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Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Getting Started Guide Cisco IOS XR Software Release
Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Getting Started Guide Cisco IOS XR Software Release

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Getting Started Guide

Cisco IOS XR Software Release 4.0

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Tel:

408 526-4000

Fax:

800 553-NETS (6387) 408 527-0883

Text Part Number: OL-23203-01

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IN NO EVENT SHALL CISCO OR ITS SUPPLIERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY INDIRECT, SPECIAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, LOST PROFITS OR LOSS OR DAMAGE TO DATA ARISING OUT OF THE USE OR INABILITY TO USE THIS MANUAL, EVEN IF CISCO OR ITS SUPPLIERS HAVE BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES.

Cisco and the Cisco Logo are trademarks of Cisco Systems, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the U.S. and other countries. A listing of Cisco's trademarks can be found at www.cisco.com/go/trademarks. Third party trademarks mentioned are the property of their respective owners. The use of the word partner does not imply a partnership relationship between Cisco and any other company. (1005R)

Any Internet Protocol (IP) addresses used in this document are not intended to be actual addresses. Any examples, command display output, and figures included in the document are shown for illustrative purposes only. Any use of actual IP addresses in illustrative content is unintentional and coincidental.

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Getting Started Guide Copyright © 2010 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.

CONTENTS Preface ix Changes to This Document About This Document ix ix Intended Audience Organization

CONTENTS

Preface

ix

Changes to This Document

About This Document

ix

ix

Intended Audience Organization of the Document Related Documents Conventions xi

x

x

x

Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request

xi

CHAPTER

1

Introduction to the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router

1-1

 

Contents 1-1

Supported Standalone System Configurations

1-1

 

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Overview

1-4

Features and Capabilities

1-4

High Availability

1-9

Management and Security

1-10

 

Cisco ASR 9000 Series SPA Interface Processor-700

1-11

1-12

 

Initial Router Configuration Management Interfaces

1-13

Router Management Interfaces Command-Line Interface

1-13

1-13

Extensible Markup Language API

1-13

Simple Network Management Protocol

1-14

 

Selecting and Identifying the Active RSP

1-14

Selecting and Identifying the DSC on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers

1-14

Connecting to the Router Through the Console Port

1-15

Configuring the Router Data Interfaces

1-19

Where to Go Next

1-19

CHAPTER

2

Bringing Up Cisco IOS XR Software on the Router

2-21

Contents

Prerequisites

2-21

2-21

Software Requirements

2-22

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Contents

 

Hardware Prerequisites and Documentation

2-22

Bringing Up and Configuring a Standalone Router

2-23

Verifying the System After Initial Boot

2-24

Firmware Upgrade

2-29

Where to Go Next

2-30

CHAPTER

3

Configuring General Router Features

3-31

 
 

Contents 3-31

Connecting and Communicating with the Router

3-31

Establishing a Connection Through the Console Port Establishing a Connection Through a Terminal Server

Establishing a Connection Through the Management Ethernet Interface

3-34

3-35

Logging In to a Router

3-38

CLI Prompt

3-39

User Access Privileges

3-39

User Groups, Task Groups, and Task IDs

Predefined User Groups

3-40

3-40

Displaying the User Groups and Task IDs for Your User Account

Navigating the Cisco IOS XR Command Modes

3-43

Identifying the Command Mode in the CLI Prompt

Summary of Common Command Modes

Entering EXEC Commands from a Configuration Mode

Command Mode Navigation Example

3-44

3-45

3-48

Managing Configuration Sessions Entering Configuration Changes

3-49

3-51

3-47

3-41

3-37

Displaying the Active Configuration Sessions

3-53

Starting a Configuration Session

3-54

.Starting an Exclusive Configuration Session

3-54

Displaying Configuration Details with show Commands

Saving the Target Configuration to a File Loading the Target Configuration from a File

Loading an Alternative Configuration at System Startup

Clearing All Changes to a Target Configuration

Committing Changes to the Running Configuration

3-60

3-61

3-61

3-62

3-56

3-61

Reloading a Failed Configuration

3-64

Exiting a Configuration Submode

3-64

Returning Directly to Configuration Mode from a Submode

Ending a Configuration Session

3-65

3-65

Mode from a Submode Ending a Configuration Session 3-65 3-65 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services

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Contents

Aborting a Configuration Session

3-65

Configuring the RSP Hostname

Configuring the Management Ethernet Interface

3-66

3-66

Specifying the Management Ethernet Interface Name in CLI Commands

3-67

 

Displaying the Available Management Ethernet Interfaces

3-67

Configuring the Management Ethernet Interface

3-68

Manually Setting the Router Clock

3-71

Where to Go Next

3-73

CHAPTER

4

Configuring Additional Router Features

4-75

 

Contents 4-75

Configuring the Domain Name and Domain Name Server

4-75

Configuring Telnet, HTTP, and XML Host Services

Prerequisites

4-77

4-77

Managing Configuration History and Rollback

4-81

Displaying the CommitIDs

Displaying the Configuration Changes Recorded in a CommitID

Previewing Rollback Configuration Changes

Rolling Back the Configuration to a Specific Rollback Point

Rolling Back the Configuration over a Specified Number of Commits Loading CommitID Configuration Changes to the Target Configuration

4-82

4-82

4-83

4-83

4-84

4-84

Loading Rollback Configuration Changes to the Target Configuration

4-85

Deleting CommitIDs

4-86

Configuring Logging and Logging Correlation

4-86

4-87

 

Logging Locations and Severity Levels

Alarm Logging Correlation

4-87

Configuring Basic Message Logging

4-88

 

Disabling Console Logging

4-90

Creating and Modifying User Accounts and User Groups

4-90

 

Displaying Details About User Accounts, User Groups, and Task IDs

4-91

Configuring User Accounts

Creating Users and Assigning Groups

4-91

Configuring Software Entitlement

Examples

4-93

4-93

4-92

Configuration Limiting

4-94

Static Route Configuration Limits

IS-IS Configuration Limits

OSPFv2 and v3 Configuration Limits

4-95

4-95

4-97

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Contents

CHAPTER

5

Routing Policy Language Line and Policy Limits

Platform Independent Multicast Configuration Limits

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Multicast Configuration Limits

4-99

4-102

MPLS Configuration Limits Video Monitoring Limits Other Configuration Limits L2VPN Configuration Limits

MPLS Configuration Limits Video Monitoring Limits Other Configuration Limits L2VPN Configuration Limits
MPLS Configuration Limits Video Monitoring Limits Other Configuration Limits L2VPN Configuration Limits
MPLS Configuration Limits Video Monitoring Limits Other Configuration Limits L2VPN Configuration Limits

4-103

4-103

4-104

4-105

4-105

4-105

4-103

CLI Tips, Techniques, and Shortcuts

5-107

Contents 5-107

CLI Tips and Shortcuts

5-107

Entering Abbreviated Commands

Using the Question Mark (?) to Display On-Screen Command Help

Completing a Partial Command with the Tab Key

Identifying Command Syntax Errors

Using the no Form of a Command Editing Command Lines that Wrap

5-107

5-110

5-110

5-111

5-111

5-108

Displaying System Information with show Commands

5-112

Common show Commands

Browsing Display Output When the --More-- Prompt Appears

Halting the Display of Screen Output

Redirecting Output to a File

Narrowing Output from Large Configurations

Filtering show Command Output show parser dump command

Accessing Admin Commands from Secure Domain Router Mode

5-112

5-114

5-114

5-114

5-116

5-119

5-113

5-119

Location Keyword for the File Command

5-119

vty / Console Timestamp

5-120

Displaying Interfaces by Slot Order

5-120

Displaying Unconfigured Interfaces

5-121

Displaying Subnet Mask in CIDR Format

5-122

Wildcards, Templates, and Aliases

5-123

Using Wildcards to Identify Interfaces in show Commands

Creating Configuration Templates Applying Configuration Templates Aliases 5-127 Keystrokes Used as Command Aliases

5-124

5-126

5-128

5-123

Keystrokes Used as Command Aliases 5-124 5-126 5-128 5-123 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router

