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AS 60038—2012

Standard voltages
Australian Standard®
AS 60038—2012
This Australian Standard® was prepared by Committee EL-034, Power Quality. It was
approved on behalf of the Council of Standards Australia on 3 December 2012.
This Standard was published on 24 December 2012.

The following are represented on Committee EL-034:

• Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry


• Australian Industry Group
• Australian Information Industry Association
• Bureau of Steel Manufacturers of Australia
• Consumer Electronics Suppliers Association
• Consumers Federation of Australia
• Electrical Regulatory Authorities Council
• Electricity Engineers Association, New Zealand
• Energy Networks Association
• Engineers Australia
• Ministry of Economic Development, New Zealand
• National Measurement Institute
• New Zealand Coordinating Committee on Power & Telecommunication Systems
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• New Zealand Electric Fence Energiser Manufacturers Standards WG


• Telstra Corporation
• University of Canterbury, New Zealand
• University of Wollongong

This Standard was issued in draft form for comment as DR AS 60038.

Standards Australia wishes to acknowledge the participation of the expert individuals that
contributed to the development of this Standard through their representation on the
Committee and through the public comment period.

Keeping Standards up-to-date


Australian Standards® are living documents that reflect progress in science, technology and
systems. To maintain their currency, all Standards are periodically reviewed, and new editions
are published. Between editions, amendments may be issued.

Standards may also be withdrawn. It is important that readers assure themselves they are
using a current Standard, which should include any amendments that may have been
published since the Standard was published.

Detailed information about Australian Standards, drafts, amendments and new projects can
be found by visiting www.standards.org.au

Standards Australia welcomes suggestions for improvements, and encourages readers to


notify us immediately of any apparent inaccuracies or ambiguities. Contact us via email at
mail@standards.org.au, or write to Standards Australia, GPO Box 476, Sydney, NSW 2001.
AS 60038—2012

Australian Standard®

Standard voltages
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First published as AS 60038—2000.


Second edition 2012.

COPYRIGHT
© Standards Australia Limited
All rights are reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or copied in any form or by
any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, without the written
permission of the publisher, unless otherwise permitted under the Copyright Act 1968.
Published by SAI Global Limited under licence from Standards Australia Limited, GPO Box
476, Sydney, NSW 2001, Australia
ISBN 978 1 74342 330 1
AS 60038—2012 ii ii

PREFACE

This Standard was prepared by the Joint Standards Australia/Standards New Zealand Committee
EL-034, Power Quality, to supersede AS 60038⎯2000, Standard voltages. After consultation with
stakeholders in both countries, Standards Australia and Standards New Zealand decided to develop
this Standard as an Australian Standard rather than an Australian/New Zealand Standard.
The objective of this Standard is to specify standard voltage values which are intended to serve as
preferential values for the nominal voltage of electrical supply systems, and as reference values for
equipment and system design.
This Standard does not apply to voltages representing or transmitting signals or measured values,
standard voltages of components and parts used within electrical devices or items of equipment.
This Standard is an adoption with national modifications and has been reproduced from IEC 60038,
Ed.7.0 (2009), IEC standard voltages.
Variations to IEC 60038:2009 are indicated at the appropriate places throughout this Standard.
Strikethrough (example) identifies IEC text, tables and figures which, for the purpose of this
Australian Standard, are deleted. Where text, tables or figures are added, each is set in its proper place
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and identified by shading (example).


There are mandatory footnotes (footnote b) and c)) applicable to Table 2, d.c. and a.c. traction
systems.
Additional information on highest and lowest voltage values according to IEC and ANSI is given in
Appendix ZZ.
AS 61000.3.100, Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC)⎯Limits⎯Steady state voltage limits in public
electricity systems, describes how to monitor power systems and apply the limits set in AS 60038 (this
Standard).
As this Standard is reproduced from an International Standard, the following applies:
(a) Its number appears on the cover and title page while the International Standard number appears
only on the cover.
(b) In the source text ‘this publication’ should read ‘this Australian Standard’.
(c) A full point substitutes for a comma when referring to a decimal marker.
The term ‘informative’ has been used in this Standard to define the application of the Annex or
Appendix to which it applies. An ‘informative’ Annex/Appendix is only for information and
guidance.
AS 60038—2012 iiiiii

CONTENTS

Page

1 Scope .................................................................................................................... 1

2 Normative references ............................................................................................. 1

3 Terms and definitions............................................................................................. 2

4 Standard voltages .................................................................................................. 4


4.1 AC systems having a nominal voltage between 100 V and 1 000 V inclusive
and related equipment ........................................................................................... 4
4.2 DC and a.c. traction systems ................................................................................. 6
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4.3 AC three-phase systems having a nominal voltage above 1 kV and


not exceeding 35 kV and related equipment .......................................................... 7
4.4 AC three-phase systems having a nominal voltage above 35 kV and
not exceeding 230 kV and related equipment ........................................................ 9
4.5 AC three-phase systems having a highest voltage for equipment
exceeding 245 kV ................................................................................................ 10
4.6 Equipment having a nominal voltage below 120 V a.c. or below 750 V d.c. ......... 10

