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Volume 119 No. 42

PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY EDITION

May 28, 2011 - May 28, 2011, The Afro-American A1

MAY 28, 2011 - JUNE 3, 2011 Stars Say Goodbye Negro League Museum C3 B1
MAY 28, 2011 - JUNE 3, 2011
Stars Say Goodbye
Negro League Museum
C3
B1
D1
to Oprah
of Md. Hosts Annual
Awards
Museum C3 B1 D1 to Oprah of Md. Hosts Annual Awards Maryland Adopts Green Construction Codes

Maryland Adopts Green Construction Codes

By George Barnette AFRO Staff Writer

Gov. Martin O’Malley continues to move Maryland towards a greener future as he signed into law the state’s adoption of the International Green Construction Code

adoption of the International Green Construction Code AFRO File Photo/Bill Tabron Gov. Martin O’Malley has

AFRO File Photo/Bill Tabron

Gov. Martin O’Malley has signed legislation that adopts the International Green Construction Code, making Maryland the first state in America to do so.

(IGCC). “We became the first state in America to adopt the International Green Construction Code,” O’Malley said during a May 11 speech. “This session, with your help, we also created new incentives for

constructing green, high- performance homes. “ This comes as no surprise to the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC). Officials there say they’ve noticed O’Malley’s vision for a green future and are pleased with the passing of the legislation. “Maryland has been one of the most important cradles of the green building movement and today’s adoption of the IGCC is another important notch in the belt for a state that’s been leading the way on these issues,” said Roger Platt, senior vice president of Global Policy and Law, USGBC, in a statement. “It is only fitting that the next step toward true market transformation and the advancement of the green building movement happens in Annapolis, under Gov. Martin O’Malley’s leadership, and with the expert counsel of USGBC’s Maryland Chapter.” According to the International Code Council, the IGCC “provides a comprehensive set of requirements intended to reduce the negative impact of buildings on the natural environment.” Despite the new law, local jurisdictions aren’t required to adhere by the standards. Local jurisdictions can adopt these standards instead of those set forth by the Maryland Building Performance

Standards. However, according to the law, if local jurisdictions do adopt the IGCC, it can make amendments adding further provisions as long as those

provisions don’t weaken or prohibit the minimum requirements set forth by the IGCC or weaken energy conservation or efficiency standards.

It’s no question though what O’Malley would prefer, as he’s made several comments this year about moving towards greener technology and cleaner

energy. “Energy touches every aspect of our lives from the cost of heating our homes to sustaining our resources for future generations. We

Continued on A3

Sprite’s Step Off II Showcases Greek Creativity

Sprite’s Step Off II Showcases Greek Creativity Photo by John Moore Delta Sigma Theta Sorority’s Sigma

Photo by John Moore

Delta Sigma Theta Sorority’s Sigma chapter from Clark Atlanta University shows they have what it takes at the Sprite Step Off II competiton on May 21 at Prince George’s County’s Show Place Arena. See page C3 for more coverage.

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Local Transportation Company Basking in Success

By George Barnette AFRO Staff Writer

In 2006, Darnell Lee was sitting in church and heard a message that would forever change his life. That message led the man to start his own transportation company. “The question was if you were to die today; how would you want to be remembered? What would you like someone to say over you and about you at your eulogy?” Lee recalled about that day. “Leaving your legacy is supposed to be for three

generations – down to your great- great grandchildren.” Lee sat back and thought about it and realized he needed to take action and that led to the creation of W & T Travel Services (WTTS). The company offers full-service transportation options which range from one person to 57 people. They transfer people to and from airport, corporate meetings, road shows, group events and other special occasions. Lee’s partner with WTTS is Continued on A3

occasions. Lee’s partner with WTTS is Continued on A3 Courtesy Photo/WTTS Darnell Lee and Alverta Lopez’s

Courtesy Photo/WTTS

Darnell Lee and Alverta Lopez’s transportation company made $6 million in 2010.

Economy Gives Chills to New College Grads

By Vincent Smith TriceEdney Wire

The poor state of the nation’s economy, which has significantly

affected the state of the job market over the past several years, is giving chills to new college graduates as thousands face the real world this spring. Fresh out of school, a new pool of people plan to enter the work force. But, is the work force ready and willing to add even more people to the already large group of Americans looking for jobs? Should students be worried that they will not be able to find adequate employment or any employment at all? Carol Dudley, director of career development at Howard University feels that worry should play a part in the minds of graduating seniors. “Students should always be worried about getting jobs regardless of what the economy is

like,” she said. “Should

be especially concerned right

now? Yes

understand totally

economy is.” This statement, however, differs from findings of a recent survey released by the National Association of Colleges and Employers. According to the survey, employers

students

I don’t feel that they

how bad the

have recently grown to be more adamant about hiring new graduates of the class of 2011. The survey also indicated an increase in projected hiring numbers from Sept. 2010 to April 2011. In September, employers anticipated hiring 13.5 percent more graduates coming from the class of 2011 than

“Should

especially concerned right now? Yes I don’t feel that they understand totally how bad the economy is.”

students be

–Carol Dudley

the graduates of 2010. Now, the number has jumped to 19.3 percent. But regardless of what numbers say, anxiety and nervousness still play a role in some graduating seniors’ lives. Katie Derhim, a senior at Catholic University in Washington, D.C., is one of those seniors. “I know not a lot of people are hiring right now so I’m nervous there will not be anything available,” Derhim said.

Continued on A3

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The Afro-American, May 28, 2011 - June 3, 2011

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AFRO National Briefs

Americans Snicker at Herman Cain’s ‘Constitution’ Snafu

Snicker at Herman Cain’s ‘Constitution’ Snafu (AP Photo) GOP Presidential Candidate Herman Cain

(AP Photo)

GOP Presidential Candidate Herman Cain

Businessman and GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain raised eyebrows during his campaign announcement on May 21 when he incorrectly recited passages from the Declaration of Independence while urging Americans to “reread the Constitution.” “We don’t need to rewrite the Constitution of the United States of America, we need to reread the Constitution and enforce the Constitution. … And I know that there are some people that are not going to do that, so for the benefit of those who are not going to read it because they don’t want us to go by the Constitution, there’s a little section in there that talks about ‘life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness,’” Cain said. “You know, those ideals that we live by, we believe in, your parents believed in, they instilled in you. When you get to the part about ‘life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness,’ don’t stop there, keep reading. [Because] that’s when it says, “When any form of government becomes destructive of those ideals, it is the right of the people to alter or abolish it.” We’ve got some altering and some abolishing to do.” The Constitution does not include the phrase “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness” nor does it mention abolishing or altering a destructive government.

Man, 45, Cured of AIDS Due to Immunity Gene A San Francisco man may be the first person to be “cured” of AIDS due to an HIV immunity gene. According to San Francisco CBS affiliate KCBS, Timothy Ray Brown, who tested positive in 1995, may be the first man in history to have the deadly disease completely removed from his body due to a “functional cure.” Brown received a bone marrow stem cell transplant in Berlin, Germany, back in 2007 after battling HIV and leukemia. The donor appears to have carried a gene which made them immune to HIV, an immunity which may have been passed to Brown. Since the transplant, Brown has stopped using his HIV medication. “I’m cured of HIV. I had HIV but I don’t anymore,” Brown told the news station. Dr. Jay Levy at the University of California, San Francisco, who helped discover the HIV virus, said Brown’s case is significant for HIV/AIDS research. “If you’re able to take the white cells from someone and manipulate them so they’re no longer infected, or infectable— no longer infectable by HIV— and those white cells become the whole immune system of that individual, you’ve got essentially

immune system of that individual, you’ve got essentially (CourtesyPhoto/cbsSF.com) Timothy Ray Brown claimed to have

(CourtesyPhoto/cbsSF.com)

Timothy Ray Brown claimed to have been “cured” of AIDS during an appearance on San Francisco CBS affiliate KCBS’ local news.

a functional cure,” Levy said.

Phill Wilson, the founder and executive director of the Black AIDS Institute in Los Angeles, said Brown may not be the first person who has been “cured,”

a word he called “complex and

interesting.” “Technically, a cure means we can eradicate the virus from an HIV-positive person’s body. I don’t think we are close to finding that,” he said in an e-mail. “I do think we are close to the day when people are more likely to die with HIV than from HIV. I think we have the tools to stop new infection, and slow down disease progression dramatically.”

Justice Clarence Thomas Goes Home, but Not All Cheer Him

Justice Clarence Thomas Goes Home, but Not All Cheer Him (AP Photo/TheAugustaChronicle,Jack ieRicciardi) Supreme

(AP Photo/TheAugustaChronicle,Jack ieRicciardi)

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas speaks to a crowd of people during the dedication ceremony of the John H. Ruffin Courthouse May 18 in Augusta, Ga.

Clarence Thomas, the only Black justice on the Supreme Court, was welcomed with a standing ovation May 18 at a ceremony to dedicate an Augusta courthouse named after a civil rights leader. But not everyone in attendance was pleased to see him. According to The Associated Press, some residents were angered that Thomas, 62, was selected to speak at the grand opening of a courthouse named after civil rights lawyer John “Jack” Ruffin Jr. Ruffin was the first Black chief judge of

the state Court of Appeals, and was recognized for his push to integrate local schools. Thomas’ known conservative record and firm stance against affirmative action programs have strained

relations with Black residents in his home state. “The folks that had a vested interest weren’t really consulted,” David Watkins, a Richmond County, Ga. state court judge, told the AP. “Look, imagine you invite someone to your house to spend the night and you don’t ask your wife, and it may be someone she didn’t agree with. Would that go well?” In the past year, the affiliation of Thomas’ wife with the tea party movement has surfaced. Critics have also called for him to sit out of the anticipated court fight over President Obama’s health care reform act, as his wife publicly criticized the legislation. These controversies have infuriated residents of Augusta. James L. Kendrick, a leader in Augusta’s Black community said, “[Thomas] has a tough relationship with his native state. “In most cases and by the standard of a lot of Black people, Justice Thomas voted to the opposite of what they felt was good,” Kendrick told the AP. “People feel betrayed by him.” During his speech, Thomas addressed public criticism and said judges should not be consumed by public opinion and said he expected “this courthouse will always be a refuge from the shifting tides of public interest.” Augusta Mayor Deke Copenhaver invited Thomas to speak and defended his decision. “Justice Thomas is a Georgia native and it’s appropriate for him to speak at the event as well,” Copenhaver said, according to the AP. “It offers a real perspective on America. People have differing views, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing.”

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A2

The Afro-American, May 28, 2011 - May 28, 2011

May 28, 2011 - June 3, 2011, The Afro-American A3

Black Fraternities Visit Cheltenham to Make a Difference

By George Barnette AFRO Staff Writer

On May 21, several local chapters of Black fraternities made the trek to Cheltenham Youth Facility in southern Prince George’s County to speak with the young men about becoming better men. “A lot of these young men definitely come from families where no one had gone to college, so we wanted to introduce them to some men who’d done that,” said Frank Malone, community service chairman of the Pi Upsilon Lambda chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha. “We have lawyers, doctors, masters of divinity and just a wide range of people to talk to the kids.” The event was Malone’s brainchild. He said that his chapter had visited the facility previously and wanted to do something bigger. “We’d been out here three times before and we reached

out to the other frats to see if they wanted to do an event with us,” Malone said. “All of the frats wanted to do it.” Members of local chapters of Kappa Alpha Psi, Omega Psi Phi, Phi Beta Sigma, Iota Phi Theta and Groove Phi Groove started meeting in February to plan the event. Then, on a sunny day in Cheltenham, the men met a group of juvenile offenders who needed the help. The members broke up into six different groups with different age groups of youth to discuss topics such as conflict resolution, self esteem, sexually transmitted diseases, respecting women and leadership. At the end, there was a free-flowing wrap-up session where speakers gave testimonies about their own life experience. Perhaps the most poignant testimony came from WPGC 95.5 on-air personality Aaron “Herkules” Graves.

Graves, who graduated from nearby Gwynn Park High School, spoke of his trials and tribulations growing up, including his run-ins with street life, surviving brain cancer and his father doubting his career choice. “I was excited. I had my first offer to work in Virginia Beach and I went to tell my parents. Do you know what my father said?” the now cancer-free Graves asked rhetorically. “He told me I was making the biggest mistake of my life.” For a while Graves too thought he’d made a mistake as he spoke of how he was on the radio and still broke. He decided to ask a friend to help him make some easy money, but that friend warned him against it. Graves took that friend’s advice and kept working and now he said his dad is his biggest fan. “My dad calls me ‘Herk’ now,” Graves said. “He tells everyone ‘My son

now,” Graves said. “He tells everyone ‘My son Courtesy photo Before starting on their day of

Courtesy photo

Before starting on their day of interacting with young men at the Cheltenham Youth Facility, members of the participating fraternities prayed for the strength and wisdom needed be of assistance and a positive influence in the situation.

Herk is on WPGC.’” It’s unclear how receptive the kids were to the message. Many times they were rowdy

and seemed preoccupied with other things. However, one thing for sure is that this will not be the last time the fraternities visit Cheltenham. “This just has to be the start,” said Eric Hollins of Iota Phi Theta. “We have to

keep coming back.” Malone said he’s hoping to do the event in the future with even more frat members. He also wants to incorporate sororities and visit a detention facility for girls as well.

Local Transportation Company Basking

Continued from A1

Alverta Lopez who serves as the company’s president. She oversees the business aspect of the company, making sure the day-to-day operations run like a well-oiled machine. “My primary function is to oversee the entire operation,” Lopez said. “Anything from billing, finance, contract management, making sure that everything is in order and that we are focused more on our customer than anything.” Lopez also mentioned how the company is always looking for ways to growth and WTTS is taking that

message seriously. So seriously that Lee has a planned trip to Africa through the African Trade Office of the Prince George’s County Economic Development Corporation (PGCEDC) to explore business opportunities their. Despite the good things the company is doing, it has faced some challenges. One major challenged came from securing small business loans. The company received a huge contract from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), but had the worse time trying

to find any banks to provide a loan to get started, despite its 8A status as a disadvantaged minority owned business. “As a member of the 8A program, the Small Business Administration (SBA) gave us a list of 100 or so banks that it’s affiliated with,” Lee said. “We went to about 30 of those banks with a package deal. The banks looked at the contract and said it was nice contract, but during that time banks weren’t loaning money.” For the first month of that commitment, WTTS

funded the contract itself

before it was able to secure

a financer. Due to that work,

the company was able to turn

a $6 million profit in 2010. Now that WTTS has been successful, the Lopez and Lee recognize they are in a position to begin to leave their legacy. “This puts us in a position to give back in the community,” Lopez said. “You’re able to help some people out here with transportation services. “You’re able to give back and it says a lot.”

Economy Gives Chills to New Grads

Continued from A1

Derhim’s classmate, Jenna Ferlise, shares some of the same concerns. “I’m nervous about getting a job [after] graduation. There [are] just

not really a lot of jobs. I feel

like you

you know somebody,” said Ferlise. According to the Department of Labor, the jobless rate for new graduates averaged 9.3 percent in 2010. For older graduates, this doubles. Where have all these jobs gone? Simply blaming the economy is not enough for people like Illinois Democrat Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. Speaking on the House floor, he recently offered his

[only] get one if

reasoning about why the job market is so bad. According to Jackson, new gadgets like the Apple iPad and Amazon’s Kindle have destroyed the book industry by putting major chain stores like Borders out of business; thus, adding to the number of lost jobs in the nation. According to the U.S Commerce Department, shipping jobs oversees has led to a huge decrease in jobs here in America. Records say American multinational companies, that employ one-fifth of total Americans employed, have decreased the number of American workers in recent years. During the 2000s 2.9 million American

workers were let go, while 2.4 million workers were hired overseas. According to the National Association of Colleges and Employers, after hitting an all-time low during the recession, the amount of new college students being hired is expected increase this year. This could be the reason why Georgetown senior Chris Kelley is not worried about his post-graduation plans. He already has them set in stone. “I am going to be working on a training floor at the Royal Bank of Scotland in Stanford, Conn.,” said Kelley. He then gave this advice:

“Be assertive. Be yourself. Don’t sell out. Do something

you want to do.” Advice for college seniors does not seem to be hard to come by. Howard’s Carol Dudley said, “Begin

first making the intellectual shift. Begin to think: ‘I am

a professional person, I’m

no longer a just a student

I am a student transforming

into a professional.’ So when

that individual begins the job

search

letter that’s being submitted to

HR professionals

that of a person who is bringing a set of skills to a professional team working on a common goal of the organization.”

the type of cover

becomes

We never run low on irony in Baltimore. Or restaurants that serve local grass-fed beef,
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markets that sell goods from local farms. It’s foodie heaven around here.
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own my own place,” get in touch. SomedayBaltimore.com Green Construction Codes Continued from A1 are all

Green Construction Codes

Continued from A1

are all here today because we understand that we are

in a fight for our children’s future,” O’Malley said in

growing ‘green’ sector is vital to our ability to create jobs and compete globally in the new economy.”

