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Subject:Troubleshooting Oracle Applications Performance Issues

Doc ID:169935.1 Type: TROUBLESHOOTING


Modified Date: 23-FEB-2009 Status: PUBLISHED

Troubleshooting Oracle Apps


Performance Issues
Carlos Sierra
Apps Engineering CoE
Oracle Support
February 2002 (updated on 30-JUL-2003)

• Purpose
• Scope & Application
• Problem Description
• Categories of Common Tuning Issues
• Certify
• Statistics Gathering
• Transaction Tuning
• Back-End Tuning
• Tech-Stack Tuning
• Reporting to Oracle
• Related Documents

Purpose
Practical guide in Troubleshooting Oracle Applications Performance Issues. Documents a systematic
approach to gather information and files usually required to: categorize, research, troubleshoot, and
eventually report to Oracle Support, an Apps Performance Issue. Documents how to use the CoE
Scripts.

Scope & Application


This document has been registered as Note:169935.1. The expected audience is: Technical Analysts or
DBAs involved in the process of reporting and/or solving an Apps Performance Issue. This document
assumes the reader has an intermediate to advanced technical background, with a good understanding of
RDBMS concepts, proficiency in SQL*Plus, and comfortable in the OS of the database server.

The main focus of this Note is on Oracle ERP Apps 11i, but references are made to earlier releases of
Oracle Apps (11.0 and 10.7). Most of the techniques and tools explained can equally be used for earlier
releases of Oracle Apps, as well as for the CRM modules.

This document can be used in several ways. It can be used as a check list to simply gather information
and files usually requested by Oracle Support in order to report an Apps performance issue. Or it can be
utilized as a process which walks the reader through common steps of the troubleshooting process of
performance issues. It can also be used as a reference source of techniques and tools available to tune
applications.
While following this process, you may solve your performance issue. If not, you will have gathered the
standard information and files required to pursue its resolution. This document classifies the Apps
Performance Issues into one of three categories. Once determined the category, it branches into the
details of that respective category.

Read this document entirely before starting to react to the steps of the troubleshooting process.

Problem Description
The first step in troubleshooting any performance issue is to clearly describe the issue. Proceed to create
an electronic file using any text editor, and document in detail the symptoms of the performance issue.
Keep in mind that you may want to use your electronic document if you later need to report the
performance issue to Oracle for further analysis. Document and differentiate factual information and user
perceptions. You may want to use the templates provided in the related documents section at the bottom
of this note, to start gathering your information in a well organized manner. You will first need to
categorize your issue however.

Your detailed description should include, at least, the following information:

1. What is the application group or module affected by your performance issue? Examples: 'AP', or
'ONT and QP', or 'all manufacturing modules', 'just this Form', 'this list of transactions', etc.
2. Instance or instances in which it can be observed. Does it happen in Production?
Development? Test? All of them? If it does not happen in all your environments, document what
is different among them. Try to determine if the difference among them can be isolated. This
may narrow the problem to a very specific area.
3. Determine if the poor performance is equally observed when the system load is either low or
high. What if there is only one active user? Is it equally slow? Document if the poor
performance keeps any relation to the system load, or not at all.
4. Is the performance issue affecting one user only? If no, document how many users are affected.
5. If your application is used on multiple locations: Does the location seem to affect the
performance? Do all users in all locations experience the same performance? Can you state
that poor performance has nothing to do with the user location?
6. Can you reproduce the issue systematically? Document how can the issue be systematically
reproduced. If you can't, document why not. In any case, try to reproduce it systematically and
document your findings.
7. Do you have a workaround available? What is it?
8. When was the last time you could complete the process or transaction without experiencing poor
performance? Document what has changed since then.
9. Determine if any software has been installed or upgraded in your server or instance since the
problem started. Include any RDBMS, Applications or 3rd party software in your analysis.
10. Document any patches applied recently which could have affected your performance. Include
Operating System patches as well as patches from RDBMS or Apps.

Categories of common Tuning Issues


The detailed description of the performance issue should be sufficient to categorize it into one of the
following 3 high-level areas. Determine which category best describe your issue. Review and document
the Certify and Statistics Gathering sections below. Then proceed to the tuning section corresponding to
the high-level category.
1. Transaction Tuning: One specific transaction denotes poor performance. It may be a Form, a
Concurrent Program, or a specific operation within a Form (i.e. the click of a button, saving one
row, displaying a list of values, etc.). If your issue affects more than one transaction but just a
few of them, it can still be classified as transaction tuning. You may want to diagnose and
document each issue separately. Transaction Tuning usually translates into SQL Tuning.
2. Back-End Tuning: Overall poor performance is observed, or several transactions perform poorly;
usually from more than one application group. This category typically includes issues where
system load has an impact in the overall performance, or it degraded after a major software
upgrade. Back-End Tuning usually translates into DB Server Tuning and/or OS Tuning.
3. Tech-Stack Tuning: Navigation between Forms or within Forms performs poorly affecting several
Forms. Opening a Form takes an unusual long time. Different performance is observed from one
location to another. Some users are affected but no others. Back-End has been reviewed and
ruled out. Tech-Stack Tuning is also known as Middle-Tier Tuning.

Certify
Use Certify within MetaLink to verify that your specific combination of Platform/Operating System,
RDBMS Release and Oracle Applications Release, is fully certified. On MetaLink main 'Certify - Platform
Selection page' select your back-end server platform. On the 'Product Group selection page', select 'E-
Business Suite'. Review the General Notes. Select your combination of Apps Release (Oracle E-
Business Suite Version), RDBMS Release (Oracle Server Version), and 'Certified combinations only'.
Locate your OS Release in the 'Database Tiers Certifications page' and review the hotlinks under
'Additional Info' and 'Issues' columns. If there are 'Interoperability Notes' for your implementation, please
review them. Under the 'Issues' hot link you may encounter a list of known Bugs and Issues affecting
your particular combination of OS/RDBMS/Apps Releases. Please review the list of known Bugs and
Issues carefully and document in your electronic file:

1. List of known Bugs and Issues according to your OS/RDBMS/Apps Releases that may relate to
your performance issue.
2. Which of the related Bugs have been applied?
3. Which ones have not yet been applied? Explain why.

Note: Be aware that the list of known Bugs and Issues changes periodically. Therefore, it is a good
practice to review this list of known Bugs and Issues affecting your very specific Product combination
every time you need to troubleshoot a new performance issue.