Annex A (informative) highest and lowest voltage values at supply and utilization
terminals for a.c. systems having a nominal voltagebetween 100 V and 1 000 V . 12

Appendix ZZ (informative) harmonized highest and lowest voltage values at supply


and utilization terminals for 50 Hz and 60 Hz ac systems having a
nominal voltage between 100 V and 1 000 V ....................................................... 15

Bibliography .................................................................................................................... 14

Table 1 – Highest and lowest voltage values at supply and utilization terminals for
a.c. systems and related equipment in Australia having a nominal voltage
between 100 V and 1000 V .................................................................................... 5
Table 2 – d.c. and a.c. traction systems ............................................................................ 7
Table 3 – a.c. three-phase systems in Australia having a nominal voltage
above 1 kV and not exceeding 35 kV and related equipment ................................ 8
Table 3A – a.c. single wire earth return (swer) systems .................................................... 9
Table 4 – a.c. three-phase systems in Australia having a nominal voltage
above 35 kv and not exceeding 230 kV and related equipment ............................. 9
Table 5 – AC three-phase systems having a highest voltage forequipment
exceeding 245 kV ............................................................................................... 10
Table 6 – Equipment having a nominal voltage below 120 V a.c. or below 750 V d.c.. .... 11
AS 60038—2012 iviv

Table A.1 – Highest and lowest voltage values at supply and utilization terminals
for a.c. systems having a nominal voltage between 100 V and 1 000 V ............... 13
Table ZZ.1 – Harmonized highest and lowest voltage values at supply and utilization
terminals for 50 Hz and 60 Hz a.c. systems having a nominal voltage
between 100 V and 1 000 V ................................................................................. 16
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AS 60038—2012 1
1

AUSTRALIAN STANDARD

Standard voltages

1 Scope

This publication applies to

– a.c. transmission, distribution and utilization systems and equipment for use in such systems with
standard frequencies 50 Hz and 60 Hz having a nominal voltage above 100 V;
– a.c. and d.c. traction systems;
– a.c. and d.c. equipment having nominal voltages below 120 V a.c. or below 750 V d.c., the a.c.
voltages being intended (but not exclusively) for 50 Hz and 60 Hz applications; such equipment
covers batteries (from primary or secondary cells), other power supply devices (a.c. or d.c.),
electrical equipment (including industrial and communication), and appliances.
This publication does not apply to voltages representing or transmitting signals or measured values.
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This publication does not apply to standard voltages of components and parts used within electrical
devices or items of equipment.

This publication specifies standard voltage values which are intended to serve

− as preferential values for the nominal voltage of electrical supply systems, and
− as reference values for equipment and system design.
NOTE 1 Two main reasons have led to the values specified in this standard:

The values of nominal voltage (or highest voltage for equipment) specified in this standard are mainly based on the
historical development of electrical supply systems throughout the world, since these values turned out to be the most
common ones, and have achieved worldwide recognition;

The voltage ranges mentioned in this standard have been recognized to be the most appropriate ones as a basis for
design and testing of electrical equipment and systems.

NOTE 2 It is nevertheless the task of system and product standards to define appropriate testing values, testing
conditions and acceptance criteria.

2 Normative references

The following referenced documents are indispensable for the application of this document. For
dated references, only the edition cited applies. For undated references, the latest edition of the
referenced document (including any amendments) applies.

References to international standards that are struck through in this clause are replaced by
references to Australian or Australian/New Zealand Standards that are listed immediately thereafter
and identified by shading.

IEC 60364-5-52: Electrical installations of buildings – Part 5-52: Selection and erection of electrical
equipment – Wiring systems

AS/NZS 3000, Electrical Installations (Known as the Australian/New Zealand Wiring Rules)

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AS 60038—2012 2
2

3 Terms and definitions

For the purposes of this document, the following terms and definitions apply.

For alternating voltages, the voltages stated below are r.m.s. values.

3.1
nominal system voltage
a suitable approximate value of voltage used to designate or identify a system

[IEV 601-01-21, modified]

3.2
highest voltage of a system
(excluding transient or abnormal conditions)
the highest value of operating voltage which occurs under normal operating conditions at any time
and at any point on the system

NOTE It excludes transient overvoltages, such as those due to switching operations, and temporary variations of voltage.

[IEV 601-01-23, modified]


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3.3
lowest voltage of a system
(excluding transient or abnormal conditions)
the lowest value of operating voltage which occurs under normal operating conditions at any time
and at any point on the system

NOTE It excludes transient voltages, such as those due to switching operations, and temporary variations of voltage.

