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The organizing committee of the Regional Chemistry

Seminar acknowledges support of

• All the participants of this seminar

• Manmohan Memorial Polytechnic, Hattimuda, Morang

• Mahendra Morang Adarsh Multiple Campus,


Biratnagar

• Nepal Chemical Society

• Central Department of Chemistry, Tribhuvan


University, Kirtipur, Kathmandu

RCS-2011 ABSTRACT VOLUME 2


Research Laboratory
Department of Chemistry
Mahendra Morang Adarsh Multiple
Campus, Biratnagar
Nepal

RCS-2011 ABSTRACT VOLUME 3


Contents
1. Preface
6

2. Committee 11

3. Key Lectures
13
PL1 Origin of Life on Earth: Role of Polymers
14
Bijan Das, Department of Chemistry, North
Bengal University,
Darjeeling 734 013, India
PL2 Analysis with homemade ion selective
electrodes
15
Raja Ram Pradhananga, Central Department of
Chemistry,
Tribhuvan University, Kirtipur, Kathmandu
PL3 Chemical Additives for Lubricating Oil 16
Pranab Ghosh,
Natural Product and Polymer Chemistry
Laboratory,
Department of Chemistry, University of North
Bengal,
Dt. Darjeeling, West Bengal, India – 734013
PL4 The Galvanized Coatings on Steel: Present
and Future

17
Amar Prasad Yadav, Central Department of
Chemistry,
Tribhuvan University, Kirtipur, Kathmandu, Nepal
4. Oral Presentations 18

RCS-2011 ABSTRACT VOLUME 4


O1 Solution Behaviour of Polyelectrolytes in
Mixed Solvent Media 19
Ranjit De1 & Bijan Das, Department of Chemistry,
North Bengal University,
Darjeeling 734 013, India
O2 Concentration Dependence of
Thermodynamic Properties of NaPb Liquid
Alloy 20
B.P. Singh1 , I.S. Jha2 and D. Adhikari1
1
Univ. Dept. of Physics, T. M. Bhag. University,
Bhagalpur, Bihar,
India, 2Dept. of Physics, M.M.A.M. Campus
(Tribhuvan University),
Biratnagar, Nepal
O3 Limonoids from the stem bark of Cedrela
tonduzii 21
Prabodh Satyal and William N. Setzer,
Department of Chemistry, University of Alabama
in Huntsville, 35899, Alabama, U.S.A.
O4 Effect of KCl on micellization of Cetyl
Trimethyl Ammonium Bromide (CTAB) and
Dodecyl Trimethyl Ammonium Bromide
(DTAB) in methanol water mixed solvent
media at 308.15 K by Conductometric
method 22
Sujit K. Shah, Ajaya Bhattarai, Sujeet Kumar
Chatterjee, Department of Chemistry
Mahendra Morang Adarsh Multiple Campus,
Biratnagar.
O5 The Effects of Concentration, Temperature
and Solvent Composition on the Partial
Molar Volumes of Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate
in Methanol –Water mixed Solvent Media

23
Ajaya Bhattarai, Tarun Kumar Deo, Tulasi Prasad
Niraula,
and Sujeet Kumar Chatterjee, Department of
Chemistry,
M. M. A. M. Campus, Tribhuvan University,
Biratnagar, Nepal.
5. Poster Presentations 24
RCS-2011 ABSTRACT VOLUME 5
P1 Preparation and characterization of
epoxidised and acrylated styrene-isoprene-
styrene (SIS) triblock block copolymer
based nanocomposite 25
Alina shakya1, Santosh Khanal1 , Goerg H.
Michler2 ,
Boulos Youssef3 , Jean M. Saiter3 , Rameshwar
Adhikari1,
1
Central Department of Chemistry, Tribhuvan
University, Kirtipur,
Kathmandu, Nepal2 Institute of Physics, Martin
Luther University
Halle-Wittenberg, D – 06099 Halle/Saale,
Germany
3
Laboratory, LECAP, Institut des Materiaux de
Rouen,
Universite de Rouen, Saint Etienne du Rouvray
Cedex, France
P2 Study of some physical properties of
polystyrene dissolved in chlorobenzene at
various concentration and temperature
26
B.P.Chaudhary1 and S.Regmi,
1
Manmohan Memorial Polytechnic, Hattimuda,
Morang
Central Department of Physics, Tribhuvan
University, Kirtipur, Nepal
P3 Nature of Ternary complex and Effects of
Time on Absorbance 27
Bimal Kumar Kanth, Department of Chemistry,
Mahendra Morang Adarsh Multiple Campus,
Biratnagar, Nepal
P4 Stability of the amalgams of alkali metals
28
S. K. Chakrabarti,Dept. of Physics, M. M. A. M.
Campus, Biratnagar
Tribhuvan University, Nepal
P5 Triterpenois from Schleichera oleosa with
antimicrobial activity 29
Amitava Mandal,1 Prasanta Chakraborty,1 Md.
Golam Rasul,1 Madhumita Chakaborty,2
2
Aniruddha Saha and Pranab Ghosh 1,

RCS-2011 ABSTRACT VOLUME 6


1
Natural Product and Polymer Chemistry
Laboatory, Department of Chemistry, University
of North Bengal, Darjeeling, India 734
013.2Department of Botany, University of North
Bengal, Darjeeling, India 734 013.
P6 Polyacrylate – LC blend as a potential lube
oil additive

30
Koushik Dey, Mahua Upadhyay and Pranab Ghosh
Natural Product and Polymer Chemistry
Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University
of North Bengal, Darjeeling-734013, India
P7 Flexible Conducting Films from
Nanostructured Block Copolymer 32
Shankar Khatiwada1, Goerg H. Michler2, Jean M.
Saiter3, Rameshwar Adhikari1,
1
Central Department of Chemistry, Tribhuvan
University,
Kirtipur, Kathmandu, Nepal
2
Institute of Physics, Martin Luther University
Halle-Wittenberg,
D – 06099 Halle/Saale, Germany, 3Laboratory,
LECAP, Institut des Materiaux de Rouen,
Universite de Rouen, Saint Etienne du Rouvray
Cedex, France