Statistics Gathering
• Statistics Gathering in 11i
• Statistics Gathering in 11.0 and 10.7

Oracle Applications 11i and later uses the Cost Based Optimizer to generate execution plans for SQL
statements. In order to generate optimal execution plans, the CBO requires updated statistics regarding
your data volume and distribution. Statistics used by the CBO are stored in the data dictionary and can
be queried using several available views. Oracle Applications 10.7 and 11.0 mostly use the Rule Base
Optimizer. Still a handful of SQL statements from these earlier releases of Oracle Apps invoke the CBO
by using embedded CBO Hints. Therefore, all Oracle Applications Releases must have current CBO
statistics available for pertinent schema objects belonging to the installed Apps modules.
There are several tools available to gather CBO statistics. All of them allow to gather stats either by
reading all the data on the table or index (compute method), or just a sample of the data (estimate
method). For Oracle Applications there is no need to gather exact stats using the 'compute statistics'
method. When gathering CBO stats you should generally use the 'estimate' method with a sample size of
10%.

Regarding the frequency of the CBO statistics gathering, the right schedule really depends on your data,
based on how often it changes. Typically, gathering CBO statistics at least once per month, with an
estimated sample of 10%, on all pertinent schema objects belonging to Apps installed modules, has
proved to be sufficient for most clients. Some clients prefer to gather CBO statistics weekly, during a
quiet system load interval. Other clients prefer to optimize the gathering of CBO stats, by scheduling the
frequency and estimate sample percentage according to the current size of their tables.

In any case, if you suspect that your CBO stats may be affecting your process performing poorly, a more
aggressive CBO stats gathering is usually worth attempting. Measure the performance again if you
refreshed your CBO statistics for one or more schema objects accessed by your process performing
poorly. Be aware that prior measurements, Traces, Trace Analyzer and TKPROF files, may become
invalid.

Also keep in mind that when an object has its CBO stats refreshed, all references to that object in the
shared pool or library cache become invalid, requiring a new hard parse for each SQL statement
referencing the object. Therefore, in order to avoid temporarily affecting the performance of all active
users in a production environment, you must refrain from gathering CBO stats during times of intensive
system usage. Always schedule the CBO stats gathering during periods of time with very low system
load, and when the number of active users is at its minimum. In other words: DO NOT GATHER CBO
STATS WHEN NUMBER OF ACTIVE USERS IS MEDIUM TO HIGH.

Note: Try gathering stats at least once per month and with an estimate sample size of 10% for all your
schema objects belonging to Apps. If you can afford gathering stats every week, do so (it is preferred, but
not required). Always gather stats with no active users, or when system load is very low.

Regarding your CBO statistics gathering, document in your electronic file:

1. Frequency of the CBO stats gathering on the pertinent schema objects accessed by your process
performing poorly (monthly, weekly, daily, etc.)
2. Method used (per table, per schema, all schemas, etc.)
3. Tool used (coe_stats.sql, FND_STATS, DBMS_STATS, ANALYZE command,
DBMS_UTILITY)
4. Estimate sample size percentage used (or if compute method, specify so)
5. When was the last time the CBO stats where gathered for the affected schema objects?

Note: Using 8i, never gather CBO statistics for data dictionary objects owned by user 'SYS'. The only
exception is the table DUAL owned by SYS, for which FND_STATS gathers stats when executed for
one or all schemas.

Statistics Gathering in 11i


From all the tools available, Oracle Apps 11i mandates the exclusive use of the FND_STATS package
to gather the CBO stats. This package can be invoked either from a seeded Concurrent Program, or
directly from SQL*Plus. When invoked using the seeded Concurrent Programs, use only the 'Gather
Schema Statistics' or the 'Gather Table Statistics'.
When using the 'Gathering Schema Statistics' concurrent program, pass only the schema name
parameter. Let the other parameters default automatically. The schema name passed can be a specific
schema or 'ALL' if you prefer to gather CBO stats for the pertinent objects belonging to all Apps installed
modules, using the estimate method with a sample size of 10% (default). Be aware this process may
take several hours to complete.

When using the 'Gather Table Statistics' concurrent program, pass only the owner of the table (schema
name) and the table name. Let all other parameters default automatically, except when the table has
been partitioned. When gathering CBO stats for a partitioned table, pass 'PARTITION' in the Granularity
parameter, otherwise FND_STATS will calculate global stats (plus partition stats) instead of rolling up
the global stats from the partitions. If this happens, you may have to delete the global stats (with cascade
equals 'false') and gather the stats for one partition to once again enable the automatic rolling up into the
global stats.

To execute the corresponding FND_STATS procedures from SQL*Plus to gather CBO stats for one or
all schemas, or for a particular table, use the following examples:

# sqlplus apps/<apps_pwd>
SQL> exec fnd_stats.gather_schema_statistics('MRP');
<- One schema
SQL> exec fnd_stats.gather_schema_statistics('ALL'); <- All
schemas
SQL> exec
fnd_stats.gather_table_stats('MRP','MRP_FORECAST_DATES'); <- One
table
SQL> begin <-
Partitioned table
2 fnd_stats.gather_table_stats(ownname => 'APPLSYS',
3 tabname =>
'WF_ITEM_ACTIVITY_STATUSES',
4 granularity => 'PARTITION');
5 end;
6 /

There is also a public script available that may help you automate the CBO statistics gathering. This is
the coe_stats.sql script, included and documented in Note:156968.1. The coe_stats.sql script uses
the FND_STATS package and schedules the CBO stats gathering according to table sizes. It uses the
estimate method with a variable sample size based also on table size. It gathers stats more accurately
for small tables (larger sample percent) and uses a smaller sample size percent for larger tables. The
main benefit of this script is that it has the potential to reduce the overall CBO stats gathering execution
time without sacrificing stats accuracy. If your total CBO stats gathering time for all pertinent schema
objects is acceptable using plain FND_STATS procedures, then there is no need to explore using the
coe_stats.sql script. In the other hand, if yours is a 24x7 operation and you need to minimize the
window to gather CBO stats, consider using the coe_stats.sql script.

If you are not confident of the current status of your overall CBO stats in your Apps 11i instance,
download and execute the bde_last_analyzed.sql script from Note:163208.1. This script reports the
current status of the CBO stats for all schema objects owned by Apps installed modules. It summarizes
by schema name (application group) and by date, where at least one schema object got its stats
refreshed. It warns you of possible erroneous stats gathering on schema objects owned by SYS. It also
reports and warns on partitioned tables which global and partition level stats are out of sync. You can
execute this bde_last_analyzed.sql script at any time. By reviewing the summary page at the
beginning of the report produced, you can quickly get the status of the CBO stats on your instance.

Statistics Gathering in 11.0 and 10.7


For earlier Releases of Oracle Applications you can use any tool available to gather CBO statistics. The
recommended tool is the DBMS_STATS package, documented in the corresponding 'Supplied PL/SQL
Packages Reference' manual for your RDBMS Release. The FND_STATS package did not exist on
11.0 or 10.7, but it is available through back-port patch for Bug 1268797. If you don't have to have
FND_STATS installed on your 11.0 or 10.7 instance, use DBMS_STATS instead.

Besides the DBMS_STATS package, the ANALYZE command documented in the 'SQL Reference'
manual corresponding to your RDBMS Release can also be used on 11.0 and 10.7, as well as the
DBMS_UTILITY package.