[IEV 601-01-24, modified]

3.4
supply terminals
point in a transmission or distribution network designated as such and contractually fixed, at which
electrical energy is exchanged between contractual partners

NOTE The supply terminals in IEC 60038 are taken to align with the point of supply definition in AS/NZS 3000.

3.5
supply voltage
the phase-to-phase or phase-to-neutral voltage at the supply terminals

NOTE An equivalent definition is: the line-to-line or line-to-neutral voltage at the supply terminals.

3.6
supply voltage range
the voltage range at the supply terminals

3.7
utilization voltage
the phase-to-phase or phase-to-neutral voltage at the outlets or at the points where utilisation
equipment is intended to be connected to the fixed installation

NOTE An equivalent definition is: the line-to-line or line-to-neutral voltage at the outlets or at the points where
utilisation equipment is intended to be connected to the fixed installation.

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AS 60038—2012 3
3

3.8
utilization voltage range
the voltage range at the outlets or at the points where utilisation equipment is intended to be
connected to the fixed installation

NOTE Attention is drawn to the fact that in some equipment standards (for example, IEC 60335-1 and IEC 60071), the
term "voltage range" has a different meaning.

3.9
highest voltage for equipment
highest voltage for which the equipment is specified regarding:

a) the insulation;
b) other characteristics which may be linked to this highest voltage in the relevant equipment
recommendations.
NOTE Equipment may only be used on systems having a highest system voltage less than or equal to its highest voltage
for equipment.

3.10
rated voltage (of equipment)
the voltage assigned generally by a manufacturer, for a specified operating condition of a
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component, device or equipment.


NOTE 1 The value for the rated voltage of High Voltage Equipment is generally assigned from the list of Highest Voltages
for Equipment in Tables 3, 4 and 5.

NOTE 2 The value for the rated voltage of Low Voltage Equipment is generally assigned from the list of Nominal Voltages
in Tables 1 and 6.

NOTE 3 Equipment may have more than one rated voltage value or may have a rated voltage range.

NOTE 4 For three-phase supply, the phase-to-phase voltage applies.

NOTE 5 The definition of rated voltage in the sixth edition of IEC 60038 was removed in the seventh edition because it is
not used in the Standard. Until rated voltage is defined in the IEV, the Australian National Committee has decided to
maintain a definition of rated voltage in AS 60038.

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AS 60038—2012 4
4

4 Standard voltages

4.1 AC systems having a nominal voltage between 100 V and 1 000 V inclusive and
related equipment
The nominal voltage of an a.c. system in the range from 100 V to 1 000 V should be selected from
the values given in Table 1.

Table 1 – AC systems having a nominal voltage between


100 V and 1 000 V inclusive and related equipment

Three-phase four-wire or three-wire systems Single-phase three-wire systems


Nominal voltage Nominal voltage
V V
50 Hz 60 Hz 60 Hz
– 120/208 120/240 d
230 c 240 c –
230/400 a 230/400 a –
– 277/480 –
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– 480 –
– 347/600 –
– 600 –
400/690 b – –
1 000 – –
a The value of 230/400 V is the result of the evolution of 220/380 V and 240/415 V systems which has been
completed in Europe and many other countries. However, 220/380 V and 240/415 V systems still exist.
b The value of 400/690 V is the result of the evolution of 380/660 V systems which has been completed in
Europe and many other countries. However, 380/660 V systems still exist.
c The value of 200 V or 220 V is also used in some countries.
d The values of 100/200 V are also used in some countries on 50 Hz or 60 Hz systems.

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AS 60038—2012 5
5

Table 1 provides the highest and lowest 50 Hz voltage values in Australia at supply terminals and at
utilization terminals, incorporating the voltage drops in AS/NZS 3000.

Table 1 – Highest and lowest voltage values at supply and utilization terminals for a.c.
systems and related equipment in Australia having a nominal voltage between 100 V and
1000 V

Voltage, V
Systems Nominal frequency Highest Highest Nominal Lowest Lowest
supply voltage supply utilization
utilization voltage voltage voltage
voltage

HZ Highest
voltage for
equipment

Three-
phase
four-wire or 50 253/440 253/440 230/400 a 216/376 205/356
three-wire 440/759 440/759 400/690 b 376/649 356/614
1 100 1 100 1 000 940 890
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Single- 50 253 253 230 c 216 205


phase
two-wire
systems
Single- 50 253/506 253/506 230/460 216/432 205/410
phase
three-wire
systems
a) The nominal value of 230/400 V is the result of the evolution of 220/380 V and 240/415 V systems which has been
completed in Europe and many other countries. However, 220/380 V and 240/415 V systems still exist.
b) The nominal value of 400/690 V is the result of the evolution of 380/660 V systems which has been completed in
Europe and many other countries. However, 380/660 V systems still exist.
c) The nominal value of 200 V or 220 V is also used in some countries.

NOTE 1 Additional information on harmonizing of voltage values between IEC 60038:2009 and IEC 60364-5-52:2009, and
between IEC 60038:2009 and ANSI C84.1 is given in Appendix ZZ.