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Contents

CHAPTER

6

Command History

5-128

Displaying Previously Entered Commands Recalling Previously Entered Commands

5-128

5-128

Recalling Deleted Entries

5-129

Redisplaying the Command Line

5-129

Displaying Persistent CLI History

5-129

Key Combinations

5-130

Key Combinations to Move the Cursor

Keystrokes to Control Capitalization Keystrokes to Delete CLI Entries Transposing Mistyped Characters

5-130

5-131

5-132

5-132

Troubleshooting the Cisco IOS XR Software

6-133

Contents 6-133

Additional Sources for Information

Basic Troubleshooting Commands

6-133

6-133

Using show Commands to Display System Status and Configuration

Using the ping Command

Using the traceroute Command

Using debug Commands

6-135

6-137

6-136

Configuration Error Messages

6-141

Configuration Failures During a Commit Operation

Configuration Errors at Startup

6-142

6-141

6-134

Memory Warnings in Configuration Sessions

6-142

Understanding Low-Memory Warnings in Configuration Sessions

Displaying System Memory Information

Removing Configurations to Resolve Low-Memory Warnings

Contacting TAC for Additional Assistance

6-142

6-143

6-147

6-144

Interfaces Not Coming Up

6-147

Verifying the System Interfaces

6-147

Understanding Regular Expressions, Special Characters, and Patterns

Contents A-151

Regular Expressions

A-151

Special Characters

A-152

Character Pattern Ranges

Multiple-Character Patterns

Complex Regular Expressions Using Multipliers

A-152

A-153

A-153

A-151

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Contents

G LOSSARY

I NDEX

Pattern Alternation

A-154

Anchor Characters

A-154

Underscore Wildcard

A-154

Parentheses Used for Pattern Recall

A-155

Wildcard A-154 Parentheses Used for Pattern Recall A-155 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Getting

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Preface This guide describes how to create the initial configuration for a router using the

Preface

Preface This guide describes how to create the initial configuration for a router using the Cisco

This guide describes how to create the initial configuration for a router using the Cisco IOS XR software. This guide also describes how to complete additional administration, maintenance, and troubleshooting tasks that may be required after initial configuration.

This preface contains the following sections:

Changes to This Document, page ix

About This Document, page ix

Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request, page xi

Changes to This Document

Table 1 lists the technical changes made to this document since it was first printed.

Table 1

Changes to This Document

Revision

Date

Change Summary

OL-23203-01

September 2010

Initial release of this document.

About This Document

The following sections provide information about Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Getting Started Guide and related documents:

Intended Audience, page x

Organization of the Document, page x

Related Documents, page x

Conventions, page xi

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Preface

Intended Audience

This document is intended for the following people:

Experienced service provider administrators

Cisco telecommunications management engineers

Third-party field service technicians who have completed the Cisco IOS XR software training sessions

Customers who daily use and manage routers running Cisco IOS XR software

Organization of the Document

This document contains the following chapters:

Chapter 1, “Introduction to the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router”

Chapter 2, “Bringing Up Cisco IOS XR Software on the Router”

Chapter 3, “Configuring General Router Features”

Chapter 4, “Configuring Additional Router Features”

Chapter 5, “CLI Tips, Techniques, and Shortcuts”

Chapter 6, “Troubleshooting the Cisco IOS XR Software”

Appendix A, “Understanding Regular Expressions, Special Characters, and Patterns”

Related Documents

For a complete listing of available documentation for the Cisco IOS XR software and the routers on which it operates, see the following URLs:

Cisco IOS XR Software Documentation

Cisco IOS XR ROM Monitor Guide Cisco IOS XR System Management Configuration Guide Cisco IOS XR System Security Configuration Guide Cisco IOS XR Routing Configuration Guide Cisco IOS XR Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide

Cisco IOS XR Interface and Hardware Component Command Reference Cisco IOS XR Routing Command Reference

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router System Documentation

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps9853/tsd_products_support_series_home.html

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Getting

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Preface

Conventions

This document uses the following conventions:

Convention

Item

boldface font

Commands and keywords

italic font

Variable for which you supply values

screen font

Displayed session and system information

boldface screen font

Commands and keywords you enter in an interactive environment

italic screen font

Variables you enter in an interactive environment

boldface font

Menu items and button names

Option > Network Preferences

Menu navigation

Note Means reader take note . Notes contain helpful suggestions or references to material not
Note Means reader take note . Notes contain helpful suggestions or references to material not

Note

Means reader take note. Notes contain helpful suggestions or references to material not covered in the

publication.

publication.

publication.
or references to material not covered in the publication. Tip Means the following information will help
or references to material not covered in the publication. Tip Means the following information will help
or references to material not covered in the publication. Tip Means the following information will help

Tip

Means the following information will help you solve a problem. The information in tips might not be

troubleshooting or an action, but contains useful information.

troubleshooting or an action, but contains useful information.

troubleshooting or an action, but contains useful information.
or an action, but contains useful information. Caution Means reader be careful . In this situation,
or an action, but contains useful information. Caution Means reader be careful . In this situation,
or an action, but contains useful information. Caution Means reader be careful . In this situation,

Caution

Means reader be careful. In this situation, you might do something that could result in equipment

damage or loss of data.

reader be careful . In this situation, you might do something that could result in equipment
reader be careful . In this situation, you might do something that could result in equipment

Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request

For information on obtaining documentation, submitting a service request, and gathering additional information, see the monthly What’s New in Cisco Product Documentation, which also lists all new and revised Cisco technical documentation, at:

Subscribe to the What’s New in Cisco Product Documentation as a Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feed and set content to be delivered directly to your desktop using a reader application. The RSS feeds are a free service and Cisco currently supports RSS version 2.0.

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Getting Started Guide

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Preface

Preface Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Getting Started Guide xii OL-23203-01

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CHAPTER 1 Introduction to the Ci sco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router This chapter

CHAPTER

1

Introduction to the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router

to the Ci sco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router This chapter introduces the routers that

This chapter introduces the routers that support Cisco IOS XR software. It also introduces router concepts, features, and user interfaces.

Contents

Supported Standalone System Configurations, page 1-1

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Overview, page 1-4

Management and Security, page 1-10

Initial Router Configuration, page 1-12

Router Management Interfaces, page 1-13

Selecting and Identifying the Active RSP, page 1-14

Connecting to the Router Through the Console Port, page 1-15

Where to Go Next, page 1-19

Supported Standalone System Configurations

The Cisco IOS XR software runs on the following standalone systems:

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router 6-Slot Chassis

Cisco IOS XR Getting Started Guide

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1-1

Supported Standalone System Configurations

Chapter 1

Introduction to the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router

Figure 1-1

6-Slot Chassis

Series Aggregation Services Router Figure 1-1 6-Slot Chassis • Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router 10-Slot Chassis

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router 10-Slot Chassis

Figure 1-2

10-Slot Chassis

Series Router 10-Slot Chassis Figure 1-2 10-Slot Chassis Each chassis type supports a capacity of up

Each chassis type supports a capacity of up to 400 G per slot. The amount of this possible capacity, which is usable as consumable bandwidth, is dependent on the choice of line card (LC). Each chassis type also uses the same Route Switch Processors (RSPs) and LCs, which are interchangeable. In each chassis, two slots are designated for RSPs, whereas the remaining slots accommodate LCs that carry the traffic. The RSPs interconnect the LCs for data plane and provide chassis management and control. Any LC can be used as a network-facing trunk card or a subscriber-facing card. It can also provide any other form of connectivity.

card. It can also provide any other form of connectivity. Cisco IOS XR Getting Started Guide

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Chapter 1

Introduction to the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router

Supported Standalone System Configurations

The router uses the following LCs:

40-port 1GE LC (A9K-40GE-L, A9K-40GE-E, A9K-40GE-B)

4-port 10GE LC (A9K-4T-L, A9K-4T-E, A9K-4T-B)

2-port 10GE, 20-port GE combo LC (A9K-2T20GE-L, A9K-2T20GE-E, A9K-2T20GE-B)

8-port 10GE oversubscribed LC (A9K-8T/4-L, A9K-8T/4-E, A9K-8T/4-B)

8-port 10GE LC (A9K-8T-L, A9K-8T-E, A9K-8T-B)

16-port 10GE oversubscribed LC (A9K-16T/8-B)

Cisco ASR 9000 Series SPA Interface Processor-700 (A9K-SIP-700)

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1-3

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Overview

Chapter 1

Introduction to the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Overview

The Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router serves multiple functions. It can serve as:

a multilayer Ethernet switching and aggregation platform

a label edge router (LER) that sits at the edge of a Multiprotocol Label Switching (MPLS) network

a Multi-Service Edge (MSE) router connecting various access media technologies

The router has links that extend outside the MPLS network. It provides access and aggregation services for enterprise and service providers.