RCS-2011 ABSTRACT VOLUME 7


P8 A Conductometric study of Sodium Dodecyl
Sulphate (SDS) in different composition of
methanol-water mixed solvent media at
308.15 K, 318.15 K and 323.15 K 34
Tulasi Prasad Niraula, Sujit K. Shah, Ajaya
Bhattarai, Sujeet Kumar Chatterjee, Department
of Chemistry, Mahendra Morang Adarsh Multiple
Campus, Biratnagar

6. List of Participants

35

RCS-2011 ABSTRACT VOLUME 8


1. Preface

Message from the President of


Nepal Chemical Society
It is a matter of pleasure for Nepal Chemical Society to
organize a Regional Chemistry Seminar in Biratnagar in
collaboration with Mahendra Morang Adarsh Multiple
Campus, Tribhuvan University and Manmohan Memorial
Polytechnic, Hattimuda, Morang. Recently NCS had
organized a national workshop on scientific writing in
Kathmandu. In fact most of the activities of NCS are
confined to Kathmandu valley and the present
conference is deviation from the past since this regional
conference is going to take place in eastern region of
Nepal. Fortunately, this event is taking place in the
International Year of Chemistry announced by
International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry
(IUPAC). This Regional Chemistry Seminar is possible
because of active role and commitments of teachers and
other communities of eastern region of Nepal specially
that of Mahendra Morang Campus. NCS would like to
thank all who willingly helped to organize this seminar.
We hope that such co-operation will continue in future so
that NCS need not have to confine its activities to
Kathmandu.

Nepal Chemical Society (NCS), established in 1979 is a


national voluntary non-profit association of all the
chemistry professionals of Nepal. At present, it has over
1000 members from different universities, colleges,
research institutions, chemical industries and
government organizations.

The society is dedicated to contribute for the overall


progress and prosperity of the nation by promoting the
research activities and capabilities as well as the quality
of chemical education of the country. The NCS is equally
devoted to strengthen the ties among chemists and
chemical technologists working in different academic

RCS-2011 ABSTRACT VOLUME 9


and research institutions, industries and government
bodies to enhance their overall well-being.

We are pleased to announce that NSC is going to


organize the International Conference on Advanced
Materials and Nanotechnology for Sustainable
Development” in Kathmandu, Nepal on October 21-23,
2011. The objective of this conference is to capitalize on
the rapidly growing field of advanced materials and
nanotechnology, bringing together expertise from across
the international and national academic communities, as
well as industry. The remarkable evolution of
nanotechnology has only been possible because of close
collaborations between chemists, materials and
biological scientists as well as industrialists. This
conference aims to bring together such diverse
specialists, and to understand the requirements of
materials science and nanotechnology research for
sustainable development in an emerging country like
Nepal. For details of this conference please visit
www.ncs.org.np.

I invite all to participate in the conference.

RCS-2011 ABSTRACT VOLUME 10


Message from the Local Organizing
Committee

In the eastern part of Nepal, Mahendra Morang


Adarsh Multiple Campus, Biratnagar has played a
vital role in the production of highly skilled manpowers.
Recently, Master’s program in Chemistry and Physics
was started in Mahendra Morang Adarsh Multiple
Campus. Biratnagar being an industrial area, we need to
develop collaboration with industries and concerned
departments to help the research activities. For this
purpose, Department of Chemistry, Mahendra Morang
Adarsh Multiple Campus, has established a research lab.
in the campus and started the Ph.D. programme to
flourish research activities. Mahendra Morang Adarsh
Multiple campus successfully organized the Eastern
Regional Chemical Symposium on May 14-15, 2010.

In addition, it is desirable to have discussion among


fellow chemists from other part of the country. The
Symposium and other seminar activities are very
essential for the scientists to enhance their knowledge in
the research activities in the national and international
fields. These types of programme will be beneficial for
the young chemists in the eastern part of Nepal to
update their knowledge in the research developments
and science education. Right now, in the department of
Chemistry, two Ph.D research scholars, Sujit Kumar Shah
and Tulasi Prasad Niraula, are working under the
supervision of Prof. Dr. Sujeet Kumar Chatterjee and Mr.
Ajaya Bhattarai as co-supervisor in the field of
surfactants.

The surfactant is widely used in the food processing, to


stabilize emulsions and suspensions, and to improve the
texture of the food products and also to remove oily
stains and residues. As such the compound is found in
high concentrations in industrial products including

RCS-2011 ABSTRACT VOLUME 11


engine degreasers, floor cleaners, and car wash soaps.
In household products, it is used in lower concentration
with toothpastes, shampoos, and shaving cream. It is an
important component in bubble bath formulations for its
thickening effect and its ability to create lather. The
research group of Department of Chemistry is also
focusing to do the research work on the interaction of
cationic and anionic surfactant in mixed solvent media.
Besides that three M.Sc. 2nd year students are working
on M.Sc. dissertation work. We are also interested to do
research work on Polymer Chemistry and Natural
Products Chemistry in the near future.
Manmohan Memorial Polytechnic is the first
polytechnic of its kind established with the generous
assistance of the Government of India as a result of an
agreement among the Government of India, Government
of Nepal and Manmohan Memorial Foundation that aims
to cater employable skills to its students which is most
essential for employability and further to help develop
the nation. It is affiliated to Council for Technical
Education and Vocational Training (CTEVT) the umbrella
organization formulated for the development of CTEVT in
Nepal. MMP is an autonomous institute empowered to
provide sound technical skills based on the practical
knowledge to prepare the students to meet the
challenges of the fast changing world. Today's need of
our country is to provide with such an education and
training to the upcoming generation that could foster
with creativity in the cross section of lives. MMP
promises for continuous striving to fulfil the need of the
society by offering programs that provides life skills to
the youths of the nation to become self-dependent.
The target population for Diploma courses being offered
by the Polytechnic is all the youths from Nepal who has
successfully completed their SLC and met the
requirement for entry into Diploma Courses
recommended by CTEVT. The MMP will also make a
provision of scholarship for a minimum of 10% poorest
students in each Diploma Course. The minimum
requirements for admission in diploma courses and
selection procedure of the students will be the same as
prescribed by CTEVT.