NOTE 2 The highest supply voltage has been listed separately to the highest utilization voltage and highest voltage for
equipment because in the future it may become necessary to lower the highest supply voltage to accommodate
embedded generation.

In Table 1, the three-phase four-wire systems and single-phase three-wire systems include single-
phase circuits (extensions, services, etc.) connected to these systems.

The lower values in the first and second columns three to seven are voltages to neutral and the
higher values are voltages between phases. When one value only is indicated in three-phase
systems it refers to three-wire systems and specifies the voltage between phases. The lower value
in the third column is the voltage to neutral and the higher value is the voltage between lines.

Voltages in excess of 230/400 V are intended for heavy industrial applications and large commercial
premises.

Concerning supply voltage range, under normal operating conditions, the supply voltage should not
differ from the nominal voltage of the system by more than ±10 %.

NOTE 1 The above clause with a 50 Hz restriction and Note 2 would harmonize the ANSI C84.1 and IEC 60038 value.

NOTE 2 Concerning the 60 Hz supply voltage range, under normal operating conditions, the supply voltage should not
differ from the nominal utilization voltage of the system by more than +10% and -5%. This clause would harmonize the
ANSI C84.1 and IEC 60038 values.

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AS 60038—2012 6
6

Concerning supply voltage range in Australia, under normal operating conditions, the supply voltage
should not differ from the nominal voltage of the system by more than +10%, −6%.

For the utilization voltage range, in addition to the voltage variations at the supply terminals, voltage
drops may occur within the consumer's installations. For more information, see IEC 60364-5-52.
This utilization voltage range should be taken into account by product committees.

For low-voltage installations in Australia, AS/NZS 3000 limits this voltage drop to 5%, therefore, the
utilization voltage range is +10%, –11%.

NOTE The highest and lowest voltage values at supply terminals and at utilization terminals, as they can be derived from
IEC 60038:2009 and from IEC 60364-5-52:2009, are provided for information in Annex A.

4.2 DC and a.c. traction systems


The voltages of a d.c. or a.c. traction system should be selected from the values given in Table 2.

Table 2 – DC and a.c. traction systems a

Voltage Nominal frequency


Lowest Nominal Highest of a.c. systems
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V V V Hz
DC systems (400) (600) (720)
500 750 900
1 000 1 500 1 800
b
2 000 3 000 3 600
AC single-phase systems (4 750) (6 250) (6 900) 50 or 60
12 000 15 000 17 250 16 2 / 3
19 000 25 000 27 500 50 or 60

a The values indicated in parentheses should be considered as non-preferred values. It is recommended


that these values should not be used for new systems to be constructed in future. In particular for a.c.
single-phase systems, the nominal voltage 6 250 V should be used only when local conditions make it
impossible to adopt the nominal voltage 25 000 V.

The values indicated in the table above are the values agreed by the international mixed committee on
electric traction equipment (C.M.T.) and by IEC technical committee 9, Electrical equipment and systems
for railways.

b In certain European countries, this voltage may reach 4 000 V. The electrical equipment of vehicles
operating international services in these countries shall be capable of withstanding this absolute maximal
voltage for brief periods of up to 5 min.

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AS 60038—2012 7
7

The voltages of a d.c. or a.c. traction system in Australia should be selected from the values given
in Table 2.

a
Table 2 – d.c. and a.c. traction systems

Voltage Nominal frequency


Lowest Nominal Highest of a.c. systems
V V V Hz
d.c. systems (400) (600) (720)
500 750 900
c
1 000 1 500 1 800
b
(2 000) (3 000) (3 600)
a.c. single-phase systems (4 750) (6 250) (6 900) 50 (or 60)
(12 000) (15 000) (17 250) (16 2 / 3 )
19 000 25 000 27 500 50 (or 60)

a The values indicated in parentheses should be considered as non-preferred values. It is recommended


that these values should not be used for new systems to be constructed in future. In particular for a.c.
single-phase systems, the nominal voltage 6 250 V should be used only when local conditions make it
impossible to adopt the nominal voltage 25 000 V.
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The values indicated in the table above are the values agreed by the international mixed committee on
electric traction equipment (C.M.T.) and by IEC technical committee 9, Electrical equipment and systems
for railways.

b In certain European countries, this voltage may reach 4 000 V. The electrical equipment of vehicles
operating international services in these countries shall be capable of withstanding this absolute maximal
voltage for brief periods of up to 5 min.

c In Australia, this voltage may reach 2050 V with regeneration from trains. The electrical equipment of
vehicles operating services in Australia shall be capable of withstanding this absolute maximal voltage for
brief periods of up to 5 min.

4.3 AC three-phase systems having a nominal voltage above 1 kV and not exceeding
35 kV and related equipment
The voltages for an a.c. three-phase system having a nominal voltage above 1 kV and not
exceeding 35 kV should be selected from the values given in Table 3.