O’Malley wants to restore the Chesapeake, reduce greenhouse gases, move towards more energy efficiency and renewable energy, and increase mass transit ridership. To achieve these goals, O’Malley has signed partnerships with Delaware and Virginia to advance offshore wind development, making it a requirement that 20 percent of Maryland’s energy come from renewable sources by 2022 and adopting the Clean Cars Act in 2007 to reduce amount of greenhouse gas emissions on the state’s highways. Maryland is the first state to wholly adopt the IGCC standards. The law will take effect March 2012.

a

statement. “Maryland

Many of O’Malley’s

is

leading the nation’s

efforts in clean energy and sustainability, and our State’s

policy goals fall into the range of sustaining Maryland’s environment.

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A4 The Afro-American, May 28, 2011 - June 3, 2011

May 28, 2011 - May 28, 2011, The Afro-American A3

Parking Payments Now Just a Call Away

By Tia Lewis Special to the AFRO

Washington, D.C. motorists are now able to feed the meter simply by making a call. The new pay-by-phone-parking program allows drivers to use their mobile phones to pay for a parking space. Through the service, parkers are able to pay only for the time used and receive a text alert before the meter expires. “The system is very easy to use and makes it very easy for motorists to pay for parking, “said John Lisle, spokesman for District Department of Transportation. “It also reduces the need to carry cash to pay for parking. For the city, we believe it will help reduce the wear and tear on the physical meters and reduce our calls for service for broken meters.” In a press release, DDOT Interim Director Terry Bellamy said, “We piloted pay by phone parking in select business districts, with great

results, and now we’re ready to offer this service citywide.” So how does the program work? “Parkers must register with the vendor, Parkmobile, either online or by phone, and provide them with your credit card number, and license plate number,” said Lisle. “Then, when you park you call in or use the mobile app, key in the zone number for the block where you are parked, indicate which car you are using and how long you want to pay for. That’s it. The system will also send you a text message 15 minutes before your time expires to remind you to add more time or move your car. There is also a small transaction fee between 30 to 35 cents.” “Parkmobile users have 24/7 access to their online account; they can print reports and easily track their parking expenses,” noted Albert Bogaard, CEO of Parkmobile, in a statement. “It’s much faster and more convenient.” Customer can also download

faster and more convenient.” Customer can also download the mobile application on to their iPhone, Blackberry

the mobile application on to their iPhone, Blackberry or Android. Lisle said the new system is an alternative to the other payment options. “Pay by phone is not

intended to replace the physical meters, but rather is an overlay system. It’s not for everyone – many people still prefer to put coins in a meter – but for others who want to pay by credit card this is a simple way to do it.” Metro areas such as Foggy Bottom, Georgetown Hospital and Ballpark are already using the service. And nearby Montgomery County is implementing the pay-by- cell to 11,000 parking meters. The service was introduced in Bethesda earlier this year and Silver Spring locations were recently completed. “Pay-by-cell is an added convenience for our customers,” said Esther Bowring, public information officer of Montgomery County. “It gives [driver’s] another way to pay for parking.” First time Montgomery County users can register at www. mc.goparknow.com . Bowring says that motorists are very enthusiastic about the service. John B. Townsend, manager of

public and government affairs for AAA Mid-Atlantic characterizes the program as “E.T phone home.” “In the past, you had as much a chance of finding an empty parking space, or having enough change in your pocket to pay for parking, as you did of seeing an extra- terrestrial. Now by dialing seven numbers on your cellphone, you can pay for on-street parking metered parking spaces in the District. This is a high-tech solution to parking woes in the District.” But even with the additional payment option, the service doesn’t come without a few glitches. “The system is not perfect,” said Townsend, who added that the system is already active in other big cities including Atlanta and Seattle, and in places like Richmond and Charlotte, and 100 other cities. “In some cities, some consumers have complained they were ticketed minutes before they arrived on the scene to re-activate their meters.”

HBCU Civil Rights Lawsuit

State Argues HBCUs Not Needed

By Shernay Williams AFRO Staff Writer

“If you create a ballpark in a cornfield, it doesn’t mean the baseball players will come,” Assistant Attorney General Campbell Killefer told a federal court judge May 18 in tones of disgust. Even if Maryland were to allocate additional funding to its four HBCUs, he implied, that wouldn’t elevate their retention or graduation rates nor would it guarantee more diverse students would be attracted to the schools. The attorney, who represents the Maryland Higher Education Commission, said he was appalled at the notion that “the state is supposed to allocate its scarce resources in a field of dreams.”

Killefer had come before U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake to argue why the nearly 5-year-old case against the state that alleges it underfunds HBCUs and allows duplicate programs at traditionally White institutions (TWIs) should be dismissed. The state has filed a motion of summary judgment to have the entire case thrown out before it can head to a trial scheduled for next month. Roughly 60 spectators crowded the courtroom to witness the two-and-a-half-hour long hearing, forcing a handful of attendees to sit in vacant juror seats. Most were African Americans donning paraphernalia from the state’s HBCUs—Coppin State University, Morgan State University, Bowie State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore.

After Killefer argued his case on behalf of the state, two attorneys for the plaintiffs—the Coalition for Equity and Excellence in Higher Education and eight current students and alumni from Maryland HBCUs—countered why the case should stand trial. The plaintiff’s lawyers asserted that inequitable operational and capital projects funding coupled with duplication of specialty academic programs have widened the disparities between HBCUs and other Maryland schools. They also contended that the state never lived up to a partnership agreement established in 2000 with the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights that dictated Maryland’s HBCUs achieve parity in funding, facilities and academic program development.

But attorneys for the state argued that Maryland has “diligently performed its obligations” and “should be commended” for setting an “aspirational goal to make HBCUs comparable and competitive.” They said the plaintiffs cannot prove that the state has discriminatory practices traceable to the segregation era, and noted that the Office of Civil Rights, which monitors educational discrimination, has yet to side with the plaintiffs. ”OCR didn’t seek to intervene; they didn’t file a lawsuit,” said Killefer. “Over five years have passed with no activity from OCR. How long is long enough that presumption is that the state is right?” Insiders speculate that the federal agency decided against aligning with the plaintiffs for political reasons. In veiled statements that seemed to question the need for HBCUs, Killefer argued that 59 percent of Maryland’s Black students attend traditionally White institutions and Continued on A6

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May 28, 2011 - June 3, 2011, The Afro-American A5

Opinion

Honest Criticism is Not Betrayal; It’s Democratic

Opinion Honest Criticism is Not Betrayal; It’s Democratic Dr. Wilmer J. Leon III (TriceEdneyWire.com) - A

Dr. Wilmer J. Leon

III

(TriceEdneyWire.com) -

A very troubling pattern is

developing within certain segments of the African- American community.

There’s a concerted effort by some within the community

to silence those who are

offering honest, valid, and well thought through analysis and criticism of the Obama administration. Radio host Tom Joyner recently told his audience that those who criticize the

president are “haters” and

need to be quiet because he (President Obama) doesn’t need the Black vote to be split. On his radio program Rev. Al Sharpton recently attacked the motivations and integrity of those, myself included (full disclosure), who questioned President Obama’s willingness to meet with the CBC to discuss targeted jobs legislation. Former Princeton professor Melissa Harris-Perry recently referred to professor Cornell West’s critique of the Obama administration as “a self-aggrandizing, victimology sermon deceptively wrapped in the discourse of prophetic witness…” As these and others attack the messengers, their analysis of the relevance of the message is woefully lacking. These ad hominem attacks by Sharpton, Joyner, Harris- Perry and others, as well-intended as they may be are very dangerous to the African-American community and the democratic process. In Germany in 1933, one of the elements that brought an end to the Weimar Republic was an intolerance of dissenting opinions and vicious personal attacks on individuals who questioned the direction of the government. In 1950 McCarthyism was the order of the day; unsupported accusations of disloyalty ruined a number of careers and lives in this country. Is the African-American community in the midst of a Weimar or McCarthy moment? Anecdotally, as others in the community attempt to engage in informed debate about the dismissals of Van Jones and Shirley Sherrod, allowing the Bush era tax cuts to continue, the escalation from two military endeavors to three (Libya), lack of support for union workers in Wisconsin, and other issues, they are summarily dismissed as traitors, haters, crazy, and misinformed. Or, as professor Harris-Perry describes, “the self-appointed Black leadership class that has been largely supplanted in recent years.” What is being overlooked is the fact that honest constructive

criticism is not betrayal, it’s key to the democratic process. In

a representative democracy it is very important for citizens

to vote but voting in and of itself is not enough. Staying engaged in the process and holding your elected representatives accountable is of the utmost importance and truly demonstrates democracy in action. If an interest group is not getting what it voted for it is obligated to protest, question, and demand that it does. Tom Joyner asked, “What would it be like without a

does. Tom Joyner asked, “What would it be like without a military’s “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell”

military’s “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell” policy. To demonstrate his

support for women and feminists in America he signed the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act. Even as the tide shifts in the Middle- East, the Obama administration continues to provide unyielding support for Zionist interests in America. As the African- American community evaluates its issues and options leading into 2012 and looks at a 16.2 percent unemployment rate, why not expect President Obama to use his bully pulpit to support targeted unemployment legislation

to address this issue? In 1857 Fredrick Douglass said, “Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will. Find out just what any people will quietly submit to and you have found out the exact measure of injustice and wrong which will be imposed upon them, and these will continue till they are resisted with either words or blows, or with both.” President Obama is the one in power, therefore, the African-American community must demand from him support for its just due. For the Joyner’s, Sharpton’s, and Harris-Perry’s of the world to call for quiet submission is dangerous and a clear demonstration of the exact measure of injustice they are willing to tolerate. Honest criticism is not betrayal; it’s democratic.

Honest criticism is not betrayal; it’s democratic. Dr. Cornel West Dr. Wilmer J. Leon III is

Dr. Cornel West

Dr. Wilmer J. Leon III is a columnist with Trice Edney Wire Services. Learn more about him at www.wilmerleon.com or contact him via e-mail at wjl3us@yahoo.com or on Twitter @drwleon.

Black man in office?” followed by

the statement, “If you don’t support him it will be much worse.” It must be clearly understood that having an African American in the Oval Office is not in and of itself a victory. Without substantive and measurable

policy outputs that benefit the African- American community, the ethnic makeup of the president is irrelevant. Also, is the “…it will be much worse” statement supposed to be a comparison to Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), Sarah Palin, Newt Gingrich, Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.) or some other neo-conservative reactionary politician? If so, why should African Americans assess success by comparisons to the worst for us instead of policy outputs that are the best for us? The critics of President Obama are not comparing him to some baseless abstract standard. In most instances they are comparing Obama to Obama. He pledged to close the prison at Guantanamo Bay, pledged to fight for the public option, pledged to end the Bush-era tax cuts and pledged to give “change we can believe in.” Many are claiming the more things change the more they look like Bush. To demonstrate his support to the Hispanic community

“Without substantive and measurable policy outputs that benefit the African-American community, the ethnic makeup of the president is irrelevant.”

the ethnic makeup of the president is irrelevant.” Tom Joyner Courtesy Photos Rev. Al Sharpton President

Tom Joyner

Courtesy Photos

the president is irrelevant.” Tom Joyner Courtesy Photos Rev. Al Sharpton President Obama nominated the first

Rev. Al Sharpton

President Obama nominated the first Hispanic female Supreme Court Justice and supports the Hispanic communities call for comprehensive immigration reform by saying, “I want to work with Republicans and Democrats to protect our borders, to enforce our laws and also to address the status of millions of undocumented workers.” To demonstrate his support to the gay/lesbian community, President Obama supported ending the

Venezuela’s African Roots

Modesto Ruiz

In Black in Latin America, a four-part series

that recently aired on PBS, Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. uncovered a side of

the region that has long been known but for just as long hidden

– the African heritage of many of its people. Gates traveled to

the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Cuba, Mexico, Peru, and Brazil for the important series, exploring how Africa has helped shape Latin America from its time of independence to the current day. Though he didn’t focus on it, Venezuela is another country with deep African roots and a significant Afro-descendent population that has long struggled with a legacy of racism that left many Afro-Venezuelans behind their Whiter countrymen. Between the 16th and 19th centuries, an estimated 100,000 enslaved Africans were brought to Venezuela, where they worked as slaves on coffee and cacao plantations. Slavery was abolished in 1854, but freedom did not bring equality. Racism continued to flourish in Venezuela throughout most of the 20th century, and African heritage was denied through an emphasis on racial mixing. In this scheme, African heritage was devalued to such an extent that state policies sought to “whiten” the population through European immigration. Venezuela, like many other Latin American countries, used the idea of the mestizo to uphold a myth of racial democracy that denied the fact that rampant discrimination on the basis of skin color and African identity took place. As a consequence of Venezuela’s historic legacy of racism, Afro-Venezuelans have long suffered the brunt of the country’s poverty, while their cultural and historic contributions have been ignored or set aside. Since President Hugo Chavez’s first election to the presidency in 1998, this has gradually started to change. Not only has Chavez acknowledged and celebrated his own African roots – “I’m so proud to have this mouth and this hair,

because it’s African,” he told Amy Goodman of “Democracy Now” in 2005 – but he has worked with Afro-Venezuelan organizations to implement policies that address and confront the country’s legacy of racism. Over the last 12 years, Afro-Venezuelans have gained a number of significant achievements, ranging from the recognition of intercultural education in the 1999 Constitution to a law against racial discrimination that the Venezuelan National Assembly will approve this month. In 2005, Chavez, the first president to appoint an Afro- Venezuelan to his executive cabinet, approved a decree establishing a commission to abolish all forms of racial

Afro-Venezuelans put the number at more than 7 million, or roughly a quarter of Venezuela’s population. Additionally, Venezuela has also dramatically expanded ties to Caribbean and started to consolidate the relationship with African nations. In the Caribbean, Venezuela is helping ease the energy burden faced by many countries through a plan called PetroCaribe, which provides countries with oil at

preferential financing rates. Venezuela also remains actively involved in the reconstruction of Haiti by providing aid and forgiving hundreds of million of dollars in debts. In Africa, Venezuela has opened 18 new embassies in countries including Mali, Morocco, Congo, Angola, and many more. President Chavez is often

“ Afro-Venezuelans

have long suffered the brunt of the country’s

criticized for supposedly limiting Venezuela’s democracy, but his actions with regards to

poverty, while their cultural and historic contributions have been

ignored or set aside.”

the country’s Afro-Venezuelan population shows just the opposite. Unlike Venezuelan politicians before him, Chavez is expanding the definition of what democracy means and what it is to be Venezuelan, and the rights associated with it. Of course, a historic legacy of racism as long as Venezuela’s won’t be corrected in only a few years, much less will it come without a fight. But Venezuela has taken the first steps towards recognizing and celebrating its African heritage – and treating Afro-Venezuelans as they central part of the country’s identity that they are.

Modesto Ruiz is an Afro-Venezuelan and a member of Venezuela’s National Assembly, where he chairs the subcommittee that deals with issues related to Afro- Venezuelans.

discrimination from Venezuela’s educational system. That same year, the National Assembly officially designated May 10 as Afro-Venezuelan Day and the entire month as a celebration of African heritage. Furthermore, massive social programs focused on education and health have given Afro-Venezuelans more opportunities than ever before, and a 2009 law on education requires that schools teach the history of the country’s Afro-Venezuelans. This year, Venezuela’s census will for the first time include questions where respondents can specifically identify themselves as Afro-descendent, allowing for the country’s Afro-Venezuelan population to be formally quantified and recognized and its problems addressed. Current estimates of

A6 The Afro-American, May 28, 2011 - June 3, 2011

A4

The Afro-American, May 28, 2011 - May 28, 2011

HBCUs

Continued from A4

in the past, the University of Maryland College Park offered scholarships for Blacks to attend the school.