RCS-2011 ABSTRACT VOLUME 12


The Diploma courses are in Mechanical Engineering,
Electronics engineering and electrical engineering. These
courses take 3 years to complete. There is also short
term courses offered by the polytechnic will be the
disadvantaged group of people. They will be brought into
technical workforce at the basic and middle levels work
in the industries all over the country. Most of them will
be the school leavers, unemployed job seekers, and
underemployed workers in the industries, women and
people working in the informal sector of the society.

RCS-2011 ABSTRACT VOLUME 13


Available facilities
• Well established world class infrastructure
• Hostel facility for 180 boys and 60 girls
• Staff quarters for 49 staff
• Guests house for guests
• Well established conference Hall and learning
centers, workshops, laboratories, library,
indoor and outdoor games, first aid service
and excellent physical facilities required for a
polytechnic.

MMP is located in Hattimuda, a beautiful suburb at a


distance of 10 kilometers north to Biratnagar city. A
motorable road towards the east from Manmohan Chowk
– Nimuwa, leads to the Polytechnic along the bank of
Biratnagar branch of Morang- Sunsari canal.

The physical environment out here is also pleasant and


pollution-free which facilitates the teaching-learning
process.

The Organizing Committee wishes all the participants a


pleasant stay in Manmohan Memorial Polytechnic,
Hattimuda, Morang and a rewarding interdisciplinary
scientific exchange.

RCS-2011 ABSTRACT VOLUME 14


RCS-2011 ABSTRACT VOLUME 15
2. Committee
Nepal Chemical Society Executive Council
President : Prof. Dr.
Raja Ram
Pradhananga
Phone: 4270455,
Chief Editor : Dr.
Mobile: 9841702620
Amar Prasad Yadav
Vice President : Dr.
Phone: 4271161,
Deba Bahadur
Mobile:
Khadka
9841281227Members:
Phone: 5545470,
Dr. Akkal Dev Mishra
Mobile: 9841689702
Phone: 061-
General Secretary :
540414,Mobile:
Dr. Ashok Kumar
9846027853
Singh
Mr.Deval Prasad
Phone: 5546267,
Bhattarai
Mobile: 9841744880
Mobile: 9841485151
Secretary : Mr. Babi
Mr. Pawan Kumar
Kumar Kafle
Mishra
Mobile: 9841216001,
Phone: 4623071,
Treasure : Dr. Susan
Mobile: 9841267929
Joshi
Mr. Santosh Khanal
Phone: 4890242,
Phone:
Mobile: 9841363224
4037937,Mobile:
9841484090
Mr. Trilochan
Pokhrel
Phone: 4771424,
Mobile: 984173208

RCS-2011 ABSTRACT VOLUME 16


Local Organizing Committee
Coordinator : Mr. Balaram Pant
Prof. Dr. S. K. Mobile: 9852048949
Chatterjee
Mobile: 9842059697 Mrs. Sabita Gautam
Members: Dahal
Mr. Chandreshwar Mobile: 9842023517
Yadav Mr. Rajesh Karki
Mobile: 9842825859 Mobile: 9842050332
Mr. Prem Kumar Mr. Ajaya Bhattarai
Shrestha Mobile: 9842077434
Mobile: 9842626006 Mr. Sujit Kumar Shah
Mr. Tulasi Pd. Mobile: 9842033826
Niraula Mr. Monaj Khanal
Mobile: 9842050465 Mobile: 9842040034
Mr. Narendra K. Mr.Ratna B. Thapa
Chaudhary Mobile: 9842631733
Mobile: 9842020096
3. Key Lectures
Origin of Life on Earth: Role of Polymers

Bijan Das

Department of Chemistry, North Bengal


University, Darjeeling 734 013, India

Email: bijan_dasus@yahoo.com
The question “How did life on earth originate?” has
been one of the most compelling quandaries for as
long as man has been able to frame enquiries. Indeed
all known cultures, past and present, primitive and
sophisticated, have some sort of a creation myth that
rationalizes how life arose. Only in the modern era,
however, has it been possible to consider the origin of
life in terms of a scientific framework, that is in a
manner subject to experimental verification.
Radioactive dating studies indicate that the earth
formed some 4.5 billion years ago. Yet the earliest
known fossil evidence of life, which was generated by
organisms resembling modern bacteria, is approx. 3.6
billion years old, although there is evidence for
biological carbon fixation as early 3.8 billion years ago.
It is now generally accepted that the development of
life occupied three stages

1. Chemical evolution, in which simple


geologically occurring molecules reacted to
form complex organic polymers.
2. The self-organization of collections of these
polymers to form replicating entities. At some
point in this process, the transition from a
lifeless collection of reacting molecules to a
living system occurred.
3. Biological evolution to ultimately form the
complex web of modern life.
The lecture will attempt to provide a brief account of
the journey from the lifeless particles that existed on
prebiotic earth to the first living entity and the
important roles of polymer molecules in the origin of
life.
Analysis with homemade ion selective
electrodes