Features and Capabilities

The router is a scalable carrier-class distributed forwarding router, which is designed for redundancy, high security and availability, packaging, power, and other requirements needed by service providers.

The router aggregates triple play Multi-service edge and Ethernet service traffic aggregating these services to 10 Gigabit Ethernet IP, MPLS edge, or core. It support Ethernet, serial (including MLPPP), frame relay and POS interface on the access side and Ethernet or POS interfaces on the core side.

The following sections describe the features and capabilities in detail:

Cisco IOS XR Software, page 1-4

Flexible Ethernet, page 1-6

L2VPN, page 1-6

Multicast, page 1-7

OAM, page 1-7

Layer 3 routing, page 1-7

MPLS VPN, page 1-8

QoS, page 1-8

MPLS TE, page 1-9

Manageability, page 1-10

Security, page 1-10

Cisco IOS XR Software

The router runs Cisco IOS XR Software, which offers the following:

Rich Networking Feature Set—Cisco IOS XR Software represents a continuation of the Cisco networking leadership in helping customers realize the power of their networks and the Internet. It provides unprecedented routing-system scalability, high availability, service isolation, and manageability to meet the mission-critical requirements of next-generation networks.

Operating system infrastructure protection—Cisco IOS XR Software provides a microkernel architecture that forces all but the most critical functions, such as memory management and thread distribution, outside of the kernel, thereby preventing failures in applications, file systems, and even device drivers from causing widespread service disruption.

and even device drivers from causing widespread service disruption. Cisco IOS XR Getting Started Guide 1-4

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Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Overview

Process and thread protection—Each process, even individual process thread, is executed in its own protected memory space, and communications between processes are accomplished through well-defined, secure, and version-controlled application programming interfaces (APIs), significantly minimizing the effect that any process failure can have on other processes.

Cisco In-Service Software Upgrade (ISSU)—Cisco IOS XR Software modularity sustains system availability during installation of a software upgrade. ISSUs or hitless software upgrades (HSUs) allow you to upgrade most Cisco router software features without affecting deployed services. You can target particular system components for upgrades based on software packages or composites that group selected features. Cisco preconfigures and tests these packages and composites to help ensure system compatibility.

Process restart—You can restart critical control-plane processes both manually and automatically in response to a process failure versus restarting the entire operating system. This feature supports the Cisco IOS XR Software goal of continuous system availability and allows for quick recovery from process or protocol failures with minimal disruption to customers or traffic.

State checkpoint—You can maintain a memory and critical operating state across process restarts to sustain routing adjacencies and signaling state during a Route Switch Processor (RSP) switchover.

Ethernet virtual connections (EVCs)—Ethernet services are supported using individual EVCs to carry traffic belonging to a specific service type or end user through the network. You can use EVC-based services in conjunction with MPLS-based L2VPNs and native IEEE bridging deployments.

Flexible VLAN classification—VLAN classification into Ethernet flow points (EFPs) includes single-tagged VLANs, double-tagged VLANs (QinQ and IEEE 802.1ad), contiguous VLAN ranges, and noncontiguous VLAN lists.

IEEE Bridging—Software supports native bridging based on IEEE 802.1Q, IEEE 802.1ad, IEEE 802.1ah provider backbone bridges (PBB) and QinQ VLAN encapsulation mechanisms on the router.

IEEE 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree (MST)—MST extends the IEEE 802.1w Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) to multiple spanning trees, providing rapid convergence and load balancing.

MST Access Gateway—This feature provides a resilient, fast-convergence mechanism for aggregating and connecting to Ethernet-based access rings.

Virtual Private LAN Services (VPLS)—VPLS is a class of VPN that supports the connection of multiple sites in a single, bridged domain over a managed IP/MPLS network. It presents an Ethernet interface to customers, simplifying the LAN and WAN boundary for service providers and customers, and enabling rapid and flexible service provisioning because the service bandwidth is not tied to the physical interface. All services in a VPLS appear to be on the same LAN, regardless of location.

Hierarchical VPLS (H-VPLS)—H-VPLS provides a level of hierarchy at the edge of the VPLS network for increased scale. QinQ access and H-VPLS pseudowire access options are supported.

Virtual Private WAN Services/Ethernet over MPLS (VPWS/EoMPLS)—EoMPLS transports Ethernet frames across an MPLS core using pseudowires. Individual EFPs or an entire port can be transported over the MPLS backbone using pseudowires to an egress interface or subinterface.

Pseudowire redundancy—Pseudowire redundancy supports the definition of a backup pseudowire to protect a primary pseudowire that fails.

Multisegment pseudowire stitching—Multisegment pseudowire stitching is a method for interworking two pseudowires together to form a cross-connect relationship.

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Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Overview

Chapter 1

Introduction to the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router

IPv4 Multicast—IPv4 Multicast supports Internet Group Management Protocol Versions 2 and 3 (IGMPv2/v3), Protocol Independent Multicast Source Specific Multicast (SSM) and Sparse Mode (SM), Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP), and Anycast Rendezvous Point (RP).

IGMP v2/v3 Snooping—This Layer 2 mechanism efficiently tracks multicast membership on an L2VPN network. Individual IGMP joins are snooped at the VLAN level or pseudowire level, and then it summarizes the results into a single upstream join message. In residential broadband deployments, this feature enables the network to send only channels that are being watched to the downstream users.

NxDS0—This feature allows channelization of the Cisco 2-Port Channelized OC-12/DS0 SPA to interface speeds as low as 56 kbit. To add bandwidth, you can combine channel groups/timeslots. For more information on NxDS0, see Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide.

Flexible Ethernet

The router uses Ethernet as its transport mechanism, which offers the following:

Ethernet virtual connections (EVCs)—Ethernet services are supported using individual EVCs to carry traffic belonging to a specific service type or end user through the network. You can use EVC-based services in conjunction with MPLS-based L2VPNs and native IEEE bridging deployments.

Flexible VLAN classification—VLAN classification into EFPs includes single-tagged VLANs, double-tagged VLANs (QinQ and IEEE 802.1ad), contiguous VLAN ranges, and noncontiguous VLAN lists.

IEEE Bridging— The software supports native bridging based on IEEE 802.1Q, IEEE 802.1ad, and QinQ VLAN encapsulation mechanisms on the router.

IEEE 802.1s Multiple Spanning Tree (MST)—MST extends the MSTP to multiple spanning trees, providing rapid convergence and load balancing.

MST Access Gateway—This feature provides a resilient, fast-convergence mechanism for aggregating and connecting to Ethernet-based access rings.

L2VPN

The router uses L2VPNs, which offers the following:

Virtual Private LAN Services (VPLS)—VPLS is a class of VPN that supports the connection of multiple sites in a single, bridged domain over a managed IP/MPLS network. It presents an Ethernet interface to customers, simplifying the LAN and WAN boundary for service providers and customers, and enabling rapid and flexible service provisioning because the service bandwidth is not tied to the physical interface. All services in a VPLS appear to be on the same LAN, regardless of location.

Hierarchical VPLS (H-VPLS)—H-VPLS provides a level of hierarchy at the edge of the VPLS network for increased scale. QinQ access and H-VPLS pseudowire access options are supported.

Virtual Private WAN Services/Ethernet over MPLS (VPWS/EoMPLS)—EoMPLS transports Ethernet frames across an MPLS core using pseudowires. Individual EFPs or an entire port can be transported over the MPLS backbone using pseudowires to an egress interface or subinterface.

Pseudowire redundancy—Pseudowire redundancy supports the definition of a backup pseudowire to protect a primary pseudowire that fails.

of a backup pseudowire to protect a primary pseudowire that fails. Cisco IOS XR Getting Started

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Multisegment pseudowire stitching—Multisegment pseudowire stitching is a method for interworking two pseudowires together to form a cross-connect relationship.

