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Section A VILAS COUNTY N EWS - R EVIEW EAGLE RIVER, WI 54521 • (715)

Section A

VILAS COUNTY

NEWS-REVIEW

EAGLE RIVER, WI 54521

(715) 479-4421 • www.vcnewsreview.com

$1.25

VOL. 126, NO. 32

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

Communities set Halloween parties

Area communities and service organizations are gearing up for annual Halloween celebra- tions. Most youth activities are planned Hal- loween night Monday, Oct. 31. Phelps has activities scheduled Sat- urday, Oct. 29, and Sugar Camp has planned activities Sunday, Oct. 30.

Some communities also have announced trick-or- treating hours. The following commu- nities have reported activ- ities to this newspaper:

Eagle River The 62nd annual Eagle River Lions Club Hallo- gras Halloween party will be held Monday, Oct. 31, in the Northland Pines Middle School gym- nasium. Doors will open at 6 p.m. Hot dogs, soda, ice cream and cook- ies will be served. Each child will receive a gift bag of candy. There also will be numerous games and prizes. The party will end at 7:30 p.m. The City Council didn’t

To HALLOWEEN, Pg. 2A

also will be numerous games and prizes. The party will end at 7:30 p.m. The City

Student numbers drop slightly in three area school districts

BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH

NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR

After tumbling for a decade and then leveling off the past two years, the student count in three area school districts dropped slightly this fall, according to district adminis- trators. Northland Pines, Three Lakes and Phelps schools all witnessed student declines in the late 1990s and early 2000s, creating tight budgets due to state-mandated revenue caps based on enrollment. But all three school districts saw enrollment numbers level off, starting three years ago. This year, all three saw their numbers drop slightly on the third Friday in September

enrollment day for the Wiscon- sin Department of Public Instruction (DPI). Northland Pines saw its enrollment drop to below 1,400 students, for the first time since 2008-’09. Three Lakes enrollment dropped two stu- dents but is on par with the last five years. After three straight years of going up, Phelps saw its enrollment drop to its lowest level in at least eight years. All three districts have made staff and program cuts or adjustments to match the steady decline in the enroll- ment. In addition, voters in all

To STUDENTS, Pg. 2A

Districtwide School Enrollments (3rd Friday in September) ’05-’06 ’06-’07 ’07-’08 ’08-’09
Districtwide
School
Enrollments
(3rd Friday in September)
’05-’06
’06-’07
’07-’08
’08-’09
’09-’10
’10-’11
’11-’12
NORTHLAND
1,469
1,444
1,393
1,426
1,432
1,427
1,399
PINES
PHELPS
159
161
156
141
145
151
139
THREE LAKES
643
610
584
583
563
578
576
151 139 THREE LAKES 643 610 584 583 563 578 576 INCOMING — Fixed on some

INCOMING — Fixed on some distant prey, a very focused bald eagle streaks downward, its wings producing the sounds of wind

rushing through flight feathers. Eagles will turn more to hunting ditches in the weeks to come. --Staff Photo By KURT KRUEGER

DOJ to process carry permits starting Nov. 1

BY ANTHONY DREW

NEWS-REVIEW ASST. EDITOR

The Department of Justice (DOJ) will begin processing applications for concealed car- ry permits Tuesday, Nov. 1, making Wisconsin the 49th state to recognize lawful con- cealed carry. Permit application forms will be made available online and by mail Nov. 1. “Implementing Wisconsin Act 35 has been a top priority for me and for the DOJ since it was signed into law back in July,” said Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen. “I’m proud of the tireless work being done by people at the DOJ and look forward to issuing permits to qualified applicants as soon

as possible.” To better prepare residents

for their concealed carry per- mit applications, the DOJ has updated its Frequently Asked Questions on the website at doj.state.wi.us. This newly created page provides updates, including a link to the emergency rules, application and training requirements information and

a model certificate to serve as

a guide for instructors provid-

ing students with proof of training. The site also lists out-of-state licenses that will be recognized in Wisconsin when the law takes effect, but

To CARRY, Pg. 3A

Social Security benefits to increase 3.6% in 2012

BY NEWS-REVIEW STAFF

Ready for the test

New Trail Bond product laid down near Eagle River

Monthly Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits for more than 60 million Ameri- cans will increase 3.6% in 2012, the Social Security Administration announced last week. The 3.6% cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) — the first increase since 2009 — will begin with benefits that nearly 55 million Social Secu- rity beneficiaries receive in

January 2012. Increased pay- ments to more than 8 million SSI beneficiaries will begin Dec. 30, 2011.

With the 3.6% COLA, the estimated average monthly Social Security benefit payable in January 2012 will be $1,229 for all retired work- ers. The average couple, with both receiving benefits, will get $1,994. A widowed mother

To INCXREASE, Pg. 2A

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

Make-A-Wish fullfills dream

Austin

Kluever

of

Eagle River spent the weekend of a lifetime visiting the Green Bay Packers. Pg. 1B

weekend of a lifetime visiting the Green Bay Packers. Pg. 1B B Y G ARY R

BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH

NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR

A new surface for bicycle- pedestrian trails that could also withstand the pounding of snowmobiles in the winter months is ready to be tested near Eagle River.

of

The

trademarked

mix

crushed granite and binder is an invention of Pitlik & Wick Inc., the Sugar Camp-based highway construction compa- ny. The company laid down a 120-yard test strip surfaced with Trail Bond last week on part of the snowmobile trail from the Mud Creek bridge west of Eagle River to the driveway into Eagle River Inn & Resort. Drivers in automo- biles can see the test strip along the north side of High- way 70.

The test strip also is a sam- ple of what much of the Great

To TRAILS, Pg. 4A

is a sam- ple of what much of the Great To TRAILS, Pg. 4A A Pitlik

A Pitlik & Wick Inc. crew member prepared a stretch of snowmobile trail near the Mud Creek

bridge west of Eagle River for a test strip of Trail

--Photo By Carlton Schroeder

Bond.