Raja Ram Pradhananga

Central Department of Chemistry, Tribhuvan


University, Kirtipur, Kathmandu

E-mail: pradhananga.rajaram@yahoo.com

All solid state ion selective electrodes (ISEs) based on


silver sulphide can be fabricated in the laboratory from
the readily available material in a common chemistry
laboratory. Such electrode can be used for education
and research in analysis with ion selective electrodes.
The use of home made ion selective electrodes in the
determination of solubility product of sparingly soluble
salts; hydrogen sulphide in cigarette smoke, fluoride in
tea infusion will be presented. The characterization of
the home made ISEs and comparison of its
performance with commercial electrodes will be
discussed. Due to extravagant cost of commercial ISE,
it is rather difficult to provide commercial ISE to
educational institutes of third world countries. The low
cost and ease of fabrication of present electrode
opens an opportunity to learn and use analysis with
ISEs even by the students of under developed
countries. The success of use of home made ISEs for
teaching analysis with ion selective electrode in
regular practical class in the Central Department of
Chemistry will be presented. This success has opened
the possibility of introducing analysis with ISE even to
the students of higher secondary level. This will
certainly have a positive impact on education on
electro-analytical technique.
Chemical Additives for lubricating oil
Pranab Ghosh
Natural Product and Polymer Chemistry Laboratory,
Department of Chemistry, University of North Bengal,
Dt. Darjeeling, West Bengal, India - 734013
With the remarkable evolution of motors and other
similar equipments, one cannot underestimate the role
of lubricating oil. They prolong the useful life of
machines, achieve greater performance and provide
fuel economy. These lubricants are in constant
evolution as they must adapt to new requirements and
demands such as less frequent oil changes, higher
motor performance, more drastic operating condition
and the most needed fuel efficiency. All these can be
achieved by the use of chemical additives, like
extreme pressure (EP), viscosity modifiers (VMs), pour
point depressants (PPDs), antioxidants, detergents,
dispersants etc, they add performances to the
lubricating oil and made them more compatible to the
new technology. In order to keep pace with the
development of the technology producing advanced
models of engine, challenges are knocking the door of
chemical laboratory to produce fuel / engine oil as
specified by the OEM. Most of them are demanding
higher fuel efficiency and green specification. In this
context development of additive chemistry is very
much essential to compete the challenges. A brief of
the recent development of additive chemistry will be
presented in the conference lecture.
The Galvanized Coatings on Steel:
Present and Future

Amar Prasad Yadav

Central Department of Chemistry, Tribhuvan


University, Kirtipur, Kathmandu, Nepal
Email:amar2y@yahoo.com

Galvanized steels with Zn and Zn-Al alloy coatings are


extensively used in industry for their low cost and
superior corrosion resistance in atmospheric corrosion
environment. Zinc and aluminum protect steels
through original barrier layer action of the coating,
secondary barrier action of corrosion products layer,
and galvanic action of coating layer with the exposed
parts of underlying steel. Aluminum coating provides
better protection than zinc coating since aluminum
itself carrying protective oxide is attacked very slowly.
However, under certain mild conditions the attack on
aluminum is too slow to provide cathodic protection to
steel and in such circumstances zinc coating is
preferred1. However, there has been growing
recognition that world’s estimated amount of zinc
reserve is limited2. It points to a need for new
alternative surface coating for future applications. Any
new coatings should have some characteristic
properties with regard to requirement for galvanic
anode, and industrial processing. Al, Mg and Si
combined together offer a good candidate. The
reasons are the relatively abundant amount of Al, Mg
and Si compared to Zn and high oxidation potential of
Mg. In this talk, prospect of a ternary Al-Mg-Si alloy as
an alternative to conventional zinc coating will be
discussed.

[1] J.C. Zoccola, H.E. Townsend, A.R. Borzillo and J.B.


Horton, ASTM STP 646(1978) 165.

[2] U.S. Geological Survey, Mineral Commodity


Summaries (2009)

4. Oral Presentations
Solution Behaviour of Polyelectrolytes in
Mixed Solvent Media

Ranjit De1 & Bijan Das*

Department of Chemistry, North Bengal University,


Darjeeling 734 013, India
*Corresponding author. Email:
bijan_dasus@yahoo.com.
Email: deranjit@gmail.com

Physical properties of polyelectrolyte solutions have


been studied for more than 60 years, but several of
them have not yet found a satisfactory theoretical
explanation. In many cases a qualitative
understanding is available but a quantitative
explanation is still awaiting. In view of the fact that
polyelectrolytes find a widening field of applications
based on their specific properties this situation is far
from satisfactory. The study of the polyelectrolyte
solutions has been conducted much more extensively
in aqueous solutions than in mixed solvent media.
However, polyelectrolyte solutions can be studied from
a more general point of view in mixed solvent media
because electrostatic interactions between the
polyions and the counterions and the related
properties can be modulated simply by altering the
composition of the solvent medium since this leads to
a changed value of the relative permittivity of the
medium.

We have undertaken a comprehensive program to


investigate the solution behaviour of various
polyelectrolytes in different mixed solvent media and
have been successful in describing the behaviour of
polyelectrolytes quantitatively in some cases. This
lecture would provide a brief account of these
investigations and the main results obtained
therefrom.

Concentration Dependence of
Thermodynamic Properties of NaPb
Liquid Alloy
B.P. Singh1 , I.S. Jha2 and D. Adhikari1*
1
Univ. Dept. of Physics, T. M. Bhag. University,
Bhagalpur, Bihar, India
2
Dept. of Physics, M.M.A.M. Campus (Tribhuvan
University), Biratnagar, Nepal

Corresponding author: Email Address:
adksbdev@yahoo.com

The alloying behaviour of NaPb alloy in molten state at


700 K has been studied on the basis of regular
associated solution model. We have computed
concentration dependent thermodynamic functions of
NaPb alloys for the analysis. The analysis suggests
that this alloy is of a strongly interacting nature. The
theoretical analysis reveals that the pairwise
interaction energies between the species depend
considerably on temperature. The asymmetry in
thermodynamic properties of NaPb alloys has been
well explained by the present analysis.
Limonoids from the stem bark of
Cedrela tonduzii

Prabodh Satyal, William N. Setzer

Department of Chemistry, University of Alabama in


Huntsville, 35899, Alabama, U.S.A.
Email: ps0013@uah.edu

Aceteone bark extract of Cedrela tonduzii (Meliacea)


was collected from Monte Verde Costa Rica. Five
limonoids were isolated from the stem bark of Cedrela
tonduzii by using large flash column chromatography
and High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC)
method and their structure was elucidated by Nuclear
Magnetic Resonance (NMR), Mass Spectroscopy (MS),
Infrared Spectroscopy (IR) and Ultraviolet (UV)
spectroscopic techniques. The limonoids were nomilin/
obacunol derivatives, mexicanolides, sweimahonin,
and 7-deacetoxy-7-oxogedunin. Antifeedant activities
of isolated compounds were also tested by a
conventional leaf disk method against the third-instar
larvae of Spodoptera littoralis. Sweimahonin was the
most active, nomilin/obacunol derivatives were weakly
active, mexicanolides are moderately active and 7
deacetoxy-7-oxogedunin was inactive at the same
concentration of the isolated compounds.
Study the effect of KCl on micellization
of Cetyl Trimethyl Ammonium Bromide
(CTAB) and Dodecyl Trimethyl
Ammonium Bromide (DTAB) in methanol
water mixed solvent media at 308.15 K
by Conductometric Study
Sujit Kumar Shah, Ajaya Bhattarai, Sujeet Kumar
Chatterjee

Department of Chemistry, Mahendra Morang Adarsh


Multiple Campus, Biratnagar.

