prompt
• response with something completely unrelated to the topic
• no attempt

Note to Teachers: Give scores of 1, 3, 5, 7 for in-between spoken responses.

xii The NorthStar Listening and Speaking Placement Test: Answer Key and Rubric
Audioscript
PArT 1.1 PArT 1.3
Time: Approx. 20 seconds Word Count: 174 words
Tina Sullivan: This is WKCP, and I’m Tina Sullivan. Dr. Time: Approx. 1 minute, 10 seconds
James Nottingham is here today to talk about children Michelle: Interesting. So, how about your son here? What
and video games. kind of games do you like?
Dr. Nottingham, I’m sure that many parents are very Boy: Well, I like action-adventure games. I think the
interested in hearing about your studies. Are video games most fun one is this game I play called Legend of
safe for children? Zelda.
Michelle: So, what makes it fun?
PArT 1.2
Boy: First of all, it’s exciting. You never know what’s
Word Count: 266 words
going to happen next. You play a character—he’s a boy
Time: Approx. 2 minutes
—and you explore different places, like forests and
Tina Sullivan: This is WKCP, and I’m Tina Sullivan. Dr. caves.
James Nottingham is here today to talk about children
and video games. Michelle: So, you just explore?
Dr. Nottingham, I’m sure that many parents are very Boy: Oh no—there’s a lot more to it than that. To win
interested in hearing about your studies. Are video games the game you have to save the princess, but first you
safe for children? have to solve puzzles and stuff. You also find weapons and
use them to fight battles against monsters along the
Dr. Nottingham: Well, one study showed that children
who play video games have more violent thoughts. way. So, it’s challenging. That makes it fun, too.
Michelle: Sounds like that game is a little violent for a kid
Tina: So, parents should not let their children play
video games. your age, don’t you think?