2A

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

26, 2011 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEATHER CORNER Note: Precipitation amounts are recorded at

WEATHER

2011 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEATHER CORNER Note: Precipitation amounts are recorded at 8

CORNER

Note: Precipitation amounts are recorded at 8 a.m. for the previous 24 hours.

LAST

SEVEN DAYS

   

ONE YEAR

 

AGO

 

Hi

Lo

Prec.

   

Hi

Lo

Prec.

Wed.,

Oct.

19

47

32

.13 R

 

Tues., Oct.

19

 

57

28

None

Thurs.,

Oct.

20

40

32

.04R

Wed., Oct. 20

56

34

None

Fri.,

Oct.

21

55

34

.02R

Thurs., Oct. 21

47

32

Tr.R

Sat.,

Oct.

53 22

27

None

Fri., Oct. 22

 

58

26

Tr.R

Sun.,

Oct.

56 23

27

Tr.R

Sat., Oct. 23

52

26

None

Mon.,

Oct.

24 35

53

.13R

Sun., Oct. 24

 

58

45

.54R

Tues.,

Oct.

44 25

35

Tr.R

Mon., Oct. 25

62

48

.43R

LASTYEAR

The average daily high at this time last year for the next sev- en days was 45, while the average overnight low was 29. There was rain on four days measuring 1.3 inches.

COMPARISON

Days precipitation recorded since Oct. 1, 2011, 13 days; 2010, 8 days.

Average high of past 30 days, 2011, 62; 2010, 62. Average low of past 30 days, 2011, 40; 2010, 37.

FOREST

Most leaves have fallen from the trees, except for a few oak leaves still clinging to branches. The deer mating season, known as the rut, is starting which increases deer activity. Drivers are urged to watch for deer along roadways.

CONDITIONS

STREAMS

Water temperatures have dropped into the 40s, which means trophy muskies will be much more aggressive. While they have recovered somewhat, the seepage lakes are still low and are in need of much fall precipitation.

AND LAKES

OUTLOOK

Wednesday will be mostly cloudy and continued cool, with a high of 44 and a low of 32. Thursday afternoon rain and snow showers are forecast, with a high of 42 and a low of 31. Fri- day a few snow showers or flurries are expected, with a high of 41 and a low of 30. Saturday look for a mix of sun and clouds, with a high of 45 and a low of 26. Sunday there is a slight chance for a morning shower, with a high of 46 and a low of 29.

( PORTIONS

OF THE

 

WEATHER

       

CORNER

 

ARE

 

THROUGHTHE

         

COURTESY

OF

KEVIN

BREWSTER,

EAGLE

RIVER

and

NEWSWATCH

12

METEOROLOGIST.

)

Halloween: FROM PAGE 1A

assign any regular hours for trick or treating in the city of Eagle River. The police department asks parents to have their children attend the Hallogras party at the school. If youths do trick or treat, Police Chief Mark Vander Bloomen suggests children go out during daylight hours only, unless accompanied by a responsible adult.

Three Lakes The Three Lakes Lions Club welcomes all Three Lakes area preschool through sixth-grade children to the annual Halloween parade, pumpkin-carving contest and

costume judging Monday, Oct.

31.

Any youths participating in the pumpkin-carving contest should take their entries to the school commons by 5:45 p.m., as judging will take place during the parade. Prizes will be awarded to four groups: preschool to kinder- garten; first to second grade; third to fourth grade; and fifth to sixth grade. Pumpkins will be judged on creativity and the Halloween theme. Children and their parents walking in the costume parade should be at the Three Lakes Winery parking lot by 6 p.m. The parade will travel south down Gogebic Street to Erie Street toward the post office and head south to the school. Costume judging, including an adult category, will begin in the school commons as soon as the parade participants arrive. Prizes will be awarded for scariest, prettiest, funniest and most creative costumes. Trick or treating after the event is at the discretion of

parents. The Lions Club, as well as police and fire depart- ments, ask that children be accompanied by an adult.

Conover The Conover Lions Club will host a Halloween party for youths Monday, Oct. 31, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Con- over Community Center, located on Highway K East. The party will feature games, candy and prizes for best costume in each age group. Food will be available.

Phelps Trick or treating is sched- uled in Phelps from 2 to 5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 29. Trick-or- treat maps are available at Phelps businesses. That night, the Phelps Par- ents Association will host a Halloween party at Phelps School from 5 to 7 p.m. A free meal of hot dogs and chips will be served, followed by games in the small gym. To donate bars or cookies, drop them off at the concession stand Saturday night. Volunteers are still needed in all areas. For more informa- tion, call Jill Mesun at (715)

545-4017.

Land O’ Lakes Trick or treating is sched- uled Monday, Oct. 31, from 3:30 to 6 p.m. in Land O’ Lakes. The Library and Recre- ation Department also will host a Halloween party fea- turing food and games at the Stateline from 4 to 7 p.m.

Sugar Camp Trick-or-treat hours in Sug- ar Camp will be Sunday, Oct. 30, from 4 to 7 p.m.

Increase:

with two children will average $2,543 and a widow or widow- er alone will receive $1,184. Some other changes that will take effect in January of each year are based on the increase in average wages. Based on that increase, the maximum amount of earnings subject to the Social Security tax (taxable maximum) will increase to $110,100 from

$106,800.

Of the estimated 161 mil- lion workers who will pay Social Security taxes in 2012,

FROM PAGE 1A

about 10 million will pay higher taxes as a result of the increase in the taxable maxi- mum. Information about Medi- care changes for 2012, when announced, will be available at Medicare.gov. For some beneficiaries, their Social Security increase may be par- tially or completely offset by increases in Medicare premi- ums. The Social Security Act provides for how the COLA is calculated.