Transaction Tuning
• Data Gathering
• Researching
• Initial Troubleshooting
• Apps 11i init.ora parameters
• Advanced Troubleshooting

Once you have validated Certify and Statistics Gathering, proceed with this next section if your
performance issue qualifies as this high-level tuning category.

Data Gathering (files and information)


Gather the indicated files and document in your electronic file the following information:

1. How long does it take for the process to complete (specify hours/mins/secs)?
2. How long did it previously take (before having the performance issue)?
3. What is the expected performance for this process (specify hours/mins/secs)?
4. If you have any customization related to this process, document it in your electronic file, in full
detail.
5. Determine module information requested below, for specific Form, Report, Package, Main Pro*C,
etc.
1. Module internal name (short name): For a Form, use the menu to find the short name
and version. For a concurrent program, use the 'Concurrent Program Define' Form from
the SYSADMIN responsibility to find short and long name.
2. Module title (descriptive or long name): For a Form, use the navigation path or the title
displayed in the Form.
3. Module version: For a concurrent program in UNIX, navigate to directory (i.e.
$AP_TOP/reports or $PO_TOP/bin) and use strings command:

# strings -a <module> | grep -i '$Header'

4. Latest version available according to MetaLink: Use 'Patches' option on MetaLink main
menu.
5. Current patchset level for application group owning the affected module: Ask your
System Administrator or DBA.
6. Latest patchset available according to MetaLink for the application group: Use 'Patches'
option on MetaLink main menu.

Note: If you find that you have an old version of the module, be aware that quite often a
newer version of it may fix a known performance issue. This may be true even if you
don't find a direct hit in the list of issues fixed between your version and the latest
version. If possible, upgrade the affected module to the latest version available. Also be
aware that in many cases, due to intricate file dependencies, Oracle Development
requires you have the latest version of the module applied, in order to troubleshoot a new
issue.

6. When the affected module is a Pro*C program, generate a text file with the list of modules
(components) linked to the Pro*C program. Use this or similar command:

# strings -a <Pro*C module> | grep -i '$Header' > MODULES.TXT

7. On a multi-org environment, determine the ORG_ID used while monitoring the performance of the
affected module. This ORG_ID or Operating Unit is usually required to later execute an isolated
SQL statement performing poorly, using SQL*Plus. If you don't know the ORG_ID, use this
command to produce a list of Operating Units, and determine the ORG_ID from the list:

SQL> select organization_id org_id, name from hr_operating_units;

8. If your transaction performing poorly is a Concurrent Program, determine if your application group
provides a Profile Option to turn ON and OFF some sort of debugging information, if it does,
execute your Concurrent Process with debugging information turned ON and recover the Log file
generated (this is in addition to the Trace file requested below). Review your Log file.
9. If yours is a Concurrent Program, document in your electronic file all the parameters requested by
the execution of your process, indicating which values you passed, including which values were
left NULL, or automatically defaulted. Include all parameter names and values. Keep in mind
that the number, name, or order of the parameters may change from one version of the module to
the next.
10. For online transactions, document in your electronic file, in full detail, the complete navigation
path, as well as step-by-step instructions to reproduce your issue. If the transaction performing
poorly is a query, document which parameters are passed to the query, as well as, which
parameters are NULL, or automatically defaulted. Be as specific as possible.
11. If your transaction has been running for several hours or days, and you did not turn SQL Trace at
the beginning of it, you can still capture the expensive SQL statements for further analysis.
Download, familiarize yourself, and execute the bde_session.sql script (Note:169630.1)
and/or the SQLAREAT.SQL script (Note:238684.1 for 8.1 and Note:163209.1 for 8.0). These
scripts can be executed even a few minutes after the process has been killed. The former
requires the session_id, the latter has no parameters.
12. All Apps Transaction Tuning issues require, at the very least, one raw SQL Trace. If tracing a
Form, turn Trace ON using the menu (Help → Diagnostics → Trace → Trace with Binds and
Waits), and set the trace size to unlimited (Help → Diagnostics → Trace → Unlimited
Trace File Size). If tracing a Concurrent Program, use whatever method is available for your
Apps Release (usually a check box at the Concurrent Program Define Form). Under some
specific conditions, Oracle Development requires a raw SQL Trace generated with Event 10046
(Trace with Binds and Waits). If you can provide that special Trace up front, it helps to
expedite the whole process. Once you generate the raw SQL Trace (standard for Concurrent
Programs, or with Event 10046 for any Form), compress it and have it available in case you have
to provide it to Oracle Support. This file is usually large. Traces are found in the
'user_dump_dest' directory.

Note: It is common to iterate in this step because the raw SQL Trace generated does not have statistics
turned ON, or because it was truncated due to its size. To avoid this unnecessary loop in the process,
verify these two init.ora parameters settings: 'timed_statistics' set to TRUE, and 'max_dump_file_size' set
to UNLIMITED. On the other hand, if your process 'hangs' and you killed it, be aware that even an
incomplete raw SQL Trace may be useful to pin-point the SQL Statement(s) performing poorly.

13. If you created a Trace with Binds and Waits, use the Trace Analyzer tool (Note:224270.1) to
analyze your Trace. This tool, when used on the same db instance where the Trace was
generated, produces a comprehensive report that can be used to identify expensive SQL in terms
of service and/or wait times.
14. # sqlplus apps/<apps_pwd>
SQL> START TRCANLZR.sql UDUMP prod_ora_9105.trc;

15. For all Apps Transaction Tuning issues, generate and be ready to provide to Oracle Support, one
TKPROF file generated with the Explain Plan option. TKPROF reports must be generated on the
same db instance where the raw SQL Trace was created. If you had to kill the process because
it never completed, don't destroy the raw SQL Trace generated, proceed to create a TKPROF
from it as well. To generate one TKPROF, unsorted, and with Explain Plan, use this syntax:

# tkprof 12345.trc 12345.prf explain=apps/<apps_pwd>

Note: Read the TKPROF and determine if it corresponds to the transaction performing
poorly. Providing to Oracle a TKPROF which does not correspond to the problematic
transaction is very common, and it causes unnecessary delays in the resolution of
performance issues. In the TKPROF, you should recognize table names and possibly
the transaction. The total TKPROF Elapsed Time should be close to the 'user' Elapsed
Time.

