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Province of SIQUIJOR

Province of SIQUIJOR 1 Philippines Fourth Progress Report on the Millennium Development Goals using CBMS Data

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Philippines Fourth Progress Report on the Millennium Development Goals using CBMS Data - Province of Province of Marinduque

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) Using CBMS Data

Province of Siquijor

Foreword The Provincial Millennium Development Goals (MDG) Report was prepared with the inten- tion of

Foreword

The Provincial Millennium Development Goals (MDG) Report was prepared with the inten- tion of providing a true and correct picture of the status of the province of Siquijor’s efforts to help the national government meet its global commitments to eradicate poverty. Knowing that more than anyone else, the Local Government Units (LGUs) are the primary institutions that deal directly with the communities who are being threatened by problems of poverty, hunger, unemployment and so many other social, economic and political problems, it would be logical to say that the LGUs take care of their people’s needs.

This report will show the accomplishments of the province, in so far as its extent of helping achieve the targets of the 8 Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). In doing this, we acknowl- edge/appreciate the contributions of all Siquijodnons who worked in close partnership with the government.The national government agencies, people’s organizations, and civil society have equally supported the local government in achieving the goals of reducing poverty, achieving universal primary education, promoting gender equality, reducing child mortality, improving maternal health, combating HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases, ensuring environmental sustainability, and, lastly, developing a global partnership for development.

The MDG Team of the province is very grateful to the administrative support of the six LGU municipalities headed by their respective Mayors and the technical support of the Municipal Planning and Development Coordinators (MPDCs) and the Municipal Local Government Operations Of cers (MLGOOs). Without them, it would have been very dif cult to produce this MDG Report.

The good thing about the Community-Based Monitoring System (CBMS), especially for us in the Planning and Development Ofce, is that we are able to locate where the people who need specic government interventions are, who they are, and what they really need in order to live a decent and improved quality of life. It is also very helpful to our of ce in our planning activities.

For us in the Planning Division, we now have baseline data to guide us in our decision- mak- ing because our Chief Executive would want correct data and information to help him decide what programs and projects need to be prioritized. This Report will also be submitted to the Local Chief Executive, to the Local Development Councils of the six municipalities and their respective Sanggunians to guide them in their respective roles and functions.

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Province of Siquijor

their respective roles and functions. 2 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

To the entire staff of the Provincial Planning and Development Of ce, for their unwaver- ing support even up to going many hours of overtime work in order to beat deadlines, our heartfelt thanks and appreciation.

To the constituents and the civil society/private sector representatives, we extend our sincer- est thanks for their involvement in making this report a reality.

We especially extend our warm gratitude to the PEP-CBMS Network Team headed by Dr. Celia M. Reyes, PEP Co-Director and CBMS Network Leader, the United Nations Develop- ment Programme (UNDP) Philippines and the National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA) for their invaluable support.

With all Siquijodnons cooperating and supporting our local of cials, the province of Siquijor will truly become a progressive island.

God Bless Siquijor!

The Provincial Planning and Development Coordinator

The Provincial Planning and Development Coordinator Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Province of Siquijor

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Message The preparation of provincial MDGs reports is a critical step that Local Govern- ment

Message

Message The preparation of provincial MDGs reports is a critical step that Local Govern- ment Units

The preparation of provincial MDGs reports is a critical step that Local Govern- ment Units (LGUs) have taken in the overall effort to localize the MDGs. As it is often said, the MDGs will be ‘won or lost’ at the local level given the conditions of uneven progress and disparities across regions and provinces in the country.

Beyond the national averages, one can see wide disparities on the gains in poverty reduction, universal education, child mortality and maternal health. This situation reinforces the notion that the progress of each province is just as important as the achievements of the country as a whole. After all, the Philippines’ progress towards the MDGs, is the sum of the efforts and gains of all LGUs.

By preparing provincial reports, LGUs are provided vital information on the status of the MDGs in their areas of inuence. These reports are important sources of information for planning, resource allocation and priority setting that LGUs are tasked under their mandate of effective local governance. Likewise, in the course of the preparation of the reports, the capacity of LGUs to collect, monitor and use data for decision making has been greatly enhanced. The reports also show how far the Community Based Monitoring System (CBMS) that UNDP has supported can go in terms of its use.

Against the backdrop of renewed optimism emanating from the new political leadership, this rst set of nine Provincial Reports on the MDGs is a timely and important milestone.The reports provide crucial insights on how to overcome the constraints in achieving the MDGs locally as the country gears towards the last stretch to attain the eight goals by 2015. They also emphasize the important role of active collaboration of political leaders, stakeholders, and donors in achieving the MDGs.

I wish to commend the nine Provincial Governments that prepared their reports – the Agusan del Norte, Agusan del Sur, Biliran, Camarines Norte, Eastern Samar, Marinduque, Romblon, Sa- rangani and Siquijor Province – the Community-Based Monitoring System (CBMS) Network and the National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA) for working together in bringing about this important accomplishment.

With this initiative, it is hoped that other provinces will follow suit to attain nationwide support

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for the need to accelerate the pace of the achievement of the MDGs by by 2015. 2015.

Dr Jac ueline Badcock
Dr Jac ueline Badcock

Dr. Jacqueline Badcock

UN Resident Coordinator and UNDP Resident Representative

Province of Siquijor

and UNDP Resident Representative Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Message

Message Republic of the Philippines PROVINCE OF SIQUIJOR OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR The conduct of the
Message Republic of the Philippines PROVINCE OF SIQUIJOR OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR The conduct of the

Republic of the Philippines PROVINCE OF SIQUIJOR OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR

The conduct of the Community-Based Monitoring System (CBMS) survey in the province of Siquijor provides the local leaders with a good picture of what the government under my present administra- tion had done to improve the living conditions of my constituents in addressing their problems and in providing their basic needs.

their problems and in providing their basic needs. The results were commendable and gratifying because we

The results were commendable and gratifying because we know our efforts did not go to waste but were properly put to good use.

Though the province of Siquijor is small in terms of land area and population, and therefore would only get a meager share from the national government in the form of the Internal Revenue Allotment (IRA), we are proud to say that Siquijor was never in the

list of the 20 poorest provinces in the Philippines. This only proves that development of

a place is not solely dependent on how much money there is in the government coffers

but on how the money is being spent for the delivery of basic services and how these services are prioritized.

All efforts of my administration are focused on the reduction of poverty and increase

of income of my constituents. Right now, we are implementing very critical programs and projects in order to realize these immediate twin goals of government. These goals are

in fact at the very heart of our nation’s thrust and we have committed to achieve these

goals together with the rest of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

Governance is at the center of all our efforts to improve the quality of life of our people. The people of my province understood that Governance is a collective responsibility where everyone -- the governed and the elective officials – is a stakeholder. This proved to be an effective scheme for Siquijor which resulted in yielding more than average re- sults, even with meager resources at the disposal of government.

even with meager resources at the disposal of government. Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

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Province of Siquijor

We consider good governance as the forefront of development. In our own lingo, we call it “strong political will.”

The Philippines will only be as strong as its weakest local government unit and so we recognize the very important role we have in charting our nation’s destiny.

God Bless Siquijor!

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Province of Siquijor

ORLANDO A. FUA, JR.

Governor

6 Province of Siquijor ORLANDO A. FUA, JR. Governor Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Table of Contents

Table of Contents Foreword Messages UN Resident Coordinator Dr. Jacqueline Badcock Siquijor Governor Orlando Fua, Table

Foreword

Messages UN Resident Coordinator Dr. Jacqueline Badcock

Siquijor Governor Orlando Fua,

Table of Contents List of Acronyms List of Tables List of Figures

Executive Summary

Part 1. Provincial Profile

1. History

2. Geo-physical Environment

3. Population and Social Environment

4. Local Economy

5. Infrastructure/Utilities/Facilities

6. Local Institutional Capability

Part 2. Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)

Goal 1 - Eradicate Extreme Poverty and Hunger

Goal 2 - Achieve Universal Primary Education

Goal 3 - Promote Gender Equality

Goal 4 - Reduce Child Mortality

Goal 5 - Improve Maternal Health

4 - Reduce Child Mortality Goal 5 - Improve Maternal Health Status Report on the Millennium

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

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Table of Contents Goal 6 - Combat HIV / AIDS, Malaria and Other Diseases Goal

Table of Contents

Goal 6 - Combat HIV / AIDS, Malaria and Other Diseases Goal 7 - Ensure Environmental Sustainability Goal 8 - Develop a Global Partnership for Development

Part 3. Meeting the 2015 Challenge

Priority Programs and Policy Responses Financing the MDGs Monitoring ProgressToward the Attainment of the MDGs

Part 4. Conclusion and Recommendations

Explanatory Text

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Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

List of Acronyms

List of Acronyms AIDS Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome ALS Alternative Learning System APGR Annual

AIDS

Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome

ALS

Alternative Learning System

APGR

Annual Population Growth Rate

ATM

Automated Teller Machine

BEMONC

Basic Emergency Obstetrical Neonatal Care

BIT-IC

Bohol Institute of Technology – Institute College

CA

Cancer

CEMONIC

Comprehensive Obstetric Neonatal Care

CS

Civic Society

DA

Department of Agriculture

DAR

Department of Agrarian Reform

DepEd

Department of Education

DOST

Department of Science and Technology

DOTC

Department of Transportation and Communications

DPWH

Department of Public Works and Highways

DTI

Department of Trade and Industry

FAITH

Food Always in the Home

GAD

Gender and Development

GER

Gross Enrollment Ratio

HIV

Human Immune Deficiency Virus

IEC

Information Education Communication

ISLACOM

Isla Communication

LGU

Local Government Unit

MCP

Maternity Care Package

MSWD

Metro Siquijor Water District

NER

Net Enrollment Ratio

NPC

National Power Corporation

NSCB

National Statistics Coordination Board

NSO

National Statistics Office

OFW

Overseas Filipino Worker

OSFUA

Optimizing Sustainable Food Upliftment Alternatives

PEPT

Philippine Educational Placement Test

PO

PeopleÊs Organization

PROSIELCO

Province of Siquijor Electric Cooperative

PTCA

Parents Teachers Community Association

PTCA Parents Teachers Community Association Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Province of Siquijor

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List of Acronyms QMIS Quezon Memorial Institute of Siquijor RCDG Reinforced Concrete Deck Girders REB

List of Acronyms

QMIS

Quezon Memorial Institute of Siquijor

RCDG

Reinforced Concrete Deck Girders

REB

Reach Every Barangay

RHM

Rural Health Midwife

SPES

Special Program for the Employment of Student

SPUG

Strategic Power Utility Group

SSC

Siquijor State College

TB-DOTS

TB-Directly Observed Treatment Service

TESDA

Technical Education and Skills Development Authority

TMSI

Telecommunication Management System Inc.

TWD

Technical Working Group

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Province of Siquijor

TWD Technical Working Group 10 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

List of Tables

List of Tables Table 1 Summary of MDG indicators, Province of Siquijor, 2006 Table 2 Land

Table 1

Summary of MDG indicators, Province of Siquijor, 2006

Table 2

Land Area, Population (2007), Number of Households and Number of Barangays

Table 3

Population in Central Visayas Region, By Province

Table 4

Siquijor Population, Annual Population Growth Rate, Density, Area by Municipality

Table 5

Mortality Data, Siquijor Province

Table 6

Morbidity, Leading Causes, Number and Rate per 1,000 Populations, 5-Year Average (2003-2007) and 2008,

Table 7

Province of Siquijor Total Enrolment of Public Elementary School, Central Visayas

Table 8

Total Enrolment of Public Secondary School Central Visayas

Table 9

Enrolment Participation Rate, Province of Siquijor, School Years 2006-2007, 2007-2008, 2008-2009

Table 10

Teacher-Pupil Ratio, Province of Siquijor , School Years 2006-2007, 2007-2008, 2008-2009

Table 11

Classroom-Pupil Ratio, Province of Siquijor, School Years 2006-2007, 2007-2008, 2008-2009

Table 12

Percentage of Paved Roads (National and Provincial Roads), Province of Siquijor

Table 13

Road Classification for Siquijor Province, Provincial Roads

Table 14

Road Classification for Siquijor Province, National Roads (DPWH)

Table 15

National Road Classification, Province of Siquijor, By Municipality

Table 16

Provincial Road Classification, Province of Siquijor, By Municipality

Table 17

Municipal Road Classification, Province of Siquijor, By Municipality

Table 18

Barangay Road Classification, Province of Siquijor, By Municipality

Table 19

Total Road Length, Province of Siquijor

Table 20

Total Road Length by Materials Paved, Province of Siquijor

Table 21

Number of Barangays Served by Electricity and Households Connections, Province of Siquijor, 2009

Table 22

Electric Generation & Consumption, Province of Siquijor

Table 23

Electrical Connections by Type of Users, by Municipality, Province of Siquijor, 2009

Table 24

Water Supply Provision for Barangays, by Water Level, Province of Siquijor

Table 25

Water Consumption & Generation, Province of Siquijor

Table 26

Magnitude and Proportion of Households/Population Living Below Poverty Threshold,

Table 27

by Municipality, by Sex and by Urban/Rural, Siquijor, 2006 Magnitude and Proportion of Households/Population Living Below Food Threshold, by Municipality,

Table 28

by Sex and by Urban/Rural, Siquijor, 2006 Poverty Gap, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Table 29

Employment Rate, by Municipality, by Sex and by Urban/Rural, Siquijor, 2006

by Municipality, by Sex and by Urban/Rural, Siquijor, 2006 Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

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Province of Siquijor

List of Tables 12 Table 30 Magnitude and Proportion of Households/Population Who Experienced Food Shortage,

List of Tables

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Table 30

Magnitude and Proportion of Households/Population Who Experienced Food Shortage, by Municipality,

Table 31

by Sex and by Urban/Rural, Siquijor, 2006 Prevalence of Underweight Children Under 5 Years of Age, by Municipality, by Sex and

Table 32

by Urban/Rural, Siquijor, 2006 Magnitude and Proportion of Children Aged 6-12 Years Old Enrolled in Elementary Education, by Municipality,

Table 33

by Sex and by Urban/Rural, Siquijor, 2006 Magnitude and Proportion of Children Aged 13-16 years old Enrolled in High School, by Municipality,

Table 34

by Sex and by Urban/Rural, Siquijor, 2006 Magnitude and Proportion of Children Aged 6-16 Years Old Enrolled in School, by Municipality, by Sex and

Table 35

by Urban/Rural, Siquijor, 2006 Literacy Rate of 15-24 Year-Olds, by Municipality, by Sex and by Urban/Rural, Siquijor, 2006

Table 36

Ratio of Girls to Boys in Primary Education, by Municipality and by Urban/ Rural, Siquijor, 2006

Table 37

Ratio of Girls to Boys in Secondary Education, by Municipality and by Urban/Rural, Siquijor, 2006

Table 38

Ratio of Girls to Boys in Tertiary Education, by Municipality and by Urban/Rural, Siquijor, 2006

Table 39

Ratio of Literate Females to Males (15 – 24 years old), by Municipality and by Urban/Rural,

Table 40

Siquijor, 2006 Proportion of Elective Seats Held by Women, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Table 41

Magnitude and Proportion of Children Aged 0 to Less Than 5 Years Old Who Died, by Municipality, by Sex and

Table 42

by Urban/Rural, Siquijor, 2006 Magnitude and Proportion of Infants Who Died, by Municipality, by Sex and by Urban/Rural,

Table 43

Siquijor, 2006 Magnitude and Proportion of Children Aged 1 to Less Than 5 Years Who Died, by Municipality, by Sex and