Rivers to the People ™

Rivers to the People

NEWS

Students: enrollments level off here

FROM PAGE 1A

three districts approved oper- ating referendums in the past three years to help school boards balance their budgets.

Pines drops 28 At Northland Pines, District Administrator Mike Richie said the enrollment dropped 28 students from 1,427 last year to 1,399. Pines had 1,432 in 2009-’10. The enrollment had dropped to 1,393 in 2007- ’08 after peaking at 1,655 stu- dents in 1998-’99. Richie said students enrolled in the 4-year-old kindergarten (4-K) program have helped stabilize the num- bers at Northland Pines. “We added 4-year-old kindergarten last year,” said Richie. “We had 48 enrolled the first year and we have 105 this year. You don’t get full credit for each student, only .6. Because of those extra stu- dents, the number of students in the Eagle River Elementary School has reached 416, the most ever.” Northland Pines has a total of 1,421 students in all its buildings, including 300 in the middle school and 497 in the high school. The DPI reporting figure is lower due to open enrollment adjustments and full-time equivalent students. Richie also said that North- land Pines continues to improve its open enrollment numbers. Pines has 89 stu- dents coming into the district this year and 67 are leaving the district. “We are plus 22 students for open enrollment. We’ve made a huge improvement since 2005- ’06, when we were minus 55,” said Richie. Richie said small incoming kindergarten classes and large

graduating classes are the main reason for declining enrollments. For example, Richie said this year’s kinder- garten class has just 69 stu- dents, while the junior class has 142. “One positive is that the class size tends to get larger as it moves through the district,” said Richie. “We pick up stu- dents from Christ Lutheran School following eighth grade and we often get homeschool children as they get older, join- ing the district for high school. For example, the 4-K class two years ago had 60 students and the same group now has 91 in first grade.” Pines is in the third year of its voter-approved referendum to exceed the revenue limit for three years. Richie predicted Pines will be able to get four years out of those tax dollars and may not have to go to ref- erendum again until the fall of 2012 for the 2013-’14 school year.

Three Lakes down 2 Three Lakes District Administrator George Karling said student enrollment dropped from 578 last year to 576 this fall. Three Lakes had fewer than 600 students for the past five years and had a high of 819 students in the 1999-2000 school year before the 10-year decline. “What’s interesting is, I traced a line going from 2010 to 2011 in the classes and we’re seeing a little bit of trend in the lower grades of classes increasing,” said Karling. “You think you graduate a big class and your kindergarten class coming in might be smaller, but it usually doesn’t work that way.” Karling said Three Lakes class sizes have shown a trend

of building over time as they pick up students along the way. “When we did the building project, we had a prefessional enrollment projection done by the University of Michigan,” he said. “The projection said we were going to remain relative- ly stable and maybe vary by 15

or 20 students either way. They take in all kinds of computer- ized information. Six or seven years later, we’re up over the

800 mark from 640, which was

where we were when we had the referendum. It’s really interesting to watch how things transpire.” The enrollment breakdown between the high school and other schools this year com- pared to last year is as follows:

high school, 294 students; Three Lakes Junior High, 78 students; Three Lakes Ele- mentary, 180 students; and Sugar Camp Elementary, 128 students. Karling said the 4-K has increased from 29 students last year to 40 students this year. “There were 19 students in 4-K when the program started in 2007,” he said. “That has helped because we can count .6 for each student in 4-K.”

Phelps at 139 At Phelps, the enrollment dropped 12 students this fall to 139. While the enrollment has been fairly stable since 2002-

’03, it’s well below the high of

216 in the 1996-’97 school year.

In 2008-’09, Phelps had 141 students, according to District

Administrator Delnice Hill, so the count has remained fairly steady. “We registered four new stu- dents since the third Friday in September count, so that is really exciting,” said Hill. “So that means there are some families moving into the dis- trict.” Hill said the Phelps School is attractive to parents because of the low teacher-to- student ratio, the number of course offerings for a small school, high ACT scores and challenging advanced place- ment course work. Concerning open enroll- ment, Phelps has 25 students coming into the district and 37 going to other schools. “We certainly are making an effort to turn those numbers around, but sometimes it’s just

a family situation, where a

parent works or lives, that determines the school of choice. We are in the process of charting the reasons students leave, and it’s really across the gamut.” Phelps is in the third year of

a referendum to exceed the revenue limit to the tune of $835,000 each year for three

years. “We will likely be going to the electors for another refer- endum to exceed the revenue limit in April of 2012,” said Hill. “We have built up the fund balance, but we don’t want to make it a make-it-or- break it situation by trying for a fourth year. We have worked hard to make the district financially sound.”

make-it-or- break it situation by trying for a fourth year. We have worked hard to make
make-it-or- break it situation by trying for a fourth year. We have worked hard to make

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

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NEWS

State Superintendent Tony Evers presented a Wisconsin School of Recognition award honoring Phelps Elementary School.

State Superintendent Tony Evers presented a Wisconsin School of Recognition award honoring Phelps Elementary School. Phelps

School District Administrator Delnice Hill, left, and teacher Dorothy Kimmerling accepted the award. --Contributed Photo

Capitol ceremony celebrates Phelps Elementary School

MADISON — State Superintendent Tony Evers recently honored Phelps Elementary School among 117 other state schools that earned Wisconsin School of Recognition awards at the State Capitol. Phelps elementary and the other award-winning schools received a plaque and $5,000 for use on any school-related activity. Ten schools that have earned School of Recognition awards for five consecutive years received a flag to mark their achievement. To be eligible for Wiscon- sin School of Recognition honors, each school was among those with the high- est poverty rates in the

state, based on free and reduced-price school lunch data. Additionally, student achievement on statewide reading and mathematics assessments in each school was higher than the state average for schools with similar poverty rates and grade configurations. Each school also made adequate yearly progress for the past two years as defined under federal education laws. Finally, each school receives, or is eligible to receive, Title I funding, the federal program that pro- vides aid for services to school districts and schools with high numbers or high percentages of children who

are economically disadvan- taged. The schools each sent a team of district personnel for the day’s events at the Capitol. The Black Hawk Middle School Orchestra of Madison, under the direc- tion of Kristie Ely, provided music during the reception and brunch. During the noon awards program, the Bruce Guadalupe Middle School Mariachi Juvenil from Mil- waukee, under the direction of Dinorah Marquez, provid- ed music. Evers delivered welcom- ing remarks, while Jeanan Yasiri, senior lecturer at UW-Madison, directed the presentation of awards.