Researching
At this point, you can pursue your performance issue with Oracle Support. Provide as many of the
requested files as possible. Or, you may opt to participate more pro-actively in the research phase by
performing the following steps before contacting Oracle Support:

1. Use the Trace Analyzer and/or TKPROF file(s) to find the expensive SQL statements. In most
cases you want to focus your attention in those SQL statements causing more than 5 to 20% of
the overall logical reads or elapsed time totals (summarized in the first page of the Trace
Analyzer report, or the last page of the TKPROF). If you are using the Trace Analyzer, you may
also want to review SQL statements with large non-idle wait times.
2. Document in your electronic file the most expensive SQL statement(s) found. Include from the
Trace Analyzer or TKPROF the block showing the SQL statement; the block showing the parse,
execute and fetch statistics for the SQL statement; and the block that shows the Explain Plan for
it.
3. For each expensive SQL statement (in most cases it is just one), search on MetaLink for known
issues. Review the SQL statement and grab from it significant and not-so-common columns to
make your search criteria as selective as possible. Take pieces from the FROM clause and the
WHERE clause. Be aware that you may be experiencing a performance issue already reported
by another customer and for which either a fix or a workaround exists. While doing your search
on MetaLink, you may want to use also the short name of the module (Form or Concurrent
Program).
4. Document in your electronic file all MetaLink hits regarding your poorly performing SQL
statement(s). Even if they seem to be unrelated or never fixed.

Initial Troubleshooting
If you decide to be pro-active in the initial troubleshooting phase, perform the following steps for each
SQL statement identified from the Trace Analyzer or TKPROF as expensive (according to the number of
logical reads performed, or according to the elapsed time for its complete execution, or the non-idle wait
time). Start with the very most expensive SQL statement that is not a BEGIN procedure or data dictionary
recursive SQL. In other words, focus only on DML commands (SELECT, UPDATE, INSERT or DELETE)
accessing Apps tables and indexes.

Note: If the most expensive statement in your Trace Analyzer or TKPROF is NOT a DML command
(SELECT, UPDATE, INSERT or DELETE), in other words, it is a PL/SQL library call, use the profiler.sql
script from Note:243755.1.

1. Create a flat file (text type) pasting the DML command (SQL statement) directly from the Trace
Analyzer or TKPROF report. Leave one and only one blank line at the end of the SQL
statement. Do not leave the statement without a single blank line at the end, and do not include
more than one blank line at the end. This is required by the SQLTXPLAIN.SQL or
coe_xplain_xx.sql scripts. Create your first flat file with the name of sql1.txt, the second
with sql2.txt and so on. The SQLTXPLAIN.SQL and coe_xplain_xx.sql scripts can
handle any file name, but the standard is sql<n>.txt. Bind variables (those with colons, i.e.
':b1',':2') should be left intact. And you should not have a semicolon ';' at the end of your SQL
statement.
2. For RDBMS Release 8.1 or later, download script SQLTXPLAIN.SQL from Note:215187.1.
For 8.0 download coe_xplain_80.sql from Note:156959.1. And for 7.3 download
coe_xplain_73.sql from Note:156960.1. Read the downloaded version of the script and
familiarize yourself with it.
3. Place your SQLTXPLAIN.SQL set of files or your coe_xplain_xx.sql script and your
sql<n>.txt file(s) into a dedicated directory.
4. Execute SQLTXPLAIN.SQL or coe_xplain_xx.sql script from SQL*Plus connecting as
apps/apps_pwd, passing as the inline parameter the name of the file containing your SQL
statement sql<n>.txt as indicated by the instructions on the corresponding script (see
commands below). The SQLTXPLAIN.SQL or coe_xplain_xx.sql script will not execute
your SQL statement included into sql<n>.txt. They just parse your SQL statement and
proceed to explode it into pieces for a detailed analysis.

SQL> start SQLTXPLAIN.SQL sql<n>.txt


SQL> start coe_xplain_xx.sql sql<n>.txt

5. If you need to provide to Oracle Support the output of the SQLTXPLAIN.SQL or


coe_xplain_xx.sql scripts, compress and send the whole directory with all spool files within it.
6. From the Trace Analyzer or TKPROF, and from the spool file created by the
SQLTXPLAIN.SQL or coe_xplain_xx.sql script, determine and compare the Optimizer
used. It should be consistent. Document in your electronic file which Optimizer is being used:
Rule Based - RBO or Cost Based - CBO.
7. If using CBO, good statistics of the schema objects accessed are crucial to generate an optimal
execution plan. Locate in your spool file the column 'Last Analyzed'. This column tells you when
you last gathered stats for each table accessed by your SQL statement. (You can do the same to
review all indexes). Look also at the column that reads 'Delta Percent' to determine gap between
actual number of rows in your tables (dynamically calculated with COUNT function) and the
number of rows recorded in your data dictionary as part of the CBO stats for your tables
accessed by your SQL statement. If your stats for the schema objects accessed by your SQL
statement are more than one month old, or the gap reported under the 'delta percent' column is
more then 10%, you need to gather fresh stats for your affected schema objects.
8. Only for CBO: If you determine that some or all the schema objects accessed by your SQL
statement require refreshed stats, you must use the appropriate tool to gather stats according to
your Apps Release. If your Apps Release is 11i, you may want to use the SQLTGSTATS.SQL
script included in the SQLT.zip file.
9. Only for CBO: If you had to refresh stats, execute the SQLTXPLAIN.SQL or
coe_xplain_xx.sql script again to produce a new Explain Plan. If the Explain Plan changed,
measure again the performance of your original transaction, as it may have changed as well.
10. If you are using CBO, are on 8.1 or later, and have only identified one expensive SQL statement,
there are two files that you want to recover and have available for Oracle Support. Be aware that
second file is Binary, therefore you must copy across servers as such.
1. Find in 'user_dump_dest' directory a raw SQL Trace generated by the
SQLTXPLAIN.SQL script automatically. This raw SQL Trace file is completely
unrelated to the first raw SQL Trace file you generated when executing your original
transaction. If SQLTXPLAIN.SQL was executed using SQL*Plus on the db
server, the raw SQL Trace generated by it may had been already copied into
the same dedicated directory from which the script was executed.
2. Generate Binary file SQLT.dmp with your CBO statistics for affected objects, by
executing Export command (exp) as per INSTRUCTIONS.TXT included in
SQLT.zip. Use command below. Execute export using ORACLE_HOME 8.0.6.

# exp apps/<apps_pwd> file=SQLT


tables='SQLT$STATTAB'

11. If you have a vanilla instance, or one in which the same transaction performs fine, follow the
same steps to reproduce the Explain Plan, and compare them to verify that you can produce the
same Explain Plan in both instances. If not, focus first on indexes. If you find index
discrepancies among instances, solve such discrepancies.
12. If you are using RBO and see in your Explain Plan that a custom index is being accessed, drop
the custom index and measure the performance again. Be aware that once you drop an index
being accessed according to the Explain Plan, all prior measurements and files become invalid.
The Explain Plan will change, as well as the performance.
13. If on an 11i instance you notice that your SQL statement makes references to Apps Views, find
corresponding view definitions in the spool file created by the SQLTXPLAIN.SQL script. You
may optionally execute the coe_view.sql to generate scripts which can be used later to clone
your views from one instance into another. Be aware there may exist several versions of the
same view depending on the version of the corresponding ODF file used to create the view. You
can use the syntax of the command below to search from the corresponding APPL_TOP for the
specific ODF file that creates a view. Once you know the file and find its version, you can search
on MetaLink for newer versions:

# find . -type f -exec grep -i


"CZ_COMPONENT_SELECTIONS_V" {} \; -print

14. If on an 11i instance, you may want to ensure all required and recommended init.ora parameters
for 11i are set correctly. Since you already have at least one SQLTXPLAIN.SQL or
coe_xplain_xx.sql report, near the end of them you will find a list of init.ora parameters
affecting the behavior of the CBO. The init.ora parameters required for your Apps Release are
clearly identified. If necessary, fix any parameter showing an incorrect setting, and repeat your
test.

