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SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

HUMANITIES 1
CREATIVE WRITING

Module 1
Lesson 1: Academic Text and Structure

FIRST SEMESTER
FIRST QUARTER

S.Y. 2020-2021
1st Edition
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

HUMANITIES 1: CREATIVE WRITING

THE HFCFI VISION, MISSION, CORE VALUES


VISION
The Furigay Colleges Foundation, Inc. aims to be locally or nationally recognized
as a leading school in the application of emerging technologies that facilitate
learning to the next generation

MISSION
To realize the vision, the Furigay Colleges targets to:
1. Provides quality education that meets student diversity by utilizing E-learning as
alternative solution to traditional schooling.
2. Build an institutional capacity which is to integrate and implement technologies
into teaching and learning practices, generate economies of scale, and increase
their development across the institution.
3. A dynamic value-driven education that is accessible and suitable for everyone.

CORE VALUES
Humility
Fair
Courage
Focused
Integrity

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HUMANITIES 1: CREATIVE WRITING

OVERVIEW

Hi, welcome to Senior High School!


I am so delighted to see you
You must have been experiencing a lot of adjustments now that classes
are on again! Well I want to let you know we are happy to see you and we
will help you get through with your new learning adventure. Through this
module your learning ride will be easier and more fun!

Hello, Apprentice Writer! Welcome to your Creative Writing module.


There, you got baptized. It’s a pretty name too! Just listen to the sound of it – Apprentice Writer.
You are not just an apprentice; you are also a writer! Not just a wannabe writer, but a real writer-in-training
with an awe-inspiring, great name. How cool is that?
There are nine lessons in this module. The first two lessons tackle the big concept of Creative Writing,
and its relevance in your modern, gadget-independent life. The next four lessons, you will explore the literary
genre called Fiction, its elements and techniques, and all its other accoutrement. In the last three lessons,
you will focus your attention on writing Short Fiction (a.k.a. Short Story), and understand its position in the
present reality of the literary and publishing world.

All throughout this lesson – and all throughout this module, for that matter – there will be writing. Yes, you read that right the
first time; but let it be said again: THERE … WILL … BE … WRITING! After all, this course is called Creative Writing, and your new
amazing name is Apprentice Writer. Cheers!
Every part of the module contains activities and enhancement exercises utilizing pictures, and illustrations which have been
proven as effective instructional materials in improving the writing skills of the students.
Don’t you worry, your teacher will help you throughout your learning journey. So, have fun!

Your Speech Teacher


INSTRUCTION TO THE USERS

At the start of the module, you are to take the pre-assessment test to see how much background information and knowledge you
have in World literature.
This module is self-instructional. You can read analyze concepts and ideas presented, and reflect on them. The activities and self-
Check question will help you assess how you progress as you go through the module. If you need help and further clarification, you can
ask the assistance of a mentor or facilitator in your school. It has been recommended that as much as possible, the mentor is a one of
family members. He or she may also be your department head
Your answers to self –check questions (SCQ’s) and Activities may be self-evaluated by your mentor or facilitator if you desire.
This will be part of your formative evaluation.
Remember, you are to work on this module independently. I shall not be around to supervise you as you go through each lesson.
It is expected that you will make the most of this module.
ZERHAN S. LAARIN Fasten your seat
SHS Instructor belt and let’s
www.facebook.com/zerhanlaarin begin the learning
www.zerhanlaarinsiddik@gmail.com ride! Let’s go!

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HUMANITIES 1: CREATIVE WRITING

My Learning Episodes

TOPIC Imagery, Diction and Figures of Speech


CONTENT STANDARDS The learners have an understanding of
imagery, diction, figures of speech, and
variations on language.
PERFORMANCE STANDARDS The learners shall be able to produce short
paragraphs or vignettes using imagery, diction,
figures of speech, and specific experiences.
MOST ESSENTIAL LEARNING Use imagery, diction, figures of speech, and
COMPETENCIES specific experiences to evoke meaningful
responses from readers.
REFERENCES Division of City Schools – Manila Creative
Writing Module, Creative Writing DIWA SHS
Series
TIME ALLOTMENT Week 1

LESSON 1: IMAGERY, DICTION


AND FIGURE OF SPEECH
“Effective Communication is 20 what you know and 80 how
you feel about what you know” ~ Jim Rohn
WHAT I NEED TO KNOW
In this lesson you are expected to:
1. use imagery, diction, figures of speech and specific experiences, and;
2. write a brief literary description or a short paragraph through making sense of pictures and
songs.

Let us begin your journey in creative writing. I am sure you are ready and
excited to answer the Pretest. Smile and cheer up!