Table 3 – AC three-phase systems having a nominal voltage above 1 kV


and not exceeding 35 kV and related equipment a

Series I Series II
Highest voltage Nominal system Highest voltage Nominal system
for equipment voltage for equipment voltage
kV kV kV kV
3,6 b 3,3 b 3b 4,40 b 4,16 b
7,2 b 6,6 b 6b – –
12 11 10 – –
– – – 13,2 c 12,47 c
– – – 13,97 c 13,2 c
– – – 14,52 b 13,8 b
(17,5) – (15) – –
24 22 20 – –
– – – 26,4 c,e 24,94 c,e
36 d 33 d 30 d – –
– – – 36,5 c 34,5 c
40,5 d – 35 d – –

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NOTE 1 It is recommended that in any one country, the ratio between two adjacent nominal voltages should
be not less than two.
NOTE 2 In a normal system of series I, the highest voltage and the lowest voltage do not differ by more than
approximately ±10 % from the nominal voltage of the system. In a normal system of series II, the highest
voltage does not differ by more than +5 % and the lowest voltage by more than –10 % from the nominal
voltage of the system.
a These systems are generally three-wire systems, unless otherwise indicated. The values indicated are
voltages between phases.
The values indicated in parentheses should be considered as non-preferred values. It is recommended
that these values should not be used for new systems to be constructed in future.
b These values should not be used for new public distribution systems.
c These systems are generally four-wire systems and the values indicated are voltages between phases.
The voltage to neutral is equal to the indicated value divided by 1,73.
d The unification of these values is under consideration.
e The values of 22,9 kV for nominal voltage and 24,2 kV or 25,8 kV for highest voltage for equipment are
also used in some countries.

Table 3 – a.c. three-phase systems in Australia having a nominal voltage above 1 kV


a
and not exceeding 35 kV and related equipment

Series I Series II
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Highest voltage Nominal system Highest voltage Nominal system


for equipment voltage for equipment voltage
kV kV kV kV
3.6 b 3.3 b (3) b (4.40) b (4.16) b
7.2 b 6.6 b (6) b – –
12 11 (10) – –
– – – (13.2) c (12.47) c
– – – (13.97) c (13.2) c
– – – (14.52) b (13.8) b
(17.5) – (15) – –
24 22 (20) – –
– – – (26.4) c,e (24.94) c,e
36 d 33 d (30) d – –
– – – (36.5) c (34.5) c
(40.5) d – (35) d – –
NOTE 1 It is recommended that in any one country, the ratio between two adjacent nominal voltages should
be not less than two.
NOTE 2 In a normal system of series I, the highest voltage and the lowest voltage do not differ by more than
approximately ±10 % from the nominal voltage of the system. In a normal system of series II, the highest
voltage does not differ by more than +5 % and the lowest voltage by more than –10 % from the nominal
voltage of the system.
a These systems are generally three-wire systems, unless otherwise indicated. The values indicated are
voltages between phases.
The values indicated in parentheses should be considered as non-preferred values. It is recommended
that these values should not be used for new systems to be constructed in future.
b These values should not be used for new public distribution systems.
c These systems are generally four-wire systems and the values indicated are voltages between phases.
The voltage to neutral is equal to the indicated value divided by 1.73.
d The unification of these values is under consideration.
e The values of 22.9 kV for nominal voltage and 24.2 kV or 25.8 kV for highest voltage for equipment are
also used in some countries.

Two series of highest voltages for equipment are given above, one for 50 Hz and 60 Hz systems
(series I), the other for 60 Hz systems (series II – North American practice). It is recommended that
only one of the series should be used in any one country.

It is also recommended that only one of the two series of nominal voltages given for series I should
be used in any one country.
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AS 60038—2012 9
9

Highest voltages for equipment are given above for 50 Hz systems in Australia.

Table 3A – a.c. single wire earth return (swer) systems

The voltages in Table 3A have been derived from three-phase highest voltage for equipment voltages
of 24 kV and 36 kV respectively. The highest voltage of the system and nominal voltages are based
on the three-phase systems that supply the swer systems.

Highest voltage for Highest voltage Nominal system


equipment of system voltage
kV kV
kV
24 13.9 12.7
36 20.8 19.1

4.4 AC three-phase systems having a nominal voltage above 35 kV and not exceeding
230 kV and related equipment
The voltages for an a.c. three-phase system having a nominal voltage above 35 kV and not
exceeding 230 kV should be selected from the values given in Table 4.
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Table 4 – AC three-phase systems having a nominal voltage above 35 kV


and not exceeding 230 kV and related equipment a

Highest voltage Nominal system


for equipment voltage
kV kV
(52) (45) –
72,5 66 69
123 110 115
145 132 138
(170) (150) (154)
245 220 230

a The values indicated in parentheses should be considered as


non-preferred values. It is recommended that these values
should not be used for new systems to be constructed in
future. The values are voltages between phases.