Dr. Nottingham: Actually, it’s not that easy. In this Boy: Well . . . I don’t know about that . . .
study children played only violent video games. Michelle: OK, so how about you? You must be the
grandfather, right? What kind of games do you play?
Tina: OK, so parents can let their children play video
games, just not the violent ones. Fantasy, simulation, Grandfather: I really like puzzle games. My favorite game
music games, these are all very popular with kids is called Tetris.
today.
PArT 1.4
Dr. Nottingham: You have a good point, but again,
another study showed that any kind of game can be Time: Approx. 11 seconds
dangerous— adventure, role-play, or even music Professor: Today I’d like to discuss what we mean by
games. What is important is how often the child plays “accent” in speech. What do we mean when we say
video games. “She speaks with an accent?” Maria?
Tina: This is getting so confusing. How often can
children play video games? That is, nonviolent PArT 1.5
games. Word Count: 363 words
Dr. Nottingham: Finally I can give you an answer. Time: Approx. 2 minutes, 20 seconds
The studies say that if children play every day, that’s a Professor: Today I’d like to discuss what we mean by
problem. You see, it’s easy for children to get addicted “accent” in speech. What do we mean when we say
to playing these games. They don’t want to do anything “She speaks with an accent?” Maria?
but sit in front of the computer all day. Maria: Doesn’t that mean the way we sound when
Tina: I have a 13-year-old. And I know exactly what we speak?
you mean. But here’s another question that people are Professor: Yes, that’s right. An accent refers to a person’s
asking. Today, adults sometimes play video games. pronunciation. Remember, it’s not the same as a dialect.
What do the studies say about this? So your assignment was to interview three people about
Dr. Nottingham: We know that violent games can be their accents. Today let’s hear about one of the people you
bad for adults and children. However, we don’t know interviewed.
about fantasy games yet. Until now we didn’t even
know that adults played these games.
Paul: I was talking to my friend Bern. His parents Sonia: I can imagine. Your body just can’t do without sleep.
came from Germany about 30 years ago. I don’t want Donald: Yeah, I know. Anyway, you said you were
to make a big deal of it, but they both sound like they learning about what?
just came to the United States. It seems so weird because
Sonia: REM sleep. It means, Rapid Eye Movement. R for
when Bern was a baby, he obviously learned to speak
from his parents. So why doesn’t Bern have a German rapid, E for eye . . .
accent? He talks just like I do. Donald: I got it. M for movement. REM. So is it
like blinking?
Professor: You’ve brought up an interesting point. It
has a lot to do with how important it is for children to Sonia: No, blinking occurs when you’re awake. And during
separate from their parents and develop their own REM it’s your eyes not your eyelids that move.
identities. Donald: Oh, so what is REM then?
Children naturally want to fit in with kids of their Sonia: It’s part of the sleep cycle. You see, you go
age group. To be accepted by them, they have to dress
through five stages of sleep. The fifth stage is REM
like their friends, talk like they do, maybe even like the sleep. During REM sleep your breathing becomes quicker
same movies they do.
and irregular, your muscles are paralyzed, and your
Paul: But not all kids want to be like everyone else. Don’t eyes move rapidly. This is when you have the most
they have a choice? dreams.
Professor: Sure. In some ways they do. For example, Donald: Since I’m not getting any sleep these days, I
they can dress the way they want to, but when it comes to guess I’m missing out on REM sleep, then.
the way they talk, it appears that they don’t
Sonia: Well, REM sleep is really important. If you
intentionally make a decision about their accent.
didn’t have REM sleep, you might have memory
Paul: So does that mean parents shouldn’t get too hung problems. Also, researchers have found that if you were
up about the way their kids speak? Maybe they deprived of REM sleep, you might have trouble
shouldn’t try to correct their children’s pronunciation. learning new things.
Professor: Well, that’s an interesting point, Paul. Can
we hear from someone else now? PArT 1.7
Maria: I was wondering about how kids learn slang. It Word Count: 378 words
seems like they make a lot of decisions about what slang Time: Approx. 2 minutes, 10 seconds
words to use. Especially teenagers. If a word is cool Michelle Trudeau: Teenagers, when allowed to, sleep
one day, they immediately decide to use that word so nearly nine and a half hours every night—as much
they won’t be stereotyped as “uncool.” Listen to how as young children. But unlike young children, even
teenagers talk today! I can’t believe their parents let them when teens do get their full sleep, they’re still out of
use some of those words. sync with everybody else. They have waves of
sleepiness in the daytime and then surges of energy
PArT 1.6 in the evening, making them wide awake late at night.
Word Count: 290 words But not, Carskadon has discovered, for the reasons
Time: Approx. 2 minutes most of us assume.
Donald: Hey Sonia, I went to the lecture hall, but there Mary Carskadon: We kind of always thought that
was no one there. adolescents stayed up late because they liked to—
Sonia: Well, if you ever went to class, you’d know which they do—and because there are plenty of
that we were meeting in Jones Hall today. things to do— which there are. . . .
Donald: No wonder. Anyway, what’d I MT: But there’s also a big push from biology that
makes teenagers such night owls. It comes from that
miss? Sonia: We finished the unit on mighty sleep hormone, melatonin.
melatonin and . . . Donald: What? MC: Melatonin is a wonderfully simple signal that
Sonia: Melatonin, the “sleep hormone.” I’ll give you turns on in the evening . . .
my notes from last week so you can catch up. MT: You’re getting sleepy. . . .
Now we’re starting the unit on REM sleep.
MC: And it turns off in the morning.
Donald: Boy, I’m really behind. I’ve missed class
because I keep oversleeping. MT: And you awaken. During adolescence, melatonin isn’t
secreted until around 11:00 P.M., several hours later than
Sonia: Sounds like you need a new alarm clock. it is in childhood. So the typical teenager doesn’t
Donald: What I need is a good night’s sleep. I’ve even get sleepy until that melatonin surge signals the
had insomnia lately, and I’m so sleep-deprived. brain that it’s night, no matter how early the teen goes
When I’m awake, I’m so cranky and irritable even I to bed. And the melatonin doesn’t shut off until nine
can’t stand to be around myself. hours later, around 8:00 A.M. But, of course, most high
schools start around
xiv The NorthStar Listening and Speaking
Placement Test: Audioscript
7:30. The result is all too evident. A teenager’s body Paul: I was talking to my friend, Bern. His parents
may be in the classroom, but his brain is still asleep on came from Germany about 30 years ago. I don’t want
the pillow. to make a big deal of it, but they both sound like they
Student: I’ll wake up and I’ll just feel miserable, just just came to the United States. It seems so weird because
kind of like, ugh, what’s wrong with me, you know? when Bern was a baby, he obviously learned to speak
from his parents. So why doesn’t Bern have a German
William Dement: An adolescent, and particularly the accent? He talks just like I do.
adolescent in high school, is almost bound to get
severely sleep-deprived. Professor: You’ve brought up an interesting point. It
has a lot to do with how important it is for children to
MT: That’s William Dement of Stanford University. separate from their parents and develop their own
Bill Dement is Dr. Sleep, captivated by the mysteries of
identities.
sleep for decades, creating the specialty of sleep
Children naturally want to fit in with kids of their
medicine. As a scientist, Dement has contributed
age group. To be accepted by them, they have to dress
more to our understanding of what happens to each
like their friends, talk like they do, maybe even like the
of us at night during those hours of unconsciousness
same movies they do.
than perhaps any other researcher. These days,
Dement makes frequent forays out of his lab—an Paul: But not all kids want to be like everyone else.
ambassador at large from the field of sleep research. Don’t they have a choice?
Teenagers, parents, and school authorities need to know Professor: Sure. In some ways they do. For example,
more about the science of sleep, he says, and how they can dress the way they want to, but when it comes to
important it is to young people’s health. the way they talk, it appears that they don’t
intentionally make a decision about their accent.
PArT 2.1 Paul: So does that mean parents shouldn’t get too hung
something or other up about the way their kids speak? Maybe they
1. each other shouldn’t try to correct their children’s pronunciation.
Professor: Well, that’s an interesting point, Paul. Can we
PArT 4 (sAme As PArT 1.5) hear from someone else now?
Word Count: 363 words Maria: I was wondering about how kids learn slang.
Time: Approx. 2 minutes, 20 seconds It seems like they make a lot of decisions about what
Professor: Today I’d like to discuss what we mean by slang words to use. Especially teenagers. If a word is
“accent” in speech. What do we mean when we say cool one day, they immediately decide to use that word
“She speaks with an accent?” Maria? so they won’t be stereotyped as “uncool.” Listen to how
teenagers talk today! I can’t believe their parents let
Maria: Doesn’t that mean the way we sound when
them use some of those words.
we speak?
Professor: Yes, that’s right. An accent refers to a person’s
pronunciation. Remember, it’s not the same as a dialect.
So your assignment was to interview three people about
their accents. Today let’s hear about one of the people
you interviewed.