Precise measurement of specific conductivity of Cetyl


Trimethyl Ammonium Bromide (CTAB) and Dodecyl
Trimethyl Ammonium Bromide (DTAB) in presence
and absence of Potassium Chloride (KCl) in 0.1 and 0.2
volume fractions of methanol-water are reported at
308.15 K. Critical Micelle Concentration (CMC) of the
surfactants are compared. CMC increases with
increase in the volume fraction of methanol in water.
However, CMC are found to decrease with the adding
of salt to the surfactant solution and on increasing the
concentration of KCl the values of CMC found to
increase. Increase in CMC with increase in volume
fractions of methanol is explained in terms of
cosolvent effect and decrease in CMC after adding KCl
is explained on the basis of the shielding effect of salt
ions to the ionic head of surfactants and thus reducing
the ionic repulsion.
The Effects of Concentration,
Temperature and Solvent
Composition on the Partial Molar
Volumes of Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate
in Methanol –Water mixed Solvent
Media

Ajaya Bhattarai, Tarun Kumar Deo, Tulasi Prasad


Niraula, and Sujeet Kumar Chatterjee

Department of Chemistry, M. M. A. M. Campus,


Tribhuvan University, Biratnagar, Nepal.
e-mail: bkajaya@yahoo.com

Precise measurements on the density of sodium


dodecyl sulphate in pure water and in methanol(1) +
water (2) mixed solvent media containing 0.10, 0.20,
0.30 and 0.40 volume fractions of methanol at 298.15,
308.15, 318.15 and 323.15 K are reported. The
concentrations are varied from 0.3 × 10-1 to 1.0 × 10-1
mol.l-1. The results showed almost constant on the
partial molar volumes with increasing surfactant
concentration. Also, the partial molar volumes are
found to increase with increasing temperature over
the entire concentration range investigated in a given
mixed solvent medium and are found to decrease with
increasing methanol content in the solvent
composition.
5. Poster Presentations
Preparation and characterization of
epoxidised and acrylated styrene-
isoprene- styrene (SIS) triblock block
copolymer based nanocomposite

Alina shakya1, Santosh Khanal1 , Goerg H. Michler2 ,


Boulos Youssef3 , Jean M. Saiter3 , Rameshwar
Adhikari1,*
1
Central Department of Chemistry, Tribhuvan
University, Kirtipur, Kathmandu, Nepal
* Corresponding author P. O. Box. 24411, Kathmandu,
Nepal,
E mail: nepalpolymer@yahoo.com
2
Institute of Physics, Martin Luther University Halle-
Wittenberg, D – 06099 Halle/Saale, Germany
3
Laboratory, LECAP, Institut des Materiaux de Rouen,
Universite de Rouen, Saint Etienne du Rouvray Cedex,
France

Styrene-Isoprene-Styrene (SIS) triblock copolymers


belong to the class of thermoplastic elastomers whose
structures are characterized by microphase-separation
of the constituent chains. The SIS copolymers behave
as cross-linked rubbers at ambient temperatures while
are processable as thermoplastics at elevated
temperatures. In this work, a commercially available
SIS triblock copolymer was modified into epoxidised
styrene-Isoprene-Styrene (ESIS) block copolymer with
performic acid generated in situ from hydrogen
peroxide and formic acid using polyethylene glycol
(PEG) as phase transfer catalyst at 600C for the
improvement of mechanical and functional properties.
The epoxidised samples were further acrylated and
nanocomposites were prepared using Boehmite
nanoparticles as filler by solution casting method. The
polymers were characterized by different techniques
such as Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR)
Spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy
(TEM), polarizing optical microscopy and
microhardness measurements.

Study of some physical properties of


polystyrene dissolved in chlorobenzene
at various concentration and
temperature

B.P.Chaudhary1 and S.Regmi,


1
Manmohan Memorial Polytechnic, Hattimuda, Morang
Central Department of Physics, Tribhuvan University,
Kirtipur, Nepal

Measurement of density, refractive index, coefficient


of viscosity and ultrasonic velocity in mixed solvent of
polystyrene /chlorobenzene has been carried out at
different temperature (20°C to 40°C) with steps of 5°C
and concentration (0 – 2 g/10ml). The related
parameters of these quantities are also calculated to
discuss the nature of molecular interaction in the
binary mixture. From this study it is found that the
parameter changes their values continuously
indicating that no structural change has taken place in
this type of mixture.
Nature of Ternary complex and Effects
of Time on Absorbance

Bimal Kumar Kanth

Department of Chemistry, Mahendra Morang Adarsh


Multiple Campus, Biratnagar, Nepal

In preliminary experiments, absorption spectra of


mixture containing UO 22+ and BPGR in the
proportions 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 1:4 and 2:1 and different
amounts of CTAB (ranging from a 0.5 to a 100-fold
excess of CTAB with respect to UO 22 + ) were
recorded. A comparison of these spectra revealed that
only one ternary complex is formed. The mixtures
attained maximum absorbance with 10 minutes of
mixing the reactants and it remained constant for 12
hours.