Table 4 – a.c. three-phase systems in Australia having a nominal voltage above 35 kV


a
and not exceeding 230 kV and related equipment

Highest voltage Nominal system


for equipment voltage
kV kV
(52) (45) –
72.5 66 (69)
123 110 (115)
145 132 (138)
(170) (150) (154)
245 220 (230)

a The values indicated in parentheses should be considered as


non-preferred values. It is recommended that these values
should not be used for new systems to be constructed in
future. The values are voltages between phases.

Two series of nominal system voltages are given above. It is recommended that only one of the two
series should be used in any one country.

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It is recommended that in any one country only one value in the following groups should be used for
the highest voltage for equipment:

• 123 kV or 145 kV;


• 245 kV or 300 kV (see Table 5) or 362 kV (see Table 5).

4.5 AC three-phase systems having a highest voltage for equipment exceeding


245 kV
The highest voltage for equipment for an a.c. three-phase system exceeding 245 kV should be
selected from the values given in Table 5.

Table 5 – AC three-phase systems having a highest voltage


a
for equipment exceeding 245 kV

Highest voltage for equipment


kV

(300)
362
420
550 b
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800 c
1 100
1 200
a The values indicated in parentheses should be considered as non-preferred values. It is recommended
that these values should not be used for new systems to be constructed in future. The values are voltages
between phases.
b The value 525 kV is also used.
c The value 765 kV is also used; the test values for equipment should be the same as defined by the IEC
for 765 kV.

It is recommended that in any one geographical area, only one value in the following groups should
be used for the highest voltage for equipment:

• 245 kV (see Table 4) or 300 kV or 362 kV;


• 362 kV or 420 kV;
• 420 kV or 550 kV;
• 1 100 kV or 1 200 kV.
NOTE In the above sentence, the term "geographical area" may indicate a single country, a group of countries which
agree to adopt the same voltage level, or a part of a very large country.

4.6 Equipment having a nominal voltage below 120 V a.c. or below 750 V d.c.
The nominal voltage for equipment below 120 V a.c. or below 750 V d.c. should be selected from
the values given in Table 6.

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11

Table 6 – Equipment having a nominal voltage


below 120 V a.c. or below 750 V d.c.

DC AC
Nominal values Nominal values
Preferred Supplementary Preferred Supplementary
V V V V
2,4
3
4
4,5
5 5
6 6
7,5
9
12 12
15 15
24 24
30
36 36
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40
48 48
60 60
72
80
96
100
110 110
125
220
250
440
600
NOTE 1 Because the voltage of the primary and secondary cells is below 2,4 V, and the choice
of the type of cell to be used in various applications will be based on properties other than the
voltage, these values are not included in the table. The relevant IEC technical committees may
specify types of cells and related voltages for specific applications.
NOTE 2 It is recognized that for technical and economic reasons, additional voltages may be
required for certain specific fields of application.

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Annex A
(informative)
Highest and lowest voltage values at supply and utilization terminals for a.c.
systems having a nominal voltage between 100 V and 1 000 V

Table A.1 gives the highest and lowest voltage values at supply terminals and at utilization
terminals, as they can be derived from the text related to Table 1 in Clause 4, and from the
indications provided by IEC 60364-5-52:2001.

NOTE Values in Table A.1 are based on the note in IEC 60364-5-52:2001, Clause 525, which indicates that "In the
absence of other considerations, it is recommended that in practice the voltage drop between the origin of consumer's
installation and the equipment should not be greater than 4 % of the nominal voltage of the installation".
Clause 525 of IEC 60364-5 is presently under consideration. Values for lowest utilization voltages should be modified in
future in accordance with revisions of IEC 60364-5-52.

Table A.1 – Highest and lowest voltage values at supply and utilization terminals for a.c.
systems having a nominal voltage between 100 V and 1 000 V

Voltage
Systems Highest Nominal Lowest Lowest
Nominal frequency supply or voltage supply utilization
utilization voltage voltage
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voltage
Hz V V V V
Three-phase 50 253 230 c 207 198
four-wire
or three-wire 253/440 230/400 a 207/360 198/344
systems
440/759 400/690 b 360/621 344/593
1 100 1 000 900 860
60 132/229 120/208 108/187 103/179
264 240 c 216 206
253/440 230/400 a 207/360 198/344
305/528 277/480 249/432 238/413
528 480 432 413
382/660 347/600 312/540 298/516
660 600 540 516
Single-phase 60 132/264 120/240 d 108/216 103/206
three-wire systems
a) The value of 230/400 V is the result of the evolution of 220/380 V and 240/415 V systems which has been
completed in Europe and many other countries. However, 220/380 V and 240/415 V systems still exist.
b) The value of 400/690 V is the result of the evolution of 380/660 V systems which has been completed in
Europe and many other countries. However, 380/660 V systems still exist.
c) The value of 200 V or 220 V is also used in some countries.
d) The values of 100/200 V are also used in some countries on 50 Hz or 60 Hz systems.