The NorthStar Listening and Speaking Placement Test: Audioscript


xv
THE NORTHSTAR READING AND
WRITING PLACEMENT TEST
The test will last 90 minutes. There are four parts to the test: Parts 1–3 (65
minutes); Part 4 (25 minutes). The test is 15 pages. Read the directions for each
section before you answer questions.
Answer every question. Write all answers directly on the test.
Make sure that you have written your name on each test page.

1
NorthStar Placement Test Name:
Reading and Writing

PART 1A: READING


1.1 Read the passage about Tim Stark. Choose the best prediction of what Tim will
do.There is only one right answer.
Tim Stark was a busy and successful management consultant 1 in New York City.
He was under a lot of stress from his job. His back hurt. To relax on weekends, Tim
started growing tomatoes in his apartment. First he grew a few tomatoes. Then he
grew more. A year later, his apartment was full of 3,000 healthy red tomato plants!
1
management consultant: someone who gives business advice to companies
A. Tim will buy a smaller apartment.
B. Tim will become a farmer.
C. Tim will stop growing tomatoes.
D. Tim will try to fix his back.
1.2 Now, read the entire story. Use the information to choose the correct answers.
Tim Stark was a busy and successful management consultant 1 in New York City.
He was under a lot of stress from his job. His back hurt. To relax on weekends, Tim
started growing tomatoes in his apartment. First he grew a few tomatoes. Then he
grew more. A year later, his apartment was full of 3,000 healthy red tomato plants!
Then, one day, Tim made a decision that needed a lot of courage. He quit his
management consultant job to become a farmer. Now Tim raises a variety of crops
on a small farm in Pennsylvania, two hours away from New York. He is still under
a lot of stress: he often works until sunset, and has a lot of responsibilities, such as
watering his crops, harvesting2 them, and bringing them to the market in his old
white truck. Tim says his back still hurts, but he likes living close to nature and
working in his fields. Tim believes being a farmer has many advantages. “My
tomatoes need me, and I need them,” he says.
1
management consultant: someone who gives business advice to companies
2
harvesting: collecting a crop when it is ready to eat
1. Now, Tim lives .
A. in an apartment in Pennsylvania
B. in an apartment in New York
C. on a farm in Pennsylvania
D. on a farm in New York

2 © 2015 by Pearson Education, Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use.
2. Tim’s favorite part of being a farmer is probably .
A. working until sunset
B. driving his truck
C. walking in his fields
D. watering his crops
1.3 Read the passage by Christopher Blum.Write whether the main idea
describes Tim Stark, Scott Halley, or both men. One answer is already given.
Scott Halley was a farmer . . . until a year ago. But the farm kept losing money.
With a heavy heart but a clear head, Mr. Halley became one of the thousands of
American farmers who sell their land each year. What surprised Mr. Halley and
others is that the move to the city was so easy. The farmers are finding jobs, and
their families are enjoying the city way of life.
Mr. Halley found a good job working as a scientist at North Dakota State
University. His salary is now twice what it was when he was a farmer. But even for
those farmers who find good jobs, there is a price to pay for leaving farming. “It’s
not just about making money but about the other rewards that farming can bring . . .
working land your parents’ parents worked, spending your days in nature, caring for
animals,” said Dr. Michael Rosmann, a farmer and psychologist who helps farmers.
Mr. Halley feels the pull of the land every day. Once a week, he drives eight hours to
work a small piece of his old farm, just to keep his connection to the land.
It was hard to leave, but Mr. Halley knows he did the right thing. For most
families that leave the land, salary goes up and the stress from having little money
goes down. Both parents and children are happier.
It is sometimes necessary to change
careers. Answer: Both men