Carry: training group approved

FROM PAGE 1A

applicants should keep in mind the list — and the list of states that will recognize Wis- consin licenses — is still being updated. Resources for instructors who wish to view a model four- hour training curriculum also have been posted. The DOJ recommends applicants and anyone inter- ested in Wisconsin’s new con- cealed carry law check back on the website Nov. 1 for the lat- est information.

AACFI accepted Meanwhile, the DOJ for- mally recognized the Ameri- can Association of Certified Firearms Instructors (AACFI) as meeting the Wisconsin qualifying standards of a firearms training organiza- tion. Anyone who plans to apply for a new Wisconsin weapons license can attend an AACFI class knowing the DOJ will accept this training, according to Tim Grant, AACFI vice president of operations and development. “We have been working closely with the DOJ since the passage of the new Wisconsin weapons law and we are pleased that our organization

VILAS COUNTY

NEWS-REVIEW

Published weekly by Eagle River Publications, Inc. Eagle River, WI 54521 www.vilascountynewsreview.com Consolidation of the Vilas County News, the Eagle River Review and The Three Lakes News

Publication #659480

Member of the Wisconsin Newspaper Association and the National Newspaper Association

Entered as periodical mail matter at the post office, Eagle River, WI 54521, under act of March 3, 1879. Subscription price in Wisconsin, Vilas and Oneida coun- ties only, is $50.00 per year, all of Wiscon- sin except for Vilas and Oneida counties, $57.00 per year. Out of Wisconsin, $68.00 per year. Subscription payable in advance. Published every Wednesday.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes, form 3579, to Vilas County News-Review, Inc., P.O. Box 1929, Eagle River, WI 54521, phone 715-479-4421, fax 715-479-6242.

and our certified firearms instructors were so quickly recognized,” said Grant. “We realize that many people have been waiting for this decision from the DOJ before making a commitment to go to a class. Your wait is officially over.” Grant said the AACFI will be in touch with its past Wis- consin course clients to be sure they have all the necessary documentation to make a suc- cessful application. The AACFI trained thou- sands of citizens who live in Wisconsin to responsibly carry lethal force since 2004, accord-

ing to Grant. “As an organization that specializes in training armed citizens, AACFI’s curriculum exceeds the training require- ments established by the Wis- consin Legislature by instruct- ing clients how to survive an attack physically, morally, legally and financially,” said Grant. AACFI currently has more than 30 active certified firearms instructors serving Wisconsin, including Dan Tomasoski of Eagle River. AACFI Wisconsin instructors can be found at aacfi.com.

Postal Service sets holiday deadline

With autumn upon the North Woods, the first deadline for the 2011 holiday season is around the corner for letters and packages destined for ser- vice members and their fami- lies stationed overseas. Saturday, Nov. 12, is the deadline for sending holiday packages to soldiers stationed overseas using parcel post to all air/army post office (APO)

or fleet post office (FPO) ZIP codes. All military mail, regardless of destination, is sent by domestic mail rate. Interna- tional rates do not apply to mil- itary mail delivery. The priority mail 12- by 12- by 5 1 /2-inch large flat-rate box offers a $2 discount to APO/FPO destinations and ships for $12.95.

a $2 discount to APO/FPO destinations and ships for $12.95. Vilas cuts $1.5 million to balance

Vilas cuts $1.5 million to balance budget

Supervisors decide to take $284,054 from general fund

BY KEN ANDERSON

NEWS CORRESPONDENT

The Vilas County Finance Committee completed work on the proposed 2012 county

budget, including making $1.5 million in cuts to reach the state-mandated levy limit.

A required public hearing

on the budget will be held

Tuesday, Nov. 8, at the court- house in Eagle River begin- ning at 9 a.m.

In addition to the cuts, the

Finance Committee will use $284,054 from the general fund, leaving a balance of $6.6 million. In addition, the coun- ty will take $593,782 from the highway segregated fund and $106,776 in other funds to reach the state-imposed tax levy limit. Total expenditures for 2012 will be $25.97 million com- pared to $27.60 million in 2011, a decrease of $1.62 mil- lion or about 6%. The proposed tax levy will drop slightly for 2012, going to $13.05 million compared to $13.09 million for 2011. The proposed mill rate for 2012 will increase 4 cents, from $1.74 per $1,000 of value to

$1.78.

According to County Clerk Dave Alleman, part of the rea- son for the increase in the mill rate is a drop in the county equalized value from $7.54 billion to $7.34 billion. Revenues coming into the county, as well as revenues generated by county depart- ments, also are expected to drop from $13.32 million to $11.93 million. One of the largest drops anticipated is from housing state prisoners in the county jail. During 2011, the antici- pated revenue was $665,000. According to Vilas County Sheriff Frank Tomlanovich, the state is looking at ending the practice of housing prison- ers in county jails, which will drop the jail revenue to $150,000, or a $514,000 decrease. Since the new Jus- tice Center was constructed, housing state prisoners has generated nearly $9 million in revenue.