Multicast

 

The router supports multicast, which offers the following:

IPv4 Multicast—IPv4 Multicast supports Internet Group Management Protocol Versions 2 and 3 (IGMPv2/v3), Protocol Independent Multicast Source Specific Multicast (SSM) and Sparse Mode (SM), Multicast Source Discovery Protocol (MSDP), and Anycast Rendezvous Point (RP).

IGMP v2/v3 Snooping—This Layer 2 mechanism efficiently tracks multicast membership on an L2VPN network. Individual IGMP joins are snooped at the VLAN level or pseudowire level, and then it summarizes the results into a single upstream join message. In residential broadband deployments, this feature enables the network to send only channels that are being watched to the downstream users.

Multicast VPN Extranet Support—This feature enables service providers to distribute IP multicast content originated from one enterprise site to other enterprise sites. This feature enables service providers to offer the next generation of flexible extranet services, helping to enable business partnerships between different enterprise VPN customers.

OAM

 

The router supports different types of operations, administration, and maintenance (OAM), which offers the following:

E-OAM (IEEE 802.3ah)—Ethernet link layer OAM is a vital component of EOAM that provides physical-link OAM to monitor link health and assist in fault isolation. Along with IEEE 802.1ag, Ethernet link layer OAM can be used to assist in rapid link-failure detection and signaling to remote end nodes of a local failure.

E-OAM (IEEE 802.1ag)—Ethernet Connectivity Fault Management is a subset of EOAM that provides numerous mechanisms and procedures that allow discovery and verification of the path through IEEE 802.1 bridges and LANs.

MPLS OAM—This protocol supports label-switched-path (LSP) ping, LSP TraceRoute, and virtual circuit connectivity verification (VCCV).

Layer 3 routing

The router runs Cisco IOS XR Software, which supports Layer 3 routing and a range of IPv4 services and routing protocols, including the following:

Intermediate System-to-Intermediate System (IS-IS)—Integrated Intermediate IS-IS, Internet Protocol Version 4 (IPv4), is a standards-based Interior Gateway Protocol (IGP). For more information on IS-IS, see Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Routing Configuration Guide.

Open Shortest Path First (OSPF)—OSPF is an IGP developed by the OSPF working group of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). For more information on OSPF, see Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Routing Configuration Guide.

Static Routing—Static routes are user-defined routes that cause packets moving between a source and a destination to take a specified path. For more information on static routing, see Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Routing Configuration Guide.

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IPv4 Multicast—IPv4 Multicast delivers source traffic to multiple receivers without adding any additional burden on the source or the receivers while using the least network bandwidth of any competing technology. For more information on IPv4 Multicast, see Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Multicast Configuration Guide.

Routing Policy Language (RPL)—RPL provides a single, straightforward language in which all routing policy needs can be expressed. For more information on RPL, see Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Routing Configuration Guide.

Hot Standby Router Protocol (HSRP)—HSRP is an IP routing redundancy protocol designed to allow for transparent failover at the first-hop IP router. For more information on HSRP, see Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router IP Addresses and Services Configuration Guide.

Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (VRRP)—VRRP allows for transparent failover at the first-hop IP router, enabling a group of routers to form a single virtual router. For more information on VRRP, see Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router IP Addresses and Services Configuration Guide.

Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) Add Path— This feature enables a BGP speaker to send multiple paths for a prefix. For more information on BGP Add Path, see Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Routing Configuration Guide.

MPLS VPN

The router supports MPLS VPN, which offers the following:

MPLS L3VPN—This IP VPN feature for MPLS allows a Cisco IOS Software or Cisco IOS XR software network to deploy scalable IPv4 Layer 3 VPN backbone services. An IP VPN is the foundation that companies use for deploying or administering value-added services, including applications and data hosting network commerce and telephony services, to business customers.

Carrier Supporting Carrier (CSC)—CSC allows an MPLS VPN service provider to connect geographically isolated sites using another backbone service provider and still maintain a private address space for its customer VPNs. It is implemented as defined by IETF RFC 4364.

Inter-AS—is a peer-to-peer type model that allows extension of VPNs through multiple provider or multi-domain networks. This lets service providers peer up with one another to offer end-to-end VPN connectivity over extended geographical locations. An MPLS VPN Inter-AS allows:

VPN to cross more than one service provider backbone.

VPN to exist in different areas.

confederations to optimize Internal Border Gateway Protocol (iBGP) meshing.

QoS

The router supports many types of quality of service (QoS), which offers the following:

QoS—Comprehensive QoS support with up to 3 million queues, Class-Based Weighted Fair Queuing (CBWFQ) based on a three-parameter scheduler, Weighted Random Early Detection (WRED), two-level strict priority scheduling with priority propagation, and 2-rate, 3-color (2R3C) Policing are all supported.

Cisco IOS XR Software—This software supports a rich variety of QoS mechanisms, including policing, marking, queuing, dropping, and shaping. In addition, the operating systems support Modular QoS CLI (MQC). Modular CLI is used to configure various QoS features on various Cisco platforms.

is used to configure various QoS features on various Cisco platforms. Cisco IOS XR Getting Started

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H-QoS—Is supported on both the SIP based interfaces and the Ethernet interfaces. For EVCs four-level H-QoS support is provided with the following hierarchy levels: port, group of EFPs, EFP, and class of service. This level of support allows for per-service and per-end user QoS granularity. For information about three-level QoS for SIP based interfaces, see Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Modular Quality of Service Configuration Guide.

Four-level H-QoS support is provided for EVCs with the following hierarchy levels: port, group of EFPs, EFP, and class of service. This level of support allows for per-service and per-end user QoS granularity. H-QOS support is also provided on SIP based interfaces.

MPLS TE

The router supports MPLE Traffic Engineering (TE), which offers the following:

MPLS TE—Cisco IOS XR Software supports MPLS protocols such as Traffic Engineering/Fast Reroute (TE-FRR), Resource Reservation Protocol (RSVP), Label Distribution Protocol (LDP), and Targeted Label Distribution Protocol (T-LDP).

MPLS TE Preferred Path—Preferred tunnel path functions let you map pseudowires to specific TE tunnels. Attachment circuits are cross-connected to specific MPLS TE tunnel interfaces instead of remote provider-edge router IP addresses (reachable using IGP or LDP).

High Availability

The router is intended for use in Service Provider and Enterprise networks that require high availability. It is designed to provide high MTBF (Mean Time Between Failures) and low MTTR (Mean Time To Resolve) rates. This minimizes outages and maximizes availability. The router achieves this using the following:

Component redundancy

Duplex power supplies

Cooling systems

Fault detection

Management features

High availability features

Non-stop forwarding (NSF)—Cisco IOS XR Software supports forwarding without traffic loss during a brief outage of the control plane through signaling and routing protocol implementations for graceful restart extensions as standardized by the IETF. NSF requires neighboring nodes to be NSF-aware.

Process restartability

Stateful switchovers

MPLS TE FRR

Bidirectional Forwarding Detection (BFD)

Standard IEEE 802.3ad link aggregation bundles

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Management and Security

In addition to the following management and security features, the router has administrative options, such as assigning Task IDs, that control who can perform router tasks.

Manageability

 

Cisco IOS XR Software manageability—This feature provides industry-standard management interfaces, including a modular CLI, SNMP, and native XML interfaces.

Command-Line Interface (CLI)—CLI is a user interface for monitoring and maintaining the router and also for configuring basic router features.

Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)—SNMP is an application-layer protocol that facilitates management information exchange between network devices.

Management Information Bases (MIBs)—MIBs are databases of objects that can be managed on a device. MIBs include the following: IP-MIB (RFC4293), CISCO-BULK-FILE-MIB, CISCO-CONFIG-COPY-MIB, CISCO-CONFIG-MAN-MIB, CISCO-ENHANCED-IMAGE-MIB, CISCO-ENHANCED-MEMORY-POOL-MIB, CISCO-ENTITY-FRU-CONTROL-MIB, CISCO-ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB, ENTITY-MIB, CISCO-ENTITY-ASSET-MIB, ENTITY-STATE-MIB, ENTITY-SENSOR-MIB, CISCO-ENTITY-ALARM-MIB, CISCO-FLASH-MIB, CISCO-IF-EXTENSION-MIB, CISCO-MEMORY-POOL-MIB, CISCO-RF-MIB (1:1 RP Card), CISCO-SYSLOG-MIB, EVENT-MIB, IF-MIB as well as RFC1213-MIB, SNMP-COMMUNITY-MIB, SNMP-FRAMEWORK-MIB, SNMP-NOTIFICATION-MIB, SNMP-TARGET-MIB, IPv6-MIB, BRIDGE-MIB, DOT3-OAM-MIB, CISCO-IETF-PW-MIB, CISCO-CLASS-BASED-QOS-MIB, ETHERLIKE-MIB, BGP4-MIB Including Cisco extensions, MPLS TE STD MIB, TE-FRR-MIB, and CISCO-IETF-IPMROUTE-MIB, IEEE-8021-CFM-MIB, DOT3-OAM-MIB.

Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP)—TFTP allows files to be transferred from one computer to another over a network, usually without the use of client authentication (for example, username and password).

Network Time Protocol (NTP)—NTP synchronizes timekeeping among a set of distributed time servers.

Cisco Active Network Abstraction (ANA)—Cisco ANA is a flexible, vendor-neutral network resource-management solution for a multitechnology, multiservice network environment. Operating between the network and the operations-support-system (OSS) layer, Cisco ANA aggregates virtual network elements (VNEs) into a software-based virtual network, much as real network elements create the real-world network. Cisco ANA dynamically discovers network components and tracks the status of network elements in near real time. Cisco ANA offers service providers:

Simplified integration of OSS applications with network information

Flexible common infrastructure for managing network resources

Consistent procedures and interfaces for all network elements

Security

Cisco IOS XR Software—Provides comprehensive network security features as follows:

ACLs

Control-plane protection

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Cisco ASR 9000 Series SPA Interface Processor-700

Routing authentications

Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting (AAA)

TACACS+

Remote Authentication Dial In User Service (RADIUS)

IP Security (IPSec)

Secure Shell (SSH) Protocol

SNMPv3

Routing Policy Language (RPL)

Layer 2 ACLs—Filters packets under an EVC based on MAC addresses.

Layer 3 ACLs—Matches ACLs by IPv4 protocol packet attributes.

Security—Supported features include:

Standard IEEE 802.1ad Layer 2 Control Protocol (L2CP) and bridge-protocol-data-unit (BPDU) filtering

MAC limiting per EFP or bridge domain

Unicast, multicast, and broadcast storm control blocking on any interface or port

Unknown Unicast Flood Blocking (UUFB)

Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) Snooping

Unicast Reverse Path Forwarding (URPF)

Control-plane security

Secure Shell (SSH)

Control Plane Policing (CoPP)

Cisco ASR 9000 Series SPA Interface Processor-700

Cisco ASR 9000 Series SPA Interface Processor-700 is a Quantum Flow Processor (QFP)10-based engine with up to four SPA interfaces. It is primarily designed to support non-Ethernet media to complement the family of Ethernet line cards available on the ASR 9000. This LC provides the ability to support multiple legacy services, for example, TDM, Frame Relay, ATM etc.

It is a 20G QFP LC for rich, flexible, extensible IP based services.The key application areas of this LC are Multi-Service Edge and Mobile Aggregation deployments.

Powered by the incredibly potent Cisco Quantum Flow Processor, the Cisco ASR 9000 Series SPA Interface Processor 700 (A9K-SIP-700) uses proven hardware and software designs to accelerate introduction of new and varied physical layers and enable a lower total cost of ownership (TCO).

The 4-bay A9K-SIP-700 doubles the capacity of previous-generation offerings. It provides powerful hierarchical quality of service (H-QoS), high multidimensional scalability, and support for rich Layer 3 services and features. The Cisco Quantum Flow Processor is a fully integrated and programmable chipset designed to unify massive parallel processing, advanced memory management, security, and sophisticated QoS mechanisms with virtual service delivery and programmability.

The Cisco ASR 9000 Series enable operators to deploy any combination of Layer 2 and Layer 3 service applications at an industry-leading price-to-performance ratio. The Cisco ASR 9000 SIP-700 is designed to complement this ability by, over time, extending the same scalability and reliability to the realm of traditional transport media such as time-division multiplexing (TDM), Frame Relay, ATM, and Packet

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over Sonet (POS), thereby reducing capital expenditures (CapEx) and operating expenses (OpEx), as well as reducing the time required to develop and deploy new services. It also allows service providers to continue their deployed services, keeping those revenue streams open, while simultaneously migrating to the next-generation routing platform that opens up new channels of revenue.

By seamlessly integrating within the same chassis, the SIP-700 and Ethernet line cards provide true network and device convergence - a key design goal for the Cisco ASR 9000 Series of routers. The Cisco ASR 9000 SIP-700 only utilizes one line card slot within the Cisco ASR 9000 Series chassis, saving valuable line-card real estate. Fully integrated with the Cisco ASR 9000 Series synchronization circuitry, the Cisco ASR 9000 SIP-700 line cards provide standards-based line-interface functions for delivering and deriving transport-class network timing, enabling support of network-synchronized services and applications such as mobile backhaul and time-division multiplexing (TDM) migration.

For more information about the Cisco ASR 9000 Series SPA Interface Processor-700, see the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router SIP and SPA Hardware Installation Guide.

Figure 1-3

Cisco ASR 9000 Series SPA Interface Processor-700

1 2 3 4 3 0 1 STATUS 12000-SIP-600 116871
1
2
3
4
3
0
1
STATUS
12000-SIP-600
116871

Initial Router Configuration

The initial configuration of the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router is determined automatically by the software when you boot the router; you do not need to set up any general configuration information. Also, there is no explicit configuration needed to make a particular RSP active. It becomes the active RSP when chosen automatically by the software upon boot.

Because there is only one RSP pair in this router, the primary RSP choices are RSP0 and RSP1. Typically, the slot with the lower number is the chosen primary RSP. If that RSP is not available, the software chooses the RSP in the other slot as the elected Route Process Controller, making it the primary RSP; the other RSP becomes standby RSP. During switchover, the active role migrates to the standby RSP.

RSP. During switchover, the active role migrates to the standby RSP. Cisco IOS XR Getting Started

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Router Management Interfaces

Management Interfaces

Although there is no need to set up general router configuration information, you do need to configure management interfaces manually. Configure management ports on RSP0, RSP1, or both at the same time using:

Telnet

SSH (v1 and v2)

Console Server

Router Management Interfaces

The router provides different router management interfaces, described in the following sections:

Command-Line Interface, page 1-13

Extensible Markup Language API, page 1-13

Simple Network Management Protocol, page 1-14

Command-Line Interface

The CLI is the primary user interface for configuring, monitoring, and maintaining routers that run Cisco IOS XR software. The CLI allows you to directly and simply execute Cisco IOS XR commands.

All procedures in this guide use CLI. Before you can use other router management interfaces, you must first use the CLI to install and configure those interfaces. Guidelines for using the CLI to configure the router are discussed in the following chapters:

Configuring General Router Features

Configuring Additional Router Features

CLI Tips, Techniques, and Shortcuts

For more information on CLI procedures for other tasks, such as hardware interface and software protocol management tasks, see the Cisco IOS XR software documents listed in the “Related Documents” section on page x.

Extensible Markup Language API

The Extensible Markup Language (XML) application programming interface (API) is an XML interface used for rapid development of client applications and perl scripts to manage and monitor the router. Client applications can be used to configure the router or request status information from the router by encoding a request in XML API tags and sending it to the router. The router processes the request and sends the response to the client in the form of encoded XML API tags. The XML API supports readily available transport layers, including Telnet, SSH, and Secure Socket Layer (SSL) transport.

For more information, see the Cisco IOS XR software documents listed in the “Related Documents” section on page x.

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Simple Network Management Protocol

Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is an application-layer protocol that facilitates the

exchange of management information between network devices. By using SNMP-transported data (such

as packets per second and network error rates), network administrators can manage network performance, find and solve network problems, and plan for network growth.

The Cisco IOS XR software supports SNMP v1, v2c, and v3. SNMP is part of a larger architecture called the Internet Network Management Framework (NMF), which is defined in Internet documents called RFCs. The SNMPv1 NMF is defined by RFCs 1155, 1157, and 1212, and the SNMPv2 NMF is defined by RFCs 1441 through 1452. For more information on SNMP v3, see RFC 2272 and 2273.