Table 44

by Urban/Rural, Siquijor, 2006 Magnitude and Proportion of Women Deaths Due to Pregnancy-Related Causes, by Municipality

Table 45

and by Urban/Rural, Siquijor, 2006 Prevalence and Death Rates Associated with Tuberculosis, by Municipality, by Sex and by Urban/Rural,

Table 46

Siquijor, 2006 Distribution of Land with Forest Cover, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2010

Table 47

Magnitude and Proportion of Households/Population with Access to Safe Drinking Water, by Municipality,

Table 48

by Sex and by Urban/Rural, Siquijor, 2006 Magnitude and Proportion of Households/Population with Access to Sanitary Toilet Facility, by Municipality, by Sex and by Urban/Rural, Siquijor, 2006

Province of Siquijor

Sex and by Urban/Rural, Siquijor, 2006 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Table 49

Magnitude and Proportion of Households/Population who are Informal Settlers, by Municipality,

Table 50

by Sex and by Urban/Rural, Siquijor, 2006 Magnitude and Proportion of Households/Population who Live in Makeshift Housing, by Municipality,

Table 51

by Sex and by Urban/Rural, Siquijor, 2006 Magnitude and Proportion of Households/Population Living in Inadequate Living Conditions, by Municipality,

Table 52

by Sex and by Urban/Rural, Siquijor, 2006 Magnitude and Proportion of Households with Landline/Telephone Lines, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Table 53

Magnitude and Proportion of Households with Cellphones, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Table 54

Magnitude and Proportion of Households with Computers, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Table 55

The CBMS-MDG Indicators and their Definition

Table 56

Poverty and Food Thresholds

their Definition Table 56 Poverty and Food Thresholds Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

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Province of Siquijor

List of Figures Figure 1 Regional Location Map Figure 2 Provincial Map of Siquijor Figure

List of Figures

Figure 1

Regional Location Map

Figure 2

Provincial Map of Siquijor

Figure 3

Population, annual population growth rate and population density, by municipality

Figure 4

Location of Health and Allied Facilities

Figure 5

Location of Educational Facilities

Figure 6

Ports in Siquijor

Figure 7

Road Map of Siquijor

Figure 8

Electricity and household connections

Figure 9

Electrical connections by type of users by municipality

Figure 10

Percent of households served per municipality, by level

Figure 11

Map on Proportion of Population Living Below Poverty Threshold, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Figure 12

Map on Proportion of Population Living Below Food Threshold, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Figure 13

Map of Poverty Gap Ratio, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Figure 14

Map on Employment Rate, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Figure 15

Map of Proportion of Population Who Experienced Food Shortage

Figure 16

By Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Map of Prevalence of Underweight Children Under 5 Years of Age By, Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Figure 17

Map of Proportion of Children Aged 6-12 Years Old in Elementary Education,

Figure 18

by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Map of Proportion of Children Aged 13-16 Years Old in High School,

Figure 19

by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Map of Proportion of Children Aged 6-16 Years Old in School by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Figure 20

Map of Literacy Rate of the Population 15-24 Year-Olds by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Figure 21

Map of Ratio of Girls to Boys in Primary Education by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Figure 22

Map of Ratio of Girls to Boys in Secondary Education, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Figure 23

Map of Ratio of Girls to Boys in Tertiary Education, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Figure 24

Map of Ratio of Literate Females to Males (15-24 Years Old), by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Figure 25

Map of Proportion of Elective Seats Held by Women, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Figure 26

Map of Proportion of Children Aged 0 to Less Than 5 Years Old Who Died,

Figure 27

by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Map of Proportion of Infants Who Died, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

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Province of Siquijor

by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 14 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Figure 28

Map of Proportion of Children Aged 1 to Less Than 5 Years Old Who Died,

Figure 29

by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Map of Proportion of Women Deaths Due to Pregnancy- Related Causes,

Figure 30

by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Map of Prevalence and Death Rates Associated with Tuberculosis, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Figure 31

Proportion of Land with Forest Cover, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2010

Figure 32

Map of Proportion of Population with Access to Safe Drinking Water,

Figure 33

by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Map of Proportion of Population with Access to Sanitary Toilet Facilities,

Figure 34

by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Map of Proportion of Population Who are Informal Settlers, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Figure 35

Map of Proportion of Population who are Living in Makeshift Housing,

Figure 36

by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Map of Population Living in Inadequate Living Conditions, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Figure 37

Map of Households with Landline/Telephone Lines, by Municipality, Province of Siquijor, 2006

Figure 38

Map of Proportion of Households with Cellphones, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Figure 39

Map of Proportion of Households with Computers, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Figure 40

CBMS Coverage in the Philippines (as of May 12, 2010)

40 CBMS Coverage in the Philippines (as of May 12, 2010) Status Report on the Millennium

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

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Province of Siquijor

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The First Millennium Development Goals (MDG) Report of the Province of Siquijor used

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The First Millennium Development Goals (MDG) Report of the Province of Siquijor used the results of the 2006 CBMS Survey.

There are good and not so good results in terms of some indicators. There are also some indicators that require more innova- tive and highly creative strategies if there is truly a desire on the part of the local gov- ernment to achieve the MDG targets by 2015. Given the financial capability of the LGU, there may be low probability of meet- ing these targets. However, with the local leaders, the constituents, and the national government working and acting together, with the help of other equally-concerned donors from other countries, the MDG tar- gets can be realized and the lives of the people in the province might be improved.

Good news

• Proportion of children aged 0-5 who are underweight was only 2.3 percent, which already surpassed the 2015 national target of 17.3 percent. Malnutrition in the province is not a very big problem also but it should be noted that the target is to have zero (0) malnutrition rate by 2015.

• Mortality rate among children aged 16 0-5 was only 0.4 percent. This very low

Province of Siquijor

rate could be attributed to the presence of readily available child health programs such as, but not limited to, immunization programs, cheaper medicines at the Botika ng Barangay, breastfeeding program, and other child-focused health projects. Given these interventions, it is believed that the province has high probability of achieving zero child mortality by 2015.

• The province recorded only three (3) pregnancy-related deaths. This very low maternal death can somehow be attributed to the fact that morbid and complicated pregnant mothers are referred to health fa- cilities outside the province. Despite this low maternal death rate, the general perception is that pre-natal care services are still poor and facility-based services are very low as most of the deliveries were performed at home (87%). To achieve zero (0) maternal death rates, deliveries must eventually be performed in the birthing facilities by trained personnel or midwives. Maternal care pack- age should also be vigorously performed.

• Literacy rate among population aged 15- 24 was high at 98.7 percent, with literacy rate of males (98.7%) being slightly higher by 0.1 percent than that of females (98.6%). Given that the target is 100 percent, the difference to be worked out until 2015 is only 1.3 percent.

difference to be worked out until 2015 is only 1.3 percent. Status Report on the Millennium

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Table 1. Summary of MDG Indicators, Province of Siquijor, 2006

1. Summary of MDG Indicators, Province of Siquijor, 2006 Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals
1. Summary of MDG Indicators, Province of Siquijor, 2006 Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

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Province of Siquijor

Table 1. (Continuation)

Table 1. (Continuation) Source: CBMS Survey 2006 18 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium

Source: CBMS Survey 2006

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Province of Siquijor

Source: CBMS Survey 2006 18 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

• The ratio of girls to boys in elementary

education was 0.94, which is very close to the desired ratio of 1. Moving to higher edu- cational levels, the ratio slightly increased in favor of girls, with 1.03 in secondary and 1.05 in tertiary. The results indicate that there is gender equality in school participa- tion. However, although the proportion of seats held by women in positions in munici- palities and the province is only 27.0 per- cent, it was assured that women are given equal opportunities in the electoral exercise.

• Proportion of households with access to safe drinking water was 95.1 percent.

• Proportion of households with access

to sanitary toilet facilities was 85.6 per-

cent, which is still higher than the 2015 national target of 83.8 percent. The re- maining 14.4 percent will be attended to in the next 5 years.

Not-so-good news

• There were 48,030 persons, or approxi-

mately 58.8 percent of the total province’s population, who are living below the pov- erty threshold. This figure is relatively higher than the national poverty rate of 32.9 per- cent in 2006. In addition, the magnitude of the population living below the food thresh- old was 35,357, which is equivalent to 43.3 percent of the total population.

• Employment rate was only 82.0

percent of the total labor force, which

rate was only 82.0 percent of the total labor force, which Status Report on the Millennium

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

means that 18.0 percent are not em- ployed. This partly explains why more than half of the population in the province was living below the poverty threshold.

• Proportion of children aged 13-16 who are enrolled in high school was only 70.1 percent. This means that a relatively large proportion of children within this age range are not attending high school. The reasons for low participation rate should be explored further and the root causes of the problem should be ad- dressed.

This report could help the province in prioritizing interventions that would help attain their MDG targets. Government programs should be implemented specifi- cally to address poverty, unemployment and hunger in order to achieve 2015 MDG target on the eradicating extreme poverty and hunger. Furthermore, since it is also widely recognized that educational status is directly linked to poverty, problems con- cerning education should be addressed. There is also a need to ensure adequate living conditions among the communities by designing appropriate interventions in the province such as implementation of a housing program or other programs such as provision of safe drinking water, installation of sanitary toilets through LGU-Household Cooperation, Bayanihan Housing Project for informal settlers and for those living in makeshift housing.

Province of Siquijor

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Part 1. Provincial Profile Figure 1. Regional Location Map 1. History Very little is known

Part 1. Provincial Profile

Figure 1. Regional Location Map

Part 1. Provincial Profile Figure 1. Regional Location Map 1. History Very little is known about

1. History

Very little is known about Siquijor and its inhabitants before the arrival of the Spaniards in the 16th century. During its occupation, however, caves in the island yielded old China wares that imply ear- lier encounters with Chinese traders. The original inhabitants called “Siquijodnons” came from Cebu, Bohol and other adjacent 20 islands. Legends tell of a “King Kihod” as

Province of Siquijor

the source of the island’s name. Old resi- dents also called the island “Katugasan”, derived from the Molave trees that cover the hill. The Spaniards, however, called it “Isla de Fuego” or island of fire because of the eerie luminescence generated by the swarms of fireflies found in the island. The first Spaniard to discover the island was Es- teban Rodriguez of the Legazpi Expedition in 1565. He was the captain of a small party that left Legazpi’s camp in Bohol to explore

a small party that left Legazpi’s camp in Bohol to explore Status Report on the Millennium

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Figure 2. Provincial Map of Siquijor

Figure 2. Provincial Map of Siquijor Source: SIMU the nearby island. After having been part of

Source: SIMU

the nearby island. After having been part of the province of Bohol until 1854 and prov- ince of Negros Oriental until 1892, Siquijor became an independent province in 1971.

2. Geo-Physical Environment

Siquijor is the smallest island province in the Central Visayas Region. The province of Siquijor is a 4th class province with a lone congressional district. It consists of six (6) municipalities: Larena, Siquijor, Lazi, Maria, San Juan and Enrique Villanueva with a total of 134 barangays (9 urban and 125 rural barangays). It is geographically located between 9°05’ N and 9°18’ N, and 123°27’ E and 123°42’ E midway between the Visayas and Mindanao islands. It is

E midway between the Visayas and Mindanao islands. It is Status Report on the Millennium Development

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

bounded on the northwest by the island of Cebu, on the northeast by Bohol, on the east by Camiguin Island, on the south by mainland Mindanao, and on the west by Negros island. On its northern shore is the Bohol Strait and on its southeast shore, the Mindanao Sea. The island is 565 aerial kilometers (km) from the National Capital Region (NCR) in Luzon and is approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes by plane.

The Province of Siquijor is basically hilly and mountainous, mostly made up of lime- stone rock. Mt. Bandilaan, the highest peak of the province, rises about 557 me- ters above sea level. The central highlands drop coastward into floodplains and deltas found in the northern and southern coasts.

Province of Siquijor

21

22 Land use in Siquijor is predominantly devoted to agriculture, covering 52.0 per- cent of

22

Land use in Siquijor is predominantly devoted to agriculture, covering 52.0 per- cent of the total land area which generally includes areas planted to coconut, corn,

and irrigated and non-irrigated paddy rice.

A substantial portion of the island is also

devoted to grassland (38.0 percent) found mostly in the uplands with slopes of 8.0 percent and above. Woodland areas are

those covered with trees or woody type of vegetation, representing about 3.0 percent

of the island’s total land area. The rest are

used for settlements and commercial pur- poses which are mostly concentrated in the Poblacion of every municipality.

The largest among the municipalities is Siquijor which covers an area of 8,205.9 hectares, followed by Lazi at 7,322.2 hect- ares. The smallest municipality is Enrique Villanueva which has 2,792.7 hectares .

Geological formations are dominated by limestone, originated in a former coral reef. Karst formations are also numerous. Some volcanic agglomerates could be found only

in the northeast of the island. Much of the island is rimmed by low limestone cliffs bor- dered by a very narrow strip of sand. In some places, small beaches are isolated in coves and indentations. Although the coastline of Siquijor is irregular, bays are almost nonexistent. The only significant bay found on the island is Maria Bay located in the eastern side of the island.

Topographic features associated with limestone terrain in Siquijor include cliffs, depressions and sinkholes. There are a lot of caves in the island. The surface drain- age of the island is not well developed and water is often diverted into subsurface channels.

3. Population and Social Environment

3.1 Population Size, Density and Growth Rate

The population of Siquijor based on the 2007 Census of Population (POPCEN 2007) was 87,695 persons. This figure is higher

(POPCEN 2007) was 87,695 persons. This figure is higher Province of Siquijor Status Report on the

Province of Siquijor

87,695 persons. This figure is higher Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

by 6,097 persons over the population count of 81,598 persons in 2000 or 7.47 percent

by 6,097 persons over the population count of 81,598 persons in 2000 or 7.47 percent increase over the 2000 count. The recent population count for the province translates to an annual growth rate of 1.0 percent for the period 2000 to 2007. It is lower than the 2.2 percent annual growth rate for the period 1995-2000 by 1.2 percent.

In the whole of Region VII, Siquijor regis- tered the lowest annual population growth rate (APGR), followed by Bohol’s 1.1 per- cent and Negros Oriental’s 1.2 percent. The province with the highest APGR is Cebu. The three provinces of Siquijor, Bohol and Negros Oriental have lower APGRs than the regional rate while Cebu exceeded the regional APGR by 0.1 percent. Region VII, however, still has a lower APGR than the national figure. In 2000, Cebu had the highest population density of 489 persons/ sq.km. Bohol followed with 276 persons/ sq.km., then Siquijor with 256 persons/ sq.km. and finally, Negros Oriental with the lowest population density of 208.4 persons/ sq.km. Only Cebu had a population density higher than the regional population density of 381 persons/sq.km. Compared with the national figure, Cebu and Bohol registered higher population densities.

Among the municipalities, Larena regis- tered the highest population density of 329 persons/sq.km. based on the 2007 census.

density of 329 persons/sq.km. based on the 2007 census. Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

This could be due to its smaller land area, followed by San Juan with 326 persons/ sq.km., Siquijor with 288 persons/sq.km., Lazi with 265, Maria with 230, and Enrique Villanueva with the lowest density of 210 persons/sq.km.

Figure 3. Population, Annual Population Growth Rate and Population Density, by Municipality

Population Growth Rate and Population Density, by Municipality 23 P r o v i n c
Population Growth Rate and Population Density, by Municipality 23 P r o v i n c

23

Province of Siquijor

Generally, there is little or no pollution in the rivers and foreshore areas except for visible garbage (particularly plastics and glass bottles) thrown or left indiscriminately by the locals and tourists alike. The waters around the harbors are visibly clear. In fact, according to some diving experts, some of the best dive sites in the island are found near piers in Siquijor and Lazi.