During 2011, the county board authorized a number of withdrawals from the unen- cumbered general fund, but still had sufficient money to offset some of the 2012 bud- get, according to Alleman. The largest withdrawal was $875,000 for updating the heating and air-conditioning systems.

Most budgets cut The Finance Committee cut the budget requests from 12 county departments and increased requested funds for three departments. Some of the largest cuts, percentagewise, came at the expense of the Civil Air Patrol, which requested $5,000 and was reduced 50% to $2,500, and for libraries,

which requested $95,966, but were cut 37% to $60,271. The largest cuts in terms of dollars were from the highway department, which requested $4.05 million and was reduced to $3.21 million, a drop of $839,045. Of four vacant posi- tions in the highway depart- ment, the Finance Committee included funds to fill only two. Left vacant at this time is the position of highway commis- sioner. The other large cut was made in the sheriff’s depart-

ment’s budget. The request for 2012 of $4.99 million was reduced to $4.89 million, a drop of $97,000. Other county departments with requests that were reduced include the district attorney’s office, general building and plant operations, land information and map- ping, Department of Natural Resources charges for fire pro- tection, emergency manage- ment, solid waste and zoning. Slight increases were allowed for Medicaid grant expenses, lead poisoning grant expenses and a Veter- ans Service grant.

Depend on taxes While most county depart-

ment operations collect some fees and therefore generate revenue to offset the total impact on those who pay prop- erty taxes, there are a number of departments that depend on the property tax levy. The department that has the highest tax impact is the sheriff’s department budget, of which $4.76 million goes on the tax rolls. Combine that with the tax impact of $1.57 million from operation of the county jail — $6.34 million is from property owners. While the county highway budget exceeds $3 million, state aid and other revenue sources account for all but

$431,384.

Administration of Social Services programs has $1.06 million on the tax rolls, while the Human Service Center has $697,000 and Juvenile Intake, $415,213. General building opera- tions places $675,397 and information systems places $485,900 on property taxes. Only one county depart- ment actually exceeds its total expenses. The Register of Deeds office anticipates con- tributing $7,281 to the county general fund in 2012.

REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS

The real estate transactions

and Donna Schneider et al to

listed below are being published at the request of many of our readers. The information is public

Colleen A. Main, prt SW NW in 1- 40-10, $195 Amy Croker to Joseph J. Small

record and reflects an index of

III

and wife, prt SW NE in 20-40-

each week’s transactions. Property transactions exceed-

11,

gov lot 4, $1,194 David C. Schultz to Gregory G.

ing $10,000 recorded at the Vilas County Courthouse the past

Sass and wife, prt SE SW in 14- 43-7; prt NE NW in 23-43-7, gov

week and the transfer fee (at $3 per $1,000):

lot

1, $567 Oct. 20, 2011 American Community Bank &

Oct. 17, 2011 Cynthia L. Turrittin to Cheryln Joanne Johnston et al and Cheryln Joanne Turrittin et al, prt SW NW, prt NW SW in 32- 40-11, $150 BMO Harris Bank to Larry VanOosten et al, lot 107 of plat 851 to Wild Eagle Lodge Condo- minium, $426 Gerard W. Wilczek and wife to Richard A. Nelson and wife, lots 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 of plat 17 in Big Bass Addn., $1,350 Richard C. Pickles and wife to Walter C. Strauss and wife, lot 5 of plat 796 in Evergreen, $1,665 Sean Michael McEnroe and wife to Shaun D. Eberdt and wife, lot 1 of plat 780 in Timber Bay Resort Condominium, $642 Sandra D. Bass to Scott M. Podhora et al and Maria E. Mer- cado et al, prt SE SW in 35-40-6,

$252

Gary Stevens et al to Mark L. Butler and wife, prt SE SW in 35- 40-9, gov lot 9, $263.70 Oct. 18, 2011 Jeffrey G. Potter and wife to Donald A. Osterberg and wife, prt SW NW in 22-40-9, gov lot 3,

$907.50

Jeffrey G. Potter and wife to Thomas D. Stobbe and wife, prt SW NW in 22-40-9, gov lot 3,

$360

Oct. 19, 2011 Nationstar Mortgage LLC to Mark V. Reid, prt NW NE in 31- 40-10, gov lot 1; prt SE NW in 31- 40-10, gov lot 2, $129 Deborah Varro et al, Dale Mayo et al, Dawn Johnson et al

Trust to Robert D. Kelleher et al and Barbara E. Herod et al, prt

SE SW in 2-42-7, gov lot 8,

$832.50

Steven R. Laking and wife to Bretl Professional Properties I, prt SW SW in 2-39-10, gov lot 5,

$2,025

Gary Lade and wife to Bruce H. Johnson, lot 100 of plat 144 in Holiday Estates, $156 Oct. 21, 2011 Timothy Wayne Anderson to James Shaughnessy, prt SE SW in 34-40-8, gov lot 6, $600 Jeffrey W. Brown to Gregory J.

Myers et al, lot 3, blk 11 of plat 277 in Rockwood Estates North Div. #3, $90 Jeffrey A. Bonack and wife et

al and George E. Baumann and

wife et al to Thomas A. Hipp and wife, lots 8 and 9 of plat 163 in Keystone Park, $570 Steven C. Elrod and wife to John Stalter and wife, prt NE NW in 8-40-10, gov lot 2; prt NW NW in 8-40-10; prt NW NE in 5- 40-10, gov lot 2; prt SW NE in 5- 40-10, gov lot 3; prt SW SE in 5- 40-10, gov lot 7; prt NW SE in 5- 40-10, $348 BMO Harris Bank to Tom Lichtfuss et al, lot 218 of plat 851 in Wild Eagle Lodge Condomini- um, $481.50