1. Farmers don’t make enough money to live.


Answer:
2. It is important to be connected to the land.
Answer:
3. Farmers are under a lot of
stress. Answer:
4. Working in the city doesn’t have many
rewards. Answer:
PART 1B: READING
1.4 Read the article. Use the information to choose the correct answers.
In the words of most scientists, global warming works something like this: humans
burn fossil fuels, which release greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. As a result,
the atmosphere becomes thicker and traps more of the sun’s energy. Consequently,
the Earth gets warmer, and various environmental problems result. If one accepts
this explanation, then the problem of climate change begins with the use of fossil
fuels.
Supporters of not using fossil fuels say it would bring both environmental and
economic benefits. If cars used less fuel, people would save money by not having
to go to the gas station as often. Furthermore, cars would emit less carbon dioxide,
a greenhouse gas. Currently, 6% of the carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere
comes from cars in the United States. Supporters say this number could easily be
reduced to 4%. Currently, the average car in the U.S. gets 27 miles per gallon of
gas. Twenty years ago, it was only 17 miles per gallon. Now, the technology exists
for cars to get 36 or more miles per gallon.
Other people are not so sure. Some economists say there is no evidence that
carbon dioxide causes global warming. They also argue such rules could
seriously harm U.S. carmakers and make cars too expensive for the average
person.
According to General Motors Vice Chairman Bob Lutz, following these rules would
cost $5,000 to $7,000 more per car.
Environmentalists are quick to disagree with Lutz’s opinion. “Everyone has
to adapt to climate change,” says Marie Lefferts of Earth First, an organization
that studies climate change. “That includes the car companies.”
1. Most scientists think the origin of global warming is .
A. warmer temperatures in the ocean
B. the increasingly thin atmosphere
C. humans’ use of fossil fuels
D. heat from the sun’s energy
2. Scientists know that carbon dioxide .
A. is a useful fossil fuel
B. leads to cooler temperatures
C. could help the environment
D. comes from the burning of fossil fuels
3. Today most cars in the U.S. get miles per gallon.
A. 36
B. 27
C. 20
D. 17
1.5 Read the passage about climate change. Use this reading and the reading from
Part 1.4 to complete the outline on the next page.Write the details in the box. Not
all details will be used. One answer is already given.
For the past decade, there have been angry debates over whether our planet is
heating up and whose fault it is. Clearly, the experts can’t agree. So, what is
the average person supposed to think, or do, about this issue?
Can carbon dioxide produced by humans cause climate change? In 1988, a
group of scientists called the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) met to
discuss three critical issues: 1) how our lifestyles affect the Earth’s climate, 2) how
climate change would affect us in the future, and 3) how exactly to deal with
climate change. Later, the IPCC recommendations were used to write the Kyoto
Protocol, a 1997 agreement that addressed our role in the Earth’s changing
atmosphere and set international limits for gas emissions.
A few governments, including the United States and Saudi Arabia, and some
companies don’t support the Kyoto Protocol. They think achieving the limits
recommended by the Protocol would cost too much money and be bad for
business. Scientists retained1 by these governments and companies argue that
recent climate change is not actually caused by humans. These scientists don’t
think we really need to change our lifestyles; that is, we should continue to drive,
fly, and live normally. They present evidence they say proves that the Earth is
going through a normal heating and cooling cycle, as it has done throughout its
history.
So, is there a link between humans and climate change or not? To reach an
educated opinion, it is important to think about the people who make scientific
claims and what their purposes may be.
1
retained: paid to work for a company now and in the future
(continued on next page)
Details from Readings in Parts 1.4 and 1.5:
We must use good judgment and ask where facts come from.
It could hurt U.S. carmakers, for example.
They think the Earth may be going through a natural heating cycle.
Even simple suggestions can cause controversy.
They say there is no evidence carbon dioxide causes global warming.
For example, if cars used less gas, people would save money.
These include countries that signed the Kyoto Protocol.

Summary Outline

There have been angry debates over global warming.


Even simple suggestions can cause controversy.
Some countries and organizations think humans must act to stop climate change. (1)
Other countries and organizations think humans are not the cause of global warming.
(2)
(3)
These groups believe limiting our use of fuel is bad for business. (4)