SNMP is a popular protocol for managing diverse commercial internetworks and those used in universities and research organizations. SNMP-related standardization activity continues even as vendors develop and release state-of-the-art, SNMP-based management applications. SNMP is a relatively simple protocol, yet its feature set is sufficiently powerful to handle the difficult problems presented in trying to manage the heterogeneous networks of today.

For more information, see the Cisco IOS XR software documents listed in the “Related Documents” section on page x.

Selecting and Identifying the Active RSP

A designated shelf controller (DSC) is a role that is assigned to one route switch processor (RSP) card

in each router.

to one route switch processor (RSP) card in each router. Note Throughout this guide, the term
to one route switch processor (RSP) card in each router. Note Throughout this guide, the term

Note

Throughout this guide, the term RSP is used to refer to the RSP cards supported on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers. If a feature or an issue applies to only one platform, the accompanying

text specifies the platform. The active RSP card acts as DSC in the system.

platform. The active RSP card acts as DSC in the system. Although each router can have

Although each router can have two RSP cards, only one can serve as the active RSP and control the router. The active RSP provides system-wide administrative functions, including:

User configuration using a terminal connection or network connection

Distribution of software to each node in the router or system

Coordination of software versioning and configurations for all nodes in the router or system

Hardware inventory and environmental monitoring

The first step in setting up a new router is to select or identify the active RSP because the initial router configuration takes place through the active RSP. The following sections describe how to select and identify the DSC on different routers:

Selecting and Identifying the DSC on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers, page 1-14

Selecting and Identifying the DSC on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Routers

A Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router supports up to two RSPs. If only one RSP is installed, that RSP

automatically becomes the active RSP. If two RSPs are installed, the default configuration selects RSP0

as the active RSP. To select RSP1 to become the active RSP for a new installation, install RSP1 first, apply power to the system, and wait for RSP1 to start up. When the Primary LED on the RSP1 front panel lights, RSP1 is operating as the active RSP, and you can install RSP0.

lights, RSP1 is operating as the active RSP, and you can install RSP0. Cisco IOS XR

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Connecting to the Router Through the Console Port

The active RSP can be identified by the green Primary LED on the faceplate of the card. The alphanumeric LED display on the active RSP displays ACTV. By default, the other RSP becomes the standby RSP, displays STBY on the alphanumeric display, and takes over if the active RSP fails.

display, and takes over if the active RSP fails. Note The active RSP acts as DSC

Note

The active RSP acts as DSC in the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router.

active RSP acts as DSC in the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router. Connecting to the Router

Connecting to the Router Through the Console Port

The first time you connect to a new router with Cisco IOS XR software, you must connect through the Console port. Although typical router configuration and management take place using an Ethernet port, you must configure the console port for your LAN before it can be used.

Because a new router has no name, IP address, or other credentials, use a terminal to connect through the Console port, setting the speed to 9600. The remote terminal setting has to match the 9600 value.

After you connect through the Console port, configure the management ports with their IP addresses. Then, you can use either SSH or Telnet to connect to the router.

you can use either SSH or Telnet to connect to the router. Note confreg 0x0 reverts

Note

confreg 0x0 reverts to the default speed setting. If you change it from the default of 9600, you must reset it afterward.

you change it from the default of 9600, you must reset it afterward. Cisco IOS XR

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Figure 1-4 shows the RSP connections on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router.

Figure 1-4

Communication Ports on the RSP Card for a Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router

1

Management LAN Ports

5

Compact Flash type I/II

2

Console Port and Auxiliary Port

6

Alarm Cutoff (ACO) and Lamp Test push buttons

3

Sync (BITS and J.211) ports

7

Eight discrete LED indicators

4

Alarm Out DB9 Connector

8

LED Matrix display

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Connecting to the Router Through the Console Port

To connect to the router through the Console port, perform the following procedure.

SUMMARY STEPS

1. Power on the router.

2. Connect a terminal to the Console port.

3. Start the terminal emulation program.

4. Press Enter.

5. Log in to the router.

6. admin

7. show dsc

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DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

Power on the router.

Starts the router.

 

This step is required only if the power is not on.

For information on power installation and controls, see the hardware documentation listed in the “Conventions”.

Step 2

Connect a terminal to the Console port.

Establishes a communications path to the router.

 

During the initial setup, you can communicate with the router only through the Console port.

Router Console port is designed for a serial cable connection to a terminal or a computer that is running a terminal emulation program.

Terminal settings are:

Bits per second: 9600

Data bits: 8

Parity: None

Stop bit: 2

Flow control: None

For information on the cable requirements for the Console port, see the hardware documentation listed in the “Conventions”.

Step 3

Start the terminal emulation program.

(Optional) Prepares a computer for router communications.

 

Not required if you are connecting through a terminal.

Terminals send keystrokes to, and receive characters, from another device. If you connect a computer to the Console port, you must use a terminal emulation program to communicate with the router. For instructions on using the terminal emulation program, see the documentation for that program.

Step 4

Press Enter.

Initiates communication with the router.

 

If no text or router prompt appears when you connect to the console port, press Enter to initiate communications.

If no text appears when you press Enter, give the router more time to complete the initial boot procedure, then press Enter.

If the prompt gets lost among display messages, press Enter again.

The router displays the prompt: Username:

Enter again. • The router displays the prompt: Username: Cisco IOS XR Getting Started Guide 1-18

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Where to Go Next

Step 5

Step 6

Step 7

Command or Action

Purpose

Log in to the router.

Establishes your access rights for the router management session.

Type the root-system username and password or the username and password provided by your system administrator.

After you log in, the router displays the CLI prompt, which is described in CLI Prompt.

admin

Places the router in administration EXEC mode.

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# admin

show dsc

Displays the RSP information for the router so that you can verify that you have connected successfully to the console port.

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(admin)# sh dsc

 

NODE

ROLE

======================== 0/RSP0/CPU0 DSC 0/RSP1/CPU0 Backup DSC

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(admin)#

Configuring the Router Data Interfaces

After connecting to the router, configure the data interfaces manually. These are Gigabit Ethernet, 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces or the SPA based interfaces available on the SIP card. Because these interfaces are for data traffic only, not management traffic, you cannot use SSH or Telnet to an IP address that is part of the interfaces. For more information about configuring Gigabit Ethernet and 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces, see the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide.

Where to Go Next

If you have logged into the router, you can perform the general router configuration as described in CLI Prompt.

If the router is prompting you to enter a root-system username, bring up the router. For more information, see Chapter 2, “Bringing Up Cisco IOS XR Software on the Router”.

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CHAPTER

2

Bringing Up Cisco IOS XR Software on the Router

CHAPTER 2 Bringing Up Cisco IOS XR Software on the Router This chapter provides instructions for

This chapter provides instructions for bringing up the Cisco IOS XR software on a standalone router for the first time. This section applies to standalone routers that are delivered with Cisco IOS XR software installed.

Contents

Prerequisites, page 2-21

Bringing Up and Configuring a Standalone Router, page 2-23

Verifying the System After Initial Boot, page 2-24

Where to Go Next, page 2-30

Prerequisites

The following sections describe the software and hardware requirements for bringing up a standalone system running Cisco IOS XR Software Release 4.0.

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Prerequisites

Chapter 2

Bringing Up Cisco IOS XR Software on the Router

Software Requirements

The system requires compatible ROM Monitor firmware on all RSPs.

system requires compatible ROM Monitor firmware on all RSPs. Caution The ROM Monitor firmware on all

Caution

compatible ROM Monitor firmware on all RSPs. Caution The ROM Monitor firmware on all RSPs must
compatible ROM Monitor firmware on all RSPs. Caution The ROM Monitor firmware on all RSPs must

The ROM Monitor firmware on all RSPs must be compatible with the Cisco IOS XR Software release installed on the router. If the router is brought up with an incompatible version of the ROM Monitor software, the standby RSP may fail to boot. For instructions to overcome a boot block in the standby

RSP, see Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Series Router ROM Monitor Guide.