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4A

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

OBITUARIES

NEWS

Linda Ratliff Callum

Linda Ratliff Callum, a 10- year resident of Appleton and formerly of Neenah died Fri-

day, Oct. 21, 2011, at Appleton Medical Center in Appleton. She was 62. She was born April 28, 1949, in Rhinelander, the daughter of Arlie Sr. and Inel- gean Ratliff and was a gradu- ate of Eagle River High School. Mrs. Callum was preceded

in death by one son, C.J.; one

daughter, Michelle Callum Robotham; three brothers, Robert, Rodney and Thomas; one sister, Barbara Lincoln; and her parents. Her survivors include two sons, Rodney (Michele) of Manahawkin, N.J., and Travis

(Ayradth) of Appleton; four sis- ters, Debbie Ratliff of Milwau- kee, Ruth (Ron) Kubale of Bril- lion, Sheila (Robert) Pezewski of Milwaukee and Mary (Ron) Zalewski of Neenah; six broth- ers, Joel (Joyce) of Clintonville, Arlie Jr. (Laurie) of Appleton, David (Annie) of Stevens Point, Leon (Emily) Adkins of Colorado, John of Rhinelander and Richard (Brenda) of Clin- tonville; and six grandchil- dren. Visitation was held Tues- day, Oct. 25, from 3 to 7 p.m. at Gaffney-Busha Funeral Home in Eagle River. A graveside service will be held Wednesday, Oct. 26, at Three Lakes Cemetery in Three Lakes.

Douglas ‘Doug’ Fassbender

Douglas “Doug” Fassben- der, a resident of Land O’

Lakes for most of his life, died Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2011, at Lillian Kerr Healthcare by Rennes in Phelps. He was 61. He was born Sept. 22, 1950,

in Appleton, the son of Hubert

“Cub” and Dolores Fassben- der. Mr. Fassbender was an avid trap shooter at Gateway

Lodge in Land O’ Lakes and enjoyed hunting and fishing. He was preceded in death by his father in 2001. Survivors include his moth-

er; three brothers, Tom (Jan- ice) of Kaukauna, Jerry (Kathy) of Land O’ Lakes and Bill of Milwaukee; and nieces and nephews.

A private family service

was held.

and nieces and nephews. A private family service was held. LIONS DONATION — The St. Germain

LIONS DONATION — The St. Germain Lions Club donated $1,000 to the Vilas Food Pantry in Eagle River last week. Taking part in the

check presentation were, front row from left, Lion David Tikalsky,

Caroline Tesch and Janlee Goska, food pantry volunteers; back row, Lion Stan Rakowski, food pantry volunteer Richard Short and Lion Doug Kaltenbach. --Staff Photo By ANTHONY DREW

Louis Nosarzewski

City coffers to receive

$70,000 from golf course

BY KEN ANDERSON

NEWS CORRESPONDENT

With a golf season starting five weeks later than in 2010, course play at Eagle River Municipal Golf Course rebounded and will be able to pay the city $70,000 in 2011. Course pro Brad Missling provided the numbers last week to the Golf Course Advi- sory Committee, showing sea- son pass holders and cart fees were up, while greens fees and range fees were down slightly. “In total, we had 22,617 rounds of golf this year and we’ll be paying the city $70,000 for property tax relief,” said Missling. “I under- stand Northwoods (golf course in Rhinelander) has to get $30,000 from the city just to pay their bills. We should be happy we’re able to give what we give.” The spring, summer and fall weather plays an important role when managing the course and this year was no exception, according to Missling. “We opened late in spring compared to last year and it rained the last 13 days in September,” Missling said, not- ing there were nine days in October when temperatures reached near 80 degrees. “We are just $14,429 short of the anticipated budget; we thought it would be much worse.” Total 2011 sales as of Oct. 20 were $595,496 compared to total sales last year of

NOTICE:

Obituary policy

Death notices that appear

in this space weekly are written and/or edited for content and consistency by assistant editors of the Vilas County News-Review and The Three Lakes News. Obituaries written in the paper’s standard format are printed at no charge. Unedited obituaries written by the family may be print- ed for a fee, either in the obituary column or in small- er type with a border. For more information, call (715)

479-4421.

$597,187. The budget showed expected sales of $609,925. Committee member Bill Lochte said he felt good about the recovery. “We thought (last spring) this was going to be nuclear fallout,” said Lochte. “The entire staff did a great recov- ery. The hole we anticipated was a lot greater than this.” Grounds superintendent Ken Smith noted that winter damage to some greens and the late spring could have made things worse. “There were some good, sound business decisions and it made for a great, great year,” Smith concluded. Committee member Ken Biegel agreed. “During the peak season, we had the lowest rates in the area and drew a lot from St. Germain due to our greens being good and I compliment you for that,” said Biegel. Missling said the Eagle Riv- er course shines above many of the other golf courses in the area, both in revenue, respect and rounds played. Smith said there were some minor issues this fall that had to do with maintenance of the greens and when to do it. He said what’s best for the health of the greens is not always best for the golfers.

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Referring to tinning the greens, Smith said, “You can tell me when to do it, but I’m telling you when it’s best to do it.”

Council’s role? Advisory Committee chair- woman and City Council mem- ber Carol Hendricks expressed concern the City Council is a “little more than a rubber stamp” of what’s done at the golf course, saying, “They need to be more involved.” Lochte responded to Hen- dricks by referring to the large emotional challenge this year. “The rumor mill got out of hand,” he said. “We did the evaluations (Sept. 1), but I don’t know what you commu- nicated to the council, what the summaries are. If we’re going to put our time in, we need to be dealt in at the end of the program.” Hendricks indicated there has been no summation given in writing, revealing she took the original evaluations home and averaged the results. “There has been no feed- back to these two,” Hendricks said, referring to Missling and

Louis Nosarzewski of Iron River, Mich., formerly of Eagle River, died Sunday, Oct. 23, 2011, at Marquette General Hospital in Marquette, Mich. He was 74. He was the son of Anton and Margaret (Doer) Nosarzewski. He was raised and attended schools in Eagle River and worked at various

potato farms throughout the Eagle River area. Mr. Nosarzewski is sur- vived by a nephew, Robert Nosarzewski of Eagle River.