Coalition attorney Karen Walker countered that “it is not enough to say you have race- neutral policies.” “The state has not satisfied its burden, she said, that it has dismantled the vestiges of segregation. Although several

historically Black institutions (HBIs) have garnered additional state funding in recent years, the coalition’s attorneys assert that the institutions have yet to receive enough resources to level the playing field and compete against TWIs after decades of

scant funding. “Even 25 years of favorable funding does not suffice to dismantle the dual system if it does not yet allow the HBIs to provide an education today free of stigma of past discrimination,” said Walker.

Their financial analyst estimates that upwards of

$2 billion was collectively withheld from the state’s HBCUs between 1984 and

2009.

Killefer discredited the expert, citing that he “may be clever but is intellectually

citing that he “may be clever but is intellectually dishonest” because he used outdated figures—from 2000

dishonest” because he used outdated figures—from 2000 to 2005—to calculate the funding discrepancies. Despite Killefer’s feelings towards the expert, Walker said state funding levels are driven by admission, and schools boasting more sophisticated programs often receive more money, which poses a problem for HBCUs who struggle to maintain unique, high-demand programs. Supreme Court rulings have forced states to wipe out duplicate academic programs, which were rooted in the segregation era, but the plaintiffs’ attorneys argue that the state has allowed TWIs to offer specialized programs that were unique to HBCUs. It’s caused Whites to leave Blacks schools to enroll in other institutions, exacerbating the lack of diversity at HBCUs. According to coalition attorney John Greenbaum, HBCUs are more segregated today than they were in the

1970s.

“HBCUs cannot desegregate because they don’t have unique programs, operation funding or the facilities to compete,” he said. As a prime example, attorneys pointed to a joint master’s in business administration degree program established at Towson University and the University of Baltimore in 2005 that mirrors a Morgan State program. Greenbaum said since desegregation, the state has opted to enrich younger schools, including Towson and UMBC, at faster rates than Blacks schools, allowing them to surpass HBCUs in resources, edifices and enrollment. “Yes, you’ve done something for HBCUs, but you have done more for the TWIs.” Killefer said the Towson program was the only program duplication instated in a 10-year span. A “dramatically different and better Maryland exists than during segregation,” he said. “Maryland is not Mississippi,” he said roughly. “It’s not Alabama in the 1970s and ‘80s, and if the plaintiffs think that, they are drinking some kind of Kool Aid.” But according to Greenbaum, “state action continues to foster all the elements that affect student choice and make students want to attend other schools.” Judge Blake said she will rule “as soon as possible” on whether the case should proceed to before a jury. With her say-so, a six-week trial would begin June 27.

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May 2011

SENIORGUIDE

a g u i d e

t o

s e n i o r

l i v i n g

f o r

t h e

a c t i v e

a f r i c a n

a m e r i c a n

Staycations Can Be Fun Too

By Joi-Marie McKenzie Spring has finally sprung and that could only mean one thing, summer
By Joi-Marie McKenzie
Spring has finally sprung and that could only mean
one thing, summer is around the corner. And while many
think summer means out-of-town vacations, there is
plenty to do in Maryland that could keep anyone busy.
Staycations are perfect for mature adults and seniors
who may be low on expendable income or want to stay
close to home for medical
or mobility reasons. Still,
vacationing in your back
Cinema’s and the Amish Farmer’s Market. Also, National
Harbor in Prince George’s County offers dining, hotel
accommodations and shopping. It also offers a wide range
of sightseeing and boat tours in the marina.
Getting Cultured
Maryland is rich in history, especially African-
American history. Whether
you’re dying to see the
birthplace of “The Star-
yard can be
entertaining,
while saving
you a few
dollars.
Whether
you’re into
shopping
trips, live
concerts,
nature walks
or historical
tours,
Maryland
offers it all.
The Alex Haley
Memorial in
Annapolis is one
of many African-
American
cultural sites in
the state.
throughout the state, is awesome, and we’re also the
birthplace of Harriett Tubman,” says Camila Clark of
the Maryland Office of Tourism. “So if you are looking
for opportunities to actually walk in the footsteps of
prominent African Americans who were actually here in
Maryland there are certainly great ways to do it.”
The Maryland Office of Official Tourism also offers
tours of the Alex Haley Memorial where Kunta Kinte’s
plaque lays and the home of Frederick Douglass, who
lived in Talbot County. You can also take a tour of the
largest African-American museum on the East Coast,
the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African
American History and Culture in
downtown Baltimore.
Health and Wellness
Nothing says vacation like
relaxation. Maryland is home to
plenty of spas, bed and breakfasts
and retreats to help you block out
busy city
The Assateague
ponies are always an
awe-inspiring sight.
life. In
Baltimore
Water, Sand
and Sun
When
you think of
Maryland,
you don’t
necessarily
think of the
beach
because it
The Inn at Perry Cabin is a luxurious
manor house resort and spa in St.
Michaels, Md. The colonial mansion
exudes calm and elegance, the perfect
hideaway.
Photos Courtesy
Maryland Office of
Tourism
doesn’t have
many. Still, there are plenty of breathtaking
harbors that allow for beach-like relaxation
and a fresh breeze. Baltimore’s Inner
Harbor not only boasts top notch restaurants
including Phillips Seafood, McCormick and
Schmick’s and The Oceanaire, it also has the
one of the best attractions in Charm City, the
The Maryland State
Fair, an 11-day event
held every year in
Timonium, Md., is
one of several annual
festivals that van be
enjoyed throughout
the summer.
Year-
round
fly fishing can
be enjoyed on
the Chesapeake
waters.
And if you’re willing to travel an hour

National Aquarium. Baltimore isn’t the only city to have a scenic harbor. Annapolis Harbour Center not only has breathtaking vistas, it also has light shopping, Bow Tie

Spangled Banner” or the home of Frederick Douglass, it’s all just around the

corner. “The Underground Railroad Network to Freedom, which takes you through African-American sites

City, there are several spas that offer facials, massages, hot stone treatments as well as manicures and pedicures. Round up your girlfriends or the guys to relax at Red Door Spa at Cross Keys, About Faces Salon and Spa Sante, which all offer the best in tranquility and treatments right in your own backyard.

down the road, Chesapeake Beach Resort and Spa offers the best in relaxation right on the Chesapeake Bay. With balcony hotel accommodations to see the best of the bay, you can also enjoy a full service spa, two restaurants and an outdoor café. There are also

Continued on B2

Caregivers in Need of Care Too

By Kyle Taylor

and adult daycare services have forced families to care for loved ones on their own. “I would say that it has become a growing necessity over the last 10 years or so,” said Joanne Williams, director of the Baltimore County Department of Aging,

very costly; those in need of care can exhaust their financial resources very quickly.” Many families choose to keep their elderly loved ones at home instead of sending them to an assisted living facility for a number of reasons, including financial strains and distrust of third-party caretakers, Williams said. Bill Fralin, a certified elder law attorney with the Estate Planning & Elder Law Firm, said it is usually a combination of both of those factors. “With an aging population and with the cost of care sky rocketing, with a lot of families it makes sense keeping them at home,” Fralin said. “No one’s going to give better care than a family member. If you can get that situation, it can work well. People want to stay home – no one gets up and says, ‘I want to go to a nursing home.’” But being a caregiver is no easy task, and there is increasing support for the idea of compensating care providers. There are several options for doing this, with the most obvious being that

the parent or client being cared for pay the person taking care of them. In this

scenario, it is prudent to have a personal care agreement in place, experts say. “It’s a good idea to write down what the job descriptions are,” said Fralin. “That way they know

Continued on B2

One day a week, Janice Faulkner has another job to go to once she leaves her full-time job for the day. This

second job doesn’t pay anything, but is an essential part of her weekly routine. Faulkner is one of an estimated 70 million Americans who take care of an elderly relative or friend without compensation, either in that person’s home or in their own, according to an AARP estimate. In Faulkner’s case, she and her eight siblings take turns caring for their mother. Though her mother suffers from dementia, Faulkner said she is extremely self-reliant. Faulkner and her siblings, however, still make it their business to assist her regularly. “All nine of us take turns taking care of her,” said Faulkner. “My mother is 95 years old and we make sure that she’s never left alone.” Because she has help, Faulkner is spared many of the burdens that can come with caring for an elderly relative.

According to AARP, two-thirds of caregivers in the United States work outside of the home, forcing them to

juggle caregiving and work-related responsibilities. Many are forced to turn down job opportunities, take an early retirement, or quit their jobs altogether. The rising costs of nursing homes

their jobs altogether. The rising costs of nursing homes Stock Image There is a growing campaign

Stock Image

There is a growing campaign to compensate the men and women who provide unpaid

care to the elderly.

of having family member caregivers. “In-home aide, adult daycare services and assisted living care can be

B2

SENIORGUIDE

The Afro-American, May 2011

African Americans Shun Hospice Care

By Tia Lewis

African Americans are 34 percent less likely than Caucasians to receive hospice services in the District of Columbia, according to research by Capital Caring (formerly known as Capital Hospice), a hospice provider since

1977.

terminal illness.” Hodges added, “The notion of failing God, abandoning one’s faith and redemptive suffering are all real issues in the African-American community. Couched in all of

this is ‘God’s will’ and his ability to heal. Many African Americans believe that

Stock Photo
Stock Photo

“They would rather rely on God’s divine intervention and accept whatever hap- pens than live a life that can truly be enhanced by quality care, even in the presence of a terminal illness.”

God will heal them so there is obviously no need to become involved in ‘terminal care,’ which is the way hospice is viewed.” These misconceptions prevent many African Americans from receiving proper help during a difficult time, experts said. “African Americans won’t experience the same quality of life at this phase that others do because hospice isn’t something they elected. This means that there will be less support at a time when families often need it the most,” added Davis. Recent statistics show that in the District, 42 percent of African-American deaths occur before age 65, compared with 23 percent of Caucasian deaths. The most common causes of death for District African Americans younger than 65 are cancer, heart disease, and AIDS. “These are diseases that commonly benefit from hospice services,” Davis said. Julia Jones, a two-year resident of Capital Caring,

In a 2011 case study, “Closing the Gap in Hospice Care for African Americans in Washington, D.C,” researchers found that while more African Americans are receiving hospice care, the disproportion between Caucasians and African Americans continues. The leading reason for this disparity “is the fact that our society still is not always as culturally sensitive as we should be in speaking about these issues with a population that has a natural reason to be distrustful based on an unfortunate legacy of racism in our nation,” stated Malene Davis, CEO and president of Capital Caring. “While we have made progress as a society in this regard, there is still much to be done in the way of communicating effectively with African-American families.” Dr. Glenda Hodges, associate director of hospital support services at Howard University Hospital, believes a spiritual disconnect contributes to the gap. “Most African Americans integrate their religious beliefs into their personal health issues,” she said. “For some reason, they feel that if they accede to hospice

care, they are ‘giving up’ on their faith and spiritual connection. They would rather rely on God’s divine intervention and accept whatever happens than live a life that can truly be enhanced by quality care, even in the presence of a

was advised by her doctor to live in a hospice because of her disability. Jones says the facility is excellent but believes most African Americans shun hospice care because of the negative perception. “They associate

Staycations

Continued from B1

plenty of golf resorts just thirty minutes outside of the city including Turf Valley Resort in Ellicott City that also offers a spa and dining.

Whether it’s a day at the harbor or a day at the spa, a staycation may just be what you need to take some time off. Also, if you look close enough in your own backyard, you’ll find that Maryland offers the best in live concerts, shopping

that Maryland offers the best in live concerts, shopping and resorts. Instead of running across the

and resorts. Instead of running across the country to find something to do, why not head downtown and experience what you’ve been missing. In the meantime, you’ll also save a few bucks for your next big trip.

The most important thing to make sure your staycation is done right is to make your plans feel like an actual vacation. That means leaving your laptop at home or staying off your cell phone. Do all of the things that you would normally do

cell phone. Do all of the things that you would normally do hospice with death, and

hospice with death, and we as a race don’t like to be reminded of imminent death,” said Jones. Other myths are that hospice care is expensive and that the facilities lack proper resources and provide limited access to its patients. Dr. Hodges believes these major misconceptions stem from unfamiliarity and miseducation about the industry. “The term ‘hospice’ engenders negative connotations for most African Americans and as such, the notion of hospice needs to be redefined in our community in order that African Americans can benefit from this useful service,” she said. “Unfortunately, most African Americans die tragic deaths of little or no quality care because of their misconceptions regarding hospice care.

Additionally, our ‘end of life’ supports systems are almost nonexistent because of unfounded and unrealistic myths.”

A study by the National Hospice and Palliative Care

Organization found that between 2002 and 2009, the total number of U.S. patients who used hospice increased from 885,000 to an estimated 1.56 million, a 76 percent increase, but less than half of the patients who are medically eligible for hospice care use it. Davis said that her company is actively working to alleviate many of the negative connotations associated with the industry and hopes that more African Americans use the service. ‘We at Capital Caring are taking some bold steps to ensure that more African-American families easily access our care. First, we held the APPEAL Training in collaboration with Duke University, a two-day long professional development program for local health care professionals, which seeks to improve care for African Americans. Second, we have changed our name from ‘Capital Hospice’ to ‘Capital Caring’ to remove any barriers to care, including fear of the word ‘hospice’ by some. Third, we have enhanced our services to include Care Navigation, Palliative Care (pain and symptom management), and Point of Hope Loss Counseling. We believe patients and families need support throughout the entire disease process.” Jones encouraged hospices to seek out patients who need their help by passing out brochures or giving it directly to them.

For more information about Capital Caring go to www.capitalcaring.org or call 1-855-571-5700.

on a vacation like forgetting about chores, finally finishing that book you’ve been reading all winter and

Caregivers

Continued from B1

splurging on those extra calories at dinner. It is your vacation, so don’t forget to enjoy it!

what they will be doing for the person and what

the compensation will be. The contract should clearly delineate what the duties are and who’s going to be involved. ”

If a relative pays a caregiver without a pre-existing

agreement in place, Fralin warned that the money may

be legally viewed as a gift, and can possibly make the relative being cared for ineligible for Medicaid.

In cases with multiple relatives caring for a family

member, Fralin recommended having someone with power of attorney who can make the decisions on that relative’s behalf. Caregivers also have other avenues in seeking financial assistance for taking care of a loved one. In some states, Medicaid runs a program called “Cash and Counseling,” which pays seniors directly to cover their in-home care. The amount of money the senior receives is dependent on a Medicaid assessment of need and the

prevailing pay rate for in-home care aides in that specific state. Seniors can then use the money to pay the family member to provide care. Local Medicaid, social services, or human services offices have more information on the program and similar ones.

If the senior being cared for has long-term care

insurance, it is possible for a caregiver to receive payments. If the senior receives monthly in-home care benefits, that money can be used to pay his/her caregiver. The federal government has also attempted to assist caregivers as well. In late 2010, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded grants totaling approximately $2.25 million to a number of states to implement the Lifespan Respite Care Program. Though caregivers will not receive any monetary benefits from the program, its goal is to provide temporary relief to caregivers and reduce the strain that comes with caring for a relative in need. Faulkner said her family has a meeting every two months at which they discuss her mother’s finances relating to medical bills and her house. As far as receiving state or federal assistance, Faulkner said the family is fortunate not to have that need right now. “We’ve never checked into getting money because we’ve never had the need to,” Faulkner said. “My mother is blessed – she’s never been in the hospital except for when she had us as babies. So why should we take money when someone else who needs it can use it?”