9000 Series Aggregation Series Router ROM Monitor Guide . Hardware Prerequisites and Documentation The Cisco IOS

Hardware Prerequisites and Documentation

The Cisco IOS XR software runs on the routers listed in the “Supported Standalone System Configurations” section on page 1-1. Before a router can be started, the following hardware management procedures must be completed:

Site preparation

Equipment unpacking

Router installation

For information on how to complete these procedures for your router equipment, see the hardware documents listed in the “Related Documents” section on page x.

documents listed in the “Related Documents” section on page x . Cisco IOS XR Getting Started

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Bringing Up Cisco IOS XR Software on the Router

Bringing Up and Configuring a Standalone Router

Bringing Up and Configuring a Standalone Router

To bring up a standalone router, connect to the router and configure the root-system username and password, as described in the following procedure:

SUMMARY STEPS

 

1. Establish a connection to the Console port.

2. Type the username for the root-system login and press Enter.

3. Type the password for the root-system login and press Enter.

4. Log in to the router.

DETAILED STEPS

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 1

Establish a connection to the Console port.

Initiates communication with the router.

 

For instructions on connecting to the Console port, see the “Connecting to the Router Through the Console Port” section on page 1-15.

After you have successfully connected to the router through the Console port, the router displays the

 

prompt: Username:

If the Username prompt appears, skip this procedure and continue the general router configuration as described in Chapter 4, “Configuring Additional Router Features.”

Step 2

Type the username for the root-system login and press Enter.

Sets the root-system username, which is used to log in to the router.

Step 3

Type the password for the root-system login and press Enter.

Creates an encrypted password for the root-system username.

 

Note

This password can be changed with the secret command.

Step 4

Retype the password for the root-system login and press Enter.

Allows the router to verify that you have entered the same password both times.

 

If the passwords do not match, the router prompts you to repeat the process.

Step 5

Log in to the router.

Establishes your access rights for the router management session.

 

Enter the root-system username and password that were created earlier in this procedure.

After you log in, the router displays the CLI prompt, which is described in the CLI Prompt.

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Examples

The following example shows the root-system username and password configuration for a new router, and it shows the initial log in:

--- Administrative User Dialog --- Enter root-system username: username1 Enter secret:

Enter secret again:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Jan 10 12:50:53.105 : exec[65652]: %MGBL-CONFIG-6-DB_COMMIT :

'Administration configuration committed by system'. Use 'show configuration commit changes 2000000009' to view the changes. Use the 'admin' mode 'configure' command to modify this configuration. User Access Verification Username: username1 Password:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router#

The secret line in the configuration command script shows that the password is encrypted. When you enter the password during configuration and login, the password is hidden.

Verifying the System After Initial Boot

To verify the status of the router, perform the following procedure:

SUMMARY STEPS

 

1. show version

2. admin

3. show platform [node-id]

4. exit

5. show redundancy

6. show environment

DETAILED STEPS

5. show redundancy 6. show environment DETAILED STEPS Cisco IOS XR Getting Started Guide 2-24 OL-23203-01

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Verifying the System After Initial Boot

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4

Step 5

Step 6

Command or Action

Purpose

show version

Displays information about the router, including image names, uptime, and other system information.

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show version

 

admin

Places the router in administration EXEC mode.

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# admin

show platform [node-id]

Displays information about the status of cards and modules installed in the router.

Example:

A card module is also called a node. When a node is working properly, the status of the node in the State column is IOS XR RUN. The status of the supported SPA interface is OK.

The show platform node-id command is used to display information for a specific node. Replace node-id with a node name from the show platform command Node column.

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(admin)# show platform

Note

To view the status of all the cards and modules, the show platform command must be executed in administration EXEC mode.

exit

Exits the administration EXEC mode.

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(admin)# exit

show redundancy

Displays the state of the primary (active) and standby (inactive) RPs, including the ability of the standby to take control of the system.

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show redundancy

If both RPs are working correctly, one node displays active role, the Partner node row displays standby role, and the Standby node row displays Ready.

show environment

Displays information about the hardware attributes and status.

Example:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show environment

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Examples of show Commands

The following sections provide examples of show commands:

show version Command: Example, page 2-26

show platform Command: Example, page 2-26

show redundancy Command: Example, page 2-27

show environment Command: Example, page 2-29

show version Command: Example

The following example shows how to display basic information about the router configuration by entering the show version command in EXEC mode.

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show version Mon May 31 02:23:47.984 DST

Cisco IOS XR Software, Version 4.0.0[Default] Copyright (c) 2010 by Cisco Systems, Inc.

ROM: System Bootstrap, Version 1.4(20100216:021454) [ASR9K ROMMON],

router uptime is 2 weeks, 6 days, 10 hours, 30 minutes System image file is "bootflash:disk0/asr9k-os-mbi-4.0.0/mbiasr9k-rp.vm"

cisco ASR9K Series (MPC8641D) processor with 4194304K bytes of memory. MPC8641D processor at 1333MHz, Revision 2.2

2 Management Ethernet

12

TenGigE

40

GigabitEthernet

219k bytes of non-volatile configuration memory. 975M bytes of compact flash card. 33994M bytes of hard disk. 1605616k bytes of disk0: (Sector size 512 bytes). 1605616k bytes of disk1: (Sector size 512 bytes).

Configuration register on node 0/RSP0/CPU0 is 0x102

Boot device on node 0/RSP0/CPU0 is disk0:

Package active on node 0/RSP0/CPU0:

asr9k-optics-supp, V 4.0.0[DT_IMAGE], Cisco Systems, at disk0:asr9k-optics-s

upp-4.0.0

Built on Thu May

6 16:52:16 DST 2010

By sjc-lds-364 in /auto/ioxbuild6/production/4.0.0.DT_IMAGE/asr9k/worksp ace for pie

asr9k-fwding, V 4.0.0[DT_IMAGE], Cisco Systems, at disk0:asr9k-fwding-4.0.0.

15I

Built on Thu May

6 16:43:46 DST 2010

By sjc-lds-364 in /auto/ioxbuild6/production/4.0.0.DT_IMAGE/asr9k/worksp ace for pie

show platform Command: Example

The show platform command displays information on router resources. In EXEC mode, the show platform command displays the resources assigned to the RP that you are managing. In administration EXEC mode, the show platform command displays all router resources.

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show platform Mon May 31 02:31:55.913 DST

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Node

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Type

State

Config State

0/RSP0/CPU0

A9K-RSP-4G(Active)

IOS XR RUN

PWR,NSHUT,MON

0/1/CPU0

A9K-40GE-B

IOS XR RUN

PWR,NSHUT,MON

0/4/CPU0

A9K-8T/4-B

IOS XR RUN

PWR,NSHUT,MON

0/6/CPU0

A9K-4T-B

IOS XR RUN

PWR,NSHUT,MON

The following administration EXEC mode example shows all router nodes:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# admin RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(admin)# show platform Mon May 31 02:35:05.459 DST

Node

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Type

State

Config State

0/RSP0/CPU0

A9K-RSP-4G(Active)

IOS XR RUN

PWR,NSHUT,MON

0/FT0/SP

FAN TRAY

READY

0/FT1/SP

FAN TRAY

READY

0/1/CPU0

A9K-40GE-B

IOS XR RUN

PWR,NSHUT,MON

0/4/CPU0

A9K-8T/4-B

IOS XR RUN

PWR,NSHUT,MON

0/6/CPU0

A9K-4T-B

IOS XR RUN

PWR,NSHUT,MON

0/PM0/SP

A9K-3KW-AC

READY

PWR,NSHUT,MON

0/PM1/SP

A9K-3KW-AC

READY

PWR,NSHUT,MON

0/PM2/SP

A9K-3KW-AC

READY

PWR,NSHUT,MON

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# end

The following example displays information for a single node in the router:

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show platform 0/1/CPU0

Tue Jun 16 23:45:17.976 PST

Node

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

0/1/CPU0

Type

State

Config State

PWR,NSHUT,MON

A9K-40GE-B

IOS XR RUN

For more information on node IDs, see Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router System Management Configuration Guide.

For more information on the show platform command, see Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Command Reference.

show redundancy Command: Example

The following example shows how to display information about the active and standby (inactive) RPs by entering the show redundancy command.