3.3.1 Health

Siquijor believes that a healthy and well- cared population is the pillar of a progres- sive nation. That is why health should be considered a main priority by the govern- ment and should thus be given more im- portance.

In the province of Siquijor, mortality data had been observed to be high. Deaths were generally caused by septicemia/Sep-

Figure 3. (Continued)

generally caused by septicemia/Sep- Figure 3. (Continued) 3.2 Language/Dialects Cebuano is the main dialect generally

3.2 Language/Dialects

Cebuano is the main dialect generally spoken in the households of Siquijor. Taga- log as well as English, however, are under- stood by a big majority of the population. The big influencing factors include the mov- ies, radio, television and publications. English remains as the medium of in- struction in schools, colleges, and other higher learning institutions aside from the fact that most foreigners who live in Siquijor are English-speaking people.

3.3 Social Environment

Siquijor province has its own unique island ecosystem and contains endemic and wildlife species probably not found anywhere in the country. There are no existing biological assessments in the island that can establish the condition and diversity of species. The differ- ent ecosystems considered vital to the overall status of the natural environment include coastal, marine and terrestrial ecosystems. National guidelines exist for the protection of such ecosystems.

24

guidelines exist for the protection of such ecosystems. 24 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the
guidelines exist for the protection of such ecosystems. 24 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the

Province of Siquijor

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

sis, pneumonia and cancer of all forms from 2006-2008. The province’s leading causes of mortality occur because of the inefficien- cy of the local health system in the province. Such inefficiency is manifested by the lack of functional management systems such as the referral network that is supposed to as- sure timely transport of patients.

The Siquijor Provincial Hospital services the island with 100 beds. There is a small hospital in Lazi, the Lazi District Hospital, which has 15 beds. Even though the num- ber of beds is sufficient for its population per the national standard (1 bed per 1,000 persons) and the land area is sufficient for the bed capacity (2.36 hectares total for hospital and grounds), improvements in the Provincial Hospital need to be made. However, no money has been allocated for such improvements. While there are plans to expand the Lazi District Hospital, it does

are plans to expand the Lazi District Hospital, it does not, however, qualify as a district

not, however, qualify as a district hospital because it only provides basic medical services for minor ailments and obstetrics.

The province shows that the causes of morbidity are the result of poor environmen- tal sanitation, unsafe drinking water, un-

Figure 4. Location of Health and Allied Facilities

un- Figure 4. Location of Health and Allied Facilities Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals
un- Figure 4. Location of Health and Allied Facilities Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Province of Siquijor

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26

healthy lifestyle, lack of vitamin supplemen- tation or malnutrition. The leading causes of morbidity are still infectious diseases such as: Bronchitis/Bronchitis, Acute Respiratory Infection, Pneumonia, Diarrhea, Hyperten- sion, TB, respiratory diseases and dengue fever (Table 5). However, it is noted that cardiovascular diseases have significantly increased in recent years, indicating a need for an intensified campaign on preventive measures specifically on healthy lifestyle programs. Sustaining and strengthening effective advocacy campaigns at the com- munity level on the prevention and control of infectious deceases is indeed a must. Lo- cal government units (LGUs) must increase investments on programs that are still con- sidered public health threats.

3.3.2 Education

The province of Siquijor has only one school division. The indicators in this sec-

Figure 5. Location of Educational Facilities

tor include the literacy rate, elementary and secondary cohort survival rates, elementary secondary classroom-pupil ratios, and ele- mentary and secondary participation rates, among others. Figure 5 also shows the lo- cation of the various educational facilities in the province.

The total enrolment for all ages in public schools in the province for SY 2007-2008 was 11,170. Total enrolment for those aged 6-11 years old for the same school year was 9,227 resulting in a Gross Enrolment Ratio (GER) of 85.4 percent and a Net Enrol- ment Ratio (NER) of 70.5 percent. Both the GER and NER are lower than the Central Visayas’ ratios.

Siquijor province had a total enrolment of 4,711 in public schools for all ages and both sexes for SY2007-2008 while the total enrolment for children aged 12-15 years old during the same school year was 3,345.

aged 12-15 years old during the same school year was 3,345. Province of Siquijor Status Report

Province of Siquijor

during the same school year was 3,345. Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium Development

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Table 7: Total Enrolment of Public Elementary School Central Visayas

Total Enrolment of Public Elementary School Central Visayas Given the total population of those aged 12-15

Given the total population of those aged 12-15 years of 8,654, GER is 54.4 percent and NER is 38.7 percent.

Table 8 illustrates the Gross and Net En- rolment Ratios in secondary education for public schools in the province of Siquijor

as well as in other provinces in Central Visayas.

3.3.3 Enrolment Participation Rate

The enrolment participation rates in Siqui- jor province for both the elementary and

Table 8: Total Enrolment of Public Secondary School Central Visayas

Total Enrolment of Public Secondary School Central Visayas Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using
Total Enrolment of Public Secondary School Central Visayas Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Province of Siquijor

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secondary education is seen to be decreas- ing. For the elementary level, based on the

secondary education is seen to be decreas- ing. For the elementary level, based on the data for SY 2006-2007 provided by the Department of Education (DepEd)-Siquijor Division Office, the enrolment participation rate registered at 72.1 percent which was really high. However, this went down to 70.5 percent in SY 2007-2008 and to 70.18 percent in SY 2008-2009.

The same trend can be seen in the sec- ondary level where the enrolment participa- tion rate decreased from 39.9 percent in SY 2006-2007 to 38.7 percent in SY 2007-2008 and then further declined in SY 2008-2009 to 37.29 percent (Table 8).

3.3.4 Teacher-Pupil Ratio

to 37.29 percent (Table 8). 3.3.4 Teacher-Pupil Ratio number of pupils and that, conversely, pu- pils

number of pupils and that, conversely, pu- pils receive less attention from the teacher. It is generally assumed that a low pupil- teacher ratio signifies smaller classes, which enables the teacher to pay more attention to individual pupils and thus contribute to the better scholastic performance of the pupils. However, this indicator does not take into account differences in teachers’ academic qualifications, pedagogical training, pro- fessional experience and status, teaching methods, teaching materials and variations in classroom condition (EFA Indicators).

The ratio of the teacher to students in the elementary level for three school years in the province of Siquijor was well within the standards. The average teacher-pupil ratio in the province was registered at 1:21 (Ta- ble 9). In the secondary level, meanwhile, the ratio showed a better picture during the latter school years due to the decrease in the enrolment participation rate.

3.3.5 Classroom-Pupil Ratio

Classroom-pupil ratio is still above the na- tional standard class size of 1:45 because some classrooms used for ancillary services were included in the computations.

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Another performance indicator of the education sector is the teacher-pupil ra- tio. It is the average number of pupils per teacher in a given school year. This indica- tor is used to measure the level of human input, in terms of number of teachers, in relation to the size of the pupil population. As of 2000, the established national standard for the number of pupils per teacher is 60. This used to be 40 pupils per teacher. A high pupil- teacher ratio suggests that each teacher has to deal with a large

In the elementary level, the ratio of class- room to pupils is one classroom for every 23 students in school year 2007-2008. This decreased to 1:22 in the school year 2008- 2009 but again increased to 1:24 in school year 2009-2010.

2009 but again increased to 1:24 in school year 2009-2010. Province of Siquijor Status Report on
2009 but again increased to 1:24 in school year 2009-2010. Province of Siquijor Status Report on

Province of Siquijor

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

In the secondary level, a general im- provement in the classroom-pupil ratio was observed during the latter school years as compared to the earlier school year. In par- ticular, there were 32 pupils for every class- room during the school years 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 as compared to 33 during the school year 2007-2008. The decrease was attributed to the additional school which was turned over to the Department of Education. This refers to the Lazi National Agricultural School.

3.3.6 Colleges and Other Institutions of Higher Learning

In the province, there are three colleges that cater to the needs of Siquijodnons for higher learning. The three collegiate in- stitutions offer several collegiate and post collegiate courses as well as technical vo- cational courses.

The three are: the Siquijor State College (SSC) located in Larena, which is the big- gest of the three collegiate institutions and run by the government, the Balite Institute of Technology (BIT), located in Siquijor, Siquijor and the Quezon Memorial Institute of Siquijor (QMIS) also located in Siquijor.

4. Local Economy

The Siquijor provincial economy is made up of the primary, secondary and tertiary sectors. These sectors represent the differ- ent industry groups and economic activities. The primary sector includes agriculture, fishery and forestry; the secondary sector comprises mining and quarrying, manu- facturing and processing, and the tertiary sector includes services.

and processing, and the tertiary sector includes services. Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

The local economy derives earnings from exporting traditional goods such as copra, live animals and fruits. Four of the top five exports of the province are copra, livestock, lumber and fruits but not in substantial vol- umes. Minor export commodities include bananas, furniture and palay. These are ex- ported to Dumaguete, Bacolod and Cebu. On the other hand, it imports processed commodities, the bulk of which are bottled merchandise and general cargo, cement, animal feeds and rice. Siquijor is highly import-dependent in terms of currency and commodities.

Agriculture remains to be the leading industry in Siquijor in terms of employment generation. Coconut and corn are the prin- cipal crops in Siquijor. Next to coconut and

corn, root crop is a significant agricultural commodity. Cassava and sweet potato are the leading 2007 crops in this category in terms of land area proportions. Peanut and cassava are principal agricultural products

in the towns of Lazi and Maria. The top two

fruits grown in Siquijor in terms of produc- tion volume are banana and mango.

Fishery in Siquijor is mainly characterized as small scale and marginal fishing. In 2008, there were a total of about 6,115 fishermen

in Siquijor province.

Mining (secondary sector) is considered

a major industry in the province in terms of local income but mainly concentrated in Lazi and Maria. The province used to be

a leading producer of manganese as early

as during the Japanese occupation in the island up until the 1970s when manganese mines closed down due to diminished min- ing prospects.

Province of Siquijor

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30

Limestone quarrying came in the middle of the 1990s and was concentrated in Lazi and Maria. But then again, it stopped operation in 2006. During its lifetime, mining (second- ary sector) was considered a major industry in terms of local income and employment but only for a short period of time.

Business establishments in Siquijor are predominantly trading and services (tertiary sector). Industries operating in the island are made up of a handful of small enter- prises. They include metalworking, food processing, ceramics, furniture, gifts, toys and house ware.

There are four banks in the province that provide financial services (deposit and credit), namely: Allied Bank, Land Bank of the Philippines, Larena Rural Bank and First Consolidated Bank. There are two auto- mated teller machines (ATM) operated by the Land Bank and Allied Bank in Larena. Both do not accept credit cards though. Credit cards are accepted only in limited tourist resorts. Visitors arriving in the island either have to carry cash or inquire on ar- rival whether their accommodation accepts credit cards as mode of payment.

Sources of income at the household level come from: (1) local employment or busi- ness, and (2) remittances from Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs) and Balikbayans residing in various countries all over the world. This segment of the labor force con- tributes considerably to the income of the locals through regular remittances sent to family members or relatives.

Province of Siquijor

5. Infrastructure/Utilities/Facilities

5.1 Transportation

Sea transportation is the primary mode of transport between Siquijor and other provinces. There are two major government ports and one private port operating in the province. The port of Larena is the principal maritime port of entry of the province.

Siquijor Province is accessible primar- ily by sea transport from the neighboring provinces of Negros Oriental, Bohol, Cebu and from Plaridel, Misamis Occidental and Iligan City in Mindanao. There are at least three ports in the municipalities of Larena, Siquijor and Lazi. The port of Larena is the principal port of entry in the province. The port of Siquijor caters only to boats plying Siquijor and Dumaguete City.

The shipping lines with main offices in Cebu City which provide trips from Cebu to Tagbilaran and Larena, Siquijor are: Co- kaliong which schedules its trips from Cebu to Larena, Siquijor every Monday afternoon and goes back to Cebu in the evening of the same day; Palacio Shipping which sched- ules its trips from Cebu to Larena, Siquijor every Monday, Wednesday and Friday af- ternoon and proceeds to Plaridel, Misamis Occidental in the early morning of Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday and comes back to Larena on Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday afternoon and goes back to Cebu on the night of the same day; Lite Shipping sails to Larena from Cebu at noon time every Tues- day, Thursday and Saturday and proceeds to Plaridel in Mindanao early morning of the next day and comes back to Larena every Wednesday, Friday and Sunday afternoon and straight back to Cebu in the evening of the same day. Ocean Jet which is a fast

in the evening of the same day. Ocean Jet which is a fast Status Report on

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Figure 6. Ports in Siquijor

Larena Port

Cang-Alwang Airport

Figure 6. Ports in Siquijor Larena Port Cang-Alwang Airport Lazi Port Siquijor Port craft sails daily

Lazi Port

Siquijor Port

Larena Port Cang-Alwang Airport Lazi Port Siquijor Port craft sails daily from Cebu at 3:40 in

craft sails daily from Cebu at 3:40 in the afternoon to Tagbilaran via Dumaguete and Siquijor and goes back to Cebu from Siquijor every morning at 6:00 o’clock.

Delta fast ferries 1 and 3 provide 50-min- ute sea transport from Dumaguete to Siqui- jor and Larena four times daily. Montene- gro Shipping sails to Dumaguete City and back to Larena and Siquijor 2 times daily.

Given the increasing volume in passenger traffic, the improvement and development of the airport such as the asphalting/con- creting of the runway is deemed necessary, as this is the only air link to nearby prov- inces. This would serve as the emergency

to nearby prov- inces. This would serve as the emergency Status Report on the Millennium Development

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

access to and from the province when sea access is not available. This will also im- prove the tourism industry in the locality as it provides an alternative means of trans- portation during very crucial times.

All the improvements will translate into in- creased employment, income and govern- ment revenues and improved quality of life.

The Siquijor Circumferential Road links one municipality to the other and carries most of the volume of traffic in the province. It has two major points, the municipalities of Larena and Lazi, corresponding to two traffic routes namely: Larena-Siquijor-San Juan-Lazi vice-versa and Larena-Tal-

Province of Siquijor

31

ingting-Maria-Lazi vice-versa. These routes pass through the centers of each of the six municipalities.

pass through the centers of each of the six municipalities. A total of 95.017 kilometers of
pass through the centers of each of the six municipalities. A total of 95.017 kilometers of
pass through the centers of each of the six municipalities. A total of 95.017 kilometers of

A total of 95.017 kilometers of national road in the province comprise the major arterial road. This circumferential road is mostly covered with asphalt. This national road passes through the six municipalities.

Access to interior parts of the province is possible. With the provincial roads, without taking the regular route, one can travel from Larena-Cang-agong-Cangumantong-Poo 32 Road. From Larena, people can take the

Province of Siquijor

Road. From Larena, people can take the Province of Siquijor Larena-Basac-Maria road to reach Maria. There
Road. From Larena, people can take the Province of Siquijor Larena-Basac-Maria road to reach Maria. There

Larena-Basac-Maria road to reach Maria. There are 168.632 kilometers of provincial roads in Siquijor.

There is a good quality road network in the island. The majority of streets is as- phalted or cemented. Remote areas have mostly graveled roads. Traffic density in Siquijor is low. The national highway spans 95.017 kilometers of either concrete or asphalt-pave roads, provincial roads, municipal roads, barangay roads or farm- to-market roads. The provincial roads have a total length of 168.632 kilometers which cover interior areas traversing the upland areas. The major arterial roads are mostly made of concrete. These are mostly all- weather roads, passable by both light and heavy vehicles, primarily transporting farm produce and passengers to and from the growth centers and settlement areas. The

to and from the growth centers and settlement areas. The Status Report on the Millennium Development

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

total length of national and provincial roads is 244 kilometers.