May 2011, The Afro-American

SENIORGUIDE

B3

Something New ‘Faceover’: Mission Accomplished Baltimore senior gives first-person account of her trip to the
Something New
‘Faceover’: Mission Accomplished
Baltimore senior gives first-person account of her
trip to the ‘wild’ side
By Rev. Dorothy S. Boulware
Yes, that’s makeup on my face. I
know it looks strange to people who
know me and are used to being greeted
without the bat of an eyelash. Sure,
most women begin to wear makeup,
at least clandestinely, as soon as their
mothers forbid it. But I didn’t. And
when I did delve into it, I discovered
my skin would be sensitive to most
things. Makeup was one thing I could
easily avoid.
But I figured with new technology
in all areas, it might be worth a second
chance. And who’s to say a woman
of a certain age can’t try new things.
for your natural colors, and then
incorporate the colors of your outfit,”
Almateen said, as she adjusted lighting
and narrowed down her pallet.
She was not at all offended at my
regular Oil of Olay soap and Aveeno
lotion regimen, and even said my skin
was beautiful – couldn’t leave that
little tidbit out. So she offered me a
bar stool that looked like a chair for a
princess and set to work.
First, the cleansing. Then, an herbal
astringent to complete the cleaning.
“It sets your face up to receive the
makeup,” she instructed as she went
along.
Foundation. Mascara. Look up.
I know the Twitter waves won’t be
crowded with tweets of my colorful
face, but, why not?
So a friend recommended a friend,
professional makeup artist Roshe
Almateen, who shared with me
the kind hospitality of her friends,
wedding coordinator, Mozell and her
husband, photographer Jerry Scott-
Bey. It was a beautiful home that
whispered “welcome” and screamed
“artists live here” and was the perfect
surrounding to make me at ease for my
debut “faceover.”
Not only do models and brides
benefit from Almateen’s artistry, she
trains others in
the profession
using her own
line of Roshe
Cosmetics. Her
renowned skills
have opened doors
for her to work
as lead artist on
television and film
settings. Having
gained knowledge
of people’s
beauty needs,
Almateen has done
corporate training
for cosmetic
executives around
the country. So
Look all the way up. Lip liner. Lip
coloring. At this point, as she surveyed
the land to be sure everything was just
right, she looked at my eyes and hers
got larger. “Let’s put on eyelashes,”
she said. And as I searched for my
usual “No,” I realized she wasn’t
waiting for my response anyway. She
was selecting the right set.
“Why not go all the way?” she said.
I could find no reason to argue.
Honestly, it felt like the “little girl”
days of playing dress-up. And, I have
to say I was really pleased with the
outcome. I did a double-take to make
sure it was my own face smiling back
in the mirror.
When the
deed was done,
we retired
to the Scott-
Beys’ perfectly
landscaped
backyard,
nature’s own
photo studio
complete with
a gazebo and
sculpted garden
for background.
With just a
few shots and
adjustments to
poses, my debut
I knew I was in
was captured for
posterity. Will
capable hands.
I do this again?
I watched as
she set up her
tools – numerous
brushes, tubes,
pallets, mirrors
– and wondered
Photo by Jerry Scott-Bey
The Rev. Dorothy
Boulware, who usually
eschews makeup, got
a beauty makeover with dramatic results.
Maybe. Will I
purchase products
to do it myself?
Maybe. Will I
paint my face
every day? No
what on Earth she
was going to do to my face. Actually,
way.
But the session was fun, thanks to
it was great fun. While she worked
Almateen.
her magic, I watched digital shows of
Jerry’s photos of Mozell’s weddings
and Almateen’s makeup.
I asked what she meant when she
said my complexion calls for “cool”
Check out Almateen’s website at roshecosmetics.
com, e-mail her at roshecosmetics@gmail.com or call
443-226-2870. Contact planning specialist, Mozell
Scott-Bey at xquisitelyours@aol.com, xquisiteaffair.
com or call 410-258-4926. Contact photographer
Jerry Scott-Bey at scottbeyphotography.com or call
colors
burgundy, plum. “I look
410-542-5332.
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Beauty

Au Naturale!

By Joi-Marie McKenzie

Whether your hair is short, long, dark brown or grey, it’s probably not what it used to be. As we mature our hair gets drier and thinner. Still, that doesn’t mean you have to let go of your crown of glory. Have you considered going natural? Many older African- American women are now letting go of the “creamy crack,” or chemical relaxers for a number of reasons. “It’s convenient and it takes some nerve to do it,” says Evelyn Archie, 76, a retired pre-school teacher. “But I’ve found that it’s a lot easier.” Imagine not having to go to a hair salon every six weeks for a touch up. Also, think of the amount of money you’ll save by not getting a chemical straightener. Going natural isn’t for every mature woman, but for those considering it, here are some tips to help you transition.

Snip, Snip!

Going natural at any age can be a tedious process. Still, the transition can be quite easy if you’re not afraid to go short. Don’t worry; you don’t have to cut off your entire perm to go natural. The easiest way to transition from chemical to natural hair is to keep

hair at a short length – a bob is short enough – while pressing the new growth with either a flat iron or straightening comb. Eventually, your perm will be cut out as your hair grows. This could take up to three to six months. Still,

if you’re bold enough, cut it all off! It can be freeing and a great way to show your commitment to your new look. Also, cutting your hair is great if it’s thinning.

Embrace the Greys

As we mature, grey or white hair is inevitable, but going natural also means

Stock Photo
Stock Photo

no more coloring. Still, to make sure your hair is that perfect shade of white, try using a shampoo with a blue or violet color. This helps neutralize any yellowing tones that may be on the hair follicle. Clairol’s Shimmer Lights or SoSilver Shampoo by Matrix will help keep your hair shining bright!

Twist It Up!

Natural hair doesn’t just mean rocking an afro anymore. There are plenty of jazzy styles to keep you looking beautiful for that special occasion. Two strand twists are great for women with natural hair because the curl holds better, and it’s easy. Simply apply a light gel or cream to the base of the hair and firmly begin to twist until

the end. You won’t need any rubber bands; the hair will curl up if it’s natural. Then use a hair dryer to dry twists. Flat twists are also a fun alternative. Although they may look like cornrows, they’re easier on the hair because the hair is simply twisted. Ladies, avoid wearing dreadlocks or Sisterlocks as those styles can lead to bald spots for mature women.

Overall, if you’re healthy on the inside then your hair will be healthy too. Make sure your diet is full of protein including fish, eggs, beans and yogurt, to ensure your hair is full and shiny. With these few steps, you’ll definitely be on your way to a simple more carefree hairstyle.

For the Men

Fellas, we couldn’t leave you out! Maintaining healthy hair and scalp is ever important as you mature. Not only are you fighting going grey but bald spots are more prevalent in men. Here are some hair styles to keep you looking suave and have people second guessing themselves saying, “Is that Billy Dee Williams?”

Keep it Close: Ask your barber for a close shave. Keeping your hair close to the scalp makes it a lot easier to mask growing bald spots. Also, it’s a no-fuss solution and is the perfect hairstyle for any occasion, whether you’re attending a wedding or playing cards with friends.

Baby ‘Fro: A well-maintained afro is always in style, so why not put a contemporary twist on a vintage look? Grow your hair out no more than one to 2 inches. Also, be sure to keep your hair moisturized, especially as you mature. Use a conditioner at least once a week.

2 inches. Also, be sure to keep your hair moisturized, especially as you mature. Use a
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May 28, 2011 - June 3, 2011, The Afro-American C1

On May 1, in the elegance of Camelot in Upper Marlboro, Md., the Prince George’s
On May 1, in the elegance of Camelot in Upper Marlboro,
Md., the Prince George’s County Delta Alumnae Foundation in
partnership with the Prince George’s County Alumnae Chapter of
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, formally introduced 18 young ladies
to society during the 2011 Jabberwock Cotillion. This fabulously
elegant and formal affair marked the culmination of months of
instruction and preparation filled with cultural, educational, and
social experiences led by committee chairwomen Tonda Price, Ebony
Cross, Michelle Howard and Darlene Richards. With 500 guests
in attendance, local NBC News 4 television general assignment
reporter and member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Tracee Wilkins
served as the mistress of ceremonies.
After a magical evening of ballroom dancing, exquisite
cuisine, formal introductions, meticulously choreographed
curtsies and endlessly flashing cameras, an unforgettable
moment joyfully erupted with Shannon Constance Anderson
being officially crowned Miss Jabberwock 2011. The daughter of
Drs. Felton and Carol Anderson, Shannon is a senior at Bishop
McNamara High School. She plans to attend Spelman College in
the fall where she will major in chemical engineering.
Rounding out the Miss Jabberwock Court were Alani Nelson,
first runner-up; Chelsie Stevens, second runner-up and Caryne
Moses, third runner-up. Taneya Marie Minor, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Charles Minor Jr. was crowned Little Miss Jabberwock
2011. Runner-ups were Kendal Ballentine, Celena Major and
Kaylin Nichols.
All of the 2011 Miss and Little Miss Jabberwock participants
Miss Jabberwock Shannon Anderson
(second from left); first runner-up,
Miss Jabberwock Shannon Anderson
Alani Nelson; second runner-up,
and her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Felton
Chelsie Stevens and third runner up
Anderson
The 2011 Miss Jabberwock escorts
Chapter President
Diane Venable
Little Miss Jabberwock
Taneya Minor and her
Tracee Wilkins, emcee, reporter
parents, Mr. and Mrs.
for NBC 4 news and her guest,
Little Miss Jabberwock, Taneya Minor and her court, Kendal
Charles F. Minor Jr.
Rex Lightning
Ballentine, Celena Major and Kaylin Nichols
Drs. Kevin and Debra Ford, parents of
Miss Jabberwock 2009, Courtney Ford
Tracee Wilkins, NBC 4 News; Edgar Brookins, Washington
Jabberwock chairwomen Ebony Love
Afro-American Newspaper; Renee Allen, USDA and Norma
Cross, Tonda Price, Darlene Richards
Former Miss Jabberwock and Little Miss Jabberwock winners
Hatot, chapter member
and Michelle Howard
By Cadet Tyra Davenport
Special to the AFRO
Entry of the Official Party
Cadets and their guests in the receiving line
With all the pomp and circumstance
steeped in military tradition, the Army
ROTC cadets of the Howard University Bison
Battalion hosted their 2011 Spring Military
Ball at the luxurious Hilton Crystal City
Hotel in Arlington, Va.
The evening was filled with an air of
hope for the future and satisfaction as
cadets, cadre and guests came together
to toast the achievements of the school
year and recognize the dedication and
commitment of the students as reflected
by this year’s cadet battalion. Under the
leadership of Maj. Tyra Sellers, department
chairwoman and battalion commander and
cadet/Lt. Col. Albert Jenkins along with
the cadet staff, planned and executed an
evening consisting of a social hour, official
receiving line; presentation of colors and
singing of the national anthem and the
traditional military toasts.
After a sumptuous dinner, the
highlight of the evening came when
Brig. Gen. Gwendolyn Bingham, 51st
Quartermaster General Commandant, U.S.
Army Quartermaster school, Fort Lee, Va.,
brought inspirational words that could be
summed up in these words, “reach for the
moon and beyond” and “stay focused on
your dreams.”
After a rousing applause for the guest
speaker, several cadets were recognized for
their outstanding achievements. The dance
floor was then opened and the cadets
begin to groove to the deejay’s music.
The official receiving line
Photos by Rob Roberts
Capt. (promotable) Brian Sansom, Cadet/Capt. Jawaan
Thomas, Maj. Duane Dickerson and Maj. Tyra S. Sellers,
Wendall B. McClellan, Army Reserves
department chairwoman and battalion commander
ambassador; Brig. Gen. Gwen Bingham,
Dr. Patrick Bingham and Col. Novell
Coots, commander, Walter Reed Army
Medical Health Center
Presentation of colors by the
U.S. Army Military District of
Washington Honor Guard
Maj. Tyra Sellers,
department
chairwoman
Cadets say, “It’s time to party.” Let the music begin.
and battalion
Cadets Jones and McDonald
commander,
win PlayStation 3
gives opening
remarks.
Master Sgt. Ivory Hallmon
and his wife, Amber
Current leaders and future leaders: Maj. Tyra Sellers, Col. Sharon
Singleton, Cadet Kyra Davenport, Brig. Gen. Gwen Bingham, Cadet
Latasha Turner and Cadet Alonza Pamplin
MSgt. Hallmon (left) and Maj. Sellers
present gifts to Dr. Bingham and Brig.
Gen. Bingham, the guest speaker
These cadets were recognized for their outstanding achievements during the 2010/2011
Cadets and their guests: Ahmeen Muhammed,
Rendering toasts to President
school year.
Justin Keyes, Camelle March, Katie French and
Barack Obama, the U.S. Army, fallen
James Tskesdones
comrades and the beautiful
ladies
Photos by Danita Delaney and Wedonna Morris

C2

The Afro-American, May 28, 2011 - June 3, 2011

Community

District Native Awarded Fulbright for Overseas Teaching

District Native Awarded Fulbright for Overseas Teaching Brittany Carroll (Courtesy Photo) Special to the AFRO Elon

Brittany Carroll

(Courtesy Photo)

Special to the AFRO

Elon University senior Brittany Carroll has been awarded a Fulbright grant that will fund a year of teaching in Taiwan in 2011-12. Carroll was one of three Elon seniors awarded a Fulbright this spring, the largest number of students in university history to receive the honor in the same academic year. The 2011 Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship will allow the Washington, D.C., native to teach

English and sharpen her own skills in Mandarin Chinese. The international studies and political science double major plans to pursue a career in international affairs. Her research interests at Elon have been on oil relations between Asian and African nations, and on international education for special needs children in Asia and Africa. “The Fulbright Teaching assistantship for Taiwan will not only afford me the opportunity to uniquely represent my

country, but also fulfill my passion for intercultural exchange, by improving my foreign language proficiency and really understanding the heart of Taiwanese culture,” said Carroll, an Asian studies minor, in a prepared statement. “It would be an absolute honor to devote my time and energy in embracing another culture, but also shedding a light to others on the rich diversity within America.” Outside of the classroom, Carroll remains active with the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority,

serving as its treasurer, historian and corresponding secretary. She is a member of the Periclean Scholars, is

involved with the Elon University Orchestra, and sings alto in the Elon University Gospel Choir. Carroll is the daughter of Jerry and Bonnie Linen-Carroll of Washington, D.C. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of State and administered by the Institute of International Education, the Fulbright was established in 1946 by Congress to “enable the government of the United States to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries.” Since its establishment under legislation introduced by the late U.S. Sen. J. William Fulbright of Arkansas, the Fulbright Program has given approximately 300,000 students, scholars, teachers, artists, and scientists the opportunity to study, teach and conduct research, exchange ideas and contribute to finding solutions to shared international concerns.

(Courtesy Photo)

Pictured (front row) from left, Paul Butler, major gifts officer; Gains Hawkins, vice president of institutional advancement; Veronique Diriker, director of development; and Dr. Nicholas Blanchard, dean of the School of Pharmacy and Health Professions; all of UMES, were presented with a check for $10,000 by Walgreens Delaware South Pharmacy Supervisor Don Holst and Delaware South District Manager Craig Clarke. Students in UMES’ inaugural Pharm. D. Program class pictured (back row) from left are Sarian Bangura, Ashley Lawrance, DeAngelo Price and Michael Geesaman. The gift is part of the company’s annual Diversity Initiative Program which awards $1 million to pharmacy schools across the country.

awareness in diversity and community outreach. Additional funds will support programs at the institution that increase the enrollment and retention of students with diverse talents and backgrounds. “We take pride in the diversity within our company and our community,” Walgreens Delaware South District Manager Craig Clark said in a statement. “The program presents an opportunity to promote this within schools of pharmacy.”