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show redundancy

Tue Jan 6 22:49:15.719 UTC Redundancy information for node 0/RSP0/CPU0:

========================================== Node 0/RSP0/CPU0 is in ACTIVE role Partner node (0/RSP1/CPU0) is in STANDBY role Standby node in 0/RSP1/CPU0 is ready Standby node in 0/RSP1/CPU0 is NSR-ready

Reload and boot info

----------------------

A9K-RSP-4G reloaded Wed Dec 31 23:59:48 2008: 5 days, 22 hours, 49 minutes ago Active node booted Wed Dec 31 23:59:48 2008: 5 days, 22 hours, 49 minutes ago

Standby node boot Thu Jan

Standby node last went not ready Thu Jan 1 00:39:17 2009: 5 days, 22 hours, 9 minutes ago Standby node last went ready Thu Jan 1 00:39:17 2009: 5 days, 22 hours, 9 minutes ago There have been 0 switch-overs since reload

1 00:35:52 2009: 5 days, 22 hours, 13 minutes ago

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Active node reload "Cause: Turboboot completed successfully" Standby node reload "Cause: self-reset to use new boot image"

Standby node reload "Cause: self-reset to use new boot image" Cisco IOS XR Getting Started Guide

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Firmware Upgrade

show environment Command: Example

To display environmental monitor parameters for the system, use the show environment command in EXEC or administration EXEC mode. The show environment [options] command syntax is used.

Enter the show environment ? command to display the command options.

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show environment temperatures

The following example shows temperature information for a Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router.

Mon May 31 02:44:19.989 DST

R/S/I Modules

Inlet

Hotspot

Temperature

Temperature

(deg C)

(deg C)

0/1/*

host

36.1

45.1

0/RSP0/*

host

30.8

41.5

0/4/*

host

34.4

44.5

0/6/*

host

37.3

47.9

The following example shows LED status of the nodes in a Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router.

RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show environment leds

Mon May 31 02:46:17.343 DST

R/S/I

Modules LED

Status

0/RSP0/*

host

Critical-Alarm Off

host

Major-Alarm

Off

host

Minor-Alarm

Off

host

ACO

Off

host

Fail

Off

For more information, see Cisco ASR 9000 Series RouterInterface and Hardware Component Command Reference .

Firmware Upgrade

The field-programmable devices (FPDs) are hardware devices implemented on router cards that support separate software upgrades. A field-programmable gate array (FPGA) is a type of programmable memory device that exists on most hardware components of the router. The term FPD is introduced to collectively and generically describe any type of programmable hardware device on SIPs and shared port adapters (SPAs), including FPGAs and the read-only memory monitor (ROMMON). Cisco IOS XR software provides the Cisco FPD upgrade feature to manage the upgrade of FPD images on SIPs and SPAs.

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For more information on upgrading or downgrading the ROM Monitor firmware, see the Upgrading and Downgrading ROM Monitor Firmware on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router module in Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router ROM Monitor Guide.

FPD versions must be compatible with the Cisco IOS XR software that is running on the router; if any incompatibility exists between an FPD version and the Cisco IOS XR software, the device with the FPGA might not operate properly until the incompatibility is resolved. An FPGA incompatibility on a SPA does not necessarily affect the running of the SPA interfaces; an FPD incompatibility on a SIP disables all interfaces for all SPAs in the SIP until the incompatibility is resolved.

For minimum firmware version requirements for Cisco IOS XR Software Release 3.7.2 and later releases, see Software/Firmware Compatibility matrix at:

http://www.cisco.com/web/Cisco_IOS_XR_Software/index.html

The Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router supports upgrades for FPGA devices on its SIPs and SPAs. FPGA and ROMMON software upgrades are part of an FPD image package that corresponds to a Cisco IOS XR software image. SIPs and SPAs support manual upgrades for FPGA devices using the Cisco FPD upgrade feature.

For more information on upgrading firmware, see the Upgrading FPD on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router module in Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router System Management Configuration Guide.

Where to Go Next

For information on configuring basic router features, see Configuring General Router Features.

basic router features, see Configuring General Router Features . Cisco IOS XR Getting Started Guide 2-30

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CHAPTER 3 Configuring General Router Features This chapter describes how to communicate with the router

CHAPTER

3

Configuring General Router Features

CHAPTER 3 Configuring General Router Features This chapter describes how to communicate with the router using

This chapter describes how to communicate with the router using the command-line interface (CLI), and it also shows basic Cisco IOS XR software configuration management.

Contents

Connecting and Communicating with the Router, page 3-31

Logging In to a Router, page 3-38

CLI Prompt, page 3-39

User Access Privileges, page 3-39

Navigating the Cisco IOS XR Command Modes, page 3-43

Managing Configuration Sessions, page 3-49

Configuring the RSP Hostname, page 3-66

Configuring the Management Ethernet Interface, page 3-66

Manually Setting the Router Clock, page 3-71

Where to Go Next, page 3-73

Connecting and Communicating with the Router

To use a router running Cisco IOS XR Software, first connect to it using a terminal or a PC. Before you connect to the router, determine which entity to manage. You can manage router hardware or named RSPs.

Connections are made either through a direct physical connection to the console port or through management interfaces.

Figure 3-1 shows the RSP connections for a Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router.

The first time a router starts, use a direct connection to the Console port to type the configuration information. When the router is directly connected to the Console port, enter CLI commands at a terminal or at a computer running terminal emulation software. This direct Console port connection is useful for entering initial configurations and performing some debugging tasks.

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Connecting and Communicating with the Router

Chapter 3

Configuring General Router Features

This chapter describes some of the tasks to perform during your initial configuration. One of those tasks is the configuration of the Management Ethernet interface, which is described in the “Configuring the Management Ethernet Interface” section on page 3-66. After the Management Ethernet interface is configured, most router management and configuration sessions take place over an Ethernet network connected to the Management Ethernet interface. SNMP agents also use the network connection.

You can use the modem connection for remote communications with the router. If the Management Ethernet interface fails, the modem connection serves as the alternate remote communications path.

4-10GE B1 1 0 0 1 1 2 2 3 3 STATUS CLEAN CONNECTOR WITH
4-10GE
B1
1
0
0
1
1
2
2
3
3
STATUS
CLEAN
CONNECTOR
WITH
ALCOHOL
WIPES
BEFORE
CONNECTING
252290
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Connecting and Communicating with the Router

Figure 3-1

Communication Ports on the RSP Card for a Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router

1

Management LAN Ports

5

Compact Flash type I/II

2

Console Port and Auxiliary Port

6

Alarm Cutoff (ACO) and Lamp Test push buttons

3

Sync (BITS and J.211) ports

7

Eight discrete LED indicators

4

Alarm Out DB9 Connector

8

LED Matrix display

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Connecting and Communicating with the Router

Chapter 3

Configuring General Router Features

The following sections describe three ways to connect to the router:

Establishing a Connection Through the Console Port, page 3-34

Establishing a Connection Through a Terminal Server, page 3-35

Establishing a Connection Through the Management Ethernet Interface, page 3-37

Establishing a Connection Through the Console Port

To connect to the router through the console port, perform the following procedure.

SUMMARY STEPS

 

1. Identify the active RSP.

2. Connect a terminal to the Console port of the active RSP.

3. Start the terminal emulation program.

4. Press Enter.

5. Log in to the router.

DETAILED STEPS

Step 1

Step 2

Command or Action

Purpose

Identify the active RSP.

Identifies the RSP to which you must connect in the next step.

There are two RSPs: RSP0 and RSP1. One is active RSP, the other is standby.

This step is not required when the router hosts only one RSP.

On a Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router, the active RSP is identified by the lighted Primary LED on the faceplate of the card.

Connect a terminal to the Console port of the active RSP.

Establishes a communications path to the router.

During the initial setup, you can communicate with the router only through the console port of the active RSP.

 

Router console port is designed for a serial cable connection to a terminal or a computer that is running a terminal emulation program.

Terminal settings are:

Bits per second: 9600 (default value)

Data bits: 8

Parity: None

Stop bit: 1

Flow control: None

For information on the cable requirements for the console port, see the hardware documentation listed in the “Related Documents” section on page x.

listed in the “Related Documents” section on page x . Cisco IOS XR Getting Started Guide

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Connecting and Communicating with the Router

 

Command or Action

Purpose

Step 3

Start the terminal emulation program.

(Optional) Prepares a computer for router communications.

 

This step is not required if you are connecting through a terminal.