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I Shall Not Die Titokowaru’s War, 1868–1869 With a new introduction James Belich You were

I Shall Not Die

Titokowaru’s War, 1868–1869 With a new introduction

James Belich

You were made a Pākehā, and the name of England was given to you for your tribe. I was made a Māori, and New Zealand was the name given to me. You forgot that there was a space fixed between us of great extent – the

sea. You, forgetting that, jumped over from that place to this. I did not jump over from this place to that … Move off from my places to your own places in the midst of the

sea.

Straddling the Māori and European worlds of the 1860s, Titokowaru was one of New Zealand’s greatest leaders. A brilliant strategist, he used every device to save the Taranaki people from European invasion. When peaceful negotiation failed, he embarked on a stunning military campaign against government forces. His victories were many, before the battle he lost. Although he was ‘forgotten by the Pākehā as a child forgets a nightmare’, his vision was one that would endure.

Titokowaru (Ngāti Ruanui) was born in South Taranaki in 1823. Converting to Christianity (and pacifism) at 20, he later became disillusioned with Christianity and joined the bitter fighting of the period – protesting against continual land loss and the erosion of his people’s rights. Leading a strong intertribal force, Titokowaru nearly succeeded in repelling the colonial forces in the Taranaki wars of 1868–69. But at the final hour his people deserted him, in circumstances that remain unclear.

Winner of the Adam Award on first publication in 1989, I Shall Not Die is a compelling history that has contributed to the rethinking of New Zealand’s past.

Titokowaru

‘This is a magnificent book, … and it proclaims yet another Māori leader, like Te Puea and Rua Kenana, whom recent historians have forced us Pākehā to

recognise as great New Zealanders.’

Jock Phillips,

Dominion Sunday Times, 1989

Zealanders.’ Jock Phillips, Dominion Sunday Times , 1989 P O Box 12474, Wellington 6144 • Phone:

P O Box 12474, Wellington 6144 Phone: 04 473 8128 Email: info@bwb.co.nz www.bwb.co.nz

SALES SHEET

JAMES BELICH I SHALL NOT DIE Titokowaru’s War 1868–1869
JAMES
BELICH
I SHALL
NOT DIE
Titokowaru’s War
1868–1869

RRP $39.99 • approx 320 pages • 240 x 170 mm paperback • 50 b/w photographs and paintings ISBN 9781877242496 • October 2010 First published in 1989 • With a new introduction by James Belich

See over for author, contents, quotes

Key points:

• This is a terrific piece of writing, and a remarkable piece of military history

• The first edition went through three printings, with sales of over 5000

• The book has been out of print for over a decade

• James Belich is one of the country’s leading historians

• His recent book Replenishing the Earth (OUP) is being promoted throughout 2010

Distributor: HarperCollins, P O Box 1, Shortland Street, Auckland Contact: customerservices@harpercollins.co.nz Sales Manager: Tony Moores, tony.moores@harpercollins.co.nz

CONTENTS

Chapter 1

Titokowaru’s Peace

Chapter 2

The Year of the Daughters

Chapter 3

‘I Shall Not Die’

Chapter 4

The Patea Field Force

Chapter 5

The Death of Kane

Chapter 6

McDonnell’s Revenge

Chapter 7

The Beak

Chapter 8

The Little Tyrant

Chapter 9

The Battle of Moturoa

Chapter 10

Handley’s Woolshed

Chapter 11

The Brink

Chapter 12

Tauranga Ika

Chapter 13

The Lion at Bay

Chapter 14

The Hunt

epIlogue:

The Last Battle

Chapter 14 The Hunt epIlogue: The Last Battle Comet over Mt Egmont, 1882. Photographer unknown, ATL.

Comet over Mt Egmont, 1882. Photographer unknown, ATL.

Comet over Mt Egmont, 1882. Photographer unknown, ATL. James Belich , ONZM, FRSNZ , has written

James Belich, ONZM, FRSNZ, has written several histories shaping the way we see New Zealand today. The recipient of many honours and awards, he is Research Professor of History at Victoria University of Wellington. His bestselling publications include Replenishing the Earth: The Settler Revolution and the Rise of the Angloworld, 1780–1930 (Oxford University Press, 2009) and Penguin’s two-volume history of New Zealand, Making Peoples (1996) and Paradise Reforged (2001).

Making Peoples (1996) and Paradise Reforged (2001). Imprisoned followers of the Pai Marire Church, 1866.

Imprisoned followers of the Pai Marire Church, 1866. Photographer unknown, ATL.

of the Pai Marire Church, 1866. Photographer unknown, ATL. Encampment near Te Putahi Pa, [1866]. Watercolour

Encampment near Te Putahi Pa, [1866]. Watercolour by von Tempsky, ATL.