Several mixtures containing UO 22 + , BPGR and CTAB


in the ratios of 1:1:20, 1:2:20, 1:3:20, 1:4:20 and
2:1:20 were prepared and their absorbances were
measured at suitable wavelength intervals. The
absorbance value corresponding to the different
mixtures and various wavelengths have been plotted.
Stability of the amalgams of alkali
metals

S. K. Chakrabarti

Dept. of Physics, M. M. A. M. Campus, Biratnagar


Tribhuvan University, Nepal
E-mail : skc_2007@yahoo.com

An alloy can be made of two metals with different


compositions of them. But at which composition it will
be most stable, that is really a matter of interest. In
the present theoretical work we have considered the
amalgams of two alkali metals e.g. Na-Hg and K-Hg.
Mercury is the only liquid metal at normal
temperature. It is generally reluctant to mix up with
other due to high cohesive force between its
molecules. However, it dissolves many metals at their
molten state in order to form the amalgams of them.
On the other hand, alkali metals are highly reactive. In
a binary alloy they usually form complexes. Due to
formation of such complexes the thermodynamic
properties of the amalgams of alkali metals often show
anomaly—deviating considerably from that of the ideal
alloys. Here we have started with the expression for
the free energy of mixing (GM) according to Flory's
model. The present alloys being strongly interactive
systems we have modified the formula accordingly.
Our main task becomes the determination of the
interchange energy between the constituent elements
of each amalgam. For this purpose the experimental
values of GM for different concentrations have been
considered. Thereafter the concentration fluctuations
in the long-wavelength limit [Scc(0)] has been
computed as a function of concentration of the alkali
metal within the concerned amalgam. Finally the
graphical method has been employed to ascertain the
stoichiometric composition. Our results corroborate
well the experimental findings as to the most stable
composition for the said amalgams.
Triterpenois from Schleichera oleosa
with antimicrobial activity
Amitava Mandal,1 Prasanta Chakraborty,1 Md. Golam
Rasul,1 Madhumita Chakaborty,2 Aniruddha Saha2 and
Pranab Ghosh*1
1
Natural Product and Polymer Chemistry Laboratory,
Department of Chemistry, University of North Bengal,
Darjeeling, India 734 013.
2
Department of Botany, University of North Bengal,
Darjeeling, India 734 013.
*Corresponding Author: E-mail address:-
pizy12@yahoo.com

Darjeeling foothills are full of plants used as folklore


medicines by the local people. Schleichera oleosa,
commonly known as Ceylon Oak belongs to the family
sapindaceae occurs natutrally from the foothiils of
Darjeeling and used in traditional medicine for several
indications from the time immemorial. It is generally
used as analgesic, antibiotic and against dysentery.
The oil obtained from its seed, called Kosum oil or
Macassar oil is traditionally used for the cure of itch,
acne, burns, other skin trouble, rheumatism (external
massage), hair dressing and promoting hair growth.
Therefore, Oak is a plant of major importance. In an
ongoing search of bioactive compounds from
medicinal plants we took a project to isolate the
triterpenoids from Oak and further studied the
antimicrobial activity of the isolated compounds. The
results are interesting and will be presented in the
poster session of the conference.

References

1. Chohan, Z. H.; Sheazi, S. K. A. Synth. React. Inorg.


Met. Org.Chem., 1983. 29,
105.
2. Palanuvej, C.; Vipunngeun, N. J. Health Res., 2008,
22, 203.
3. Ghosh, P.; Mandal, A.; Chakraborty, P.; Rasul, G. M.;
Chakaborty, M.; Saha, A. Ind. J. Pharm. Sci., 2010,
72 (4), 504.
4. Ghosh, P.; Mandal, A.; Chakraborty, M.; Saha, A. J.
Chem. Pharm. Sci., 2010, 2 (4), 714.
Polyacrylate – LC blend as a potential
lube oil additive

Koushik Dey, Mahua Upadhyay and Pranab Ghosh*

Natural Product and Polymer Chemistry Laboratory


Department of Chemistry, University of North Bengal,
Darjeeling-734013, India
*Corresponding Author: E-mail address:-
pizy12@yahoo.com

Base fluids mineral oil generally cannot satisfy the


requirements of high performance lubricants without
using the benefit of modern additive technology and
the development of modern engine and transmission
technologies would be impossible without lubricant
additives. Additives are synthetic chemical substances
that can improve the performance parameters of
lubricants. Some of them impart new and useful
properties to the lubricant, some enhance properties
already present, while some act to reduce the rate at
which undesirable changes take place in the product
during its service life. Apart from the use of polymeric
additives, compounds with layered structure, e.g.
graphite, WS2, MoS2 are also used as performance
additives. Thus, because of their specific
morphological feature it is also anticipated that
suitable liquid crystals (LC) may also play the same
role if added to the lubricating oils.
Keeping this view in mind recently we have
synthesized some long chain polyacrylate and have
blended them with single liquid crystal of cholesteryl
benzoate. Physical characterization of the polymers
and the blends was carried out employing
thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), IR and NMR
techniques.
A brief discussion on the performance of these
prepared LC blended polymers in comparison to the
polyacrylate itself as a pour point depressant (PPD)
and viscosity index improver (VII) in lubricating oil will
comprise the subject matter of our presentation in the
conference.

References

1. J.Yao, Q.Wang, Z.Xu, J.Yin, S.Wen:


Tribological performance of nematic liquid
crystal
2. Mortier, R.M., Orszulik, S.T. (1997).
Chemistry and Technology of Lubricants,
Blackie Academic and Professiona, London,
pp.144.
3. Beyer, C. and Jelitte, R., Lubr. Eng. 48, 450
(1992).
4. Ghosh, P., Pantar, A.V. and Sarma, A.S., Ind.
J. Chem. Tech. 5, 371 (1998).
Flexible Conducting Films from
Nanostructured Block Copolymer

Shankar Khatiwada1, Goerg H. Michler2, Jean M.


Saiter3, Rameshwar Adhikari1,*
1
Central Department of Chemistry, Tribhuvan
University, Kirtipur, Kathmandu, Nepal

* Corresponding author: P. O. Box. 24411, Kathmandu,


Nepal,

E mail: nepalpolymer@yahoo.com
2
Institute of Physics, Martin Luther University Halle-
Wittenberg,

D – 06099 Halle/Saale, Germany


3
Laboratory, LECAP, Institut des Materiaux de Rouen,
Universite de Rouen, Saint Etienne du Rouvray Cedex,
France

The conducting polymers have many useful


applications in electronics industries and electrical
devices. This class of polymers can be prepared in
various ways. Some polymers are intrinsically
conducting while others can be made conducting by
means of blending with inorganic conducting materials
or by using doping agents. In this work, we investigate
the conducting polymers prepared on the basis of
nanostructured block copolymers by adding different
amount of metal salts and by introducing ionic groups
by chemical modification of one of the blocks of the
block copolymer. First of all, the insulating
polystyrene-block-polybutadiene-block-polstyrene
(SBS) triblock copolymer was epoxidised by performic
acid followed by blending with various metal salts
which leds to the formation of electron conducting
polymer films. In another set of experiments, the
sulfonated ionomer was prepared from the epoxidised
SBS block copolymer followed by means of ring
opening reaction with an aqueous solution of NaHSO 3.
The products were characterized by Fourier Transform
Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric
analysis (TGA) and electron microscopy. The
sulfonated ionomers having different sulfonation
degree are believed to behave as proton conducting
membranes due to the presence of SO3-H+ group on
polymer matrix. This notion was confirmed by
comparing the flow of different ions through
polyelectrolyte membrane and standard salt bridge.
The results so far obtained indicate that the increase
in the sulfonic groups content in ionomer enhances
the properties of the membrane such as proton
conductivity, viscosity etc.
A Conductometric study of Sodium
Dodecyl Sulphate (SDS) in different
composition of methanol-water mixed
solvent media at 308.15 K, 318.15 K and
323.15 K.