PART 1C: READING


1.6 Read the beginning of an interview in a magazine. Choose the best prediction
of what the reading will be about.There is only one right answer.
INTERVIEWER: Welcome to Teen Counseling, Denny.
DENNY: Thank you. For a long time, I yearned for a job where I would
feel that I was part of a family, and that’s how I feel here at the
Counseling Center.
INTERVIEWER: You’ve had an interesting career path. Can you tell us about how you
got interested in counseling?
A. Denny’s career in counseling
B. the Teen Counseling Center
C. the importance of family
D. Denny’s interest in teenagers
1.7 Now, read the entire interview with Denny. Use the information to choose
the best answers.
INTERVIEWER: Welcome to Teen Counseling, Denny.
DENNY: Thank you. For a long time, I yearned for a job where I would
feel that I was part of a family, and that’s how I feel here at the
Counseling Center.
INTERVIEWER: You’ve had an interesting career path. Can you tell us about how you
got interested in counseling?
DENNY: Well, I originally studied business in college. I was raised to think
that I’d end up in a business-related career, like my parents. In fact,
I did work at a small import-export firm for a few years, crunching
numbers, working on contracts. In that job, though, I always felt so
isolated.
INTERVIEWER: It sounds like you really struggled to find meaning in your desk job.
DENNY: I did. It was confusing for me. Over time, I started feeling real
hopelessness in my job. Finally, I quit the import-export
company and started working in my parents’ restaurant. That
was a dead-end1 too.
INTERVIEWER: How did you get from your restaurant job into counseling?
DENNY: Well, one day, an extraordinary thing happened. I was in the
restaurant, and I overheard a couple of the waitresses chatting
about various things—school, their parents, their friends, their jobs.
I immediately related to their issues, and I wanted to help them.
That night, I went home and got online and started researching
careers in counseling. Immediately, I felt this sense of freedom. I
knew that I needed to go back to school and become a counselor.
INTERVIEWER: Then you enrolled in the Clover Hill Community College?
DENNY: I did, and as soon as I started school, my world was transformed. I
loved my instructors and my classes. I was eager to do my
homework and learn more. I could hardly wait to start actually
counseling kids.
INTERVIEWER: That’s when you ended up here at Teen Counseling?
DENNY: Right. Teen Counseling had an opening for an intern. For me, the
position was a dream-come-true. Now, every day, I get the chance to
talk with young people about their lives . . . and I get paid for it! I
feel that I am making a real connection with them, literally touching
their lives, and it is like paradise2 for me.
1
dead-end: a path that ends, or an uninteresting path
2
paradise: something that is beautiful and
perfect
(continued on next
page)
1. Denny talks a lot about his .
A. parents’ careers
B. need for a family
C. job in the import-export firm
D. path to a counseling career
2. At his job with the import-export firm, Denny .
A. traveled a lot
B. sat in an office
C. worked on ships and planes
D. coordinated his work with a college
3. Denny started looking for another career for all of the following reasons except
.
A. he felt isolated
B. he wanted to earn more money
C. he wasn’t interested in working in his parents’ business
D. the waitress’s conversation drew him in
4. When he started to study counseling, Denny felt .
A. enthusiastic
B. nervous
C. isolated
D. stuck
5. Denny’s world was transformed because he .
A. was confused about his job
B. had to go back to school
C. found something he liked doing
D. began counseling young children
PART 2: VOCABULARY
2.1 Read the paragraph about chess. Use the words from the box to fill in the blanks.
Not all of the words will be used. One answer is already given.

board game combine opponent


characters game pieces take turns

Chess was originally a board game , but now it is a computer game as


well. In chess, there are two different color (1) : black and
white.
Each player tries to take those of his (2) . The two players
(3) moving one piece at a time.
2.2 Use the words from the box to complete the sentences. Not all of the words will be
used. One answer is already given.

attributed conditioned evolutions prevail


concepts evaluation predicted resembled

The rats were conditioned to push a button when they arrived at the
end of the maze.
1. Scientists that the rats would continue to push the button
even after they had stopped giving them rewards.
2. The of learning, performing, imitating, and seeking
reward are similar but different in important ways.
3. Some researchers the rats’ performance to boredom.
2.3 Complete the chart with the missing word forms.Write the words in the boxes. Be
sure to use correct spelling. One answer is already given.

Noun Verb Adjective


combination combine combined

1. bleed bloody

2. burglarize

healer 3. healed

nature 4.
dependent 5. dependent

6. courageous

2.4 Complete the chart with the missing word forms.Write the words in the boxes. Be
sure to use correct spelling. One answer is already given.

Noun Verb Adjective Adverb


astonishment 1. 2. astonishingly

suspect suspect suspicious 3.

10 © 2015 by Pearson Education, Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use.
2.5 Complete the sentences using the correct form of a word from the chart. Be sure
to use correct spelling. One answer is already given.

Noun Verb Adjective Adverb


admiration admire admiring admiringly

challenge challenge challenging

determination determine determined

inspiration inspire inspired inspirationally

proposal propose proposed

Jacob always loved to take on a big challenge .