Priority among the internal routes is the upgrading or improvement of the coastal highway (circumferential roads) from as- phalt to concrete pave roads, all the way north and south. The rehabilitation/im- provement of this road network is ongoing under the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH) Central Office and the rest under the Regional and District Offices of the DPWH. Such activities implemented are perceived to increase the level of service and to improve mobility of people with less vehicle- operating expenses and less time/ effort consumption.

cial roads, 27.929 kilometers of municipal roads, and 80.763 kilometers of barangay roads. Provincial roads and municipal are mostly asphalt.

Siquijor municipality has the longest stretch of municipal roads (9.8 kilometers) in the province. Next is Lazi with 7.6 kilo- meters of municipal roads while San Juan has the shortest municipal roads of only about 1.7 kilometers

the shortest municipal roads of only about 1.7 kilometers The municipality of Siquijor has the longest
the shortest municipal roads of only about 1.7 kilometers The municipality of Siquijor has the longest
the shortest municipal roads of only about 1.7 kilometers The municipality of Siquijor has the longest
the shortest municipal roads of only about 1.7 kilometers The municipality of Siquijor has the longest

The municipality of Siquijor has the longest artery of barangay roads in the province with more than 43 kilometers. Next to Siquijor are Larena and Lazi with almost 11 kilometers of barangay roads for each of the said municipali- ties. Enrique Villanueva has the short- est length of barangay roads with only about 4 kilometers.

The local government units also took part in undertaking complementary activities like asphalting, concreting and gravelling of lo- cal roads of 168.632 kilometers of provin-

gravelling of lo- cal roads of 168.632 kilometers of provin- As to the road surface types,

As to the road surface types, gravel is still predominant. Total road length over total population is 0.004 which is very much high-

33

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Province of Siquijor

Figure 7. Road Map of Siquijor

Figure 7. Road Map of Siquijor er than the national standard which is 0.001 or 1

er than the national standard which is 0.001 or 1 kilometer in every 1000 population.

5.2 Communication

The province of Siquijor has communica- tion facilities, with all municipalities having direct contact through telephones, cellular phones and single-side band radio sets. There are also privately owned and man- aged telephone services operating in the province like TMSI, GLOBE and ISLACOM. Most of the telecommunications facilities of these companies are located in Larena and Siquijor.

The LGUs and the Department of Trans- portation and Communications (DOTC) operate the rest of the telecommunication 34 facilities in the province jointly.

Province of Siquijor

The communication facilities include newspapers, internet servers and cafes, cellular phone sites, telephone, telegraph and post offices.

5.3 Power

The power supply in Siquijor province is being provided by the Strategic Power Utility Group (SPUG), the missionary arm of the National Power Corporation (NPC). The main sources of power in the province are the MAN diesel generator sets located in the municipality of Siquijor. These gen- erators were installed back in 1984. There are five generators all in all but, but only three are operational and the other two are right now undergoing major repair. The other source of electricity of the province is the Power Barge 113, which is docked

of the province is the Power Barge 113, which is docked Status Report on the Millennium

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Source: Province of Siquijor Electric Cooperative (PROSIELCO) at the municipality of Lazi located at the

Source: Province of Siquijor Electric Cooperative (PROSIELCO)

at the municipality of Lazi located at the southern part of the island. Power Barge

113 came from Mindoro and is basically

used to augment the generation of the diesel power plants during the peak hours and another Power Barge 116 installed at Larena, Siquijor.

As of July 2009, the Province of Siquijor Electric Cooperative (PROSIELCO), the island’s distribution system, was able to provide electrical connections to 15,047 households, which comprised 87.1 per-

cent of the total households of 17,285. The remaining 13 percent are not served with electricity. In terms of barangays served,

134 out of 134 barangays or 100 percent

are served by PROSIELCO.

Clustering of houses and accessibility in the province are factors that affect the provision of power lines. Thus, electrical power is well provided in the two primary growth centers of the province, which are the municipalities of Larena and Siquijor.

The province of Siquijor has an average power consumption of 1.6 mega watts per hour and has a capacity to generate 1.77 mega watts per hour which entails 0.11 mega watt per hour of surplus power.

hour which entails 0.11 mega watt per hour of surplus power. Status Report on the Millennium

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Figure 8. Electricity and Household Connections

CBMS Data Figure 8. Electricity and Household Connections Source: PROSIELCO There were 16,542 electrical connec- tions

Source: PROSIELCO

There were 16,542 electrical connec- tions in the province of Siquijor as of 2009. These were predominantly residential (81 percent), followed by commercial establish- ments (10 percent), streetlights (5 percent), public buildings (4 percent) and industrial

Province of Siquijor

35

connection (1 percent). The municipality of Siquijor has the most number of electrical connections (30

connection (1 percent). The municipality of Siquijor has the most number of electrical connections (30 percent), followed by Lar- ena (19 percent) while Enrique Villanueva had the least with 7 percent of the total connections in the province.

opment of the feeder airport are high priority plans. Improvement of the power supply will likely result in the reduction of power outages (service interruptions) and reduced power bills plus the likeli- hood of sustained and quality service. Eventually, the province will be able to attract investors to put up and establish big business in the island.

5.4 Water

put up and establish big business in the island. 5.4 Water Improvement of the power supply

Improvement of the power supply and development and management of the water system as well as the devel-

Water is the basic need or requirement for domestic, com- mercial or industrial use, and all other ac- tivities and is there- fore considered a critical determinant of economic development. Water supply program has always been on top of the development agenda of the Provincial

36

Figure 9. Electrical Connections by Type of Users, by Municipality

Source: PROSIELCO
Source: PROSIELCO

Province of Siquijor

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Government, both in the short-term and medium-term.

There is abundant water supply in the province. In fact, there is an excess water generation of 0.11 million cubic meters. However, in some municipalities, water supply is inefficient and the common per- ception for this situation is the poor plan- ning in the waterworks system (improper sizes of pipes, piping network system poorly laid out/designed and small-sized reservoirs).

The whole province of Siquijor is served by Level I, Level II and Level III water sys- tems, where:

• Level I refers to water tapped directly

from point sources such as rain collectors, springs, shallow and deep wells. • Level II pertains to water distributed through pipes with communal faucets (stand pipe) which serve clusters of households at the barangays or sitios.

• Level III corresponds to piped water sys-

tems with individual household connections.

.

The Metro Siquijor Water District (MSWD) supplies Level III water to the towns of Lazi, Maria, San Juan and Siquijor. The munici- palities of Larena and Enrique Villanueva are managing their own municipal water supply systems. Rural Water Supply As- sociations (RWSAs) are also found in the province operating Level II water supply systems in the areas not served by MSWD and by the two municipal water districts.

Springs are the major sources of water supply for the municipalities. Currently, three springs, namely, Cansilim, Cangkabo and Candura are the sources of water sup-

Cansilim, Cangkabo and Candura are the sources of water sup- Status Report on the Millennium Development

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

ply serving 15 barangays. Aside from these springs, there are other springs --Tubod, Canghaling and Capilay -- which are po- tential sources for water supply.

Although the island has sufficient water sources, however, they are not fully uti- lized. Some areas still suffer from shortage and water is not provided 24 hours a day. To solve such problems, privately owned resorts and establishments have started finding their own resources by utilizing wells in their areas or setting up water tanks to reserve water for non-drinking usage dur- ing times of water shortage. To economize on the usage of water, some of the resort owners have adopted certain measures to minimize their consumption like having small sinks, low-flow showerheads and low-pressure flush toilet and making use of treated sewage for watering plants and use of rainwater, among others.

Table 23 shows the number and percent- age shares of barangays being served by water level systems I, II and III. A greater number of barangays is being served by Level II water system at 44 percent while 38 percent is served by Level III water system, and 18 percent by Level I system.

In terms of individual household con- nection/access to the water system, this is not prevalent in the municipality of Siquijor where 32 out of 42 barangays, which is equivalent to 76 percent of households, have such connection. Larena also has the advantage of having more than one third (39 percent) of its barangays being served by level III. Enrique Villanueva has no access to piped water distribution for individual households. Except for Maria and Siquijor, at least half of all barangays

Province of Siquijor

37

in the other four municipalities are served by Level II water system, with Lazi having the highest share at 67 percent. Enrique Villanueva relies heavily on Level I water system with half of its barangays depen- dent on said source. The municipalities of Siquijor and Larena have minimal shares of barangays dependent on this system. In Maria, about 45 percent of its barangays also depend on Level I system. Water is also a very important resource that inves- tors look for, especially for businesses that require big volumes of water.

6. Local Institutional Capabilities

6.1 Structure and Functions of the Local Development Council

The Provincial Development Council is

headed by the Governor and is composed of the following members:

1. all mayors of the six (6) municipalities

of Enrique Villanueva, Larena, Lazi, Maria, San Juan and the capital town of Siquijor.

2. the chairman of the Committee on Ap-

propriations of the Sangguniang Panlala- wigan 3. the Congressman or his representative 4. the representatives of people’s organiza- tions (POs) or civil soci- ety (CS) who shall con- stitute less than ¼ of the members of the fully organized council. In the case of Siquijor Province, there are four (4) representatives from the POs and CS.

It also has an Executive Commit- tee that represents and acts on be- half of the Provincial Development Council when it is not in session composed of the Gov- ernor as the Chairman, and the president of the League of Municipali- ties, the Chairman of the Committee on Ap- propriations, the Presi- dent of the Provincial Liga ng mga Barangay and a representative

of the Provincial Liga ng mga Barangay and a representative Figure 10. Percent of Households Served
of the Provincial Liga ng mga Barangay and a representative Figure 10. Percent of Households Served

Figure 10. Percent of Households Served per Municipality, by Level

10. Percent of Households Served per Municipality, by Level 38 Source: PDPFP Province of Siquijor Status

38 Source: PDPFP

Served per Municipality, by Level 38 Source: PDPFP Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium

Province of Siquijor

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

of the POs/CS who sits in the Council, as members.

The functions of the Provincial Develop- ment Council are the following:

1. Formulate long-term, medium-term and

annual development plans and policies.

2. Formulate local development invest-

ment plans and annual investment program.

3. Evaluate and prioritize socio-economic

development programs and projects.

4. Formulate local investment incentives

to promote inflow of capital investments.

5. Coordinate, monitor and evaluate the

implementation of development programs and projects.

6.2 Technical Capability of the Local Planning and Development Council

The Local Planning and Development Council has very limited technical capabili- ties to carry out its mandated functions and responsibilities.

Although the provincial government has very recently undertaken a review of the provincial plantilla positions with the end in view of streamlining the bureaucracy, what actually happened was simply an upgrad- ing of positions and making permanent certain employees in the positions where they were previously designated.

The Provincial Planning and Development Office is staffed with mostly clerical and administrative positions. The technical staff only consist of the Provincial Planning and Development Coordinator, the Planning Of- ficer III and the Statistician Aide. The rest are Draftsman, and Computer Operators, among others.

rest are Draftsman, and Computer Operators, among others. Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Trainings identified to be important and necessary are on planning, project pro- posal writing and packaging, Geographic Information System, Computer Program- ming, and map laying, among others.

6.3 Fiscal Management Capability

Lower-class LGUs like Siquijor need more financial resources to support the provision of basic services and to fund local develop- ment plans that will help attain key human development outcomes. On one hand, rev- enue generation and resource mobilization are hampered by complex tax structures, poor system and procedures, and weak local capabilities. On the other hand, plan- ning and budgeting at the local level are restrained by the short political tenure of lo- cal officials and the lack of a clear mandate supporting the linkage between the Local Development Plan, the Local Development Investment Program and the Annual Invest- ment Program.

LGUs may have identified and developed strategies and systems that will enable them to increase their financial resources but the legislature usually does not have the po- litical will to enforce and put into law the proposed measures that would guarantee improved revenue collections.

a. Development orientation of the Sang-

gunian as evidenced by its legislative out- put. There is still much to be desired as far as the performance of the Sanggunian vis-à-vis the development agenda for the province is concerned.

b. Extent of representation and participa-

tion in local governance of non-government sections. The non-government sector, the

Province of Siquijor

39

40

civil society and the people’s organizations actively participate in the governments programs and projects. They are properly represented in public consultations, espe- cially in matters of policy formulation and program implementation. The NGOs/POs are very well represented even in the Local Development Council.

c. Vertical and horizontal linkages of the LGU with other government agencies. There is relatively weak horizontal and vertical linkage. However, efforts are being un- dertaken to strengthen linkages between and among national government agencies.

In the planning processes, vertical link- ages are carried through the Regional Development Council and the NEDA Re- gional Office, with policy inputs provided by means of the Regional Development Plans, Regional Physical Framework Plans, Regional Development Investment Plans, the Medium-Term Philippine Development Plan and the National Framework for Physi- cal Planning.

Province of Siquijor

In the Municipal Planning and Develop- ment Offices, inputs from their Comprehen- sive Land Use Plans and other Local Devel- opment Plans coming from the Barangay Development Plans are integrated into the provincial plans. From the line agencies’ Technical Working Groups (TWGs), the inputs of the national line agencies are also integrated in the overall development framework of the province.

Horizontal linkages may be forward and/ or backward. Forward linkages with the Provincial Finance Committee provide pro- grams/projects/activities as inputs to the in- vestment programming process. Backward linkage with the Provincial Department Heads and their Monitoring and Evaluation Units provide feedback and other inputs for revision or replanning.

As a whole, the process goes back and forth, with national and regional plans and policies guiding provincial and other local plans while receiving feedback and input from the province.

plans while receiving feedback and input from the province. Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Part 2. Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals

Part 2. Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals 41 41 Goal 1: Eradicate Extreme Poverty
Part 2. Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals 41 41 Goal 1: Eradicate Extreme Poverty
Part 2. Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals 41 41 Goal 1: Eradicate Extreme Poverty
Part 2. Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals 41 41 Goal 1: Eradicate Extreme Poverty

41 41

Goal 1: Eradicate Extreme Poverty and Hunger

Target 1A: Halve, between 1990 and 2015, the proportion of people whose income is less than one dollar a day.

A. STATUS AND TRENDS

Proportion of Population Below Poverty Threshold

Results of the 2006 CBMS survey conduct-

Poverty Threshold Results of the 2006 CBMS survey conduct- Status Report on the Mill ennium Deve

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

ed in the province of Siquijor reveal that the proportion of population living below the poverty threshold in the province was 58.8 percent or an equivalent of 48,030 persons. Out of the 48,030, 24,442 were males and 23,588 were females. More males than females live below the poverty threshold. Comparison by rural and urban categories showed that there were more rural people living below poverty threshold than those in

Province of Siquijor Province of Siquijor
Province of Siquijor
Province of Siquijor
urban areas. On the other hand, the munici- palities of Enrique Villanueva, Lazi, Maria and

urban areas. On the other hand, the munici- palities of Enrique Villanueva, Lazi, Maria and San Juan had higher proportions of population living below poverty threshold than the province. Larena had the lowest proportion at 44.9 percent while Lazi had the highest at 75.9 percent.

In all six municipalities, only Enrique Vil- lanueva had a lower male than female proportion at 63.9 and 65.5 percent, re- spectively. The other five municipalities dis- closed higher male to female proportions. All the six municipalities disclosed higher rural than urban proportions of the popula- tion below poverty threshold.