A funeral service will be

held at 11 a.m. Friday, Oct. 28, at Gaffney-Busha Funeral Home in Eagle River. Visita- tion will for one hour prior to the service.

Smith. Lochte said it was not prop- er for them to wait 70 or 80 days to see if they had a job or not. Committee member Chuck Bonson agreed, saying there seemed to be a conflict between the Advisory Commit- tee and common council. “We did the evaluations and the council does the contract; we were left out on a limb,” said Bonson. “We did the eval- uations and they didn’t get the results of what we did?” Hendricks said the council needs to take action concern- ing the golf course. “I made a decision to go to the council and they didn’t show the interest I think they should,” Hendricks continued. “I don’t like the council to be a rubber stamp. I don’t run the golf course and, if I did, there would be major changes, and I would be paid for it.” Hendricks didn’t reveal any of the major changes she would make and refuted alle- gations, saying that it was “nothing to do with personali- ties, although that was how it may have been interpreted.”

Trails:

FROM PAGE 1A

Headwaters Trails (GHT) bike-pedestrian system will be like as it’s developed in east- ern Vilas County over the next 10 years. The GHT system will include trails connecting Eagle River to St. Germain, Conover, Phelps and Land O’ Lakes. The GHT system will be developed in partnership with area snowmobile clubs, accord- ing to GHT representative Jeff Currie. Much of it will be for year-round use — for snowmo- biling in the winter and walk- ing and bicycling the rest of the year. “Crushed, compacted lime-

stone is one surface that meets the needs of many multiuse trails, but limestone needs to

be trucked in from as far away

as Shawano or Escanaba,

Mich.,” said Currie. “Asphalt is

a less suitable material for

such trails due to wear from snowmobile carbides and the way snow melts off the dark material.”

Pitlik & Wick’s Trail Bond

is a lighter color than asphalt

and is as hard and durable as limestone, according to Currie.

It’s also made of rock quarried in Sugar Camp, which means less transportation cost. Several groups and individ- uals will watch to see how Trail Bond performs over time. They include Vilas County’s Snowmobile Program Coordi- nator Dale Mayo, Sno-Eagles Snowmobile Club President Ken Storms, GHT’s Engineer- ing Committee Chairman Gary Meister and head engi- neer Carlton Schroeder, and Brian Pitlik of Pitlik & Wick. “We deeply appreciate Bri- an’s willingness to donate all the work and material needed to provide this test strip,” said Meister. “Thanks also go to Ron Van Dusen for letting us put it in right in front of the Eagle River Inn.” If Trail Bond performs as hoped, it could provide the sur-

face for GHT’s first trail seg- ment when it is constructed in Conover next summer, accord- ing to Currie. It will be 3.2 miles of off-road, multiuse trail on abandoned railroad

grade extending east from the Conover business district to Muskrat Creek Road.

Deputy zoning administrators set winter town hall schedule

Vilas County Zoning Administrator Dawn Schmidt recently announced that starting Tuesday, Nov. 1, deputy zoning administrators will begin their winter town hall schedule. In addition to regularly scheduled office hours at the courthouse in Eagle River, deputy zoning administrators will be available at the follow- ing town hall locations and dates:

Arbor Vitae, second and fourth Wednesdays of each month, from 8 to 11:30 a.m.; Lac du Flambeau, first and third Fridays of each month, from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; Land O’ Lakes, second Mon- day of each month, from 8 to

Land O’ Lakes, second Mon- day of each month, from 8 to 10:30 a.m.; and Presque

10:30 a.m.; and Presque Isle, first and third Tuesdays of each month, from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m.

A detailed copy of the

weekly deputy zoning admin- istrator schedule is available on the website at co.vilas.

wi.us or by calling (715) 479-

3620.

Copies of the schedule are also available at the Vilas County Zoning office at the Vilas County Courthouse, located at 330 Court St. in Eagle River, whose office hours are Mondays through Fridays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

5A

NEWS

POLICE REPORT

NEWS WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011 5A NEWS POLICE REPORT TRUCK HITS TREE — The driver of

TRUCK HITS TREE — The driver of a Ford F-150 struck a tree Tuesday morning, becoming airborne before crashing to a stop

near Kathan Inn & Resort on County H in Sugar Camp. The driver

--Staff Photo By ANTHONY DREW

was not seriously injured.

Vilas County Court report

Man who hit deputy at hospital placed on probation for 18 months

Vilas County Sheriff A total of 232 complaints were entered by Vilas County Sheriff’s Department dis- patchers last week. In addition to those with sufficient detail to report be- low, a review shows at least four vehicle accidents, 12 vehi- cle/deer accidents, four requests for agency assistance, one ambulance request, four animal problems, two attempts to locate, five burglar alarms, five requests for citizen assis- tance, two reports of criminal damage to property, three dis- turbances, one report of domes- tic violence, two fires, one report of found property, two reports of fraud, two reports of harassment, two reports of hazardous conditions, nine reports of suspicious circum- stances, one theft, one report of

threats, four traffic violations, one trespassing complaint, two vacation checks, three welfare checks and two 911 hang ups. At least 17 calls were re- ferred to the Eagle River Police Department, and there were at least five information- al or procedural entries. In the past week, at least

14 people were booked at the

Vilas County Jail, including

one for bail jumping, four for operating while intoxicated, three for battery, three for probation violations, one for trespassing, one for resisting arrest and one for operating after revocation. During the week, the in- mate population ranged from

72 to 85. As of Oct. 24, there

were 76 inmates.