Tulasi Prasad Niraula, Sujit K Shah, Ajaya Bhattarai,


Sujeet Kumar Chatterjee

Department of Chemistry
Mahendra Morang Adarsh Multiple Campus,
Biratnagar.

Precise measurement of specific conductivity of


Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate (SDS) in 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3
volume fractions of methanol-water are reported at
308.15 K, 318.15 K, 323.15 K. Specific conductivities
of SDS in methanol water increase with increase in
concentration as well as methanol-water composition.
Critical Micelle Concentration (CMC) increases with
increase in the volume fraction of methanol in water.
CMC are found to increase with the increase in the
temperature. Increase in CMC with increase in volume
fractions of methanol is explained in terms of breaking
of water structure due to cosolvent effect.
6. List of Participants
INSTITUTION/COU
NAME TITLE
NTRY
Research M.M.A.M.C. , Tribhuvan
Ajaya Bhattarai
Scholar University, Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Akash Dev Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
Central Department of
Research
Alina Shakya Chemistry, (T.U.),
Scholar
Kirtipur, Kathmandu
Central Department of
Amar Prasad Yadav Dr. Chemistry, (T.U.),
Kirtipur, Kathmandu
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Post Graduate
Ambika Poudel Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Amit Kumar Sarkar Lecturer Tribhuvan University,
Nepal
Natural Product
Research Polymer Chemistry
Amitava Mandal
Scholar Laboratory, N.B.U.,
Darjeeling, India
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Anil Kumar Graduate
Tribhuvan University,
Chaudhary Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Anu Shah Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
Purwanchal
Arun Prasad Teaching
Engeenering Campus,
Chaudhary Assistant
Dharan
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Ashok Kumar Das Lecturer Tribhuvan University,
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Teaching
Ashok Kumar Yadav Tribhuvan University,
Assistant
Nepal
Avinash Kumar Deo Graduate M.M.A.M.C. ,
Student Tribhuvan University,
Nepal
Manmohan Memorial
B. P. Choudhary Lecturer
Polytechnic, Morang
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Post Graduate
Babu Ram Parajuli Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Post Graduate
Balaram Bikram Shah Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Teaching
Balaram Pant Tribhuvan University,
Assistant
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Post Graduate
Bhola Nath Luitel Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Bhumiraj Tamang Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
North Bengal
Bijan Das Prof. University, Darjeeling,
India
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Bikash Kumar Mishra Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Post Graduate
Bikram Deo Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
Rajbiraj Multiple
Bimal Kant Jha Assoc. Prof.
Campus (T.U.)
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Bimal Kumar Kanth Dr. Tribhuvan University,
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Post Graduate
Binita Yadav Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Binod Raj K.C. Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
Gokundeshwar H.S.S,
Bishnu Chettri Teacher
Dhankuta, Nepal
Brahma Deo Yadav Lecturer Siraha Campus (T.U.)
Chandeshwar Prasad
Assoc. Prof. Siraha Campus (T.U.)
Yadav
Chandradip Kumar Teaching Dhankuta Multiple
Yadav Assistant Campus (T.U.), Nepal
Teaching Mechi Multiple
Chitra Bahadur Bista
Assistant Campus (T.U.)
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Post Graduate
Chom Nath Adhikari Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
Education Training
Damodar Phuel Instructor
Centre, Sunsari
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Das Bahadur Post Graduate
Tribhuvan University,
Shrestha Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Deepak Jyoti Basnet Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Devendra Adhikari Assoc. Prof. Tribhuvan University,
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Teaching
Devesh Pradhan Tribhuvan University,
Assistant
Nepal
Teaching Hattisar Campus,
Dil Bahadur Limbu
Assistant Dharan
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Dilip Kumar Rajbanshi Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
Damak Multiple
Dilli Ram Pokharel Lecturer
Campus
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Dinesh Kumar Mandal Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Teaching
Dipak Baral Tribhuvan University,
Assistant
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Teaching
Dipak Pokharel Tribhuvan University,
Assistant
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Teaching
Dipak Sapkota Tribhuvan University,
Assistant
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Teaching
Gajendra Pandit Tribhuvan University,
Assistant
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Post Graduate
Ganesh Khadka Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
Gayatri Subedi Lecturer Birta H.S.S. , Jhapa
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Ghan Shyam Yadav Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Ghanshyam
Assoc. Prof. Tribhuvan University,
Shrivastav
Nepal
Dhankuta Multiple
Gyanendra Yadav Lecturer
Campus (T.U.), Nepal
Sukuna Multiple
Hark Gurung Lecturer
Campus
Teaching Hattisar Campus,
Indu Mati Paudel
Assistant Dharan
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Indu Pudsain Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Indu Shekhar Jha Dr. Tribhuvan University,
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Teaching
Janak Adhikari Tribhuvan University,
Assistant
Nepal
Teaching
Jay Chandra Yadav Siraha Campus (T.U.)
Assistant
Mechi Multiple
Jay Narayan Mitruka Lecturer
Campus (T.U.)
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Post Graduate
Jay Prakash Singh Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Post Graduate
Joshna Raut Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
Environmenta
K. B. Shahi l Monitoring Seam-N, Biratnagar
Expert
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Post Graduate
Kabita Jha Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Kamal Adhikari Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
Post Graduate Post Graduate
Kanchan Jha
Student Campus, Biratnagar
Kaushalya Sharma Lecturer Araniko H.S.S.
Natural Product
Research Polymer Chemistry
Koushik Dey
Scholar Laboratory, N.B.U.,
Darjeeling, India
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Krishna Bahadur Post Graduate
Tribhuvan University,
Bhandari Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Post Graduate
Kuber Limbu Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Kumud Kumari Teaching
Tribhuvan University,
Choudhary Assistant
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Kundan Kumar Post Graduate
Tribhuvan University,
Chaudhary Student
Nepal
Purwanchal
Teaching
Lal Kishor Yadav Engeenering Campus,