Comparing across municipalities, the mu-

nicipalities of Larena and Siquijor registered lower proportions of the population below poverty threshold at 44.9 percent and 48.1 percent, respectively than the province. This may be due to the fact that Larena and Siquijor have more employment oppor- tunities than the rest of the municipalities. Aside from being the commercial and trade centers in the province, these two munici- palities have colleges and therefore varied small business activities related to board and lodging facilities, internet cafes, and sale of food items, among others.

Meanwhile, Lazi has every opportunity to have a lower proportion of population living below poverty threshold because it has bigger areas for farming and they

Figure 11. Map on Proportion of Population Living Below Poverty Threshold, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

42

Below Poverty Threshold, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 42 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium

Province of Siquijor

by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 42 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

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are privileged to have received the most number of government implemented socio-economic projects. However, ac- cording to the MLGOO and MPDC, they believed that the high poverty result ob- tained in Lazi may be due mainly to the people’s belief and attribute that when government conducts survey especially concerning the plight of the poor constitu- ents, the end result would be that there will be financial assistance and funding and that big projects will be released to them and so they would respond to questions that would categorize them as poor. So the seriousness of the answers would be affected by what they presumed would be the end result. On the other hand, others say that the problem may be in the encod- ing which somewhat affect the truthfulness and faithfulness of the responses.

Proportion of Population Living Below Food Threshold

The population in the province living be- low the food threshold is 43.3 percent or a total of 35,357 in magnitude. A higher percentage of males living below the food

threshold at 44.1 percent was registered compared with females at 42.6 percent. With regard to urbanity, the proportion of the population living below the food thresh- old in the rural areas is higher than in the urban areas.

Data in the municipalities showed that the same municipalities of Larena (29.2%) and Siquijor (30.3%) had recorded lesser percentage than the province in terms of this indicator. Thus, the proportions of popula- tion living below the food threshold in these places are relatively lower than that of the province. Again, the municipalities of En- rique Villanueva, Lazi, Maria and San Juan had higher proportions of the population living below food threshold than the pro- vincial figure, with Lazi again posting the highest percentage at 64 percent.

As to sex, the proportion of males living below the food threshold is higher than the females in the five municipalities of Larena, Lazi, Maria, San Juan and Siquijor. It is only in Enrique Villanueva where the proportion of females to males is higher at 52.8 percent as against 51.4 percent.

to males is higher at 52.8 percent as against 51.4 percent. Status Report on the Millennium
to males is higher at 52.8 percent as against 51.4 percent. Status Report on the Millennium

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

43

Province of Siquijor

Figure 12. Map on Proportion of Population Living Below Food Threshold, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Living Below Food Threshold, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Poverty Gap Table 28 shows the poverty gap

Poverty Gap

Table 28 shows the poverty gap or the mean distance separating the population from the poverty line. The poverty gap of the

the population from the poverty line. The poverty gap of the province is 0.3. The municipalities

province is 0.3. The municipalities of Larena and Siquijor have a poverty gap figure of 0.2, which is 0.1 lower than the provincial figure. Lazi again has the highest at 0.5 while Enrique Villanueva has 0.4 and Maria and San Juan both have 0.3. The relatively high poverty gap in Lazi as compared to other municipalities in Siquijor poses a great challenge to the local government unit. With the proper implementation of anti-poverty projects, especially skills and development activities, it would still be possible to lower the poverty gap.

44

Figure 13. Map of Poverty Gap Ratio, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Map of Poverty Gap Ratio, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the

Province of Siquijor

Ratio, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Target 1B. Achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all, including women and

Target 1B. Achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all, including women and young people

Employment Rate

Survey results for 2006 indicated that employment rate in the province is

82.0 percent or a magnitude of 26,889.

Meanwhile, the urban-rural distribution

showed that of the total labor force liv- ing in the urban areas, 75.9 percent were employed. On the other hand, employ- ment rate in the rural areas is higher at

80.7 percent.

The municipality of San Juan posted the highest employment rate among all municipalities in Siquijor (84.0%), fol- lowed by Enrique Villanueva (83.0%). Although there is relatively high employ- ment, poverty is still felt by most of the households as evidenced by the high proportion of households living below the poverty threshold. Some possible reasons are the nature of employment and the amount of wages received. Wages in Siquijor are very much lower than the minimum wage. Most jobs are agriculture-related and are therefore seasonal in nature.

Figure 14. Map on Employment Rate, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

14. Map on Employment Rate, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals
14. Map on Employment Rate, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Province of Siquijor

45

The proportion of males employed vis- à-vis females is higher in all six municipali- ties.

The proportion of males employed vis- à-vis females is higher in all six municipali- ties. The municipality with the biggest dis- parity in the proportion of male to female employment was Lazi with 85.5 percent for males versus 70.1 percent for females. This is because the females usually stay in the house to care for the family while the males go out to work.

Target 1C. Halve, between 1990 and 2015, the proportion of people who suffer from hunger

Proportion of Population who Experienced Food Shortage

The proportion of the population who experienced food shortage was 3.6 per-

cent based on the 2006 CBMS survey or an equivalent of 2,913 persons. About 3.7 percent of males and 3.5 percent of females experienced food shortage during the refer- ence period. More households in the rural areas (3.5%) experienced food shortage as compared with those in the urban areas

(2.7%).

Across municipalities, three municipalities had proportions lower than the province, namely, Siquijor (1.7%), San Juan (3.2%) and Lazi (0.7%). The rest had proportions higher than the provincial record, namely, Larena (4.1%), Maria (7.8%) and Enrique Villanueva (9.3%). The latter has the highest proportion of the population who experi- enced food shortage.

Figure 15. Map of Proportion of Population Who Experienced Food Shortage By Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

46

Experienced Food Shortage By Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 46 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium

Province of Siquijor

By Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 46 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

As mentioned earlier, Lazi had the lowest percentage of population who experienced food shortage. This

As mentioned earlier, Lazi had the lowest percentage of population who experienced food shortage. This seems to be inconsistent and difcult to explain given the fact that the municipality recorded the highest percentage of population living below poverty threshold and food threshold. One explanation offered by MPDO and MLGOO of Lazi is that the house- holds really did not experience food shortage during the reference period, as they were able to eat three square meals a day and did not skip any meal. However, the kind of food they consumed may just be simple staple like rice or corn with viand or no viand at all.

Prevalence of Underweight Children Under 5 years of Age

In the province, the proportion of under- weight children under 5 years of age was

2.3 percent or an equivalent of 158 children.

The proportion of underweight among male children under 5 years was 2.3 percent while for the female, the proportion was

2.2 percent.

As to urban and rural distribution of un- derweight children under 5 years of age, the proportion was 2.6 percent for urban areas and 2.2 percent for rural, indicating that there were more underweight children under 5 years of age in the urban areas than in the rural areas.

In Maria, there was no prevalence of un- derweight children below 5 years of age. It is followed by Lazi with a prevalence rate of less than 1 (0.8%), and then, Enrique Villan- ueva (1.4%), San Juan (2.1%) and Siquijor

Figure 16. Map of Prevalence of Underweight Children Under 5 Years of Age By, Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Under 5 Years of Age By, Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals
Under 5 Years of Age By, Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Province of Siquijor

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48

(2.2%). Larena has the highest prevalence of underweight children under 5 years of age at 6.7 percent. However, it is still way below the national standard of 24 percent. There is, however, no regional target.

B. CURRENT POLICIES AND PROGRAMS

Topping the provincial government’s devel- opment agenda is the eradication of extreme poverty and hunger among the Siquijodnons.

1. Increase agricultural production

It is the government’s policy to exhaust all measures to ensure that the average Siquijodnon has F-A-I-T-H, meaning “Food Always In The Home” as well as substantial livelihood opportunities. Hence, the gov- ernment pours more funds in the agriculture sector in order that programs, projects and activities are implemented to increase ag- ricultural production, especially on basic staples such as rice, corn, vegetables and other high value commercial crops. This is over and above the national programs implemented by the national government. Another program includes livestock and native poultry production because native poultry commands a high price in the mar- ket and said native breed is abundant in Siquijor.

Vegetable production tops in all agricul- ture production programs. It was started in 2008 with a budget of P800,000 and an ini- tial number of cooperators of 76 elementary and secondary schools. In 2009, the bud- get was increased to P1.5 million and the coverage expanded to include 4 primary schools and 90 barangays. Dubbed as OS- FUA, the program “Optimizing Sustainable

Province of Siquijor

Food Upliftment Alternatives” is expected to reach out to all the 134 barangays in the province and it is hoped that after 2010, all these 134 barangays will participate in the program where the adopters will be pro- vided with complete garden implements and tools, organic/inorganic fertilizers, and pinakbet package seeds. Aside from en- suring food in the home, the program also allows them to earn more income.

Another program, the fishery develop- ment program, includes aquaculture pro- duction and freshwater/brackish water fish production. It is primarily aimed at increas- ing incomes for the populace.

2. Provide skills training

Skills training programs are also being conducted by different agencies of govern- ment like Technical Education and Skills De- velopment Authority (TESDA), Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), Department of Science and Technology (DOST), Depart- ment of Agriculture (DA), Department of Agrarian Reform (DAR) and other institu- tions in order to provide the population with important skills to engage in small business and livelihood opportunities.

3.Introduce substantial livelihood opportunities

There are also funds for livelihood/capi- tal assistance for small-time entrepreneurs that are interest-free and collateral-free to really encourage business operation. This fund assistance had been loaned out to enterprising cooperatives. In 2009, P1.0 million was appropriated, benefiting 4 co- operatives with a total membership of 260.

benefiting 4 co- operatives with a total membership of 260. Status Report on the Millennium Development

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

4. Develop tourism

Tourism is also giving additional income to the people. It is even considered the island’s economic driver. In fact, Siquijor province has been declared as a Marine Reserve and Tourist Zone under Proclama- tion No. 1810.

5. Infuse funds for employment development

assistance / conduct jobs fairs

Another loan facility which the provincial government also opened for Overseas Filipino Workers was the OFW Assistance Fund which had been operating since 2004. Many Siquijodnons have been helped by this program.

6.Nutrition program / supplemental feeding

The province, in coordination with the Department of Social Welfare and Devel- opment (DSWD), the Department of Health (DOH), and civic organizations jointly implement the Nutrition/Feeding program.

7.

Aid to individuals during crisis situations

The DSWD, in coordination with the Provincial Government, provides funds to individuals as assistance during times of crisis situations.

8. Self – Employment Assistance (SEA – K)

This is also a DWD’s program which aims to provide the poor and disadvantaged sector of the society with timely access to credit and development opportunities.

with timely access to credit and development opportunities. Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

C. CHALLENGES

As in all government programs, the chal- lenge is in the sustainability of the programs. The attitude of the Filipinos known as “nin- gas cogon” is a threat to the sustainability of any program, whether government-ini- tiated or privately implemented. Constant monitoring and evaluation has to be made part of the overall program.

Another big challenge is the fulfillment of Goal I, which is to reduce the proportion of the people living in extreme poverty by half by 2015. The goals of achieving a 50 percent reduction in the proportion of the population experiencing food shortage and also a 50 percent reduction in the preva- lence of underweight children are also big challenges to overcome.

Information is power. Hence, the chal- lenge is to provide important and correct information to the province’s constituents. The impact of global warming and climate change on agriculture must also be widely disseminated and ways to mitigate the adverse effects must be properly planned.

Tourism is considered as an economic driver for the island province of Siquijor. The development activities that are currently being undertaken to increase tourist traffic and thereby increase economic activities in the province include the following:

1. Construction of a view deck tower and wellness center at the Bandilaan Mountain Resort (the highest mountain in the prov- ince).

Province of Siquijor

49

2. Organization of a healing festival every

Holy Week season

3. Construction of a leisure and recreation

spa in the barangays of Minalulan and Liloan in Maria. This is a private business development venture.

4. Development of outdoor recreation

facilities like mountain treks, wall climbs,

and the like.

The provincial and municipal LGUs need to access funds to implement all these proj- ects. Most importantly, there must be politi- cal will among the province’s top officials.

Food Always In The Home (FAITH) Program FAITH is considered to be the province’s most
Food Always In The Home (FAITH)
Program FAITH is considered
to be the province’s most effec-
tive way to combat poverty and
hunger. Under this program is the
OSFUA project. Basically, this
project helped the students and
their families in providing for their
basic needs in the homes as well as
in the school.
through the following scheme:
1. 40 percent for supplementary feeding
2. 25 percent for garden maintenance
3. 20 percent for the pupil’s share
4. 10 percent for administrative funds
5. 5 percent for the school clinic
The produced vegetables in the
schools are sold by the students
and the proceeds are being shared
The program has helped the parents because
instead of providing for their chidren’s school
needs, funds have been provided for them. At the
barangay level, the program has clearly led to the
improved income of the constituents and to the
nutrition of the children.

50

Province of Siquijor

to the nutrition of the children. 50 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium Development

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Goal 2: Achieve Universal Primary Education Target 2A. Ensure that, by 2015, children everywhere, boys
Goal 2: Achieve Universal
Primary Education
Target 2A. Ensure that, by 2015, children
everywhere, boys and girls alike, will be
able to complete a full course of primary
schooling

A. STATUS AND TRENDS

Proportion of Children Aged 6-12 Years Old Enrolled in Elementary Education

The proportion of children aged 6-12 years old enrolled in elementary education is 80.0 percent and the proportion of males against females is almost the same and the difference is actually very negligible. Even in the distribution of these children in the urban and rural areas, there is just a very slight difference. This means that educa- tion services have really reached the rural barangays.

tion services have really reached the rural barangays. Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Status Report on the Millennium
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS
Data

51 51

Province of Siquijor Province of Siquijor
Province of Siquijor
Province of Siquijor
Proportion of Children Aged 13-16 Years Old Enrolled in High School For the proportion of

Proportion of Children Aged 13-16 Years Old Enrolled in High School

For the proportion of children aged 13-16 years old enrolled in high school, the pro- vincial statistics showed that 70.1 percent of all children aged 13-16 years old are enrolled in high school. Of this figure, 66 percent are males and 74.1 percent, fe- males. In high school, more females enroll than males. The Filipino culture is such that the males are encouraged to pursue higher education because they will be the future heads of families and breadwinners. But for this particular indicator, the proportion

of males to females aged 13-16 years old enrolled in high school is 66.0 percent ver- sus 74.1 percent for females, indicating that more females are enrolled in high school than males. This may be explained by the fact that males in this age bracket 13-16 years old are already capable of getting jobs albeit their being menial and low- paying jobs. As to urbanity, 71.4 percent come from the urban areas and only 69.9 percent from the rural areas. This could be explained by the fact that most high schools are in the poblacions. The difference be- tween the actual enrollees from the urban and rural areas, however, is not very high.

Figure 17. Map of Proportion of Children Aged 6-12 Years Old in Elementary Education, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Old in Elementary Education, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 52 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the

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Province of Siquijor

by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 52 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

This is due to the fact that there are already barangay national high schools spread

This is due to the fact that there are already barangay national high schools spread in the rural barangays.

Proportion of Children Aged 6-16 Years Old Enrolled in School

The proportion of children aged 6-16 years old enrolled in school is 91.0 percent, with the males’ proportion at 89.3 percent and the females’ at 92.6 percent. Overall, there are less males than females attending

school. This is because males usually look for work to help in augmenting the family income. In terms of location, 91.8 percent of children 6-16 years old in urban areas were not attending school while and 90.8 percent was recorded in the rural areas.