Continued on C4

Walgreens Donates $10,000 To UMES School of Pharmacy

on C4 Walgreens Donates $10,000 To UMES School of Pharmacy By AFRO Staff Walgreens, the largest

By AFRO Staff

Walgreens, the largest drugstore chain

in the nation, recently donated $10,000 to the University of Maryland Eastern Shore’s School of Pharmacy and Health Professions. As part of their annual commitment, the company donates funds totaling to $1 million

to numerous pharmacy schools across the country. “We recognize the significant contribution the university makes in fostering the educational development of future pharmacy leaders,” Walgreens Delaware South Pharmacy Supervisor Don Holst said in a statement. According to Holst, a portion of the funds will

jumpstart the creation of a Walgreens Diversity Scholarship to a student whose efforts raised

Area Teen Youngest U. of Baltimore Grad

By AFRO Staff

Well over 600 graduates walked across the stage at the University of Baltimore’s annual commencement on May 15 and among them all, one special student made history. According to the Baltimore Sun, 15-year- old prodigy Ty Hobson- Powell recently became the university’s youngest graduate ever. The Washingtonian completed his undergraduate studies in just three years after spending two at Howard University. Hobson-Powell was drawn to UB after he discovered the school offered an interdisciplinary

undergraduate degree in public policy, psychology and history. He transferred last fall. “I wanted to go ahead and pursue an education that best exemplified me,” he told the Sun. “I have more than just one interest.” Despite his noteworthy accomplishments, his parents insist that he’s a typical teen whose interests mirror other individuals his same age. Still, Hobson-Powell has always proved to be ahead of his peers even during his formative years. “Before he even had teeth in his mouth, he was actually talking,” his father told NBC News Washington back in 2009. Additionally, while other

toddlers were barely learning the English alphabet, the prodigy was already learning Chinese. Shortly thereafter, Hobson-Powell started first grade at 4 years old and

capped off high school in two years. In the fall, the teen will enroll in law school, and

is considering medical

school after that. Though he’s acquired many accomplishments in just

a short time, he says the

journey hasn’t been difficult. “Surprisingly, it doesn’t take that much effort,” Hobson-Powell told the Sun. “This gift that I’ve been

given, it’s sort of natural so

I don’t have to do too much

work. Being a 15-year-old just comes naturally to me.”

our vision for kids: The Mission Continues Target ® partnered with volunteers from a national
our vision for kids:
The Mission
Continues
Target ® partnered with volunteers from a national veterans’ organization
in a School Library Makeover for Manor View Elementary in Fort Meade,
MD: new technology, 2,000 books and a bright new learning space for
military kids. It’s one of the ways we support communities like yours,
for kids like yours.
Learn
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Target.com/
Target is
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©2011 Target Stores. The Bullseye Design and Target are registered trademarks of Target Brands, Inc. All rights reserved. 51110

May 28, 2011 - June 3, 2011, The Afro-American C3

www.afro.com More Reader’s Corner Book Reviews on afro.com
www.afro.com
More Reader’s Corner Book Reviews on afro.com
More Reader’s Corner Book Reviews on afro.com Clark Atlanta Deltas, Chicago Alphas Stomp into First Place
More Reader’s Corner Book Reviews on afro.com Clark Atlanta Deltas, Chicago Alphas Stomp into First Place
More Reader’s Corner Book Reviews on afro.com Clark Atlanta Deltas, Chicago Alphas Stomp into First Place
Clark Atlanta Deltas, Chicago Alphas Stomp into First Place at Sprite Step Off Winners take
Clark Atlanta Deltas, Chicago Alphas Stomp into First Place at Sprite Step Off
Winners take home $100K scholarship
Hip-hop artist and
District native Wale
Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity’s Delta Xi chapter
performs his hit songs at
from Central State University, Chicago
the final competition for
performed their winning stepping routine at
Sprite Step Off.
the Show Place Arena in Upper Marlboro, Md.
Delta Sigma Theta Sorority’s
R&B Grammy Award
winner Ciara performs
Sigma Chapter from Clark Atlanta
University poses with Sprite Step
Off’s grand prize of $100,000.
her hit song “Goodies”
at Sprite Step Off
2011.
Photos by Jessica Patterson
at Sprite Step Off 2011. Photos by Jessica Patterson Thousands gathered at Prince George’s County’s Show

Thousands gathered at Prince George’s County’s Show Place Arena May 21 to see members from the “Divine Nine” organizations face off at the annual Sprite Step Off competition. Many audience supporters donned Greek-lettered paraphernalia in support of the various organizations, including

in support of the various organizations, including leaders of the sororities and fraternities. At the end

leaders of the sororities and fraternities. At the end of the night, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority’s Sigma chapter from Clark Atlanta University and Alpha Phi Alpha’s Delta Xi chapter from Central State University, Chicago, took the $100,000 scholarship prizes for their dynamic step routines.

$100,000 scholarship prizes for their dynamic step routines. Stars Say Goodbye to Oprah By AFRO Staff

Stars Say Goodbye to Oprah

By AFRO Staff

May 25 marked the ending of an era in American television when the final episode of “The Oprah Winfrey Show” aired after a quarter century of entertaining afternoon viewers with one-on-one interviews with celebrities, experts and extraordinary everyday people. A two-episode farewell event on May 23 and May 24 preceded the official finale. The event was pre-recorded in Chicago’s United Center May 17, and saw music, movie and television stars surprise Oprah and share thoughts on her legacy. Oprah’s production studio received more than 154,000 ticket requests to attend the farewell event, but only 13,000 tickets were distributed to fans free of charge through a lottery, according to The Associated Press. “Thank you is not enough, but thank you, for your love and support,” Winfrey told the crowd. Performers Aretha Franklin, Patti LaBelle, Jamie Foxx, Stevie Wonder and Beyoncé took to the stage to sing to Oprah and express their admiration for the host. “Oprah Winfrey, because of you women everywhere have graduated to a new level of understanding of who we are, of what we are and most of all who we can be,” said singer Beyoncé. Actress Rosie O’Donnell even sang a tune, while Michael Jordon praised the talk show host as an inspiration, and actor Tom Cruise said she “always had the power, and that is the message you brought into our lives.”

Madonna said she is among the millions that adore Winfrey. “She fights for things she believes in, even if it makes her unpopular,” Madonna said. Will and Jada Pinkett Smith told Winfrey she mothered millions of viewers, which puts her in the “status of a goddess.” In a moving speech, the talk queen’s longtime partner,

In a moving speech, the talk queen’s longtime partner, AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast Oprah Winfrey is

AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast

Oprah Winfrey is

surrounded by stars during

a star-studded double-

taping of “Surprise Oprah!

A Farewell Spectacular,” in

Chicago.

Stedman Graham, told her he loved her. “It really does amaze me that I get to be around a woman who changes people’s lives every day and who also takes her own lunch to work,” Graham said. “You know what really is amazing? You have done this, sweetheart, through all of the sacrifices you’ve made, humility you have and through God’s amazing grace.” Other participants included actresses Halle Berry, Queen Latifah, Tyler Perry and newswoman Diane Sawyer. Between the stars’ appearances, clips of fan farewells and recaps of past episodes will be shown. The Rev. Beryl Whipple, pastor of Asbury United

Methodist Church in White Marsh and John Wesley UM Church in Joppa, Md. since 2008, was among those in the audience for the finale. Whipple, a Morehouse University graduate, joined other Oprah Scholars. “I was contacted by Harpo Studios in late March,” he said. “And I was thrilled to be one of the more than 320 Morehouse men there. “ Others from the area were Michael Miller, 2001; Christopher E. Carter, 2004 and Christian Scott, 2006. “What many saw on television was only an abbreviation of the excitement shared that evening. Oprah cried real tears. It was a very emotional moment.” Whipple added, “I didn’t get a chance to personally speak to Ms. Winfrey, but being able to stand as part of the cloud of witnesses she

helped propel to do so many things will stick with me.

It may have been the most important ‘thank you’ of my life.” The Rev. Dorothy Boulware contributed to this article.

Family, Friends, Hip-Hop Community Devastated by Murder of Cali Swag District Member M-Bone

By Dennis J. Freeman Special to the AFRO

Montae Talbert, known by those close to him as M-Bone, was a young man on the threshold of fulfilling his dreams. Talbert had aspirations of becoming a music star and, as the dance member of the hip hop group Cali Swag District, the 22-year-old Talbert was well on his way. The group released the infectious hit “Teach Me How

to Dougie,” last year, and appeared to be on the brink of stardom. But Talbert’s dream came to an abrupt halt when he was gunned down in his hometown of Inglewood, Calif. in the late night hours of May 15. Talbert’s family, friends, fellow musicians and the larger hip hop community have been in mourning since the fatal shooting. “He was a real energetic person,” said hip hop artist Suge Gotti, who worked alongside Talbert and Cali Swag District. “He was all positive, no negative. He was a harmless person. That’s why I don’t understand how this could happen to him. I don’t have anything negative to say about him. He’ll truly be missed. It’s a big loss. To watch a young man growing into something and then be part of the game…that’s hard to replace.” According to police, Talbert was sitting in a car outside of Airport Liquor & Groceries Store on LaBrea Avenue in Inglewood when another car drove up beside

LaBrea Avenue in Inglewood when another car drove up beside Courtesy Photo Montae Talbert, known to

Courtesy Photo

Montae Talbert, known to fans as M-Bone

the vehicle he was in and its occupants opened fire. Talbert was hit twice in the head, police said. The news of Talbert’s demise sent shock waves nationwide, and throngs of visitors and well-wishers have

 

Reader’s Corner

 
 

Incognito: An American Odyssey of Race and Self-Discovery

By Kam Williams Special to the AFRO

Courtesy Image

Courtesy Image

“I grabbed the phone and punched in the number… my heart pounding… My dad… Thirty years later. ‘My name is Michael Sidney Fosberg, and I’m your son!’ I blurted out. ‘Son? Well, first of all,

want you to know that no matter what you were told, or what you thought happened, I have always

I

loved you… There’s one other thing I’m sure your mother never told you.’ ‘What’s that?’ ‘I’m African-American,’ he said. My body went numb. I felt light-headed and my legs began to give way. I braced myself against the bureau…

 
 

I

sat down slowly on the bed in stunned silence, trying to

breathe without trembling. My throat was dry I struggled to respond, but all I could say was, ‘Wow!’” — The author learning his father was Black. (pgs. 71-74)

Michael Sidney Fosberg was raised in a lily-White, Chicago suburb at the height of the Civil Rights Movement by his Caucasian mother and stepdad. Consequently, he grew up blissfully unaware of the fact that the real father he’d been separated practically at birth from was Black. A Jew-fro and a slightly swarthy complexion were all that made Michael stand out in family photos taken with his parents and two younger siblings. His mom explained away the differences in their appearance by saying that he was part Cherokee, an excuse which her emotionally conflicted son bought until he bottomed out in his 30s while trying to make it as an actor in L.A. It was then, after almost dying of a drug overdose, that he resolved to turn his life around, despite having thus far frittered away his adulthood in rudderless fashion, between substance-abusing and serial womanizing. With the help of Alcoholics Anonymous, Michael soon sobered up and came to understand the role that “the loss and absence of

my biological father at such an early age” had played in his self-destructive patterns. So, he pressured his mother for info about his paternal roots, and she provided him with a name, John Woods, and

 
 

a

hometown, Detroit, without divulging anything about her

ex’s ethnicity. Therefore, it’s easy to imagine Michael’s utter shock upon learning that his long-lost father was African American. He soon shared the big development with his half- sister, Lora, who took the news in stride, matter-of-factly remarking, “Damn! My brother’s a brother.” And that was only the first of numerous jaw-dropping disclosures about to come out of the closet. As it turned out, Michael’s dad had remarried after divorcing his mother but had then another mixed child with a Jewish mistress of many years. Worse, Woods was unemployed, on the run from the law, and doing his best to avoid a stiff prison sentence for bribery. So much for Michael’s dream of an idyllic father- son reunion and making up for lost time. With his dad first evading authorities and then behind bars, Michael instead immersed himself in African- American culture, even becoming engaged briefly to a sister who unfortunately turned out to be a gold digger. Alternately hilarious and heartbreaking, Incognito is a riveting and revealing autobiography of self-discovery with

message most reminiscent of that age old maxim, “Be careful what you wish for!”

a

 

placed flowers and cards in front of the store where he was murdered, forming a makeshift memorial. Since Talbert’s death, speculation has swirled around why he lost his life, and the identity of his killers. Some of those rumors point to an unidentified young woman and possibly another male. Talbert’s family and friends have set aside those rumors, and said they lost an energetic, loving soul who helped give America more than a dance craze. “Montae was the fifth of my 13 grandchildren. We want to see justice come for my beloved Montae,” said Mary Alice Phillips, Talbert’s grandmother. “I raised Montae all the days of his life, all through school, all through the whole process…and what joy.” Talbert’s family has offered

a reward for information leading to the identification and arrest of those responsible for his death. Among the community members shaken by Talbert’s killing was Pamela Sanders, who operates Washington Hancock for Girls, a group home for abused girls in Los Angeles. Sanders came into contact with Talbert in 2008 when Cali Swag District stopped by the group home and brought Christmas gifts for 186 girls. Sanders said the group has faithfully stopped by every year since to bring the girls presents. Sanders said she remembers Talbert fondly, and was shocked to hear of his murder. “It’s unbelievable,” Sanders said. “His personality was beautiful. Their [Cali Swag District’s] personality was beautiful.”

C4

The Afro-American, May 28, 2011 - June 3, 2011

Community

Continued from C2

Hard Work Pays Off for Bowie State Graduating Senior

Biology major to attend pharmacy school

Graduating Senior Biology major to attend pharmacy school Barry Jones (Courtesy Photo) (Bowie, Md.) – When

Barry Jones

(Courtesy Photo)

(Bowie, Md.) – When Bowie State University

appeared in front of him at

a college recruiting fair in

high school, Barry Jones had no idea that four years

later he would be graduating from that institution with

a bachelor’s degree in

biology and acceptance into

a competitive pharmacy

school. Jones, a native of Baltimore, Md., graduated with honors at the spring 2011 commencement ceremony later this month. “I have always been fascinated with learning,”

said Jones. “I was blessed with a great memory, so education became

a natural outlet for me, more specifically,

math and science. My commitment to further develop my understanding of the world I live in has been my motivation to succeed and excel.” Not familiar with Bowie State at the time, the college fair is what prompted Barry to apply and later be accepted into the university’s honors programs. During his four years at Bowie State, Jones has been successful and active in the Bowie State community. He served as a peer mentor for the Academic Advisement Center; an executive board member for the Minority Association for Pre-Medical Students; a member of the Honda Campus All-Star Challenge team; and a member of the research group for Dr. Alan Anderson, assistant professor in the Department of Natural Sciences.

Working with Anderson provided him the opportunity to conduct scientific research including synthesis of molecular compounds, and learning to use a rotovap, GD mass spectrometer and IR spectrometer. This type of practical work has been instrumental for Jones in developing the skills needed to be successful in pharmacy school. Jones credits his success and growth to several professors including Dr.

Monika Gross, professor and director of the Honors Program, who guided and disciplined him when necessary; Dr. Sammye Miller of the History and Government Department who instilled motivation in him; and Dr. Anderson, along with other professors within the Department of Natural Sciences, who contributed to preparing Jones for his choice of career. “Barry is one of the brightest, most dedicated students we have seen in the biology program at Bowie State University,” said Dr. George Acquaah, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, in a statement. “One of our primary goals is to prepare students for graduate and professional school or for the workforce. Barry is an exceptional student whose commitment paid off with his acceptance into Howard University’s School of Pharmacy.” Jones will begin attendance at Howard University’s School of Pharmacy this fall.

Walgreens Donates $10,000 To UMES School of Pharmacy

Continued from C2

The past year has marked the first for the school’s unique, three-year Doctor of Pharmacy Program. The program had an enrollment of 63 students at its inception and in its third year, it’s estimated to draw nearly 180 participants. UMES pharmacy students were also given the opportunity to intern at 15 Walgreens sites this school year. “These gifts will allow our students the opportunity to continue their dream of one day becoming a pharmacist,” Paul Butler, major gifts officer at UMES, said in a statement.

Ward 4 Welcomes First Full-Service Community Health Center

Mayor, Redskin Donovan McNabb among attendees

Special to the AFRO

Redskin Donovan McNabb among attendees Special to the AFRO (Courtesy Photo) D.C. Councilman David Catania, I-At-Large,

(Courtesy Photo)

D.C. Councilman David Catania, I-At-Large, and Councilwoman Muriel Bowser, D-Dist.4, participate in the ribbon cutting at Mary’s Center on May 18.

approximately 20,000 patients per year, nearly doubling annual service capacity. Mary’s Center received $11.625 million, nearly 70 percent of the total cost of the facility, from the District’s Medical Homes Project. The Medical Homes Project is administered by the DC Primary Care Association with funding from the District’s Tobacco Settlement fund. The Mary’s Center Clinic is the second major medical clinic expansion primarily funded through the Medical Homes Project. Mary’s Center, founded in 1988, is a nonprofit, non-religious organization based in the District. It provides comprehensive and integrated health care, education, and social services to individuals and families whose needs often go unmet.

Mary’s Center is located at 3912 Georgia Ave., N.W. For more information, visit maryscenter.org.