Table A.1 gives the highest and lowest voltage values at supply terminals and at utilization
terminals, as they can be derived from the text related to Table 1 in Clause 4 of IEC 60038:2009,
and from IEC 60364-5-52:2009.

NOTE 1 Values for lowest utilization voltages should be modified in future in accordance with revisions of IEC 60364-5-52.

NOTE 2 The 50 Hz values in the Table A.1 were derived from the text related to Table 1 in Clause 4 of IEC 60038:2009,
and from IEC 60364-5-52:2009 Clause 525 and Table G.52.1 for low voltage installations supplied directly from a public
low voltage distribution system, which in consumer’s premises allows a 3% voltage drop in lighting circuits and a 5%
voltage drop in circuits for other uses. For 60Hz harmonization, see Appendix ZZ.

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NOTE 3 Highest voltage for equipment has been added in brackets to the highest supply or utilization voltage heading to
remind the reader that the highest supply or utilization voltage should not exceed the highest voltage for equipment.

Table A.1 – Highest and lowest voltage values at supply and utilization terminals for a.c.
systems having a nominal voltage between 100 V and 1 000 V

Voltage
Systems Nominal Highest Nominal Lowest Lowest utilization voltage
frequency supply or voltage supply
utilization voltage V
voltage
Hz V V V Lighting Other
Three-phase 50 253 230 c 207 200 196
four-wire or
253/440 230/400 a 207/360 200/348 196/340
three-wire
systems

440/759 400/690 b 360/621 348/600 340/587

1 100 1 000 900 870 850


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60 132/229 120/208 108/187 104/181 102/177


264 240 c 216 209 204

253/440 230/400 a 207/360 200/348 196/340

305/528 277/480 249/432 241/418 235/408

528 480 432 418 408

382/660 347/600 312/540 302/522 295/510

660 600 540 522 510

Single- 60 132/264 120/240 d 108/216 104/209 102/204


phase
three-wire
systems
a) The value of 230/400 V is the result of the evolution of 220/380 V and 240/415 V systems which has been
completed in Europe and many other countries. However, 220/380 V and 240/415 V systems still exist.
b) The value of 400/690 V is the result of the evolution of 380/660 V systems which has been completed in
Europe and many other countries. However, 380/660 V systems still exist.
c) The value of 200 V or 220 V is also used in some countries.
d) The values of 100/200 V are also used in some countries on 50 Hz or 60 Hz systems.

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14

Bibliography

IEC 60050-601:1985, International Electrotechnical Vocabulary⎯Chapter 601: Generation,


transmission and distribution of electricity⎯General

IEC 60071 (all parts), Insulation co-ordination

AS 1824 (all parts), Insulation co-ordination

IEC 60335-1, Household and similar electrical appliances – Safety – Part 1: General requirements

AS/NZS 60335.1, Household and similar electrical appliances ⎯ Safety ⎯ Part 1: General
requirements

IEC 60364-5-52:2001, Electrical installations of buildings – Part 5-52: Selection and erection of
electrical equipment – Wiring systems

AS 61000.3.100, Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) ⎯ Limits ⎯ Steady state voltage limits in public
electricity systems
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Appendix ZZ
(Informative)
Harmonized highest and lowest voltage values at supply and utilization
terminals for 50 Hz and 60 Hz a.c systems having a nominal voltage between
100 V and 1 000 V
Table ZZ.1 is provided in this Standard to assist Australian manufacturers, importers and exporters
to understand the relationship between the IEC and ANSI 60 Hz Standards.

The Table ZZ.1 provides the highest and lowest voltage values at supply terminals and at utilization
terminals following the publications of IEC 60038:2009 and IEC 60364-5-52:2009.

The 50 Hz values in the Table ZZ.1 were derived from the text related to Table 1 in Clause 4 of IEC
60038:2009, and from IEC 60364-5-52:2009 Clause 525 and Table G.52.1 for low voltage
installations supplied directly from a public low voltage distribution system, which in consumer’s
premises allows a 3% voltage drop in lighting circuits and a 5% voltage drop in circuits for other
uses.

Consistent with most of the Tables in IEC 60038, highest voltage for equipment has been used as
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the heading for the maximum voltage with highest supply or utilization voltage retained in brackets
to remind the reader that the highest supply or utilization voltage should not exceed the highest
voltage for equipment.

The 60 Hz values in Table ZZ.1 were developed to harmonize the discrepancies between ANSI
C84.1 and IEC 60038:2009 Section 4.1 including IEC 60364-5-52:2009 Clause 525 and Table
G52.1. These discrepancies are mainly the product of ANSI C84.1 having a nominal supply voltage
and a nominal utilization voltage at each voltage level. This leaves two choices for applying the
formulae in Section 4.1 of IEC 60038:2009.