Literacy Rate of 15-24 Year-Olds

Simple literacy rate is measured in terms of the percentage of the population who can read, write and understand simple

Figure 18. Map of Proportion of Children Aged 13-16 Years Old in High School, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Years Old in High School, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals
Years Old in High School, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Province of Siquijor

53

messages in any language or dialect. The province’s literacy rate for those aged 15- 24

messages in any language or dialect. The province’s literacy rate for those aged 15- 24 years old was high at 98.7 percent per the 2006 CBMS survey results. Municipal- ity results revealed that the best performer was Siquijor with 99.3 percent, followed by San Juan with 99.0 percent and Enrique Villanueva with 98.9 percent. These three municipalities have rates higher than the province. The bottom three were Lazi with 98.6 percent, Larena with 98.3 percent and, Maria with 97.5 percent. Generally, the pro- portion literate among males is higher than among females in this age bracket.

B. CURRENT POLICIES AND PROGRAMS

The policies and programs currently im- plemented by the Department of Education (DepEd) to ensure that all children of school age are in school are:

1. Enrollment campaign during PTCA meetings and barangay assemblies. The DepEd officials during PTCA meetings and barangay assemblies explain to the par- ents that the government is very concerned about the education of children and that is

Figure 19. Map of Proportion of Children Aged 6-16 Years Old in School by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

54

6-16 Years Old in School by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 54 Province of Siquijor Status Report on

Province of Siquijor

by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 54 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

why it offers free public elementary and high school education. They also explain that parents

why it offers free public elementary and high school education. They also explain that parents are held liable by the government if their school-aged children 6-16 years old are not in school.

This is an important activity because many parents especially in the far-flung barangays do not recognize the relevance of education in the future of their children. People are not motivated to do things if they do not understand why these things have to be done. It is in line with this that teachers campaign for education.

2. Encouraging over-aged students to take PEPT examination. Some children who

have stopped schooling for sometime are ashamed to get back to school in their old age. Hence, they are being encouraged to take placement tests so they can pursue higher years in school.

3. Mapping Program (surveying school-

aged children who are continuing school and those who are school leavers). This would really help determine where these out-of-school children are so that it would be easy tracking them and encouraging them to go back to school.

4. Drop-out reduction program for sec-

ondary level. This aims to reduce drop-outs among children in the secondary level.

Figure 20. Map of Literacy Rate of the Population 15-24 Year-Olds by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Population 15-24 Year-Olds by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS
Population 15-24 Year-Olds by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Province of Siquijor

55

56

5. Project Reach - this aims to reach all children of elementary and secondary school.

On the part of the provincial government, the first phase of OSFUA was implemented to give the school children additional in- come while attending school. The expan- sion of the beneficiaries to include parents in the barangays was for the intention of having additional family income plus more food on the table.

Increasing the incomes of parents so that they are able to afford sending their school aged children to school is always consid- ered a very important program thrust of government. It is the overarching policy framework and it cuts across all sectoral reforms.

The Provincial LGU also implements a Special Program for the Employment of Students (SPES) wherein all school chil- dren aged 15-25 years old who belong to indigent families are attending school and are willing to enroll in the next school year can be employed during summer for 20 days per student so that they will have money for enrollment. Furthermore, another program implemented was the

Province of Siquijor

Special Education (SpEd) for Impaired School-aged children.

C. CHALLENGES

The challenge would be financial on the part of the teacher implementing these ad- vocacies because advocacy efforts really require funding. In terms of policy formula- tion, the Sanggunian, as records indicate, has little knowledge on education policy formulation.

Entrepreneurial skills among parents of school children may have to be developed in order that they will have finances to en- sure that the children are provided with their school needs. The Local School Board may have to conduct a capability program among its local policymakers.

There is also a need to improve the quality of education so that the schools may pro- duce what the industries need. This refers to the “job-matching” aspect. Improvement of school facilities and provision of simple school amenities and school supplies to indigent school children is also necessary. Increase of teachers’ salaries may also be advocated.

Increase of teachers’ salaries may also be advocated. Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Goal 3: Promote Gender Equality A. STATUS AND TRENDS for every 100 boys who are
Goal 3: Promote Gender Equality
A. STATUS AND TRENDS
for every 100 boys who are enrolled in
primary education.
Target 3A. Eliminate gender disparity
in primary and secondary education,
preferably by 2005, and in all levels of
education no later than 2015
Ratio of Girls to Boys in Primary Education

In the entire province, the ratio of girls to boys in primary education is 0.94. This means that there are less girls in the primary education than boys. In fact, on the average, there were about 94 girls

As can be seen in the results, five of the six municipalities had records showing that there were less girls than boys in primary education as evidenced by the proportions which were less than one (1) in the munici- palities of Enrique Villanueva (0.97), Larena (0.94), Siquijor (0.93), Lazi (0.90) and Maria (0.90). Only the municipality of San Juan had a ratio of 1.05 which indicated that there were more girls in primary education than boys.

57 57

there were more girls in primary education than boys. 57 57 Status Report on the Millennium
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Status Report on the Millennium Development
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data
Data
Province of Siquijor Province of Siquijor
Province of Siquijor
Province of Siquijor
Ratio of Girls to Boys in Secondary Education Provincial results indicated that the ratio of

Ratio of Girls to Boys in Secondary Education

Provincial results indicated that the ratio of girls to boys in secondary education was 1.03 which means that there were more girls than boys in secondary education. Results

were more girls than boys in secondary education. Results also showed that the ratio in the

also showed that the ratio in the urban ar- eas (0.98) is slightly lower than in the rural areas (1.03). This means that while there were less girls enrolled in secondary edu- cation in the urban areas, more girls we enrolled in the rural areas.

Ratio of Girls to Boys in Tertiary Education

In the province, the ratio of girls to boys in tertiary education is 1.05 which means that there were more girls in tertiary education than boys. Meanwhile, the ratio of girls to boys in urban and rural areas were 1.02 and 1.06, respectively, which also indicates a higher number of girls in tertiary education both in urban and in rural areas.

Among all municipalities, Enrique Villan- ueva has the lowest ratio of girls to boys (i.e., 0.75) which also indicates that there were less girls than boys in tertiary educa- tion in this municipality. Urban areas had a ratio of 0.65 while rural areas had a ratio of 0.77. There were less girls than boys in tertiary education in both urban and rural areas in this municipality with urban areas recording a lower ratio (i.e., 0.65) as com- pared to rural areas (i.e., 0.77) .

Figure 21. Map of Ratio of Girls to Boys in Primary Education by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

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Boys in Primary Education by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 58 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the

Province of Siquijor

by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 58 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Figure 22. Map of Ratio of Girls to Boys in Secondary Education, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Boys in Secondary Education, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 The municipality with the biggest ratio of girls

The municipality with the biggest ratio of girls to boys in tertiary education was Maria (1.33). It may also be important to note that the ratios in the urban and rural areas are also highest which indicate that girls are more bent in pursuing tertiary education. This observation could be due to the fact that the boys stop school as early as upon completion of secondary education and go out to find work in order to help get income for their family’s needs. In addition, one of the reasons why there are more girls in ter- tiary education could also be attributed to the fact that even married women are now able to get back to school with the presence of a State College in Siquijor.

to school with the presence of a State College in Siquijor. Figure 23. Map of Ratio

Figure 23. Map of Ratio of Girls to Boys in Tertiary Education, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Boys in Tertiary Education, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using
Boys in Tertiary Education, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Province of Siquijor

59

Ratio of Literate Females to Males (15-24 years old)

At the provincial level, the ratio of liter- ate females to males was 0.90 which in- dicates that there are less literate females than males. However, if disaggregated by urbanity, the ratio was 1.05 in urban areas and 0.88 in rural areas. This showed that in urban areas, more female literates are seen than male literates while the opposite is true in the rural areas. This may be explained by the fact that most women in the urban areas are more eager to learn and earn a degree because of what they see and hear in their community and in the radio and television which is not necessarily true for most women in the rural areas who are content with fam- ily and are more held by strong family ties.

The ratios of literate females to males in the five municipalities of Enrique Villanueva, Lazi, Maria, San Juan and Siquijor are less than 1. It is only in Larena where the ratio is greater than 1 (i.e., 1.03). These results give an indication that there were less lit- erate females than males in Enrique Villan- ueva, Lazi, Maria, San Juan and Siquijor while, more literate females were recorded in Larena.

while, more literate females were recorded in Larena. Proportion of Elective Seats held by Women in

Proportion of Elective Seats held by Women in Municipalities and Province

The proportion of seats held by women in the province was 27.0 percent. Among all the municipalities, Maria had the big- gest proportion of seats being held by women at 35.4 percent, followed by Lar- ena with 33.5 percent and Enrique Vil- lanueva (32.1). The proportion is smallest in Lazi at 21.7 percent. In the province of Siquijor, political affairs are being con- trolled mostly by men.

Figure 24. Map of Ratio of Literate Females to Males (15-24 Years Old), by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

60

Males (15-24 Years Old), by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 60 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the

Province of Siquijor

by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 60 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

B. CURRENT POLICIES AND PROGRAMS The Provincial Government encouraged the organization of women groups espe-

B. CURRENT POLICIES AND PROGRAMS

The Provincial Government encouraged the organization of women groups espe- cially those that advocate for equal access of women and men in the workplace, and equal opportunities to participate and get involved in political governance. In particu- lar, more women are being encouraged to join Local Special Bodies. Women are taught and empowered to assert their rights and fight for their dignity. Information and advocacy efforts are being encouraged to protect women’s and children’s rights.

C. CHALLENGES

1. Functionalize Gender and Develop-

ment (GAD) Focal Point. The biggest chal- lenge is to activate and functionalize the GAD Focal Point.

2. Formulation of GAD Plan/Code. The

province has yet to formulate by law the GAD Plan and Code but it believes that all the development projects that it has imple- mented under the 20 percent Development Fund and even from the General Fund are GAD-related projects.

3. Allocating 5 percent of the annual bud- get for GAD. While the province recognizes the need to allocate the 5 percent GAD- mandated budget from its annual provincial budget, it also realizes that said amount will eat up much of its yearly budget.

4. Mainstreaming GAD into the PDPFP.

The challenge therefore is on how to really institutionalize the GAD into the mainstream of development.

Figure 25. Proportion of Elective Seats held by Women in Municipalities and Province

Elective Seats held by Women in Municipalities and Province Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals
Elective Seats held by Women in Municipalities and Province Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Province of Siquijor

61

62 62 Target 4A. Reduce by two-thirds, between 1990 and 2015, the under-five mortality rate

62 62

Target 4A. Reduce by two-thirds, between 1990 and 2015, the under-five mortality rate A. Status
Target 4A. Reduce by two-thirds,
between 1990 and 2015, the under-five
mortality rate
A. Status And Trends
Proportion of Children Aged 0 to Less
Than 5 Years Old Who Died
The proportion of children aged 0 to less
than 5 years old who died to the total number
of children in this age bracket was 0.4 percent.
The proportion was 0.3 percent among males
and 0.4 percent among females. In rural ar-
Province of Siquijor
Province of Siquijor

Goal 4: Reduce Child Mortality

Province of Siquijor Goal 4: Reduce Child Mortality eas, 0.4 percent of children aged 0 to
Province of Siquijor Goal 4: Reduce Child Mortality eas, 0.4 percent of children aged 0 to

eas, 0.4 percent of children aged 0 to less than 5 years old died while there were no reported death cases among this group of children in the in the urban areas.

As to municipal performance, the pro- portion of children’s deaths aged 0 to less than 5 years old was highest in Maria at 0.7 percent while Lazi had no reported cases of death among children of the same age group. The proportion of male deaths was highest in San Juan (0.7%), while the highest proportion of female deaths was recorded in Maria (0.9%).

proportion of female deaths was recorded in Maria (0.9%). Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Proportion of Infants Who Died The proportion of infant deaths to the total number of

Proportion of Infants Who Died

The proportion of infant deaths to the total number of infants in the province was 1.5 percent. About 1.4 percent of male infants died while 1.6 percent of female infants died during the reference period. Among all the

municipalities, Maria had the highest pro- portion of infant deaths at 3.4 percent, fol- lowed by Larena (2.2%), San Juan (2.2%) and Siquijor (0.7%). No infant deaths were reported in Enrique Villanueva and Lazi.

Figure 26. Map of Proportion of Children Aged 0 to Less Than 5 Years Old Who Died, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Than 5 Years Old Who Died, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Status Report on the Millennium Development
Than 5 Years Old Who Died, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Status Report on the Millennium Development

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

63

Province of Siquijor

The highest incidence of male infant deaths was recorded in San Juan (3.4%) while the

The highest incidence of male infant deaths was recorded in San Juan (3.4%) while the highest incidence of female in- fant deaths was in Maria (3.7%). No infant deaths were recorded in urban areas. All cases of infant deaths occurred in the rural areas, with Maria getting the highest pro- portion at 4.0 percent.

Proportion of Children Aged 1 to Less Than 5 Years Who Died

Table 37 shows that the proportion of children aged 1 to less than 5 years old who died to the total number of children aged 1 to less than 5 years old was 0.1 percent. Deaths among children in this age

Figure 27. Map of Proportion of Infants Who Died, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

of Infants Who Died, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 64 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the

64

Province of Siquijor

by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 64 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

group were recorded only in the rural areas. Among all the municipalities, the propor- tion was highest in San Juan (0.3%) while no deaths were recorded among children aged 1 to less than 5 years old in Lazi.

among children aged 1 to less than 5 years old in Lazi. Figure 28. Map of

Figure 28. Map of Proportion of Children Aged 1 to Less Than 5 Years Old Who Died, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Than 5 Years Old Who Died, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Status Report on the Millennium Development
Than 5 Years Old Who Died, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Status Report on the Millennium Development

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

65

Province of Siquijor

Although the proportion of maternal deaths in the province was low, problems still exist. Poor
Although the proportion of maternal deaths in the province was low, problems still exist. Poor
Although the proportion of maternal deaths in the province was low, problems still exist. Poor
Although the proportion of maternal
deaths in the province was low, problems
still exist. Poor health-seeking behavior,
and certain beliefs and practices of preg-
nant clients have caused such problems.
Most of the birth deliveries, for one, still take
place at home despite massive campaigns
to have facility- based child deliveries. This
was primarily due to the lack of accredited
birthing facilities in the municipalities in the
whole island. Other considerations would
be financial which force mothers to deliver
at home. Some traditions or rituals that
were being practiced by the mothers and
their families also prevented them from de-
livering in the hospital. Inspite of a memo-
randum circular from the DOH regulating
the functions of hilots, they still continue to
assist in child deliveries registering about 1
percent of deliveries in 2007. Trained hilots
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data
Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Goal 5: Improve Maternal Health

Target 5.A: Reduce by three quarters, between 1990 and 2015, the maternal mortality ratio

A. Status And Trends

Proportion of Women Deaths Due to Pregnancy- Related Causes

The number of women deaths due to pregnancy-related causes in the province was 3. In proportion to the total number of pregnant women provincewide, it was 0.3 percent. Furthermore, the proportion of women deaths due to pregnancy-related causes was 0.9 percent in the urban areas and 0.2 percent in the rural areas. Women deaths due to pregnancy-related causes were recorded only in the municipalities of Larena (2) and Maria (1).

