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2010 UNSW / MiTSUbiShi LecTUre School of Mining Engineering Thursday 13th May, 2010 John Niland
2010 UNSW / MiTSUbiShi LecTUre School of Mining Engineering Thursday 13th May, 2010 John Niland

2010 UNSW / MiTSUbiShi LecTUre

School of Mining Engineering

Thursday 13th May, 2010 John Niland Scientia Building, University of New South Wales

The Future for Coal

To be delivered by:

Dr Don Elder

Chairman, World Coal Institute and Chief Executive Officer, Solid Energy New Zealand

Lecture (no charge): 5:30pm to 7:00pm – Ritchie Theatre, John Niland Scientia Building Cocktails ($30): 7:00pm to 8:30pm – Pavilions, Matthews Building

($30): 7:00pm to 8:30pm – Pavilions, Matthews Building The Lecture Six generations have elapsed since the

The Lecture

Six generations have elapsed since the industrial revolution. Global GDP/capita has increased twenty-fold. Cheap, abundant energy from coal, oil and gas has enabled one sixth of the world’s population – those of us in the OECD – to enjoy a standard of living unimaginable in the previous two hundred generations. Yet three quarters of the world still has a GDP/capita less than quarter the OECD average. Thirty percent live in poverty and twenty percent have no electricity. The UNDP Millennium Development Goals look no closer than they did over a decade ago.

Most of the developing world now target the standard of living we enjoy today. If current trends continue, within one further generation global GDP will increase by as much again as it did in the past 200 generations. This may not be possible. It requires global supply of most resources, and food, to nearly double, when these are becoming increasingly constrained. The period of human history with never-ending economic growth fuelled by cheap fossil

fuels is over. Affordable oil then gas may have less than one more generation. Coal, with much greater resources, has a key role to play in a transition to a world running on other energy sources. Yet many would prefer to see coal the first fossil fuel to disappear.

Although countries rich in resources per capita, like Australia and New Zealand, have an opportunity – unique in history – to meet these global needs we are already seeing the massive tensions it creates. How we manage this defines our new global responsibility.

background

Mitsubishi Development Pty Ltd is a major stakeholder in surface coal mining operations in Australia through its associations with BHP Billiton in Qld, and Xstrata and Rio Tinto in NSW. The company is supporting minerals tertiary education at UNSW through a range of initiatives that include undergraduate scholarships and an annual public lecture on a topical aspect of mining.

and an annual public lecture on a topical aspect of mining. For further information and accommodation

For further information and accommodation advice, please contact:

Carol Bell Tel: (02) 9385 4515

Email: C.Bell@unsw.edu.au

Fax: (02) 9313 7269

Emeritus Professor Jim Galvin

Tel: 0417 710 476

Email: Jim.Galvin@Galvin.net.au

Fax: (02) 9144 4199

rSVP – cocktail function: Friday 7th May, 2010 by – Fax: 02 9313 7269 or Email: c.bell@unsw.edu.au

I/We will attend the cocktail function (finger food and drinks) following the lecture

Name(s):

Phone:

Fax:

Email:

Address:

Enclosed is $ ………… as payment for the cocktail function ($30/person)

Please make cheques payable to the School of Mining Engineering, UNSW and post to:

School of Mining Engineering, University of New South Wales, UNSW NSW 2052