On May 18, Mary’s Center hosted a grand opening ceremony for its newest location in Ward 4. The facility is the first full-service community health facility in that ward. As part of the festivities, District Mayor Vincent Gray declared May 18 Mary’s Center Day at the grand opening. “The Mayor of the District of Columbia, do hereby proclaim May 18, 2011, as Mary’s Center Day in Washington, D.C., and call upon all the residents of this great city to join me in recognizing the members of this organization for their dedication and commitment to strengthening the foundation of our beloved community -the District residents,” Gray said. Also in attendance

were Redskins quarterback Donovan McNabb, Council member David Catania and Ward 4 Councilwoman Muriel Bowser. “Today’s opening shows that despite challenging economic times and budget tightening, the District is still able to make possible the delivery of vital health and social services to those in need,” said Catania. “Mary’s Center is a shining example of the good that can be accomplished by dedicated community members and effective public programs.” The Georgia Avenue site will be Mary’s Center’s largest community health center, with 26,000 square feet of space, 22 exam rooms and five dental chairs. The facility also has new space for mental health and social services, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) and family literacy programs. The new facility also allows Mary’s Center to serve

The new facility also allows Mary’s Center to serve when opportunity hits home With you Home
The new facility also allows Mary’s Center to serve when opportunity hits home With you Home

when opportunity hits home

With you

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May 28, 2011 - June 3, 2011, The Afro-American C5

Community Calendar

May 26-29

DC Black Pride Weekend

2011

M Street Hotel, 2022 M St., N.W. D.C. Celebrate Black culture in Chocolate City at this festival featuring live performances, exhibitions, book signings and more. Free and paid events. For more information: 202-

737-5767.

May 27 Friday’s Praise Festival Mt. Sinai Tabernacle Church, 8910 Simpson Lane, Clinton, Md. 8-11 p.m. Various gospel artists will perform at this event. An open mic session will be held from 7:45-8 p.m. For more information: gilliamvocalsinc. com.

May 28

AFI Life Achievement

Award Retrospective:

Morgan Freeman AFI Silver Theatre & Cultural Center, 8633 Colesville Road, Silver Spring, Md. 7-9 p.m. The American Film Institute will honor Morgan Freeman, this year’s recipient of the AFI Life Achievement Award, by

presenting a selection of his most outstanding films. For more information: 301-495-

6720.

May 29

DC Reggae Awards Tribute

to Bob Marley, Dennis Brown, Gregory Isaacs Everlasting Cafe, 2829

Georgia Ave., N.W. D.C.

6 p.m. Enjoy an evening

honoring legends in reggae music. $13. For more information: 202-332-1700.

May 30 DanceAfrica, DC 2011 Dance Place, 3225 Eighth St., N.E. D.C. Various times. Experience the vibrancy of African heritage through dance, music, visual arts, food, clothing and crafts at this week-long festival. $10- $20. For more information:

202-269-1600.

Fort Ward Park Memorial Day Jazz Festival Fort Ward Park, 4301 West Braddock Road, Alexandria, Va. 1-7 p.m. This annual Memorial Day Jazz Festival will feature big band, swing and contemporary jazz music with a different band playing each hour. For more information: 703-883-4686.

June 1-13

DC Jazz Festival 2011

Various locations throughout the DMV. The DC Jazz Festival will feature a stellar lineup of performers from across the globe. Each year, this event partners with over 35 clubs, restaurants, hotels and galleries to promote more than performances over 12 nights. For more information: www.dcjazzfest. org.

Storytellers: W. Ellington

Felton

Martin’s Lounge, 1919 9th St., N.W. D.C. 7-11 p.m. Come out and witness this musical series in which artists tell stories about their

music, experiences and their memories. In this segment, W. Ellington Felton, DJ, artist, author and actor will take listeners on a musical journey through his extensive catalog. $10. For more information:

storytellers.eventbrite.com.

June 2

Bill Cosby

this evening of laughs. $20-

$40. For more information:

703-255-1868.

June 2-3 Sister Souljah Book Tour Thursday, Martin Luther King Jr., Memorial Library

Great Hall, 901 G St. N.W. D.C. 2-3:30 p.m. Friday, B&N in Union Station, 50 Massachusetts Ave. N.E. D.C. 12 noon. Author and hip-hop activist Sister Souljah will come to the District to discuss her new book, Midnight and the Meaning of Love. For more information: www. sistersouljah.com.

June 4 Beltway BBQ Showdown Watkins Regional Park, 301 Watkins Park Drive, Upper Marlboro, Md. 12-5 p.m. Cooks from all over the East Coast will compete for a spot in the national competition in Kansas City. Pork, beef and chicken barbeque will be available for purchase from food vendors. For more

information: 301-627-2828.

June 4-5 Vintage Virginia Wine Festival

Bull Run Regional Park, 7700 Bull Run Drive, Centreville, Va. Various times. This event features tastings from over 50 wineries, educational seminars, art exhibits, children’s activities and more. For more information: Vintagevirginia. com.

BowieFest 2011 Allen Pond Park, 3330 Northview Drive, Bowie, Md. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. At this annual festival, enjoy live entertainment, rides, food vendors, information booths and more in celebration of Bowie. For more information:

301-809-3029.

SEE WHO WON! GO TO FACEBOOK.COM/MACYS TO WATCH THE FINALE WOW! PASS EXTRA SAVINGS ON
SEE WHO WON!
GO TO FACEBOOK.COM/MACYS TO WATCH THE FINALE
WOW! PASS
EXTRA SAVINGS ON ALL SALE &
CLEARANCE APPAREL!
(EXCEPT SPECIALS & SUPER BUYS)
EXTRA 15 % OFF
SELECT SALE & CLEARANCE APPAREL FOR HIM, HER
& KIDS PLUS FINE & FASHION JEWELRY & INTIMATES
EXTRA 10% OFF ALL SALE & CLEARANCE
WATCHES, SHOES, COATS, SUITS, DRESSES; SUIT
SEPARATES & SPORTCOATS FOR HIM; ELECTRICS
AND SELECT HOME ITEMS
Excludes: specials, super buys, furniture, mattresses, floor coverings,
rugs, men’s store electrics, cosmetics/fragrances, gift cards, jewelry trunk
shows, previous purchases, special orders, selected licensed depts., special
purchases, services, macys.com. Cannot be combined with any savings
pass/coupon, extra discount or credit offer except opening a new Macy’s
account. EXTRA SAVINGS % APPLIED TO REDUCED PRICES.
VALID NOW-5/30/2011
NOW THROUGH MONDAY, MAY 30
MEMORIAL DAY SALE
25% TO 5O% OFF STOREWIDE
PLUS VALUES
TAKE AN
EXTRA 15% OR 1O% OFF ‡
WITH YOUR MACY’S CARD OR PASS ‡Exclusions apply; see pass.
FREE ONLINE SHIPPING
EVERY DAY + EXTRA 15% OR 10% OFF!
Free shipping with $99 purchase
($8 flat-fee shipping with purchases under $99).
Use promo code: KICKOFF for extra savings;
offer valid now-5/30/2011. Exclusions apply;
see macys.com for details.

FIND MACY'S EVERYWHERE!

see macys.com for details. FIND MACY'S EVERYWHERE! Shop, share and connect anytime. Wolf Trap-Filene Center,

Shop, share and connect anytime.

Wolf Trap-Filene Center,

1552 Trap Road, Vienna, Va.

8 p.m. Classic funnyman Bill

Cosby comes to Virginia for

MEMORIAL DAY SALE PRICES IN EFFECT NOW THROUGH 5/30/11.

for MEMORIAL DAY SALE PRICES IN EFFECT NOW THROUGH 5/30/11. OPEN A MACY’S ACCOUNT FOR EXTRA

OPEN A MACY’S ACCOUNT FOR EXTRA 20% SAVINGS THE FIRST 2 DAYS WITH MORE REWARDS TO COME. Macy’s credit card is available subject to credit approval; new account savings valid the day your account is opened and the next day; excludes services, select licensed departments, gift cards, restaurants, gourmet food and wine. On furniture, mattresses and rugs/floor coverings, the new account savings is limited to $100; application must qualify for immediate approval to receive extra savings; employees not eligible.

C6

The Afro-American, May 28, 2011 - June 3, 2011

with yourrr Only Every time $50 or more you spend in a single EXTREME VALUE
with yourrr
Only
Every time
$50 or more
you spend
in a single
EXTREME
VALUE
transaction !
*
PACK
Rancher’s Reserve ®
Beef Ribeye Steak
*Restrictions and and exclusions exclusions apply. apply.
5
99
See store
for r details. details.
LB
Club Price
ClCluClul b PriPrricec
Or Rancher’s Reserve ® Boneless
Beef Ribeye Steak $6.99 lb.
100%
U.SU.S BEEFBEEF
Pork Spareribs
or Beef Back Ribs
5
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Frozen. PorkSpareribs. Sold
in a 10-lb. Box at $15.90 ea.
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B
12-Pack Coca-Cola,
Pepsi or 7-UP
BUY 2 GET
3FREE
st
EQUAL OR LESSER VALUE
Club Price
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59
12-oz. cans. Selected
varieties. Limit 6 Free
12-Packs per transaction.
SAVE up to $17.97 on 5
M
LB
Club Price
Gatorade
Lay’s
Fresh Express
Club Price
Potato Chips
Salad Blends
8-pack, 20-oz. Selected varieties.
Club Price: $4.44 ea.
SAVE up to $5.10 on 2
2
10 to 11-oz.
Selected varieties.
SAVE up to $3.99 on 2
8
88
4 to 12-oz.
Selected varieties.
SAVE up to $3.49 on 2
for
Sweet
Blueberries
BUY 1 GET
BUY 1 GET
1FREE
1 Pint. Limit 2.
SAVE up to
$3.00 ea.
Club Price
2
99
1FREE
1
EQUAL OR LESSER VALUE
EA
EQUAL OR LESSER VALUE
Club Price
t
Club Price
Popsicle
i
Novelties
17.5 to 38.4-oz.
m
Selectedvarieties.
SAVE up to $2.60
Club Price
1
99
i
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li
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D
99
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Lucerne ® Shredded
or Chunk Cheese
h t
6to8-oz.
EA
Selectedvarieties.
In
Club Price
ClubPrice:$2.00ea.
Club Price
SAVE up to $1.98 on 2
2
$ 4
for
Signature Cafe ®
8-Pc. Fried or
All Natural Chicken
®®
Nabisco Snack
Crackers or
Toasted Chips
5.5 to 10-oz. Selected
2 each: Drumsticks, Breasts,
Thighs and Wings.
SAVE up to $2.00 ea.
4
varieties. Limit 4.
SAVE up to $2.00
Club Price
1
99
t
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m
White or
i
All American
Bi-Color Corn nn
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Split Pie
8-inch.
Club Price: 17¢ ea.
SAVE up to $9.90 on 12
Apple/Cherry variety.
SAVE up to $2.00
99 12
2
1
98
Club Price
Club Price
for
Edy’s Ice Cream
1.5-qt. Selected varieties.
Club Price: $3.00 ea.
SAVE up to $5.58 on 2
2
$ 6
for
Club Price
Bush’s Best Grillin’
or Baked Beans
waterfront BISTRO ®
Colossal
RawShrimp
13 to 15-ct. Sold in a 2-lb. bag.
Frozen. SAVE up to $6.00 lb.
99
21 to 22-oz. Grillin’ or 28-oz. Baked.
Selectedvarieties. ClubPrice: $1.67ea.
SAVE up to $1.87 on 3
Club Price
9
LB
3
$ 5
for
Club Price
Brawny
Paper Towels
12-Roll Towels.
Selected varieties.
SAVE up to $3.00
Club Price
12
99
Deer Park Water
3
$ 10
GGGGGGG Grilling Favorites
for
Club Price
24-pack, 16.9-oz. bottles.
Club Price: $3.34 ea.
SAVE up to $4.67 on 3
¢
JJJJJ Jack Daniel’s Barbecue Sauce,
19-oz., 11111 Bulls-Eye Barbecue
SSSSSS Sauce, 18-oz., Lawry’s
Capri Sun Drinks
Club Price
Marinade, MMMMMMM 12-oz., Safeway
OOOO Olives, 5.75 to 6-oz.
SSSS Selected varieties.
10-pack, 111 6-oz.
79
Club Price
1
SSS Selected varieties.
SS SAVE up to $1.21
Fresh Safeway
Snapple
Chicken
Leg Quarters
Or Fresh Drumsticks or
Thighs $1.29 lb.
12-pack, 16-oz. bottles.
Selected varieties.
SAVE up to $7.00
EXTREME
VALUE
PACK
¢
99
Club Price
Cllulub PrPrPricce
LB
Club Price

MAY

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

WED THUR

FRI

SAT

SUN

MON

Prices on this page are effective Wednesday, May 25 thru Tuesday, May 31, 2011. ALL LIMITS ARE PER HOUSEHOLD, PER DAY. Selection varies by store.

TUES

ITEMS & PRICES IN THIS AD ARE AVAILABLE AT YOUR SEAT PLEASANT, MD: 6300 CENTRAL AVE., LANDOVER HILLS, MD: 4600 COOPERS LN., BALTIMORE, MD:

1205 W. PRATT ST., 5660 BALTIMORE NATIONAL PIKE, 2401 N. CHARLES ST., TEMPLE HILLS, MD: 2346 IVERSON ST., DISTRICT HEIGHTS, MD: 5800 SILVER HILL RD., OXON HILL, MD: 6235 OXON HILL RD., WASHINGTON, DC: 3830 GEORGIA AVE. NW., 514 RHODE ISLAND AVE. NE, 322 40TH ST. NE., 6500 PINEY BRANCH RD. NW, 2845 ALABAMA AVE. SE, 1747 COLUMBIA RD., NW AND 1601 MARYLAND AVE. NE SAFEWAY STORES. ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE ARE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS. QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED. SAVINGS VALUES MAY VARY BY STORE. SOME ADVERTISED ITEMS MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE IN ALL STORES. SOME ADVERTISED PRICES MAY BE EVEN LOWER IN SOME STORES. ALL APPLICABLE TAXES MUST BE PAID BY THE PURCHASER. SALES OF PRODUCTS CONTAINING EPHEDRINE, PSEUDOEPHEDRINE OR PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE LIMITED BY LAW. “ON BUY ONE, GET ONE FREE (“BOGO”) OFFERS, CUSTOMER MUST PURCHASE THE FIRST ITEM TO RECEIVE THE SECOND ITEM FREE. BOGO OFFERS ARE NOT 1/2 PRICE SALES. IF ONLY A SINGLE ITEM IS PURCHASED, THE REGULAR PRICE APPLIES. MANUFACTURERS’ COUPONS MAY BE USED ON PURCHASED ITEMS ONLY - NOT ON FREE ITEMS. LIMIT ONE COUPON PER PURCHASED ITEM. CUSTOMER WILL BE RESPONSIBLE FOR TAX AND/OR BOTTLE DEPOSIT ON PURCHASED AND FREE ITEMS.” NOT

RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL OR PICTORIAL ERRORS. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO CORRECT ALL PRINTED ERRORS. © 2011 SAFEWAY INC. ALL LIMITS ARE PER HOUSEHOLD, PER DAY.

AA

Faith Pulse

Rev. James Forbes Comes to Peoples Congregational

Join Peoples Congregational United Church of Christ on June 2 and June 3 at 7 p.m. for their spring revival featuring the Rev. James Forbes. Pastor emeritus of New York City’s Riverside Church and voted by EBONY magazine as one the nation’s 15 best preachers, Rev. Forbes is a dynamic minister with an unconventional preaching style, who does not stay confined to the pulpit and

style, who does not stay confined to the pulpit and Courtesy Photo Rev. James Forbes provides

Courtesy Photo

Rev. James Forbes

provides attendees with a powerful word that is relevant and timely for today. The St. Augustine choir will perform. The nursery will be open and free childcare will be provided. Peoples Congregational Church is located at 4704 13th St. N.W., D.C. The revival is free and open to the public. Visit www. peopleschurchucc.org or call 202- 829-5511 for more information.