PRE-TEST Let’s Answer This! Activity 1.1

Before we start with this module, let us check what you already know about this course by answering this
pretest

Directions: Choose the letter of the correct answer. Write the letter on the space provided.

_____1. Figurative language is a language that:


A. uses words or phrases which is different from the literal meaning
B. deviates from the normal language to convey an unusual meaning
C. makes writing interesting and vivid
D. All of the above

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HUMANITIES 1: CREATIVE WRITING

_____2. “Like as the armed knight appointed to the field” is an example of:
A. Simile B. Metaphor C. Personification D. Hyperbole

_____3. ______________ is a figure of speech in which a thing or concept is described in terms of another thing
associated to it.
A. Simile B. Metaphor C. Metonymy D. Synecdoche

_____4. A figure of speech in which a thing, a place, an abstract quality, an idea, a dead or absent person, is addressed
as if present and capable of understanding is called:
A. Alliteration B. Apostrophe C. Synecdoche D. Metonymy

_____5. Which of the following is NOT true about diction?


A. It is the prescribed words used by the writers.
B. It is the word choice an author uses to convey a particular tone.
C. It includes formality of the language, the emotional content, and the sounds of words.
D. It is the combination of denotation, connotation, concrete and abstract words, and sound devices.

MOTIVATION Let’s Move On! Activity 1.2

Bring out the music in me!


Directions: Select one song inside the boxes which piqued your interest. Using your smartphone or computer, listen to the song in any
video or music streaming website you prefer. After listening, read and accomplish what is described below.
“Imagine” “Photograph” “The Scientist” “Fast Car”
by John Lennon by Ed Sheeran by Coldplay by Tracy Chapman
“Rainbow” “In the End” “You Belong With Me” “Out of My League”
by Southborder by Linkin Park by Taylor Swift by Stephen Speaks

Write a about a memory triggered by the music you have chosen. Think of where you are when you last heard the music and what it
meant for you. Include any images that come into mind.
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LEARNING
ESSENTIALS

Imagery as a general term covers the use of language to represent objects, actions, feelings, thoughts, ideas, states of mind
and any sensory experience. It is a figurative language used to appeal to the senses through vivid descriptive language. Imagery creates
mental pictures in the reader as they read the text.

Example:
An excerpt from Peter Redgrove’s Lazarus and the Sea contains imagery:
The tide of my death came whispering like this
Soiling my body with its tireless voice.
I scented the antique moistures when they sharpened

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HUMANITIES 1: CREATIVE WRITING

The air of my room, made the rough wood of my bed, (most dear),
Standing out like roots in my tall grave.

Diction refers to the selection of words in a literary work. A work’s diction forms one of its centrally important literary elements as
writers use words to convey action, reveal character, imply attitudes, identify themes, and suggest values. It includes the formality of the
language, the emotional content, the imagery, the specificity, and the sounds of the words.

Example:
“I prize thy love more than whole mines of gold,
Or all the riches that East doth hold.”
- Anne Bradstreet, “To My Dear and Loving Husband”

• The use of antiquated words such as “thy” instead of “your” and “doth” instead of “do” gives the poem a formal diction.
• These antiquated words are considered grand, elevated, and sophisticated language.

FIGURES OF SPEECH

Figures of speech are words or phrases used in a non-literal sense for rhetorical or vivid effect.

The most common figures of speech are simile, metaphor, onomatopoeia, personification, apostrophe, hyperbole,
synecdoche, metonymy, oxymoron, and paradox.

1. Simile – a stated comparison (formed with “like” or “as” between two fundamentally dissimilar things that have certain qualities in
common.

Example: “Does it dry up like a raisin in the sun?” – Langston Hughes, “Harlem”

2. Metaphor – an implied comparison between two unlike things that have something in common.

Example: “Hope is the thing with feathers – That perches in the soul –”
- Emily Dickinson, “Hope is the Thing with Feathers”

3. Onomatopoeia – uses words that imitate sounds associated with objects or actions.

Example: “The crooked skirt swinging, whack by whack by whack.”


- James Joyce, “Ulysses”

4. Personification – endows human qualities or abilities to inanimate objects or abstraction.

Example: “Ah, William, we’re wary of the weather,” said the sunflowers shining with dew.
. – William Blake, “Two Sunflowers Move in the Yellow Room”

5. Apostrophe – is addressing an absent person or thing that is an abstract, inanimate, or inexistent character.

Example: “Death be not proud, though some have called thee.”


- John Donne, “Death Be Not Proud”

6. Hyperbole – a figure of speech which contains an exaggeration for emphasis.

Example: “To make enough noise to wake the dead.”