1. Jacob was to build a bicycle for every boy in the home.
2. Those who know about Mother Teresa’s acts of devotion look at her with great
.
3. The generosity of Oprah Winfrey has other donors to
give, too.
4. Some schools that community service should be a
requirement.
5. He has provided for many people who want to help
others.
PART 3: SKILLS FOR WRITING
3.1 Write the correct past tense form of the verb in parentheses. One
answer is already given.
For a long time, Tim (want) wanted to be a farmer.
1. The first time Tim (try) to grow tomatoes was in his
apartment.
2. When Tim (eat) the tomatoes, he liked the flavor.
3. His old job (not be) interesting.
3.2 Read the sentences. Fill in the blanks with the correct comparative form of the
adverb in parentheses.
Men are not always polite when they speak. Women are usually more
polite. Generally, women speak more politely than
men.
(politely)
1. Male friends often only talk once a week. Female friends may talk every day.
Usually, female friends male friends.
talk (frequently
)
2. Boys’ games always need a winner. Girls often don’t care who wins.
In general, girls boys.
play (competitively
)
3. Men sometimes interrupt at meetings. Usually, women don’t do this.
People say men don’t women.
listen (patiently
)

3.3 Read the article about Guillermo’s goldfish experiment. Underline adjective
clauses. One is already underlined. Underline three (3) more adjective
clauses.
Every day before feeding the goldfish that he was trying to train, Guillermo placed
a music box next to the fish’s bowl. Then he played a loud song that the fish could
hear for one minute. After the minute, Guillermo fed the fish.
Guillermo put the control fish in a place where he couldn’t hear the music. “I fed
the control fish directly, without playing any music,” explained Guillermo.
To Guillermo’s surprise, the fish that got the music before his feedings almost
immediately learned that food would follow the music. Guillermo reported that
within a few days, “as soon as the music started, the fish swam quickly to the
surface” to eat. In fact, he swam to the surface just as fast as the fish that saw food
at the surface.
3.4 Write the letter of each detail next to the opinion it supports. Not all details will be
used. One answer is already given.

Details
They heal from the crime and better understand the situation.
Statues, buildings, and mailboxes have to be repainted.
Last year robbers broke into fifty homes.
They sometimes beat victims up or even kill them.
They should clean parks and pick up garbage.
Prisoners need job training and education.

C Burglary is a serious problem in our town.


1. Drawing on buildings causes serious damage.
2. Robbers often hurt people.
3. The government should help prisoners more.
3.5 Read the story about Peter and Barbara’s hike.Write the letter of the correct
subordinator or transition to complete the story. Not all of the choices will
be used. One answer is already given.
Peter and Barbara had a frightening experience on their hiking trip last Friday.
They forgot to bring the food and water they had packed! E , they did have some
fruit juice, but not a lot. , they really wanted to do their hike anyway. By the
1.
time they reached the top of the mountain, they had already drunk all of their juice,
and they were really thirsty. , they were getting hungry. So, they hiked down as
2.
fast as they could. There, they found a new surprise! , they had left their car
3.
keys on the top of the mountain! They didn’t want to hike back up, but they had to.
A. Also
B. However
C. In the same way that they had left their food in the car
D. Just as they were hungry and thirsty on their first round-trip
E. While they didn’t have any water
F. As a result
PART 4:WRITING

Re-read the story about Tim Stark from Part 1.2.


Tim Stark was a busy and successful management consultant 1 in New York City.
He was under a lot of stress from his job. His back hurt. To relax on weekends, Tim
started growing tomatoes in his apartment. First he grew a few tomatoes. Then he
grew more. A year later, his apartment was full of 3,000 healthy red tomato plants!
Then, one day, Tim made a decision that needed a lot of courage. He quit his
management consultant job to become a farmer. Now Tim raises a variety of crops
on a small farm in Pennsylvania, two hours away from New York. He is still under
a lot of stress: he often works until sunset, and has a lot of responsibilities, such as
watering his crops, harvesting2 them, and bringing them to the market in his old
white truck. Tim says his back still hurts, but he likes living close to nature and
working in his fields. Tim believes being a farmer has many advantages. “My
tomatoes need me, and I need them,” he says.
1
management consultant: someone who gives business advice to companies
2
harvesting: collecting a crop when it is ready to eat

Assignment: Write an essay. Describe how Tim’s life changed when he became a
farmer. Then, give your opinions about Tim’s decision and the effects of stress.
• Take notes in the space below before you start writing.
• Describe Tim’s life before and after he started farming.
• Support your opinions with examples from people you know or
have heard about.
• Include an introduction and a conclusion.
• Do not copy phrases or sentences from the reading passage.

Planning space
THIS IS THE END OF THE TEST!

PLEASE WRITE YOUR NAME AND


RETURN THE TEST TO YOUR TEACHER.
THE NORTHSTAR LISTENING AND
SPEAKING PLACEMENT TEST
The test will last 55 minutes. There are four parts to the test: Parts 1–3 (50
minutes); Part 4 (5 minutes). The test is 11 pages. Read the directions for each
section before you answer questions.
Answer every question. Write all answers directly on the test.
Make sure that you have written your name on each test page.