66 66

Province of Siquijor Province of Siquijor
Province of Siquijor
Province of Siquijor
were recorded only in the municipalities of Larena (2) and Maria (1). 66 6 6 Province
attended to 3 percent of the deliveries while 12 percent were attended to by doctors.

attended to 3 percent of the deliveries while 12 percent were attended to by doctors.

working at securing funds for the upgrading and construction of identified health facili-

A

great portion (i.e., about 87%) of the

ties, hiring of personnel and procurement

deliveries, were performed by midwives at

of equipment, devices, medicines, supplies,

home. Most of the infant deaths were due

among others.

to

prenatal complications. It is important

to

note that: (1) there is no BEmONC facil-

In 2008, the low quality of prenatal care

ity in the province; (2) Siquijor Provincial Hospital has yet to be accredited as a CE- mONC facility, though it has the capability

and post partum care were mainly due to the low supply of Vitamin A and ferrous sulfate with folic acid for pregnant mothers.

to

perform caesarian section; (3) there is

Moreover, low utilization of antenatal care

no MPC-accredited RHUs; (4) there are no birthing facilities at the BHS; and (5) private sector collaboration has not been estab- lished. Thus, in 2009, the province was

(ANC) services is also due to the lack of or having the wrong information. The risks and benefits associated with antenatal care need to be effectively explained to mothers

Figure 29. Map of Proportion of Women Deaths Due to Pregnancy- Related Causes, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Pregnancy- Related Causes, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS
Pregnancy- Related Causes, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Province of Siquijor

67

68

such that it will encourage them to prioritize ANC visits.

With the adoption of the Provincewide Integrated Plan for Health for Siquijor in 2009, it is hoped that the province’s in- frastructures, especially for health, will be funded and implemented.

B. CURRENT POLICIES AND PROGRAMS

The Provincial Government, through the Integrated Provincial Health Office

(IPHO), is undertaking the following pro- grams:

1. Family Planning as part of the con-

tinuum of Maternal Newborn Child Health Care & Nutrition (MNCHN). The benefits

that family planning offer to the adopters of this method cannot be over emphasized. With proper child phasing, health risks of mothers could be minimized and deaths prevented.

2. Full implementation of facility-based

delivery to all pregnant mothers. As of the present, only the municipality of Larena has

that facility and caters only to the pregnant women in the municipality.

3. Continuing advocacy to mothers to

complete their prenatal and post-natal care. 4. Capability building of health personnel

on the different aspects of safe motherhood and family planning.

5. Upgrading of health facilities for Ma-

Province of Siquijor

ternity Care Package especially in the rural health centers.

6. Provision of quality micronutrient sup-

plements and supplies in the rural health centers for pregnant mothers.

C. CHALLENGES

1. The primary challenge is to have ad-

equate/sufficient funds in order to imple- ment programs that would address the concerns relating to women deaths relat- ed to pregnancy. The need to improve ac-

cess to and utilization of critical maternal health, family planning and other health care services through behavior change interventions and enhancement of health systems deemed necessary in improving maternal, newborn and child health and nutrition requires massive information and education campaign.

2. The health workers also need to be

equally capacitated and become knowl-

edgeable advocates. They need extensive training.

3. Upgrading of the 6 Rural Health Units

for Maternity Care Package (MPC).

4. Upgrading of Lazi Medicare Commu-

nity Hospital as Basic Emergency Obstetri- cal Neonatal Care (BEMONC) facility and the Siquijor Provincial Hospital as Com- prehensive Emergency Obstetrical Care (CEMONC) facility.

5. Securing of funds for the expansion of

the National Health Insurance System for all indigent families.

National Health Insurance System for all indigent families. Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Target 6.C: Have halted by 2015 and begun to reverse the incidence of malaria and
Target 6.C: Have halted by 2015 and
begun to reverse the incidence of malaria
and other major diseases

A. Status And Trends

Prevalence and Death Rates Associated with Tuberculosis

The province recorded 22 deaths associ- ated with tuberculosis. This translates to about 27 deaths per 100,000 population. Deaths associated with tuberculosis in the

population. Deaths associated with tuberculosis in the Status Report on the Mill ennium Deve lopment Goals

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Report on the Mill ennium Deve lopment Goals Using CBMS Data Goal 6: Combat HIV/ AIDS,

Goal 6: Combat HIV/ AIDS, Malaria and Other Diseases

urban areas was about 10 per 100,000 population which is lower as compared to the rate in rural areas (i.e., 14 per 100,000 population).At the municipality level, most of the deaths related to tuberculosis were recorded in the rural areas. The highest death rate among rural areas was record- ed in Siquijor (52 per 100,000 population). Considering all households in both urban and rural areas, the municipality of Siqui- jor still registered the highest proportion of tuberculosis-associated deaths at 49 per 100,000 population, while Lazi has the lowest at about 6 per 100,000 population.

69 69

Province of Siquijor Province of Siquijor
Province of Siquijor
Province of Siquijor
B. CURRENT POLICIES AND PROGRAMS 1. Full implementation of the quality as- surance system for

B. CURRENT POLICIES AND PROGRAMS

1. Full implementation of the quality as-

surance system for operation microscopy.

2. Creation of the TB Diagnostic Com-

mittee.

3. Strict observance of the National Tuber-

culosis Program Treatment Protocol.

4. Accreditation of all rural health units as

TB-Directly Observed Treatment Services (TB-DOTS)

5. Advocacy and Information, Education

and Communication (IEC) programs

6. Indigency Program of the National

Health Insurance Program

C. CHALLENGES

1. The need to establish a Tuberculosis

Directly Observed Treatment Short Course

(TBDOTS) room and a Tuberculosis Micros- copy Laboratory

2. Training of newly hired health person-

nel to capacitate them in the detection of tuberculosis cases.

3. The importance of correct information

on the TB Program.

Figure 30. Map of Prevalence and Death Rates Associated with Tuberculosis, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

70

with Tuberculosis, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 70 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium

Province of Siquijor

by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 70 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

71 71 Province of Siquijor Province of Siquijor Goal 7: Ensure Environmental Sustainability Target 7.A:
71 71 Province of Siquijor Province of Siquijor Goal 7: Ensure Environmental Sustainability Target 7.A:
71 71 Province of Siquijor Province of Siquijor Goal 7: Ensure Environmental Sustainability Target 7.A:

71 71

Province of Siquijor Province of Siquijor
Province of Siquijor
Province of Siquijor

Goal 7: Ensure Environmental Sustainability

Target 7.A: Integrate the principles of sustainable development into country policies and programs and reverse the loss of environmental resources

A. STATUS AND TRENDS

Proportion of Land with Forest Cover

The province of Siquijor has a total land area of 31,812.985 hectares. Of this, 1,160.442 hectares or 3.7 percent

are covered with forest. Disaggrega- tion by municipality is presented in Table 46. The municipality of Maria (7.5%) had the largest forest covers among all municipalities in the prov- ince, followed by Larena (3.9%). This may be due to the fact that Maria and Larena have private tree farm opera- tors in their respective municipalities. In Larena, the LGU also operates its own tree farm under the management of the Municipal Agricultural Office.

under the management of the Municipal Agricultural Office. Status Report on the Mill ennium Deve lopment

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

who had access to safe drinking water at 99.6 percent. The capital town of Siquijor

who had access to safe drinking water at 99.6 percent. The capital town of Siquijor placed second at 97.8 percent, followed by Lazi which had a proportion of 95.9 percent. These three municipalities registered higher proportions than the province.

Proportion of Households/Population with Access to Safe Drinking Water

About 95.3 percent of households in the province had access to safe drinking water. Meanwhile, the proportion of the popula- tion with access to safe drinking water to the total provincial population was 95.1 percent. About 95.0 percent and 95.2 per- cent of the male and female population, respectively had access to safe drinking water. In terms of urbanity, the figure was higher in urban areas (96.6%) than in rural areas (95.1%). This means that there were more people in the urban areas than in the rural areas who had access to safe drink- ing water.

For the individual municipal performanc- es, the data show that Enrique Villanueva had the highest proportion of households

Enrique Villanueva operates its own wa- ter system. It was also a recipient of the KALAHI-CIDSS project which implemented projects such as the construction of water facilities. Siquijor and Lazi are under the Lo- cal Water Utilities Administration (LWUA)– Metro Siquijor Water District but only in barangays near the poblacion area.

On the other hand, the 3 municipalities of Maria (94.3%), Larena (94.1%) and San Juan (90.3%) had proportions lower than the provincial figure of 95.3 percent. Maria and San Juan are also under the LWUA while Larena operates its own water system as an economic enterprise. At pres- ent, Larena is improving its water system through a loan facility with the Land Bank of the Philippines so that it can service its consumers better.

Figure 31. Proportion of Land with Forest Cover, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2010

of Land with Forest Cover, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2010 72 Source: DENR Siquijor Provincial Office Province

72

Source: DENR Siquijor Provincial Office

Province of Siquijor

Source: DENR Siquijor Provincial Office Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Proportion of Households/Population with Access to Sanitary Toilet Facility A total of 16,243 households in

Proportion of Households/Population with Access to Sanitary Toilet Facility

A total of 16,243 households in the prov- ince or 84.2 percent have access to sanitary toilet facility. The proportion of households with access to sanitary toilets in the urban areas was 92.8 percent while the proportion in the rural areas was 83.0 percent.This is an

indication that there were more households with access to sanitary toilets in the urban areas than in the rural places.

The municipality with the highest percent- age of population with access to sanitary toilet facility was Larena (93.5%), while the municipality with the lowest access was Lazi (73.5%)

Figure 32. Map of Proportion of Population with Access to Safe Drinking Water, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

to Safe Drinking Water, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using
to Safe Drinking Water, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

73

Province of Siquijor

Proportion of Households/Population who are Informal Settlers The proportion of households and population who are

Proportion of Households/Population who are Informal Settlers

The proportion of households and population who are informal settlers in the province was 1.3 percent or a total of 253 households with 1,095 population. The proportion of households in the urban and rural areas who are informal settlers were both 1.3 percent.

Among the municipalities, San Juan had the highest percentage of informal set- tlers at 2.3 percent while Siquijor had the lowest at 0.6 percent. One of the reasons why San Juan had the highest number of informal settlers is that this area is a fish- ing ground and most of the fishermen from nearby Mindanao come to San Juan to settle there temporarily.

Figure 33. Map of Proportion of Population with Access to Sanitary Toilet Facilities, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Sanitary Toilet Facilities, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 74 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium

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by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 74 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Proportion of Households/Population Who Live in Makeshift Housing In the province, the proportion of households

Proportion of Households/Population Who Live in Makeshift Housing

In the province, the proportion of households who live in makeshift hous- ing was 3.9 percent or 749 households.

In terms of the population, the propor- tion was 3.4 percent. While only 2.4 percent of the households in the urban areas were living in makeshift housing, about 4.1 percent was recorded for rural households.

Figure 34. Proportion of Households/Population who are Informal Settlers

of Households/Population who are Informal Settlers Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS
of Households/Population who are Informal Settlers Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS

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Proportion of Households/Population Living in Inadequate Living Conditions The proportion of households in the prov-

Proportion of Households/Population Living in Inadequate Living Conditions

The proportion of households in the prov- ince who live in inadequate housing condi- tions was 22.9 percent or 4,415 households,

which are mostly found in the rural areas as shown in Table 31. The highest proportion was in Lazi (31.1%), followed by San Juan (30.2%), Maria (25.3%), Siquijor (17.3%), Larena (15.1%) and Enrique Villanueva

Figure 35. Map of Proportion of Population who are Living in Makeshift Housing, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Living in Makeshift Housing, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 76 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the

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by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 76 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

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(12.2%). These households were mostly in the rural areas. Those who live in the rural

(12.2%). These households were mostly in the rural areas. Those who live in the rural areas are mostly farmers and fisherfolks who do not have enough income to build decent homes and who do not have much access to basic necessity.

B. Current Policies and Programs

among others, the implementation of reforestation programs and projects to ensure that there are continued planting activities, especially in the watershed and denuded areas. Forest protection activities are also undertaken so that illegal cutting of trees, and slash-and-burn activities are prevented.

The Sangguniang Panlalawigan had passed and adopted the Siquijor Envi- ronmental Code of 2008 which provided,

To address global warming and climate change, a project “Tree Nursery in Every Barangay” was launched to provide a

Figure 36. Map of Population Living in Inadequate Living Conditions, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006

Living Conditions, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS
Living Conditions, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006 Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

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steady supply of planting materials. This would increase the forest cover and more importantly, the water supply.

The provincial government vigorously implements projects with focus on the improvement and development of the water systems. Funds come from the 20 percent Development Fund and from the PDAF of the province’s congressman. At least 15 percent of the 20 percent De- velopment Fund is allocated every year for the repair/rehabilitation/expansion of water supply coverage. Most proj- ects implemented are on construction of water tanks, installation of submersible pumps, provision of polyethylene pipes for assistance to household connections, and installation of shallow tube wells and artesian wells.

To address the problem of access to sanitary toilet facility, the province also al- located funds for the procurement of toilet bowls, including materials to ensure that the toilet bowls are installed. The beneficiaries are the indigent families identified by the So-

Province of Siquijor

cial Welfare and Development Office.4.The province benefits from the Integrated Coastal Resource Management Program of the Government which addresses both the conservation and preservation aspects of coastal resources, and the livelihood and enterprise development component for the improvement of the conditions of the popu- lation living in the coastal areas.

C. CHALLENGES

The province is faced with the challenges of tapping the available water resources in the island and of coming up with a viable island water system that would be able to provide sufficient water to all residents. With the water problem solved, the other prob- lems related to it like sanitation will likewise be eventually solved.

However, there are not enough experts in the province who could make a project design for an island water development system. Moreover, the province does not have the funds to hire a consultant for this.

does not have the funds to hire a consultant for this. Status Report on the Millennium

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

percent or 719 households. Larena (17.2%) had the highest proportion of households with land lines
percent or 719 households. Larena (17.2%) had the highest proportion of households with land lines
percent or 719 households. Larena (17.2%)
had the highest proportion of households
with land lines while the municipalities of
Enrique Villanueva and Maria had no land-
line connections.
Source: CBMS Survey 2006

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Province of Siquijor
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Goal 8: Develop a Global Partnership for Development

Target 8. F: In cooperation with the private sector, make available the benefits of new technologies, especially information and communications

A. Status And Trends

Proportion of Households with Landline/Telephone Lines

Based in the record of telephone compa- nies operating in Siquijor (including TMSI/ PLDT, Globe, and Smart Communication.), the proportion of households in the prov- ince with land lines/telephone lines was 4.1

in the prov- ince with land lines/telephone lines was 4.1 Status Report on the Mill ennium

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Figure 37. Map of Households with Landline/Telephone Lines, by Municipality, Province of Siquijor, 2006

Lines, by Municipality, Province of Siquijor, 2006 Proportion of Households with Cellphones The proportion of

Proportion of Households with Cellphones

The proportion of households with cell- phones in the province was 68.8 percent representing 11,945 households. The municipality with the highest proportion is Siquijor (81.0%), followed by Larena (72.0%). At the bottom is Enrique Villanueva with an estimate of only 50.0 percent.

is Enrique Villanueva with an estimate of only 50.0 percent. Source: CBMS Survey 2006 FigureFigure 3838

Source: CBMS Survey 2006

FigureFigure 3838 MMapap ooff PProportionroportion ooff HHouseholdsouseholds wwithith CCellphones,ellphones, bbyy
FigureFigure 3838 MMapap ooff PProportionroportion ooff HHouseholdsouseholds wwithith CCellphones,ellphones, bbyy MMunicipality,unicipality, Siquijor,Siquijor, 20062006

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Siquijor,Siquijor, 20062006 80 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS

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Proportion of Households with Computers

The proportion of households with com- puters is 6.0 percent which is equivalent to 1,042 households. Larena had the highest proportion of households with computers at 10.4 percent or 250 households. Again, the lowest proportion is recorded in Enrique Vil- lanueva with 2.1 percent or 25 households.

in Enrique Vil- lanueva with 2.1 percent or 25 households. Source: CBMS Survey 2006 Figure 39.