– R. Davies, “What’s Bred in the Bone”

7. Synecdoche – a figure of speech in which the part stands for the whole, and thus something else is understood within the thing
mentioned.

Example: “Give us this day out daily bread”


*Bread stands for the meals taken each day.

8. Metonymy – a figure of speech in which the name of an attribute or a thing is substituted for the thing itself.

Example: “Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears.”


– William Shakespeare, “Julius Caesar”
*Lend me your ears = to pay attention; to listen

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HUMANITIES 1: CREATIVE WRITING

9. Oxymoron – a figure of speech which combines incongruous and apparently contradictory words and meanings for a special effect.

Example: “Here’s much to do with hate, but more with love.


Why then, O brawling love! O loving hate!
O anything! of nothing first create!
O heavy lightness! serious vanity!
Mis-shapen chaos of well-seeming forms!”
- William Shakespeare, “Romeo and Juliet”

10. Paradox – a statement which seems on its face to be logically contradictory or absurd yet turns out to be interpretable in a way that
makes sense.

Example: “One short sleep past, we wake eternally


And death shall be no more; Death, thou shalt die.”
- John Donne, “Death Be Not Proud”

INDEPENDENT
RACTICE Activity 1.3

Activity 1 Outside Looking In.


Directions: Below are excerpts from different literary texts. Identify what figure of speech is exemplified in each number. Choose your
answer from the box and write on the space provided.

Simile Metaphor Onomatopoeia Personification


Apostrophe Hyperbole Synecdoche Metonymy
Oxymoron Paradox

_______________1. “Ebony and ivory / Live together in perfect harmony” (McCartney & Wonder)

_______________2. “Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health, Still-waking sleep, that is not what it is!” (Shakespeare)

______________3. “Pity, you ancient stones, those tender babes Whom envy hath immured within your walls” (Shakespeare)

_______________4. “He watches from his mountain walls, and like a thunderbolt he falls.” (Tennyson)

_______________5. “That I may rise, and stand, o’erthrow me.” (Donne)

_______________6. “Even at night time, Mama is sunrise.” (Hunt)

_______________7. “The western wave was all a-flame. The day was well nigh done!” (Coleridge)

_______________8. “A day was twenty-four hours long but seemed longer. There was no hurry, for there was nowhere to go, nothing to
buy and no money to buy it with…” (Lee)
_______________9. “…the glish of squirting taps plus slush of foam knocked off and a faint piddle of drops...” (e.e. cummings)

_______________10. “Fall had barely touched the full splendor of trees…” (Knowles)

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HUMANITIES 1: CREATIVE WRITING

ENRICHMENT Let’s Do it! Activity 1.4

What is it like?
Directions: Take a very careful look at the picture below. Write a brief paragraph of the place using imagery, diction, and figures of speech.
You may incorporate an experience related to the location to make your literary description more vivid.

Image from: https://ccsearch.creativecommons.org/photos/2e452542-ef22-402b-a3f7-8527da483e0f

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HUMANITIES 1: CREATIVE WRITING

EVALUATION Let’s Answer This!


Activity 1.5

Directions: Choose the letter of the correct answer. Write the letter on the space provided

_____1. A figure of speech which combines incongruous and apparently contradictory words and meanings for a special effect.
A. Paradox B. Oxymoron C. Metaphor D. Personification

_____2. Imagery is characterized by the following EXCEPT:


A. it is considered as a figure of speech
B. it consists of descriptive language
C. it draws on the five senses
D. it is a literary device

_____3. It is a direct and explicit address either to an absent person or to an abstract or nonhuman entity.
A. Synecdoche B. Onomatopoeia C. Oxymoron D. Apostrophe

_____4. All of the following are examples of figures of speech except:


A. Metonymy B. Synecdoche C. Symbol D. Hyperbole

_____5. Which of the following does NOT describe diction?


A. It is the writer’s manner of speaking.
B. It is a special style used by writers in creating a literary text.
C. It is the writer’s distinctive choice and use of language.
D. It is the linguistic choices a writer makes to effectively convey action or reveal a character.

LESSON 1: IMAGERY, DICTION AND FIGURES OF SPEECH


REFLECTIVE LEARNING SHEET

Directions: Write a reflective learning about what you have learned about imagery, diction and figure of speech by
answering the questions inside the box. You may express your answers in a more critical and creative
presentation of your great learning. Have fun and enjoy!

WHAT I LIKED THE


MOST ABOUT THE
LESSON

WHAT I NEED TO
IMPROVE IN
UNDERSTANDING
THE LESSON

WHAT I WANT TO
LEARN CONNECTED TO
THE LESSON

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