1
NorthStar Placement Test Name:
Listening and Speaking

Listen to a passage.Then, you will have 20 seconds to answer each question.You


will hear a beep when the next passage will begin.

PART 1A: LISTENING

1.1 Listen to the beginning of an interview. Choose the best prediction of what the
rest of the interview is about.There is only one right answer.
A. the safety of video games for children
B. the use of video games to teach children
C. parents who are interested in children’s video games
D. the number of studies about children’s video games

1.2 Now listen to the entire interview. Use the information to choose the correct answers.
1. This interview is mainly about .
A. how often children should play video games
B. which video games are safe for children
C. what violent games do to children
D. how video games affect children
2. Dr. Nottingham said some studies show that .
A. it is safe for children to play fantasy and adventure games
B. children who play video games every day are more violent
C. children who play violent video games have more violent thoughts
D. video games are not harmful for children if they play every week
3. How do Dr. Nottingham and Tina feel about violent video games?
A. They agree that violent video games are bad.
B. They disagree that violent video games are bad.
C. They are unsure that violent video games are bad.
D. They do not care about violent video games.

2 © 2015 by Pearson Education, Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use.
4. When Dr. Nottingham says, “You see, it’s easy for children to get addicted
to playing these games,” why does Tina say, “I have a 13-year-old. And I
know exactly what you mean”?
A. She doesn’t want her children to be addicted to video games.
B. She wants to tell Dr. Nottingham about her family.
C. She wants advice from Dr. Nottingham about her family.
D. She understands and agrees with Dr. Nottingham.

1.3 Listen to a family being interviewed at a video exhibition. Use the


information from this listening and the listening in Part 1.2 for your
answers. Check (✓) the box that shows how each person feels about the
opinion. One answer is already given.
Opinion: It is OK for children to play Action/Adventure video games.

Agree Disagree Not sure

Grandfather ✓
1. Dr. Nottingham

2. Boy

PART IB: LISTENING

1.4 Listen to the beginning of the class discussion.What does it mean when
we say someone speaks with an accent? Choose the correct answer.
1. What does it mean when we say someone “speaks with an accent”?
A. the way he or she acts when talking with others
B. the way he or she fits in when talking with others
C. the way he or she looks when talking with others
D. the way he or she sounds when talking with others
1.5 Now listen to the entire discussion. Use the information to choose the
correct answers.
1. The discussion is about how accents relate to people’s .
A. dialects
B. identities
C. parents
D. slang
2. The professor says that many children want to their
parents.
A. dress the same as
B. fit in with
C. separate from
D. speak like
3. Whose parents came from Germany?
A. the male student’s
B. the female student’s
C. Bern’s
D. the professor’s
4. Which person feels negatively about the way teenagers talk today?
A. the male student
B. the female student
C. Bern
D. the professor
PART IC: LISTENING

1.6 Listen to a conversation. Use the information to choose the correct answers.
1. What happens during REM sleep?
A. You begin to breathe slowly.
B. A sleep hormone is released.
C. Your muscles don’t move.
D. You have problems with memory.
2. During non-REM sleep .
A. you have bad dreams
B. you are not fully asleep
C. your eyes move rapidly
D. your breathing is regular
3. If you are deprived of REM sleep, you might have trouble .
A. moving your eyes
B. learning new things
C. falling back to sleep
D. releasing sleep hormones
4. Why does Donald say “What”?
A. He wants Sonia to repeat what she said.
B. He wants Sonia to speak more loudly.
C. He wants Sonia to give an explanation.
D. He wants Sonia to continue with what she was saying.
1.7 Listen to the interview about teen sleep. Use information from this interview
and the conversation in Part 1.6 to complete the outline. Use the letters of the
phrases to complete the outline. Not all answers will be used. One answer is
already given.
A. can occur after 10 minutes
B. can make you feel miserable
C. is a stage of sleep
D. can affect memory
E. is a hormone released to make you sleepy
F. can occur when you first fall asleep
G. is called rapid eye movement

I. Sleep
A. REM sleep
1. G
(1) 2.
(2) a. lack of REM sleep
B. Melatonin
(3) 1.
(4) a. lack of sleep

PART 2: SKILLS FOR SPEAKING

2.1 Listen to the words or phrases.Write the number of words you hear. One
answer is already given.
3 words
1. words

This is the end of the audio section of the test. Now, you have 25 minutes to
complete the written portion of the test.
2.2 Read the conversation between the policeman and a woman. Fill in the blanks
with the correct form of the verb in parentheses. One answer is already given.

POLICEMAN: Where were you on Monday afternoon?


(be)
WOMAN: Well, riding on the bus. Why?
1. (be)
I
POLICEMAN: Did you see a woman getting on the bus?

WOMAN: Yes,
she on the bus at 33rd Street.
2. (get
)
POLICEMAN: OK. Thank you for your time.