Source: CBMS Survey 2006

Figure 39. Map of Proportion of Households with Computers, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006
Figure 39. Map of Proportion of Households with Computers, by Municipality, Siquijor, 2006
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82 Part 3. Meeting the 2015 Challenge Eradicating extreme poverty and hunger is an enormous

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Part 3. Meeting the 2015 Challenge

Eradicating extreme poverty and hunger is an enormous task which every adminis- tration or government faces. More than anything, the problem of poverty and hun- ger is a primary concern that needs to be immediately looked into. This is very much reflected in the province’s priorities, espe- cially in the Economic Development Aspects of its development agenda. Economic De- velopment Sector posted the highest share in terms of budget requirements.

The present provincial administration re- alizes this truth. The Government therefore needs to capacitate and provide capabil- ity interventions to the poor segments of society to enable them to rise above their present “extremely poor conditions” and be able to live decent lives. The programs, projects and activities identified and priori- tized are mostly those that directly provide capabilities and skills to create livelihood opportunities and allow the people to earn incomes.

The rest of the MDGs are achievable once the poor get extra income. Henceforth, the issues on education health, malnutrition,

Province of Siquijor

and maternal care problems may be prop- erly addressed. On primary education, the programs and projects are mainly on the repair/rehabilitation of school buildings and classrooms. The province has enough school buildings and classrooms as well as teachers until 2015. The province’s class- room-pupil ratio is 1:22 while its teacher- pupil ratio is 1:21.

Gender equality issues are best ad- dressed through massive advocacy. With regard to the issue of women having seats in political positions, the province sees to it that women are given equal opportuni- ties but eventually, of course, the will of the electorate will prevail.

Child mortality is actually low in the prov- ince. With massive efforts to convert the 6 RHUs as BeMONC facilities, and strong implementation of child care programs, child mortality will definitely decrease over the years until hopefully, the mortality rate becomes zero in 2015. The same is true with maternal deaths. Implementation of mater- nal health care package will fast-track the reduction of maternal deaths.

package will fast-track the reduction of maternal deaths. Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

A. Priority Program and Policy Responses

A. Priority Program and Policy Responses Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data
A. Priority Program and Policy Responses Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

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84 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

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Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

B. Financing the MDGs

B. Financing the MDGs C.Monitoring Progress Toward the Attainment of the MDGs By way of monitoring

C.Monitoring Progress Toward the Attainment of the MDGs

By way of monitoring the progress of the attainment of the Millennium Devel- opment Goals (MDGs), the province will conduct in early 2011 the second round of the CBMS Survey. The provincial gov- ernment would have wanted to do the second round this year (2010) but funds have already been fully appropriated for several other programs and projects, necessitating the postponement of the second round.

As in the first round, the municipalities and barangays will be requested to put

the municipalities and barangays will be requested to put Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

up at least some counterpart funds and human resource counterparts. At the same time, the MDG Provincial Team will endorse a proposal to the Provin- cial Development Council to approve the conduct of a CBMS survey every 3 years even after 2015.

The MDG Team will also endorse to the Local Development Council (LDC) the adoption of the CBMS survey re- sults as the benchmark data for the province and that they be considered the basis for the identification of projects to be implemented in their respective barangays and munici- palities.

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Part 4. Conclusion and Recommendations The 2006 CBMS Survey proved to be a good and

Part 4. Conclusion and RecommendationsThe 2006 CBMS Survey proved to be a good and more accurate source of infor-

The 2006 CBMS Survey proved to be a good and more accurate source of infor- mation on the state of the living conditions of the people of Siquijor considering that it covers all households in the province. The results could be the basis for prioritizing interventions that would help them achieve their MDG targets. For instance, results showed that more than half of the popu- lation in Siquijor lived below the poverty threshold which confirms that there are still many poor residents in the province. Most of them also did not have enough income to meet their basic food needs. Furthermore, the unemployment rate in the province is relatively high (18.0%). Given these, gov- ernment should implement programs that would address poverty, unemployment and hunger that would lead to the attainment of the MDG targets of eradicating extreme poverty. Interventions that would address problems on education and inadequacy of living conditions should also be imple- mented. During program implementation, corruption should also be eradicated so that all things will take their proper places.

The major recommendation for the Provin- 86 cial Government is to prioritize, through the

Province of Siquijor

Provincial Development Council, the fund- ing of the MDG Funding Requirements so that the province can implement all the sug- gested programs and policies that would translate the MDG targets into realities.

The following are some specific recom-

mendations based on the results discussed in this report:

1. Exercise of strong political will of the

Executive and Legislative. This is particularly in terms of implementing policies that would facilitate the achievement of the MDGS tar- gets. Priorities should be given on sectors which need the interventions based on the available data.

2. Enact policies and ordinances in the

LGU that would eliminate corruption. This is very important to ensure that the funds will be judiciously utilized to implement comprehensive basic health care services,

undertake viable and profitable livelihood projects. For instance, there should be improvements in the procurement system within the LGUs.

3. Implement agriculture development

programs that can be sustained. Given the fact that Siquijor is still predominantly agri- culture-based, with 52.0 percent of its land

agri- culture-based, with 52.0 percent of its land Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

devoted to agriculture production (e.g., corn and rice production, coconut produc- tion), agricultural development should be given attention. Although there have been several projects in the past which addressed agricultural development, a common prob- lem is the lack of equity among LGUs in order to sustain the projects. Hence, this should be considered in designing any ag- ricultural development project.

4. Improve revenue generation and col-

lection strategies. One of the things that should be done is updating of the Tax Maps, which will reflect the updated valuation of properties which hopes to increase rev-

enue collection. Better collection strategies should also be implemented.

5. Improve access to education. It is gen-

erally recognized that educational status is directly related to poverty. Hence, address- ing the problems on access to education could help improve the living conditions of the population in the long-run. The reasons for non-enrollment of children should be explored further and the root cause of the problem should be addressed.

and the root cause of the problem should be addressed. Status Report on the Millennium Development

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

6. Create jobs and improve opportunities

for employment. This can be done through the conduct of livelihood trainings (e.g., making

souvenirs) and seminars (e.g., for tour guides).

7. Improve capabilities and knowledge.

This would include trainings that improve computer literacy. 8. Encourage women participation in governance. Aside from participation in elections, women shall be encouraged to become members of the different councils

and committees in the province. This shall start by organizing a women’s organiza- tion in the province which advocates equal opportunities for men and women. Mem- bers of the organization could be part of consultative meetings and may even be elected as members of the local councils and committees.

9. Conduct a second round of CBMS

survey in the province. The conduct of an- other round of CBMS survey in the province will help assess the impact of government interventions. The data collected will also allow the province to monitor its progress in attaining the MDG goals.

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EXPLANATORY TEXT A. Preparation of Provincial Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) Report Using CBMS Data 1.

EXPLANATORY TEXTA. Preparation of Provincial Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) Report Using CBMS Data 1. Background and

A. Preparation of Provincial Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) Report Using CBMS Data

1. Background and Justification

The availability of good statistics and the capacity of governments, donors and international organizations to systematically measure, monitor and report on progress in all social and economic spheres are at the heart of development policy and the achievement of the MDGs.

The Millennium Development Goals Report 2007

While progress toward the attainment of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) is systematically being measured, moni- tored and reported at the national level, clearly, there must be a parallel effort at the local level to bring the MDGs into the main- stream of the local development agenda.

This is especially called for under decen- tralized regimes where local government 88 units (LGUs) are at the forefront of policy

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or program execution. Unfortunately, how- ever, national statistical systems have yet to respond adequately to the demand for mi- cro-level statistics that can aid LGUs in their poverty alleviation efforts, as noted in a joint World Bank and Asian Development Bank report, to wit: “the most comprehensive and consistent comparative subnational data (are) is at the regional level although this is simply an administrative level of govern- ment that has no responsibilities for delivery of social services. More data (are) is gradu- ally becoming available at the provincial level, but not at lower levels which are at the frontline of efforts to reduce poverty .”

In response, the Philippine Government has embarked on an initiative to localize the MDGs using the Community-Based Monitoring System (CBMS). In 2005, the National Statistical Coordination Board (NSCB) issued Resolution No. 6 “recog- nizing and enjoining support to the CBMS as a tool for strengthening the statistical system at the local level that will generate statistics for monitoring and evaluation of

will generate statistics for monitoring and evaluation of Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

development plans, including the progress of the local governments in attaining the Millennium Development Goals.”

Meanwhile, several approaches are be- ing carried out by the Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG) in capacitating LGUs to contribute to the at- tainment of the MDGs and uplifting the quality of life of their constituents. These interventions are particularly stated in DILG Memorandum Circular (MC) No. 2004-152 “Guide to Local Government Units in the Localization of the MDGs” dated Novem- ber 2004, which provides for the: (a) menu of Programs, Projects and Activities (PPAs) per MDG goal and target to guide LGUs in responding to the MDGs; (b) diagnosis of the local situation using existing local indicators and monitoring system; and (c) call for documentation and replication of good practices.

The CBMS that is being implemented in the Philippines is indeed well-positioned to track progress toward the attainment of the MDGs at the local level. For one, a number of indicators being monitored in the CBMS are included in the indicators for monitor- ing the progress in achieving the MDGs. Moreover, CBMS is intended to be done on a regular basis and can therefore be used for updating MDG indicators and facilitat- ing preparation of regular MDG reports. The CBMS can also be used as basis by national and local governments for costing and identifying appropriate interventions needed to achieve the MDGs as well as for resource allocation. Finally, given the large spatial disparities, the CBMS can help identify where focus has to be given to achieve the targets.

identify where focus has to be given to achieve the targets. Status Report on the Millennium

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

The CBMS’ role in localizing the MDGs was recognized during an Experts Group Meeting on Localizing the MDGs held on November 28, 2006 at the United Na- tions Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (UN ESCAP) in Bangkok, Thailand. The Committee on Poverty Reduction composed of 24 na- tion-states agreed that the CBMS could complement the official data collection activities of national statistical offices and improve the availability of the MDG and other indicators at the local level. It also agreed that localizing the MDGs through CBMS would help integrate the goals into the national development strategies. It therefore urged other de- veloping countries to initiate and imple- ment similar innovative systems that would help localize the MDGs.

As of May 12, 2010, CBMS is being im- plemented in 59 provinces (32 of which are province-wide), 687 municipalities and 43 cities in the Philippines, cover- ing 17,848 barangays all over the coun- try (see Figure 40). A good number of these LGUs have already consolidated their CBMS databases and are well- positioned to generate their own local MDG Reports. For one thing, CBMS col- lects information that reflects the multi- faceted nature of poverty. In addition, data generated by the CBMS can be broken down by municipal, barangay, purok and even down to the household level, thereby presenting meaningful in- formation and enabling deeper analysis of the poverty situation. Moreover, the CBMS can generate color-coded maps showing the poverty status at each geo- political level.

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Figure 40. CBMS Coverage in the Philippines (as of May 12, 2010)

40. CBMS Coverage in the Philippines (as of May 12, 2010) 2. Objectives This technical collaboration

2. Objectives

This technical collaboration aims to ca- pacitate nine provincial governments to systematically measure, monitor and report their status with respect to the MDGs. The operative word here is status since the prov- inces used their first round of CBMS data in formulating this report. These provinces include Agusan del Norte, Agusan del Sur, Biliran, Camarines Norte, Eastern Samar, Marinduque, Romblon, Sarangani and Siquijor. The abovementioned provinces were selected since they were among the first LGUs that were able to consolidate their CBMS databases at the provincial level. The CBMS Census was conducted in these provinces between 2005 and 2007 (for detailed information on census years, see Table 56).

In particular, the technical collaboration was 90 carried out to meet the following objectives:

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(i) to track the status on the attain- ment of the MDGs in the identified provinces; (ii) to assist these provinc- es in preparing their Provincial MDG Reports; and (iii) to increase local awareness on how these reports can bridge local and national development strategies.

3. Expected Technical Collaboration Outputs

The project is expected to produce the following outputs: (i) mentored technical staff of the nine CBMS-partner provinces on how to prepare Provincial MDG Reports, and (ii) Provincial MDG Reports of the nine provinces.

4. Capacity-Building

The capacity-building of the Provincial MDG Teams consists of three workshops and one-on-one mentoring process.

of three workshops and one-on-one mentoring process. Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Processing of CBMS Data to Generate MDG Indicators. This 2-day activity was designed to provide participants with: (i) a deeper appreciation of the importance of the CBMS in benchmarking/tracking local progress toward the attainment of the MDGs; (ii) a satisfactory level of knowledge in process- ing CBMS data to facilitate analyses of accomplishments versus targets; (iii) some basic skills on how to incorporate MDG targets in local development plans and fa- cilitate corresponding increase in budget allocation for MDG-responsive PPAs; and (iv) tools and methodologies in formulating MDG reports.

Preparation of Provincial MDG Reports Using CBMS Data. This 2-day activity was designed to build on the gains of the first workshop by providing technical assistance to the Project Teams in (i) processing CBMS data to generate the additional MDG indi- cators and consolidating their data at the provincial level, (ii) benchmarking/tracking their progress toward the attainment of the MDGs , (iii) reviewing partial provincial reports based on the indicators generated using the first workshop, and (iv) finalizing list of indicators to be included in the report.

Presentation and Critiquing of Provin- cial MDG Reports. This 3-day activity was designed to finalize the Provincial MDG Reports and at the same time provide an opportunity for an exchange of views and possible harmonization of approaches as well as for the provision of consistent guid- ance to all the Provincial MDG Teams. The expected output from this workshop was the complete manuscript of the MDG Report which already incorporates the comments/

of the MDG Report which already incorporates the comments/ Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

inputs of the assigned mentor and resource persons who were invited to share their ex- pertise during the workshop.

Mentor/Mentee Relationship. In order to ensure a sustained and focused mentoring program, a mentor from the Research Team of the CBMS Network was matched to one Provincial MDG Team.

The assigned mentor was expected to set a specific time each week to interact with his/her Provincial MDG Team and discuss the following: (1) review progress in drafting the Provincial MDG Report, (2) set/identify targets for the coming weeks, and (3) draw up an action plan to achieve those targets. In addition, the mentor was expected to assist his/her assigned MDG Team in identifying and solving problem areas.

Meanwhile, Dr. Celia M. Reyes, Anne Bernadette E. Mandap and Marsmath A. Baris, Jr. reviewed all partial and final re- ports. The technical staff of the NEDA Social Development Staff headed by Director Er- linda Capones also reviewed and provided valuable comments on the reports.

B. CBMS-MDG Indicators

Unless otherwise indicated, all the statisti- cal tables, graphs, charts and poverty maps presented in this report were generated us- ing the CBMS methodology.

The MDG Indicators, which were esti- mated using CBMS data, are presented in Table 55.

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Box 1. Community-Based Monitoring System

The CBMS is an organized way of col- lecting data at the local level to be used by local governments, national govern- ment agencies, nongovernment orga- nizations (NGOs) and civil society for planning, budgeting, and implementing local development programs as well as for monitoring and evaluating their perfor- mance. It is a tool for improved local gov- ernance and democratic decision-making that promotes greater transparency and accountability in resource allocation.

It involves the following steps:

Step 1 – Advocacy/organization Step 2 – Data collection and field editing Step 3 – Data encoding and map digiti- zation Step 4 – Data consolidation, database- building & poverty mapping Step 5 – Data validation and community consultation Step 6 – Knowledge (database) manage- ment Step 7 – Plan formulation Step 8 – Dissemination, implementation, and monitoring

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implementation, and monitoring 92 Province of Siquijor Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS

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Table 55. The CBMS-MDG Indicators and their Definition

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Table 55. The CBMS-MDG Indicators and their Definition 93 93 Status Report on the Millennium Development

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Table 55. (Continued)
Table 55. (Continued)

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