Apps 11i init.ora parameters


Development has provided an official list under Note:216205.1.

You may optionally download the bde_chk_cbo.sql script from Note:174605.1. This script allows to
quickly validate all database initialization parameters according to Note:216205.1. This script includes
which EVENTs must be set or unset for Oracle Apps 11i as well.

Advanced Troubleshooting
This phase requires special skills, and at this point most performance issues are raised to Oracle
Support. If you are proficient in SQL*Plus and you understand the Explain Plan, you may want to review
this section; otherwise collect the requested files and provide them to Oracle Support.

Fully read the output of the SQLTXPLAIN.SQL or coe_xplain_xx.sql script and make sense of the
Explain Plan and all related information. Familiarize yourself with this report and make a sanity check on
its contents.

To proceed with this phase, you need to prepare a tuning environment. This tuning environment can be
located on the same instance on which the performance issue is observed, or it can be on a different
instance. If the issue is observed in a Production instance, try to set the tuning environment on the Test
or Development instances. Tune on the Production instance only when you have failed to reproduce the
issue on a non-production environment. Reproducing an issue does not necessarily mean reproducing its
performance. In most cases it is sufficient to reproduce the same 'bad' Explain Plan, rather than the slow
access itself.

In general, a good tuning environment is one in which you can perform the following two independent
activities at will. You may end up with two tuning environments, one for each activity.

1. Reproduce the exact same Explain Plan from original version of SQL statement.
2. Execute the expensive SQL statement in its original version and on several different 'modified'
versions (hopefully improved).

Reproducing the exact same Explain Plan on a different instance usually represents a significant
challenge, as the CBO decides the plan based on: CBO statistics, init.ora parameters, schema object
attributes, RDBMS Release, and in a very few cases, in the Platform used. The latter is particularly true
when hitting a platform specific OS or RDBMS Bug. With RBO, reproducing the same explain plan is
much easier, since it depends mostly on the schema objects defined and accessed. Therefore, this
advanced troubleshooting phase relates mostly to issues regarding the CBO.

The focus of the tuning effort is usually in or around the Explain Plan Operation with the largest number of
rows, according to the Explain Plan from the Trace Analyzer or TKPROF report. If the column 'Rows' on
the Explain Plan from the Trace Analyzer or TKPROF report shows all zeroes (meaning zeroes for all
Operations), then it is almost indispensable to isolate the SQL statement, identify, define and assign the
values of the bind variables, and execute from SQL*Plus with SQL Trace enabled. Then create a new
Trace Analyzer or TKPROF from new raw SQL Trace. The new Trace Analyzer or TKPROF will have the
Rows column of the Explain Plan populated. This relates to how SQL*Plus handles cursors compared to
other tools. The cursor must be closed in order to get the number of rows column in the Explain Plan,
and SQL*Plus keeps open one cursor at a time, forcing the closure of the prior cursor.
To reproduce the exact same Explain Plan from original version of SQL statement, try the following:

1. Copy the CBO statistics from the source instance (where the SQL performs poorly) into the
destination instance (tuning environment):
1. When you ran the SQLTXPLAIN.SQL on the source instance, it updated a staging
table SQLT$STATTAB with the CBO stats for all schema objects related to the SQL
statement (tables, indexes, columns and histograms).
2. Use the Export command on the source instance, according to the
INSTRUCTIONS.TXT file provided inside the SQLT.zip file. Generate an external
binary file SQLT.dmp with the following command:

# exp apps/<apps_pwd> file=SQLT


tables='SQLT$STATTAB'

3. Copy this binary file from source to destination instance. Do not use ASCII. Treat always
as BINARY.
4. Use the Import command on destination instance, as documented on the
SQLTSTATTAB.SQL script, also included inside the SQLT.zip file.

#imp apps/<apps_pwd> file=SQLT


tables='SQLT$STATTAB' ignore=y

5. Execute script SQLTSTATTAB.SQL on the destination instance to update the data


dictionary CBO stats from imported SQLT$STATTAB table.

Note: To restore the stats in the destination instance, simply gather new stats for
affected schema objects. You may also want to use the SQLTGSTATS.SQL
script included in the SQLT.zip file. This means you don't need to backup CBO
stats on destination instance prior to overriding them with stats from source
instance.

2. Review and compare the init.ora parameters files from source and destination instances. If these
instances are Production and Test, you may have the exact same parameters. If not, annotate
the differences in case you have to adjust the CBO relevant parameters in the destination
instance. You don't have to take action right away, as you may produce the same Explain Plan
without changing any init.ora parameter. Even if you adjust an init.ora parameter, you may be
able to do so with an ALTER SESSION command for most of them, instead of modifying the
init.ora file and bouncing the database altogether.
3. Review and compare schema object attributes such as 'Partitioned' and Parallel 'Degree'. If you
find discrepancies, sync them up.
4. Annotate the RDBMS Release version (up to the fifth digit), as well as the Platform. You must be
at least on the same RDBMS Release up to the 3rd digit before trying to reproduce the same
Explain Plan. It would be better, if you are on sync up to the 4th digit.
5. Now try, using the SQLTXPLAIN.SQL script, to generate the same Explain Plan in source and
destination. If you don't get the same Explain Plan, adjust CBO related init.ora parameters in
destination and try again (use ALTER SESSION if parameter allows). If you still cannot obtain
the same Explain Plan using common CBO stats, init.ora parameters, and schema object
attributes, try then ruling out differences among the source and destination instances (one at a
time). Determine what is different between source and destination instances. Focus on the
discrepancies that may be causing the 'bad' Explain Plan (assuming the plan on destination
instance performs better, of course), and rule them out (one by one) until you find which of the
discrepancies causes the Explain Plan to switch from 'good' to 'bad'.
Note: In most cases, finding the root cause of a ' bad' Explain Plan, is the same than
finding the solution to the performance issue.