2.3 Complete the commercial. Fill in the blanks using the correct verb form: either
infinitive
or present progressive. One answer is already given.

ANNOUNCER: Are you having trouble remembering things? If so, I


(have)
want you about a new solution. This little pill is
1. (tell
)
called Don’t Forget. It is so effective you’ll never suffer the

embarrassment that Jim did. Look at Jim now, after a week of

Don’t

Forget. He is at a party, hands with his boss,


2. (shake
he )
and with no fear, he his wife, Elena.
3. (introduce)
2.4 Read the paragraph.There are four present unreal conditional verb errors in the
paragraph.Write the correct form of the verb on the lines below. One answer is
already given.
If I don’t have a cup of coffee after dinner, I would sleep better. If I had sleep
better, I could get up earlier too. If I got up earlier, I can get to work on time. At
work, I wouldn’t be yawning and falling asleep at my desk. I would get much
more accomplished if I stop drinking coffee after dinner.
didn’t
1.
2.
3.
2.5 Use an expression from the box to complete each sentence. One
answer is already given.

How about That’s a good idea What’s the matter


Maybe you should That’s too bad

OLIVER: What’s the matter ? You look miserable.


SILVIA: I didn’t get any sleep. My husband was snoring all night.
1. OLIVER: give him some Snore No More.
He can take a pill one hour before he goes to bed, and you’ll both
sleep like babies.
2. SILVIA: . I’ll try it tonight.
2.6 Read the sentences.Write S for a strong opinion, W for a weak opinion, and N if it
is not an opinion sentence.
1. It seems like people would be happier and healthier if they ran more.
2. I think my story can inspire others to keep a positive attitude.
2.7 Below are five facts about John, a high school senior, and three elements of
personal achievement. Choose the two facts that are elements of personal
achievement.Write the letter of each fact next to the element it represents. One
answer is already given.

Elements of Personal Achievement Facts about John

D A. John grew up in a neighborhood of poverty.


Background

1. Accomplishment B. John thinks he will get along well with students at


Simpson College.

2. Life Lesson C. John stayed in high school despite being poor and
having to work.

D. John hopes to attend Simpson College next year.

E. John learned that hard work and dedication can help


anyone succeed.
PART 3:VOCABULARY
3.1 Fill in the blanks with the words from the box. Not all words will be used. Be
sure to use correct spelling. One answer is already given.

addicted to endurance healthy overcome promote


ashamed fatigue intentionally prevent simply

Some say to lose weight you simply have to make up your mind.
1. Most quick and easy diets will not you from gaining
weight again.
2. If you count your calories, you will lose weight and have a
lifestyle.
3. Lack of sleep leads to , and this can affect your alertness.
4. Advertisers will include emotional appeals to their
product.
5. I’m not to admit that I prefer to take it easy in the morning.
6. Every night I used to turn on the TV; I suddenly realized that I was
it.
3.2 Choose the word that best completes the sentence. There is only one right answer.
1. A week ago someone committed a in our town.
A. challenge
B. crime
C. habit
D. prison
2. After one year of running, I was able to my dream.
A. achieve
B. alert
C. give
D. limit
(continued on next page)
3. Before I ate my dinner, I turned on the television to the
news.
A. catch
B. create
C. plead
D. prove
3.3 Complete the chart with the missing word forms. Write the words in the boxes.
Be sure to use correct spelling. One answer is already given.

Noun Verb Adjective


selection select

power 1.
information 2.

3. produce

4. colorful

harm harm 5.
organization 6.

3.4 Choose the word form that best completes the statement. There is only one right answer.
1. means without a name.
A. Forename
B. Misname
C. Nameless
D. Nameful
2. means to be born again.
A. Foreborn
B. Inborn
C. Misborn
D. Reborn

10 © 2015 by Pearson Education, Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for classroom use.
3. means not clear.
A. Disclear
B. Inclear
C. Nonclear
D. Unclear
4. means bad luck.
A. Disfortune
B. Imfortune
C. Misfortune
D. Refortune
5. means hiding the truth.
A. Dishonest
B. Forehonest
C. Nonhonest
D. Rehonest

PART 4: SPEAKING

Listen to the class discussion. You may take notes in the space on the next page.
Then, complete the three activities below.
1. Say one thing that the professor discussed with the class. (5–20 seconds)
2. Say one thing that the female student, Maria, thought about teenagers
today. (5–20 seconds)
3. Now, you will have 1–2 minutes. Speak about whether the professor
would agree or disagree with this statement and then give your opinion:
“A person speaks the way his or her parents do.”
• Include information from the listening.
• Explain why you think the professor agrees or disagrees.
• Give your opinion and support it with examples.
THIS IS THE END OF THE TEST!

PLEASE WRITE YOUR NAME AND


RETURN THE TEST TO YOUR TEACHER.