Historic St. Augustine Chorale

The St. Augustine Chorale, one of the oldest organizations in history Saint Augustine Catholic Church in the District, celebrates 138 years of music ministry rich in Catholic and African-American traditions. The choir will perform “Coronation Mass” by W. A. Mozart, “Best Pair of Sirens” by Hubert H. Parry and “Ave Verum” by Gabriel Faure in a special anniversary concert on June 12 at 5 p.m. in the church sanctuary, 15th and V streets, Northwest. The guest soloists are Detra Battle, soprano; Kehembe V. Eichelberger, mezzo soprano; Michael Ford, tenor; Jonathan Deutsch, bass and Everett P. Williams, guest organist. Also included on the program are Allison Lorraine Porter, soprano and Reid Carter, tenor and students from the Center for the Visual and Performing Arts of Suitland High School. Attendees may may offer a free-will offering.

from the Center for the Visual and Performing Arts of Suitland High School. Attendees may may
from the Center for the Visual and Performing Arts of Suitland High School. Attendees may may

May 28, 2011 - June 3, 2011, The Afro-American D1

www.afro.com Tim Lacy’s Another Viewpoint on afro.com
www.afro.com
Tim Lacy’s Another Viewpoint on afro.com

Local Sports Entrepreneur Offers Life Lessons That Are Greater Than Basketball

Offers Life Lessons That Are Greater Than Basketball Arize Ifejika Courtesy Photo By Stephen D. Riley

Arize Ifejika

Courtesy Photo

By Stephen D. Riley AFRO Staff Writer

Budding basketball businessman Arize Ifejika didn’t

just take over the local hardwood scene overnight—he did it gradually. The former Florida A&M graduate caught his first break in 2007 as the fresh-faced assistant tournament director of Hoop Group, New Jersey’s leading youth basketball organization. From there, Ifejika transferred titles down to Chantilly, Va., home of Hoop Magic, another prep basketball biggie. For the 26-year-old Ifejika, holding such

a dominant designation at an early

age was both a rite of passage and

a pathway to criticism, but it was

an experience that would go on to serve him well. “People began to say, ‘Well,

if he can do it and he’s so young

then so can I, you don’t need him,’” Ifejika recalls about the behind-the-back bashing that he

used to encounter. Fed up with the words and ready for a move closer to home, the Washington, D.C., native spread his wings in 2009 and launched his own hoops haven, More Than Basketball. The name became fitting for Ifejika, who strongly believes that young hoops hopefuls shouldn’t “put all their marbles into becoming a professional basketball player, they should put all their marbles into becoming a professional.” For the past few years, More Than Basketball has been gaining steam. The program sponsors high school showcases, AAU tournaments and both summer

and fall leagues for local high school and area basketball teams.

Although the concentration is focused on basketball, the message is always the same: Life is more than basketball. For his latest

endeavor, Ifejika recently partnered with local tennis shoe and clothing giant, Downtown Locker Room, for a three-on-three tournament in

late March that featured several local high school teams. The tournament concluded as a success with the winning team, D.C.’s Theodore Roosevelt High School, being offered a chance at winning an all-expense-paid trip to this year’s NBA Finals. Giving back and showing local youths another way to success were the cornerstone concepts on which More Than Basketball was constructed. “For every kid that was going to Duke or Kentucky, there were thousands that weren’t going to school at all and had nothing to fall back on. They put all their [energy and focus] into basketball and it started to really get to me. That’s the reason why I left Hoop Magic and started my own company because I wanted to set an example for kids so they can say, ‘If he does it, I definitely can do it.’” His motives, recent success and own age have turned the college graduate into a walking

icon for young adults. But similar to the title name of his company, it doesn’t just rest on the hardwood for Ifejika. He moonlights as a motivational speaker, operates his own clothing line (Swagger and Substance) and even manages a rap artist when he’s not organizing events. Staying true to his company’s name is a breeze; it’s trying to follow in Russell Simmons’ footsteps that presents the greatest challenge for Ifejika. The young entrepreneur has a keen affection for the rap mogul who rose to national acclaim in the music industry without even touching a microphone. “The thing I like about him is that he never rapped,” says Ifejika. “The same way people look at me and say he never played college or pro basketball and wonder how I’m able to run these great events, I look at Simmons the same way.”

For more on Ifejika, visit www. morethanbasketballmg.net.

For more on Ifejika, visit www. morethanbasketballmg.net . Courtesy Photo Georgetown’s Chris Wright is one of

Courtesy Photo

Georgetown’s Chris Wright is one of six seniors to graduate from the men’s basketball team this spring.

Several Local Student-Athletes Graduate in 2011

By AFRO Staff

Education Secretary Arne Duncan months ago expressed his disappointment with the low graduation rates among most student-athletes attending major universities throughout the nation. But he wouldn’t have much to complain about after a few local colleges and universities in the Washington, D.C./Maryland region graduated their senior classes this past weekend. More than 40 current and former student-athletes joined Bowie State University’s graduates during the 2011 spring commencement on May 20 at BSU’s Bulldog Stadium. Six BSU student-athletes graduated with honors, including Male Student-Athlete of the Year Sterling Grant-Jones, two-time winning CIAA Softball Champion Danielle McClay, two- time winning CIAA Bowling Champion Rebecca Frusciante and Jatyra Heath of the women’s volleyball team. “We are very proud of our student-athlete graduates today. These young men and young

Negro Leagues Museum of Maryland Hosts Annual Awards

By Patricia Johnson Special to the AFRO

Atkinson, Al Burrows, Eddie “GG” Burton, Geraldine Day, Willie Fordham, Mamie “Peanut” Johnson and Jim Weedon. The Orioles’ Big Bird also made a grand

The phrase “take me out to the ball game” took on a new persona on May 14, as the Hubert V. Simmons Negro Leagues Baseball Museum of Maryland sponsored their Annual “Back To The Old Ball Game Day of Honors.” Martin’s West Banquet Hall was transformed into a mini baseball stadium and many ticketholders arrived dressed from head to toe in baseball paraphernalia. Hot dogs, hamburgers with all the trimmings, sodas, popcorn and peanuts and Maryland crab cakes were enjoyed by the

crowd and also added to the authenticity of the occasion. The wonderful event began

with the traditional singing of the national anthem by Anthony Brown, a color guard, and the invocation by Pastor Donald Johnson of Lochern Presbyterian Church. Kai Jackson from WJZ-TV, along with T. Russell Hopewell, president of the NLBMM were the masters of ceremonies. Gerald Brown, the deejay, added a bit of nostalgia as he played tunes from the past during the event. Guests participated in a 50/50 raffle, a baseball outfit contest, door prizes, games for children and a silent auction. But, a special highlight of the afternoon was the playing of Shadow Ball, where baseball veterans played baseball in a pantomime. It was enjoyable to watch and even more fun for the players. Terry Dear, who called the game, was quite animated and made lots of jokes. The ball players included Luke

and made lots of jokes. The ball players included Luke Courtesy Photo Della Mallon, Audrey L.

Courtesy Photo

Della Mallon, Audrey L. Simmons, executive director, NLBMM; T. Russell Hopewell, president, NLBMM and John Berkley pose together during the Negro Leagues of Maryland Museum’s annual honors ceremony.

appearance and posed for photos with the guests. In addition, the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum was pleased to have three outstanding former Orioles players sign autographs for the event: Nate Snell, Ken Dixon and Al Bumbry. The focus of the extraordinary afternoon was, of course, the Awards Recognition segment, during which awards were given to the following recipients for their dedicated contributions, extraordinary volunteerism, tireless service within the community/ government, and in the field of baseball. The awardees included: Eddie W. Banks, James Bland,Wilbur “Willie” Fordham (posthumously), Baltimore County Del. Adrienne A. Jones, Allen M. Meacham Sr., LaTasha Janelle Peele, Melvin L. Stukes and James “Jim” Weedon.

Md. Legislator Angered by Absence of Black Jockeys in Preakness on afro.com

Md. Legislator Angered by Absence of Black Jockeys in Preakness

on afro.com

ladies are the true examples of student-athletes,” said BSU Athletic Director Anton Goff. “They have embraced the mission of the Athletic Department and understand the importance we have stressed about academics. It is a proud moment for our coaches and administrators to be a part of the joyous occasion.” In D.C., Georgetown University graduated all six of its seniors on the men’s basketball team, including star players Austin Freeman of Mitchellville, Md., and Chris Wright of Bowie, Md.

Wright said that receiving a bachelors’ degree in government from Georgetown is one of the proudest moments of his young life. “It’s been a long road, but this is something I’m really proud of,” Wright said. “I said at the banquet that I put my blood, sweat and tears into this and I didn’t just mean on the basketball court; I meant in school, too. And, I know my family is proud of me for graduating and I am, too. It will always be great to be a Hoya.” Freeman, who’s preparing to start his professional basketball career, was just as happy as Wright to graduate. “Just to get a degree from Georgetown, it does a lot for you. I’m really happy I had the chance to come here,” Freeman said. “Georgetown is not one of the biggest schools so everyone knows everyone. You build relationships and this week shows how special it is, you learn a lot from everyone. It’ll be good to see all those guys one last time as students. We’ve been in this together. We’ve been through a lot, both good and bad, but we can say we made it through.”

We’ve been in this together. We’ve been through a lot, both good and bad, but we

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LEGAL NOTICES

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

20001-2131

Administration No.

2011ADM459

Elmer Milton Delilly III Decedent Robert M. McCarthy Esq. 4405 East West Hwy,

#201

Bethesda, MD 20814 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Willie Gross, whose address is 2308 Ashbrook Place, Suitland, MD 20746 was ap-

pointed personal representa- tive of the estate of Elmer Mil- ton Delilly III, who died on January 28, 2011 without a will, and will serve without

Court supervision. All un- known heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objec- tions to such appointment shall be filed with the Regis- ter of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before November 27, 2011. Claims against the de- cedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy

to the Register of Wills or filed

with the Register of Wills with

a copy to the undersigned, on

or before November 27, 2011, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, ad- dress and relationship. Date of Publication:

May 27, 2011 Name of newspaper:

Afro-American

Washington Law

Reporter

Willie Gross

Persona

Representative

301-395-7439

TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 5/27, 6/3, 6/10

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

20001-2131

Administration No.

2011ADM464

PAUL BLAIR Decedent Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Paul L. Blair Jr, whose ad- dress is 1311 Florida Ave NW Washington DC 20009 was

appointed personal repre- sentative of the estate of Paul Blair, who died on March 18, 2011 with a will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are un- known shall enter their appearance in this proceed- ing. Objections to such appointment (or to the pro- bate of decedent´s will) shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before November 27, 2011. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the under- signed with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before November 27, 2011, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register

of Wills, including name, ad-

dress and relationship. Date of Publication:

May 27, 2011 Name of newspaper:

Afro-American

Washington Law

Reporter

Paul L. Blair Jr. Personal Representative TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 5/27, 6/3, 6/10

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

20001-2131

Administration No.

2011ADM416

Jessie B. Thomas Decedent Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Johnnie B. Cadlett, whose address is 4 Laurel Trail, Ber- lin, MD 21811 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Jessie B. Thomas, who died on March 16, 2011 with a will, and will serve without Court supervi- sion. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceed- ing. Objections to such appointment (or to the pro- bate of decedent´s will) shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before November 27, 2011. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the under- signed with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before November 27, 2011, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, ad- dress and relationship. Date of Publication:

May 27 2011

LEGAL NOTICES

Name of newspaper:

Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Johnnie B. Cadlett Personal Representative

410-641-6184

TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 5/27, 6/3, 6/10

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

20001-2131

Administration No.

2011ADM441

OTTO UNGAR Decedent NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Genevieve O. Ungar, whose address is PO Box 57381, Washington DC 20037 was appointed personal repre- sentative of the estate of Otto Ungar, who died on January 1, 2011 with a will, and will serve without Court supervi- sion. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceed- ing. Objections to such appointment (or to the pro- bate of decedent´s will) shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street,

N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before

November 27, 2011. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the under- signed with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before November 27, 2011, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, ad- dress and relationship. Date of Publication:

May 27, 2011 Name of newspaper:

Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Genevieve O. Ungar Personal Representative

202-251-1488

TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 5/27, 6/3, 6/10

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

20001-2131

Administration No.

2011ADM386

ROY A. BLAKE Decedent Thomas H. Queen Esq. 530 Eighth Street SE Washington DC 20003 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Beryl Blake, whose address is 4804 Illinois Avenue NW, Washington DC 20011 was

appointed personal repre- sentative of the estate of Roy A. Blake, who died on November 7, 2005 with a will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objec- tions to such appointment (or to the probate of decedent´s will) shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before November 27, 2011. Claims against the de- cedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy

to

with the Register of Wills with

the Register of Wills or filed

a copy to the undersigned, on

or before November 27, 2011, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, ad- dress and relationship. Date of Publication:

May 27, 2011 Name of newspaper:

Afro-American

Washington Law

Reporter

Beryl Blake

Personal

Representative

202-882-9518

TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 5/27, 6/3, 6/10

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

20001-2131

Administration No.

2011ADM451

Janice Marie Autry

Decedent Charles E. Walton Esq 10905 Fort Washington Suite 201 Fort Washington MD

20744

Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS Chinwe M. Aldridge, whose address is 13229 L’enfant Drive FT., Washington MD 20744 was appointed per- sonal representative of the estate of Janice Marie Autry, who died on January 23, 2011 without a will, and will serve without Court supervi- sion. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceed- ing. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before Novem- ber 27, 2011. Claims against the decedent shall be pre- sented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register

LEGAL NOTICES

of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before November 27, 2011, or be forever barred. Persons be- lieved to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice

by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so in- form the Register of Wills, including name, address and

relationship.

Date of Publication:

May 27, 2011 Name of newspaper:

Afro-American

Washington Law

Reporter Chinwe M. Aldridge Personal Representative

301-292-8357

TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 5/27, 6/3, 6/10

IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA CIVIL DIVISION Civil Action No. 2005CA002912L RP

Calendar #18

Magistrate Jude Beshouri Vickie Jeffries 11805 Brookville Landing

Court

Mitchellville MD 20721

PLAINTIFF

v.

The Estate of Esther May Wire Serve Estha Wire Wal- per, Execturix PO Box 1086 Pinehusrt NC 28370

and

The Estate of Esther May

Wire

Serve: Marvin M. Wire.

Executor

Address Unknown

The Estate of Charles Edwin Wire, Serve: Raymond Wire

Executor

3911 Bradley Lane

Chevy Chase MD 20815

and

Jean Wire Murphy, heir

3069 Universty Terrace, NW

Washington DC 20016

and

Joan Myrl Wire Wood, Heir, Miami FL

and

Preston W. Wire Jr.,

heir,

4925

Loughboro Road, NW

Washington DC 20016

and

Estha Wire Walper, heir, PO Box 1086

Pinehurst NC 28370

and

Marvin

M. Wire, heir,

Address Unknown

and

C. Raymond Wire,

Heir, 3911 Bradley Lane

Chevy Chase, MD 20815

and District of Columbia

Serve: Attorney General of

the

District of Columbia Attn: Darlene Fields 441 4th Street NW Washington DC 20001

And

All Unknown owners of the property described below, their heirs, devisees, per- sonal representatives, and executors, administrators grantees, assigns or succes-

sors in right, title, interest in having or claiming any inter- est in the leasehold or fee simple in the property and premises in the District of Columbia described as:

Square 4065 LOT 0801: With cross streets at Neal Street to the north, West Virginia Ave- nue to the west, Montello Avenue to the east, and Morse Street to the south and adjacent to and abutting the east side of 1167 Neal Street

in NE, Washington, DC.

Defendants.

FOURTH AMENDED

ORDER OF

PUBLICATION

In accordance with D.C. Of- ficial Code §47-1375 (2001 ED.), the object of this proceeding is to secure the foreclosure of the right of re- demption in the following real property located in the Dis- trict of Columbia, and sold by

the Mayor of the District of

Columbia to the Plaintiff in

this action, described as

SQUARE 4065, LOT 0801 and assessed to the THE ESTATE OF ESTHER MAY WIRE, THE ESTATE OF CHARLES EDWIN WIRE and/or their known and un- known heirs, which property between Morse Street tot he south, West Virginia Avenue

to

the west, Montello Avenue

to

the east, and Neal Street to

the north in NE, adjacent to

and abutting the east side of

1167 Neal Street. the Com-

plaint states, among other things, that the amounts re- quired for redemption have not been paid. Pursuant to the Chief Judge´s Administration Or- der Number 02-11, it is this 11th day of May, 2011.,. ORDERED by the Superior Court of the District of Colum- bia, that notice be given by the insertion of a copy of this order in The Afro-American Newspaper, once a week for

three (3) successive weeks,

n o t i f y i n g a l l p e r s o n s

interested in the real property described above to appear in this Court on or before 27th day of July 2011, and redeem the Real Property by pay- ment of $56,650.00, together with interest from the date the Real Property tax certificate was purchased; court costs, reasonable attorney’s fees, expenses incurred in the publication and service of process reasonable fees for title search; all other amounts paid by Plaintiff in accor- dance with the provisions of D.C. Code §§47-1361 and 47-1377 (2001 ed.) and all outstanding municipal lien amounts due and owing on the aforementioned Real Property, or answer the com- plaint or, thereafter, a final judgment will be entered foreclosing the right of re- demption in the Real Prop- erty and vesting in the plaintiff a title in fee simple. J.E. Beshouri Magistrate Judge (Signed in chambers)

A TRUE TEST COPY:

5/27, 6/3, 6/10

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LEGAL NOTICES

Superior Court of the District of Columbia Civil Division Case No. 2010CA6853 IN RE:

Michael Lamonte Blyther Applicant ORDER OF PUBLICATION CHANGE OF NAME

Michael Lamonte Blyther having filed a complaint for judgment changing his name to Abdulshahed Hafez Al-

Muhaemen and having ap-

plied to the court for an Order of Publication of the notice required by law in such cases; it is by the Court this 9th day of May 2011, hereby ORDERED, that all persons concerned show cause, if any there be, on or before the 13th day of June 2011, why the prayers of said complaint should not be granted; pro- vided that a copy of this order be published once a week for three consecutive weeks be- fore said day in the Afro- American newspaper. 0 that pursuant to SCR 205(b) notice be sent to the DC Chief of Police and to the DC

Department of Corrections by registered or certified mail and that proof of service of mailing be made in the man- ner provided in SCR Probate Rule 19(b).