6. If you find yourself in a situation in which CBO stats, schema object attributes, and init.ora, are all
the same, but Platform and RDBMS Release are different, and instance in which RDBMS is
newer performs better, you can be almost certain that upgrading the RDBMS engine will solve
your performance issue.
7. If you have the same CBO stats, schema object attributes, init.ora and Platform, and only
RDBMS Release is different, and the instance with the newer Release performs better, try to
upgrade your RDBMS Release on the older instance.
8. If you, or Oracle Support, can reproduce the same 'bad' Explain Plan on the same or different
Platform (common up to the 3rd digit RDBMS Release), using your CBO stats, most likely your
issue is an Application Bug. In such case, the issue needs to be reported to Oracle Development
and you will be given a new Bug number.
9. Once your performance issue has been cataloged as a new Application Bug, the next steps in the
troubleshooting process require to explain and execute the SQL statement in its original form and
on several different modified versions, trying to create one execution plan delivering a better
performance.

Note: If you have two similar instances. One performing well and the other poorly, and
they have similar data but producing different Explain Plans, as a workaround you can
force the 'good' plan into the slow instance by migrating the CBO stats using
SQLTXPLAIN.SQL together with SQLTSTATTAB.SQL.

To execute the expensive SQL statement in its original version and on several different modified versions,
try the following:

1. You need to be able to isolate the expensive SQL statement for execution from SQL*Plus, at will.
To do this, you need first to find the values of the bind variables referenced. If you can deduce
the values by reviewing the SQL statement, do so. Otherwise, you might have to use one of the
methods available for tracing with bind variables according to Note:171647.1, and then use the
Trace Analyzer (Note:224270.1) to process the raw SQL Trace and identify the bind variables
from your raw SQL Trace created with Event 10046 on your transaction.
2. Assign the values of the bind variables referenced in the SQL statement. Be careful conserving
the same data types. You may need to define and assign values to bind variables. Avoid
replacing bind variables with literals.
3. If your Explain Plan shows any table with suffix '_ALL', this means you need to set up the multi-
org environment. Using the corresponding Operating Unit (ORG_ID), set multi-org with this
command:

SQL> exec fnd_client_info.set_org_context('&org_id');

4. Use ALTER SESSION commands to turn SQL_TRACE ON and OFF, and execute your SQL
statement. To facilitate the whole process, you may want to create a script with the setting of
multi-org, the 'ALTER SESSION SET SQL_TRACE = TRUE;' command, the assignment of the
bind variable values, your SQL statement, and the command to terminate the SQL Trace. This
way you can execute the SQL statement systematically.
5. For INSERT, UPDATE or DELETE SQL statements, you need to focus on the subquery
performing poorly (usually the main query feeding the insert/update/delete). Transform the
original SQL into an isolated stand-alone query. If this is not possible, add the ROLLBACK
command to the script with your INSERT, UPDATE or DELETE SQL statement.
6. Tuning the SQL statement requires a lot of practice and patience. All methods converge to the
same principle: apply your knowledge to create a modified and improved version of the original
SQL statement and determine if it performs better for every situation. Some analysts mostly use
the Explain Plan leaving the benchmark of a candidate to the end. Others prefer to execute and
measure the performance of each candidate (modified SQL statement). It becomes a matter of
style at this level.
7. While iterating in this process, generating explain plans for several versions of the same SQL
statement, you can use the SQLTX.SQL script (included in SQLT.zip), or the bde_x.sql
script from Note:174603.1. The latter script generates a very simple Explain Plan and their
execution is faster than complex SQLTXPLAIN.SQL.
8. Things to try in order to improve the Explain Plan and ultimately the performance of the SQL
statement:
1. Verify all tables referenced in the FROM clause are actually joined in the WHERE clause.
2. Improve CBO stats, either by using a higher sample size or with histograms for columns
that are filtered with literals in the WHERE clause. You can also temporarily modify the
CBO stats for an index or column (only as a short term workaround).
3. Indexes with better selectivity for specific filter or join conditions. These indexes may
ultimately be custom indexes.
4. Switch the optimizer from RBO to CBO, or from CBO to RBO. The latter as a temp
solution only.
5. Use one or more CBO Hints.
6. Rewording the SQL statement.
7. Avoid overuse of UNION, ORDER BY, DISTINCT and other clauses that may not be
necessary.
8. Using dynamic SQL to avoid poorly written code with functions like NVL or DECODE in
the WHERE clause, which may affect the selectivity of the predicates.
9. If the SQL statement has been fully tuned, and the reason of the poor performance is
purely the volume of data necessarily retrieved, then you may want to consider data
partitioning or parallel query. Keep in mind that data partitioning or parallel processing
are not the right solution to fix a poorly tuned SQL.

Back-end Tuning
Once you have validated Certify and Statistics Gathering, proceed with this section if your performance
issue qualifies as this high-level tuning category.

• Data Gathering
• Initial Troubleshooting
• Advanced Troubleshooting

Data Gathering (files and information)


Gather the indicated files and document in your electronic file the following information:

1. Architecture information: Basically how are the database server and the middle-tier configured?
Are they in the same box? If not, how many boxes you have? Which type? etc. Try answering:
Where do you have what?
2. Hardware Profile: CPU(s) number, type and speed. Amount of memory. How is the I/O
subsystem configured? What is the network type and speed? etc. Provide high-level information
of your hardware and components.
3. Server workload profile: What do you have running on same box? Databases in use on same
server. Number of concurrent active users. Number of concurrent active processes at a given
time (usually peak times). Basically, how busy is your box.
4. Do other applications or databases you may have running in the same box also perform poorly?
If not, explain.
5. What is the current and projected system load? What is the current vs. projected number of
active concurrent users. Same for active concurrent processes.
6. What are the concurrent processing policies? Have you moved as much of the concurrent
processing to lower online user activity periods? Do you have any restrictions to concurrent
processing at all? Do you use concurrent managers to restrict this intensive processing activities
during the day?
7. Have you validated any Operating System resource contention? This includes CPU, memory and
disk. Your comments should take into consideration all your boxes (back-end and middle-tier).
Validate and document if you are experiencing CPU spikes, memory paging, hot disks, etc. If you
have noticed memory swapping, document in detail, as well as any action being taken, including
short-term actions like borrowing hardware from Development or Test servers.
8. Make a list of all application modules (application groups), installed and in use on this Apps
instance. Example: AP, GL, FND, ONT, etc.
9. For the application modules (groups) affected by poor performance, document currently installed
patchset level.
10. For same affected application modules, research on MetaLink and document in your electronic
file what is the latest patchset available. Use the 'Patches' option on MetaLink main menu.
Document if you can upgrade to latest patchset levels shortly.
11. What is the Operating System patching level in your server box? Try to rule out any known
performance issues on your hardware platform. In general, try to keep your OS patching level as
current as possible. It is known that several overall performance issues are caused by
inadequate OS patching level. Consult your hardware vendor in this regard.
12. If you have any prior Performance related Report with specific recommendations regarding
hardware, configuration sizing, benchmark, stress test or similar, include the report in your
electronic documentation of your performance issue and provide it to Oracle Support. This
includes any formal or informal recommendations made by any Oracle or 3rd party entity.
Especially important if you are considering or in the process of implementing such
recommendations.
13. Review init.ora parameters file doing a sanity check on it, and have it ready to make it available to
Oracle Support. If you find that some Events are set in this file, determine if there is a strong
valid reason why. If none, delete them. If your init.ora file references another file by using the
command IFILE, review the referenced file and have it available as well.
14. Review ALERT.LOG for possible server errors or any other evident abnormalities. If the
ALERT.LOG is large, have the last 48 hours of it available for Oracle Support. Be sure the
ALERT.LOG includes the monitored interval where the performance was poor.
15. Make file APPLPTCH.TXT available to Oracle Support. This file keeps track of patches applied
to Apps.
16. Identify up to the top 10 user transactions performing poorly. This transactions are usually what
is causing your users to complain of the poor performance in the first place. Examples: entering
an order, saving a line, performing a query, etc. Document for each of this up to 10 'critical' user
transactions:
1. Transaction name or short description. Example: booking an order
2. Performance during normal system load (secs/mins)
3. Expected performance (secs/mins)
4. Performance when system load is almost zero (when only one or very few users are
active on instance)