Paragraph 5 of Section 4.1, shown with strikethrough together with Note 1 and Note 2 are all that is
required to implement the harmonization in Appendix ZZ.

Table ZZ.1 harmonizes between IEC 60038 and ANSI C84.1:


(a) The single highest supply or utilization voltage.
(b) The lowest supply voltage.
(c) The lowest lighting circuit utilization voltage.
It also harmonizes the highest supply or utilization voltage between the 50 Hz and 60 Hz systems.

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Table ZZ.1 – Harmonized highest and lowest voltage values at supply and utilization
terminals for 50 Hz and 60 Hz a.c. systems having a nominal voltage between 100 V and
1 000 V

NOTE: The values include one nominal 50 Hz voltage, two nominal (supply, utilization) 60 Hz voltages, 3% (lighting) and
5% (other) voltage drops in the consumer’s premises, a ±10% supply voltage range at 50 Hz, a +10%,-5% supply
voltage range at 60 Hz, highest 60 Hz supply or utilization voltage based on nominal utilization voltage, lowest 60 Hz
supply voltage based on nominal utilization voltage, lowest 60 z utilization voltage based on the nominal utilization
voltage.

Voltage, V
Systems Highest Nominal Lowest Lowest
Rated voltage for voltage supply utilization voltage
equipment voltage
System Utilization
frequency (Highest
supply or
utilization
voltage)
Hz Lighting Other
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Three-phase 50 253 230 c 207 200 196


four-wire 253/440 230/400 a 207/360 200/348 196/340
three-wire or
Single-phase 440/759 400/690 b 360/621 348/600 340/587
two-wire 1 100 1 000 900 870 850
systems
60 127/220 f 120/208 115/200 e 109/190 g 106/184 i 104/180 h,j
253 f 240 c 230 c,e 219 g 212 j 207 h,j
253/440 f 230/400 a 230/400 a 219/380 g 212/368 j 207/360 h,j
293/506 f 277/480 266/460 e 253/437 g 245/423 j 239/414 h,j
506 f 480 460 e 437 g 423 j 414 h,j
365/633 f 347/600 332/575 e 315/546 g 305/529 j 299/518 h,j
633 f 600 575 e 546 g 529 j 518 h,j
Single-phase 60 127/253 f 120/240 d 115/230 e 109/219 g 106/212 j 104/207 h,j
three-wire
systems

See footnotes on next page.

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Footnotes to Table ZZ.1

a The value of 230/400 V is the result of the evolution of 220/380 V and 240/415 V systems which has been
completed in Europe and many other countries. However, 220/380 V and 240/415 V systems still exist.

b The value of 400/690 V is the result of the evolution of 380/660 V systems which has been completed in
Europe and many other countries. However, 380/660 V systems still exist.

c The value of 200 V or 220 V is also used in some countries.

d The values of 100/200 V are also used in some countries on 50 Hz or 60 Hz systems.

e The alternative 60 Hz nominal utilization voltages used in some countries are included to show the
relationship between the two 60 Hz nominal voltages and the highest supply or utilization voltage.

f At 60 Hz, the highest supply or utilization voltage values in Table A.1 of IEC 60038:2009 are based on 1.1
times the nominal supply voltage, whilst the values in Table ZZ.1 are based on 1.1 times the nominal
utilization voltage. The Table ZZ.1 values are within two volts or 0.4% of the Range B values in ANSI C84.1
and are closer to the values likely to be found in National Standards.

g At 60 Hz, The lowest supply voltage values in Table A.1 of IEC 60038:2009 are based on 0.9 times the
Nominal supply voltage, whilst the values in Table ZZ.1 are based on 0.95 times the nominal utilization
voltage. The Table ZZ.1 values are within four volts or 0.5% of the range B values in ANSI C84.1 and are
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closer to the values likely to appear in National Standards.

h At 60 Hz, the lowest utilization voltage values in Table A.1 of IEC 60038:2009 are based on 0.86 (a 10%
and a 4% voltage drop) times the nominal supply voltage, whilst the “other” values in Table ZZ.1 are based
on 0.9 (two 5% voltage drops) times the nominal utilization voltage. The Table ZZ.1 values are within 2.3%
of the ANSI C84.1 range B values.

i At 60 Hz, the “lighting” values in Table ZZ.1 are based on 0.92 (a 5% and a 3% voltage drop) times the
nominal utilization voltage. The Table ZZ.1 values are within 2 volts and 0.2% of the ANSI C84.1 range B
values where lighting loads are supplied.

j At 60 Hz, the “other” values in Table ZZ.1 are based on 0.90 (a 5% and a 5% voltage drop) times the
nominal utilization voltage. The Table ZZ.1 values are within 2 volts and 0.5% of the ANSI C84.1 range B
values where lighting loads are NOT supplied.

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AS 60038—2012
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NOTES
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AS 60038—2012
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NOTES
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AS 60038—2012
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NOTES
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