JOHN R. HESS JUDGE A TRUE COPY TEST:

5/27, 6/3, 6/10

Superior Court of the District of Columbia Civil Division Case No.

0003665-11

IN RE:

Trimaine Hason Lamale Blackmon Applicant ORDER OF PUBLICATION CHANGE OF NAME Trimaine Hason Lamale Blackmon having filed a com- plaint for judgment changing Trimaine Hason Lamale Blackmon name to Alexis Tramain Blackmon and hav- ing applied to the court for an Order of Publication of the notice required by law in such cases; it is by the Court this 10 day of May 2011 hereby. ORDERED, that all persons concerned show cause, if

any there be, on or before the 14th day of June 2011, why the prayers of said complaint should not be granted; pro- vided that a copy of this order be published once a week for three consecutive weeks be- fore said day in the Afro- American newspaper. JUDGE A TRUE COPY TEST:

5/20, 5/27, 6/3

LEGAL NOTICES

Superior Court of the District of Columbia Civil Division Case No. 0003693-11 IN RE:

ADOLPH JOSEPH HUTTER Applicant ORDER OF PUBLICATION CHANGE OF NAME

Adolph Joseph Hutter having filed a complaint for judgment changing Adolph Joseph Hutter name to Joseph Dolph Hutter and having applied to the court for an Order of Pub- lication of the notice required by law in such cases; it is by the Court this 11th day of May 2011 hereby. ORDERED, that all persons concerned show cause, if any there be, on or before the 18th day of June 2011, why the prayers of said complaint should not be granted; pro- vided that a copy of this order be published once a week for three consecutive weeks be- fore said day in the Afro- American newspaper. 0 that pursuant to SCR- 205(b) notice be sent to the applicants’s creditors by reg- istered or certified mail and that proof of service of mail- ing be made in the manner provided in SCR Probate rule

14(b).

JUDGE A TRUE COPY TEST:

5/20, 5/27, 6/3

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

20001-2131

Administration No.

2011ADM407

WILLIAM LAWSON PARKERSON, JR. Decedent Michelle Lanchester, Attorney at Law 601 Pennsylvania Ave NW Suite 900 South Building Washington DC 20004 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Michelle D. Parkerson, whose address is 2132 32nd Place, SE Washington DC 20020 was, appointed per- sonal representative of the estate of William Lawson

LEGAL NOTICES

Parkerson, Jr. who died on September 4, 2002 without a will, and will serve without Court supervision. All un- known heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objec- tions to such appointment

shall be filed with the Regis- ter of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before November 20, 2011. Claims against the de- cedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy

to the Register of Wills or filed

with the Register of Wills with

a copy to the undersigned, on

or before November 20, 2011, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, ad- dress and relationship. Date of Publication:

May 20, 2011 Name of newspaper:

Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Michelle D. Parkerson Personal Representative

202-220-3000

TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 5/20, 5/27, 6/3

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

20001-2131

Administration No.

2011ADM180

Edythe Ferguson Decedent Thomas L Campbell, Esq 3807 Minnesota Ave NE Washington DC 20019 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Angela Walker Suttles, whose address is 4820 Dix Street, NE Washington DC 20019 was appointed per- sonal representative of the estate of Edythe Ferguson, who died on February 8, 2011 with a will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are un-

LEGAL NOTICES

known shall enter their appearance in this proceed- ing. Objections to such appointment (or to the pro- bate of decedent´s will) shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before November 20, 2011. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the under- signed with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before November 20,

2011, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs

or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, ad- dress and relationship. Date of Publication:

May 20, 2011 Name of newspaper:

Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Angela Walker Suttles Personal Representative TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 5/20, 5/27, 6/3

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

20001-2131

Administration No.

2011ADM418

MINNIE R. PARKER Decedent Mack C Allen PO Box 6916 Washington DC 20032 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Connie L. Parker, C. Maurice Parker and Vincent T. Parker whose address(es) are 3432 N Street SE, Washington DC 20019, 2319 Sawgrass Cir- cle, Derby KS 67037, and 336 Glen Oaks Blvd. Dallas TX 75232(was, were) ap- pointed personal representa-

tive(s) of the estate of Minnie

R Parker, who died on

November 10, 2010 without a will, and will serve without Court supervision. All un- known heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown

shall enter their appearance

in this proceeding. Objec-

tions to such appointment

May 28, 2011 - June 3, 2011, The Afro-American D3

LEGAL NOTICES

shall be filed with the Regis- ter of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before November 20, 2011. Claims against the de- cedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy

to the Register of Wills or filed

with the Register of Wills with

a copy to the undersigned, on

or before November 20, 2011, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, ad- dress and relationship. Date of Publication:

May 20, 2011 Name of newspaper:

Afro-American

Washington Law

Reporter

Connie L. Parker C. Maurice Parker Vincent T. Parker Personal Representative

202-584-8221

316-788-1771

214-372-4897

TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 5/20, 5/27, 6/3

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

20001-2131

Administration No.

2011ADM385

James B. Lancaster Sr. Decedent NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Valerie Lancaster Beal, whose address is 220 River- side Blvd., Apt 38A New York, NY 10069 was ap- pointed personal representa-

tive of the estate of James B. Lancaster, Sr. who died on January 7, 2011 with a will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objec- tions to such appointment (or to the probate of decedent´s will) shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before November 13,

2011. Claims against the de-

cedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy

to the Register of Wills or filed

with the Register of Wills with

a copy to the undersigned, on

or before November 13, 2011, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication

shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, ad- dress and relationship. Date of Publication:

May 13, 2011 Name of newspaper:

Afro-American

Washington Law

Reporter

Valerie Lancaster Beal Personal Representative

917-576-8302

TRUE TEST COPY

REGISTER OF WILLS 5/13, 5/20, 5/27

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

20001-2131

Administration No.

2011ADM414

James Marc Taylor Decedent NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Rachel Randolph, whose ad- dress is 5221 Winchester Crossing Court, Canal Win-

chester, Ohio 43110 was ap- pointed personal representa- tive of the estate of James Marc Taylor, who died on March 30, 2011 without a will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objec- tions to such appointment shall be filed with the Regis- ter of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before November 13,

2011. Claims against the de-

cedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy

to the Register of Wills or filed

with the Register of Wills with

a copy to the undersigned, on

or before November 13, 2011, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of

this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, ad- dress and relationship. Date of Publication:

May 13, 2011 Name of newspaper:

Afro-American

Washington Law

Reporter

Rachel Randolph

Personal

Representative

614-920-0279

TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 5/13, 5/20, 5/27

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

20001-2131

Administration No.

2011ADM403

Betty J. Heath Decedent NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Linda Laws, whose address is 9314 Fairhaven Avenue, Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20772 was appointed per- sonal representative of the estate of Betty J. Heath, who died on April 9, 2011 with a will, and will serve without Court supervision. All un- known heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objec-

tions to such appointment (or to the probate of decedent´s will) shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before November 13,

2011. Claims against the de-

cedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy

to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with

a copy to the undersigned, on

LEGAL NOTICES

or before November 13, 2011, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register

of Wills, including name, ad- dress and relationship.

Date of Publication:

May 13, 2011 Name of newspaper:

Afro-American

Washington Law

Reporter

Linda Laws

Personal

Representative

301-801-4839

TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 5/13, 5/20, 5/27

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

20001-2131

Administration No.

2011ADM411

Sharon Y. Leonard Decedent NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Kiona M. Leonard, whose ad- dress is 2908 30th Street, #10, Washington DC 20020 was appointed personal re- presentative of the estate of Sharon Y. Leonard, who died

on November 10, 2010 with- out a will, and will serve with- out Court supervision. All un- known heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objec- tions to such appointment shall be filed with the Regis- ter of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before November 13,

2011. Claims against the de-

cedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy

to the Register of Wills or filed

with the Register of Wills with

a copy to the undersigned, on

or before November 13, 2011, or be forever barred.

Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, ad- dress and relationship. Date of Publication:

May 13, 2011 Name of newspaper:

Afro-American

Washington Law

Reporter

Kiona M. Leonard Personal Representative

202-696-9634

TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 5/13, 5/20, 5/27

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION

Washington, D.C.

20001-2131

Administration No.

2011ADM345

Joe Louis Randolph Decedent Evelyn E. Crawford Queen 1629 K Street NW Suite 300 Washington DC 20006 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Erik Randolph and Tony Ran- dolph, whose address(es) is

1012 Jackson Street NE,

Washington DC 20017 were appointed personal repre- sentative(s) of the estate of Joe Louis Randolph, who died on February 25, 2011 without a will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are un- known shall enter their appearance in this proceed- ing. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C.

20001, on or before Novem- ber 13, 2011. Claims against the decedent shall be pre- sented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before November 13, 2011, or be forever barred. Persons be- lieved to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice

by mail within 25 days of its

first publication shall so in-

form the Register of Wills,

including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication:

May 13, 2011 Name of newspaper:

Afro-American

Washington Law

Reporter

Erik Randolph

Tony Randolph

Personal

Representative

202-316-1221

240-672-4956

TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 5/13, 5/20, 5/27

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

20001-2131

Administration No.

2011ADM362

Amanda G. Sellers aka Amanda Sellers Decedent NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Jackie Sellers and Cherly Sellers, whose address is 5814 Ruatan Street, College Park, 20740 were appointed personal representative(s) of the estate of Amanda G. Sell- ers aka Amanda Sellers, who died on February 22, 2011 with a will, and will serve with- out Court supervision. All un- known heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objec- tions to such appointment (or to the probate of decedent´s will) shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before November 13,

2011. Claims against the de-

cedent shall be presented to

the undersigned with a copy

to the Register of Wills or filed

with the Register of Wills with

a copy to the undersigned, on

or before November 13,

2011 or be forever barred.

LEGAL NOTICES

Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of

this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, ad- dress and relationship. Date of Publication:

May 13, 2011 Name of newspaper:

Afro-American

Washington Law

Reporter

Jackie Sellers

Cheryl Sellers

Personal

Representative

202-669-6297

TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 5/13, 5/20, 5/27

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C.

20001-2131

Administration No.

2011NRT12

Lena Celeste Loman Decedent NOTICE OF EXISTENCE OF REVOCABLE TRUST

Lena Celeste Loman (name of deceased settlor) whose address was 517 Fern Place, NW, Washington DC 20012 created a revocable trust on July 28, 1989, which re-

mained in existence on the date of her death on October 9, 2010, and Lillian L. Barnes, whose address is

9 4 1 7

Springdale, Maryland 20774

s the currently acting trustee, hereinafter the Trustee. Communications to the trust should be mailed or directed

to Cheryl Chapman Hender-

son, Esq. at 4920 Niagara

Road, Suite 200 College Park, Maryland 20740.

The Trust is subject to claims of the deceased settlor’s creditors, costs of admin- stration of the settlor’s estate, the expenses of the

deceased settlor’s funeral and disposal of remains, and

statutory allowances to a

surviving spouse and chil- dren to the extent the de- ceased settlor’s residuary probate estate is inadequate

to satisfy those claims, costs,

expenses, and allowances.

Claims of the deceased set- tlor’s creditors are barred as against the Trustee and the trust property unless pre- sented to the Trustee at the address provided herein on

or before November 13, 2011

6 months after the date of the

first publication of this no- tice). An action to contest the validity of this trust must be commenced by the earliest of (1) Octomber 9, 2011 (one year from date of death of the

deceased settler) or (2) November 13, 2011(6 months from the date of first publication of this notice) or (3) ninety days after the Trustee sends the person a copy of the trust instrument and a notice informing the person of the trust’s exis- tence, the Trustee’s name and address, and the time al- owed for commencing a proceeding. The Trustee may proceed to

distribute the trust property in accordance with the terms of the trust before the expiration of the time within which an action must be commenced unless the Trustee knows of

a pending judicial proceeding

contesting the validity of the

trust or the Trustee has re-

ceived notice from a potential contestant who thereafter commences a judicial proceeding within sixty days after notification. This Notice must be mailed postmarked within 15 days of ts first publication to each heir and qualified beneficiary

of the trust and any other per-

son who would be an

nterested person within the meaningof D.C. Code, sec.

20-101(d)

Date of Publication:

May 13, 2011 Name of newspaper:

Afro-American

Washington Law

Reporter

Lillian L. Barnes Personal Representative TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 5/13, 5/20, 5/27

U t i c a

P l a c e ,

LEGAL NOTICES

Concrete General, Inc. is seeking MBE subcontractors & suppliers who perform various types of work relating to highway, bridge, & utility construction in the Mary- land area. Call Mark Miller 301-948-4450. EEO

of work relating to highway, bridge, & utility construction in the Mary- land area. Call Mark

MBE/WBE Subcontractors and Suppliers Ulliman Schutte Construction, LLC, Miamisburg, OH is interested in receiving quotes from qualified MBE/WBE subcontractors and suppliers for the Di- vision C CSO-019 Overflow and Diversion Structures project located in, Washington, D.C., bid- ding on June 8, 2011. Opportunities are available for Specifications Divisions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 11, and 16. Plans available online:

http://www.ullimanschutte.com/documents/bids/ Please Fax quotes to 937-910-9910 attention Nick Scott on June 7th by 5:00 pm. Contact telephone

937-910-9900.

Ulliman Schutte Construction, LLC 9900 Springboro Pike Miamisburg, Ohio 45342 www.ullimanschutte.com Equal Opportunity Employer

ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, MARYLAND Annapolis, Maryland

ANNOUNCEMENT

REQUEST FOR BIDS

”Notice to Contractors for the Sylvan Shores Sewer

and Water is available online at the Purchasing Of- fice website www.aacounty.org and www. ebidmarketplace.com. On or after May 23, 2011,

Plans and Specifications may be examined or pur- chased at the Department of Public Works, Heritage Office Complex, 2662 Riva Road, 3rd Floor/Suite 350, Annapolis, MD 21401, 410-222-7543. Copies of these documents may be obtained upon payment of $150.00 payable to Anne Arundel County. And is non refundable. Bids will be received until time/date shown below, at the Purchasing Office, Heritage Office Complex, 2660 Riva Road, 3rd Floor, Annap- olis, MD 21401. Bids received after the date and time set will be rejected. Due by 1:30 p.m. Local Time, Tuesday, July 26, 2011 Project No.: W803701 & S803801

Contact: Vahid Tayebi 410-222-7537

William L. Schull, C.P.M., CPPB Purchasing Agent

Archer Western Contractors, Ltd. is seeking partici- pation from bona fide subcontractors for, Contract

No. CD4257A05 WSSC Western Branch WWTP

ENR and Upgrade. All Subcontractor/ Supplier quotes are due before Friday, June 24th, 10:00 a.m. Fax quotes to: (404) 495-8701 referencing project name and scope of work. Construction of the En- hanced Nutrient Removal (ENR) facilities at West- ern Branch WWTP and other upgrades. - All other work specified herein and/or indicated on the plans. Drawings Plans are available to potential sub- contractors and suppliers, and other interested par- ties must obtain WSSC security clearance in order to obtain the Construction Plans. WSSC´s Security Clearance Form may be found in CBR under the tab ”Bidder Registration”. Parties interested in obtaining the Construction Plans are required to complete this Form and submit it along with a copy of the ap- plicant´s Driver´s License to Ms. Ana Debevoise of WSSC´s Acquisition Office by mail at the address listed above, by fax at (301)206-8290 or by e-mail at adebevo@wsscwater.com. Quotes will be evaluated on scope, price, experience, financial condition, and other pertinent factors. EOEM/F