Initial Troubleshooting
At this point, you can pursue your performance issue with Oracle Support. Provide as many of the
requested files as possible. Or, you may opt to participate more pro-actively in the initial troubleshooting
phase by performing the steps in this section before contacting Oracle Support.
1. For 11i instances: Verify required and recommended init.ora parameters are set correctly. Use
the provided script AFCHKCBO.sql and Interoperability Notes as well. Generate the
AFCHKCBO.TXT file containing the Apps 11i required init.ora parameters names and values.
Make this file available to Oracle Support. Fix any discrepancy, and document possible reason
why 'current' and 'required' columns don't have the same value. If the AFCHKCBO.sql script
and the Interoperability Notes require different values, set the values of the Note. To execute the
script use the syntax below:

# sqlplus apps/<apps_pwd>
SQL> SPOOL AFCHKCBO.TXT;
SQL> start $FND_TOP/sql/AFCHKCBO.sql
SQL> SPOOL OFF;
SQL> QUIT;

2. For 11i instances: There is another script that validates all required and recommended init.ora
parameters according to RDBMS Release. Use script bde_chk_cbo.sql from Note:174605.1
as an extension to AFCHKCBO.sql. Be aware that script bde_chk_cbo.sql provides more
detail than AFCHKCBO.sql.
3. For 11i instances: Verify CBO statistics by executing the bde_last_analyzed.sql script from
Note:163208.1. This script reports CBO stats per application group (schema name) and per
date. It also creates a summary at the beginning indicating how old the CBO stats are, if data
dictionary objects are free of CBO stats, and if you have partitioned tables requiring you fix their
global stats. Review BDE_LAST_ANALYZED.TXT reports and make them available to Oracle
Support.
4. For 10.7 and 11.0 instances: Verify you are gathering your CBO stats at least one per month, all
schema objects, with an estimate of 10%
5. For 8.0 and later: when the system is performing poorly, take one snapshot of the SQL area, to
easily identify if there is any evident expensive SQL being executed, or recently executed. For
8.1 and later, use SQLTAREAT.SQL from Note:238684.1. For 8.0 use coe_sqlarea_80.sql
from Note:163209.1. Read and get yourself familiarized with the specific version of
SQLTAREAT.SQL script and its output. Compress the whole directory which contains the
SQLAREAT.SQL generated spool file(s).

Advanced Troubleshooting
This phase is not complex, but it requires you to invest more time initially, monitoring the performance of
your instance for up to one working day. Therefore, you may want to proceed to reporting to Oracle
Support your overall bad performance issue at this time. Once your issue has been reported, proceed
immediately with this advanced troubleshooting phase, in order to quickly generate the necessary files to
pursue a final resolution.

1. For 7.3 and 8.0: Generate and provide at least one REPORT.TXT file from UTL scripts
'ULTBSTAT/UTLESTAT'. Your DBA should be familiar with these common performance
monitoring scripts.
2. For 8.1 and later: Install the latest version available of the StatsPack package. This package is
automatically available on 8.1, but it requires it be installed from its location at
$ORACLE_HOME/rdbms/admin into the database (as any other package). Look for detailed
instructions in the document spdoc.txt within the same directory. Your DBA should already
either be familiar with this package, or get familiar with it since it replaces former UTL scripts
'ULTBSTAT/UTLESTAT'. Read Note:153507.1 for more information on StatsPack for Oracle
Apps. Once installed, monitor poor performance during 4-8 hours, taking snapshots every 30
mins during the whole monitored interval (4-8 hours). Then generate one or more StatsPack
Report based on the snapshots while performance was worse (usually between 1 and 2 hours
within the 4-8 hours monitored interval). Provide these reports to Oracle Support.
3. For all RDBMS Releases, monitor OS performance at the same time database performance is
monitored. For 8.1 and later, every 30 mins during the whole monitored interval (4-8 hours). For
7.3 and 8.0, every 30 mins during the same interval of 'ULTBSTAT/UTLESTAT' execution. Use
standard OS performance monitoring tools like: vmstat, iostat, mpstat and top.
4. If there is an obvious resource contention in your OS, stop here and try to alleviate it with
permanent or temporary actions at the OS level.
5. Have your DBA read and analyze your ULTBSTAT/UTLESTAT or StatsPack Report. Search on
MetaLink for possible known issues with the same characteristics.
6. If you opt to be pro-active reducing the number of performance issues due to known problems,
keep your code as recent as possible, starting by the OS and moving towards RDBMS, leaving
Apps code last. Upgrading the OS software is usually painless, the RDBMS requires minor
testing, and the Apps layer requires significant user testing.
7. Provide all your gathered files, performance template, and dial-in to Oracle Support. Familiarize
yourself with Oracle Direct Connect ODC

Tech-Stack Tuning
Once you have validated Certify and Statistics Gathering, proceed with this section if your performance
issue qualifies as this high-level tuning category.