Assistant
Dharan
Hattisar Campus,
Lalita Shrestha Lecturer
Dharan
Manmohan Memorial
Lochan Raj Neupane Engineer
Polytechnic, Morang
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Malati Kumari Karn Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
Teaching Hattisar Campus,
Manoj Khanal
Assistant Dharan
Mina Kumari Aryal Lecturer Cohed College
Lord Buddha College,
Mohan Jee Thakur Dr.
Biratnagar
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Post Graduate
Mohan Singh Darji Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Mukesh Kumar Sah Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
Damak Multiple
Nabin Basnet Lecturer
Campus
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Teaching
Nabin Kumar Roy Tribhuvan University,
Assistant
Nepal
Saraswati H.S.S.,
Nagendra Lal Deo Lecturer
Duhabi
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Namrata Dahal Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Narendra Kumar Teaching
Tribhuvan University,
Chaudhary Assistant
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Naresh Yadav Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
Purwanchal
Netra Jang Dhangi Lecturer Engeenering Campus,
Dharan
Teaching Hattisar Campus,
Netra Prasad Subedi
Assistant Dharan
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Nilam Kumari Graduate
Tribhuvan University,
Chaudhary Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Niribha Yadav Assoc. Prof. Tribhuvan University,
Nepal
Om Prakash Gupta Lecturer Udaypur
Purwanchal
Parthopritam Das Teaching
Engeenering Campus,
Gupta Assistant
Dharan
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Post Graduate
Piyush Sapkota Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
Department of
Research
Prabodh Satyal Chemistry, Univ. of
Scholar
Alabana, U.S.A.
Central Department of
Post Graduate
Pramila Poudyel Chemistry, (T.U.),
Student
Kirtipur, Kathmandu
North Bengal
Pranab Ghosh Assoc. Prof. University, Darjeeling,
India
Mechi Multiple
Prem Kumar Shrestha Lecturer
Campus (T.U.)
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Teaching
Prem Narayan Sah Tribhuvan University,
Assistant
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Priti Khatiwada Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
Central Department of
Post Graduate
Rabin Dahal Chemistry, (T.U.),
Student
Kirtipur, Kathmandu
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Post Graduate
Rabin Prasad Adhikari Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Rabindra Kumar Graduate
Tribhuvan University,
Chaudhary Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Rahul Sah Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Raj Kumar Kamat Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
Central Department of
Rajaram
Prof. Chemistry, (T.U.),
Pradhananga
Kirtipur, Kathmandu
Damak Multiple
Rajendra Dhakal Lecturer
Campus
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Rajendra Prasad Teaching
Tribhuvan University,
Yadav Assistant
Nepal
Rajesh Karki Lecturer Araniko H.S.S.
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Post Graduate
Raju Dahal Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Raju Dahal Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
North Bengal
Research
Ranjit De University, Darjeeling,
Scholar
India
Damak Multiple
Ratna Bahadur Thapa Lecturer
Campus
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Rita Sharma Bhandari Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Teaching
Rupesh Kumar Mishra Tribhuvan University,
Assistant
Nepal
Manmohan Memorial
Sabita Gautam Dahal Lecturer
Polytechnic, Morang
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Sandhya Chaudhary Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Sanjay Kumar Thakur Lecturer Tribhuvan University,
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Post Graduate
Sanjay Neupane Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Sanjeev Sapkota Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Sanjib Chaudhary Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Santos Kumar Sah Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Post Graduate
Santosh Kumar Sah Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Santosh Shah Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
Central Department of
Research
Shankar Khatiwada Chemistry, (T.U.),
Scholar
Kirtipur, Kathmandu
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Sharmila Amatya Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Post Graduate
Shikha Mallik Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Teaching
Shiv Kumar Yadav Tribhuvan University,
Assistant
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Teaching
Shiv Narayan Yadav Tribhuvan University,
Assistant
Nepal
Post Graduate
Shiva Kumar Rai Assoc. Prof. Campus (T.U.),
Biratnagar
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Shivaraj Koirala Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Shumi Jha Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Shyam Ghimire Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Shyam Kumari Karn Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Sitaram Gupta Assoc. Prof. Tribhuvan University,
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Post Graduate
Siyanan Chaudhary Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Srijana Karn Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
Mechi Multiple
Subash Chapagain Lecturer
Campus (T.U.)
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Subhangi Subedi Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Sudha Kumari Karn Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Sujeet Kumar
Prof. Tribhuvan University,
Chatterjee
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Research
Sujit Kumar Shah Tribhuvan University,
Scholar
Nepal
Rajbiraj Multiple
Sunil Prasad Yadav Lecturer
Campus (T.U.)
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Surendra Sutihar Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Suresh Prasad Post Graduate
Tribhuvan University,
Mahato Student
Nepal
Suryadev Prasad Teaching Dhankuta Multiple
Yadav Assistant Campus (T.U.), Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Swapan Kumar
Lecturer Tribhuvan University,
Chakrabarti
Nepal
Mechi Multiple
Tara Kant Jha Lecturer
Campus (T.U.)
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Teaching
Tarun Kumar Deo Tribhuvan University,
Assistant
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Tekraj Dahal Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
Tika Prasad Sukuna Multiple
Lecturer
Upadhyaya Campus
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Tulasi Prasad Niraula Lecturer Tribhuvan University,
Nepal
William N. Setzer Prof. Department of
Chemistry, Univ. of
Alabana, U.S.A.
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Yadu Dangal Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
M.M.A.M.C. ,
Graduate
Yograj Podar Tribhuvan University,
Student
Nepal
Sukuna Multiple
Yub Raj Sitaula Lecturer
Campus
Purwanchal
Teaching
Yuv Raj Shah Engeenering Campus,
Assistant
Dharan