Data Gathering (files and information)


Gather the indicated files and document in your electronic file the following information:

1. How long does it take for the process to complete (specify hours/mins/secs)?
2. How long did it use to take (before having the performance issue)?
3. What is the expected performance for this process (specify hours/mins/secs)?
4. Architecture information: Basically how are the database server and the middle-tier configured?
Are they in the same box? If not, how many boxes you have? Which type? etc. Try answering:
Where do you have what?
5. Hardware Profile: CPU(s) number, type and speed. Amount of memory. How is the I/O
subsystem configured? What is the network type and speed? etc. Provide high-level information
of your hardware and components.
6. Server workload profile: What do you have running on same box? Databases in use on same
server. Number of concurrent active users. Number of concurrent active processes at a given
time (usually peak times). Basically, how busy is your box.
7. Do other applications or databases you have running on the same box also perform poorly? If
no, explain.
8. Do other applications running on the same client also perform poorly? If no, explain.
9. If the issue relates to slowness in loading a Form or navigating, does it reproduce when the client
is connected directly to the network hub closest to the server?
10. What is the current and projected system load? What is the current vs. projected number of
active concurrent users. Same for active concurrent processes.
11. What are the concurrent processing policies? Have you moved as much of the concurrent
processing to lower online user activity periods? Do you have any restrictions to concurrent
processing at all? Do you use concurrent managers to restrict this intensive processing activities
during the day?
12. Have you validated any Operating System resource contention? This includes CPU, memory and
disk. Your comments should take into consideration all your boxes (back-end and middle-tier).
Validate and document if you are experiencing CPU spikes, memory paging, hot disks, etc. If you
have noticed memory swapping, document in detail as well as any action being taken, including
short-term actions like borrowing hardware from Development or Test servers.
13. Make a list of all application modules (application groups), installed and in use on this Apps
instance. Example: AP, GL, FND, ONT, etc.
14. For the application modules (groups) affected by poor performance, document the currently
installed patchset level.
15. For the same affected application modules, research on MetaLink and document in your
electronic file what is the latest patchset available. Use 'Patches' option on MetaLink main
menu. Document if you can upgrade to latest patchset levels shortly.
16. What is the Oracle Forms Release version?
17. Which is the JINITIATOR version?
18. Browser name and version?
19. Document in your electronic file, in full detail, the complete navigation path, as well as step-by-
step instructions to reproduce your issue. If the transaction performing poorly is a query,
document which parameters are passed to the query as well as which parameters are NULL, or
automatically defaulted. Be as specific as possible.

Proceed to report your Tech-Stack performance issue to Oracle Support.

Reporting to Oracle
Providing to Oracle well organized, accurate, and comprehensive information and files, helps to expedite
the total resolution time. Try to determine the right balance between the initial time invested in gathering
as much information and files early in the process, with the benefit they provide to the overall process
reducing the number of iterations between the end-user, the technical user, Oracle Support, and Oracle
Development. Reports like the one produced by the SQLTXPLAIN.SQL script consolidate pieces of
information like CBO stats, indexes, init.ora parameters, etc. Having all this information gathered
systematically and into one single place, certainly reduces the number of iterations and therefore the total
resolution time.

Requested Files for Transaction Tuning Issues


At the very minimum, provide files 1 to 5 below. If you pro-actively participated on the initial
troubleshooting phase, or Oracle Support has guided you through it, provide files 6 to 9 accordingly.

1. Apps Performance Bug Template - Transaction Tuning


2. For Pro*C Concurrent Programs, MODULES.TXT with versions of modules
3. For Concurrent Programs, Log file with debugging information
4. Raw SQL Trace from the transaction, with or without Event 10046 details (compressed),
complete or incomplete
5. Trace Analyzer and/or TKPROF file(s) with Explain Plans
6. SQL<n>.TXT file(s) with identified expensive SQL
7. Compressed file with spool files generated by SQLTXPLAIN.SQL
8. Only for CBO and SQL1.TXT: Raw SQL Trace produced by SQLTXPLAIN.SQL
9. Only for CBO and SQL1.TXT: Binary file SQLT.dmp with CBO stats

Requested Files for Back-End Tuning Issues


At the very minimum, provide files 1 to 5 below. If you pro-actively participated on the initial
troubleshooting phase, or Oracle Support has guided you through it, provide files 6 to 8 accordingly. If
you opted to, or Oracle Support instructed you to perform the advanced troubleshooting steps, provide
files 9-11 accordingly.

1. Apps Performance Bug Template - Back-End Tuning


2. Any prior Performance related Report available
3. File init.ora, including any ifile(s) referenced on the init.ora
4. ALERT.LOG file, including last 48 hours
5. APPLPTCH.TXT file
6. For 11i, AFCHKCBO.TXT and/or BDE_CHK_CBO.TXT with required init.ora parameters
7. For 11i, BDE_LAST_ANALYZED.TXT with summary of CBO stats
8. For 8.1 or later, SQLAREAT.SQL spool files with expensive SQL statements
9. For 7.3 or 8.0, REPORT.TXT produced by bstat/estat tool
10. For 8.1 or later, StatsPack Report
11. Set of stats from OS performance monitoring tools, like: vmstat, iostat, mpstat and top

Requested Files for Tech-Stack Tuning Issues

1. Apps Performance Bug Template - Tech-Stack Tuning

Related Documents
Scripts
All related COE, BDE, TRCA, SQLT and PROF scripts can be downloaded from MetaLink

MetaLink Script Title


224270.1 TRCANLZR.SQL Trace Analyzer (8.1.6+)
Enhanced Explain Plan and related info for one
215187.1 SQLTXPLAIN.SQL
SQL statement (8.1+)
Implementing and Using the PL/SQL Profiler
243755.1 profiler.sql
(8.1+)
Enhanced Explain Plan for given SQL Statement
156959.1 coe_xplain_80.sql
(8.0)
Enhanced Explain Plan for given SQL Statement
156960.1 coe_xplain_73.sql
(7.3)
Simple Explain Plan for given SQL Statement
174603.1 bde_x.sql
(8.1+)
Clones views across instances for SQL tuning
156972.1 coe_view.sql
exercises (8.0+)
238684.1 SQLAREAT.SQL Top 10 Expensive SQL from SQL Area (8.1+)
163209.1 coe_sqlarea_80.sql Top 10 Expensive SQL from SQL Area (8.0)
Expensive SQL and resources utilization for
169630.1 bde_session.sql
given Session ID (8.1+)
174605.1 bde_chk_cbo.sql Current, required and recommended Apps 11i
init.ora params (11i)
Verifies Statistics for all installed Apps
163208.1 bde_last_analyzed.sql
modules (11i)
Automates CBO Stats Gathering using FND_STATS
156968.1 coe_stats.sql
and Table sizes (11i)
SQL Tracing Apps online transactions with Event
156969.1 coe_trace.sql
10046 (11i)
SQL Tracing Apps online transactions with Event
156970.1 coe_trace_11.sql
10046 (11.0)
Turns SQL Trace ON for all open DB Sessions
156971.1 coe_trace_all.sql
(8.0+)
156965.1 coe_locks.sql Session and serial# for locked Rows (7.3+)

Templates

MetaLink Apps Performance Bug Template


Transaction Tuning
169938.1 Back-End Tuning
169939.1 Tech-Stack Tuning

Notes

MetaLink Title
39817.1 Interpreting Raw SQL Trace and DBMS_SUPPORT.START_TRACE
153507.1 Oracle Applications and StatsPack
171647.1 Tracing Oracle Applications using Event 10046
170223.1 Profile Option: Initialization SQL Statement - Custom
.