Rebecca J. Jensen, both of

Arbor Vitae. Jensen was cited for inattentive driving.

- 6:02 p.m. - A vehicle/deer accident was reported on Zeman Road in the town of

Cloverland, involving Julie L. Priefer of Eagle River. Thursday, Oct. 20

- 4:26 p.m. - A two-vehicle

accident was reported at the intersection of Maple and First streets in Eagle River, involving Edith A. Kukanich and Gretchen Nasharr, both of

Eagle River. Nasharr was cit- ed for failure to yield.

- 5:50 p.m. - A vehicle/deer

accident was reported at the

intersection of Highway B and Palmer Lake Road in Land O’ Lakes, involving Kelly R. Allen of Lac du Flambeau. Wednesday, Oct. 19

- 4:45 p.m. - A vehicle/deer

accident was reported at the intersection of Little Portage Lake Road and Big Portage Lake Road in Land O’ Lakes, involving Ellen N. Nielsen of Land O’ Lakes.

Eagle River Police Among the calls received by Vilas County dispatchers were at least 17 calls for the Eagle River Police. These included one vehicle/deer accident, two vehicle accidents, one request for citizen assistance, one re- port of criminal damage to property, two disturbances, two reports of suspicious cir- cumstances, one report of haz- ardous conditions, two traffic violations and one welfare check. Three people were tak- en into custody and booked into the Vilas County Jail.

A 36-year-old Eagle River man had a sentence withheld and was placed on probation

for 18 months after he entered

a no contest plea and was

found guilty to an amended charge of misdemeanor battery

and an added charge of disor- derly conduct in Vilas County Circuit Court last week. Benjamin P. Brand, who battered a Vilas County deputy at Ministry Eagle Riv-

er Memorial Hospital after he

was transported there follow- ing involvement in a one-car

rollover June 10, was original-

ly charged with battery of a

peace officer, a felony. Conditions of Brand’s pro- bation include: a fine of $488, alcohol and other drug abuse (AODA) assessment and fol- low-through as deemed neces-

sary by the agent, he is not to possess or consume intoxi- cants, no taverns, and 30 days

in the Vilas County Jail with

work-release privileges. Cir- cuit Judge Neal A. Nielsen III said Brand can serve the jail time in another county if arrangements can be made. His jail time must start by Nov. 18 and he will receive credit for four days. According to court records, Brand attempted to leave the hospital without being treated and struck the officer with a

closed fist on the left side of the officer’s face in the hospi- tal parking lot. According to the complaint, investigators later learned Brand had a bro- ken rib and collapsed lung and was transported to St. Joseph’s Hospital in Marsh- field. William R. Deditz, 17, of Eagle River, was charged as an adult with burglary of a building or dwelling, party to a crime. His preliminary hear- ing was set for Nov. 16 at 1 p.m. and his bond was amend-

ed to a $2,500 signature bond.

Deditz allegedly broke into The Country Store through a bathroom window on the sec- ond floor and took more than

$620 in cash and coins from the business at 115 E. Wall St.

in Eagle River.

Conditions of his bond include no contact with Lucas Johnston-Burnett, who was allegedly involved in the bur- glary, he is not to go on the premises of The Country Store and have no contact with the owners, reside with parents at their home or in a treatment facility and his cur-

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few is from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. unless he is with his parents. Jason C. Jensen, 34, of Sug- ar Camp, charged with stalk-

ing, had an initial appearance adjourned to Nov. 7 at 10 a.m. and is free on a $1,000 signa- ture bond. Jensen allegedly attempted to make phone contacts with a former girl- friend, showed up at her house in the town of Arbor Vitae and left a gift on her driveway. He is to have no contact with the 35-year-old victim. Authorities said the woman is under emotional stress and fear due to Jensen’s alleged actions between March 17 and June 22, accord- ing to the criminal complaint. Suzanne A. Miller, 25, of Bir- namwood, charged with 10 counts of obtaining prescription drugs with fraud, party to a crime, and five counts of manu- facturing or delivery of pre- scription drugs had an initial appearance adjourned to Oct. 24. Miller allegedly obtained medications at an Eagle River pharmacy under another wom- an’s name between Nov. 2, 2010, and Feb. 4, 2011, when she also was charged for obstructing an officer. Miller also was charged with felony bail jumping Aug. 16, when authorities learned she was not residing in Birnam- wood, according to her bond. The authorities learned that she allegedly was living in Fort Meyers, Fla., and two months previously in Janesville. Todd A. Koster, 49, of Pleas- ant Prairie, charged with fifth-offense operating while intoxicated, operating with a prohibited alcohol concentra- tion, operating while intoxi- cated causing injury and oper- ating with a prohibited alco- hol concentration causing injury Nov. 11 in Conover, had an initial appearance resched- uled for Nov. 21 at 10 a.m. Anna M. Smith, 47, of Eagle River, entered a no con- test plea and was found guilty of operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated, fourth offense in five years. A charge

of operating with a prohibited

alcohol concentration was dis- missed. Smith’s sentence was with- held, and she was placed on probation for three years with conditions, including a fine of $2,182, driver’s license revoked for 28 months, AODA assessment and follow- through as deemed necessary by the agent, six months in the Vilas County Jail and Huber privileges for family health care to start Jan. 17, 2012, ignition interlock device for 28 months, not to possess or consume intoxicants and no taverns. She will receive cred- it for one day served in jail. She was arrested in Eagle River April 11. Richard F. Allen, 21, of Lac du Flambeau, entered a no- contest plea and was found guilty of two amended counts of second-degree reckless endangerment. Charges of first-degree reckless endan- germent and carrying a con- cealed weapon were dis- missed. Allen was arrested for shooting a firearm at an occu- pied house at 2822 Little Pines Road in Lac du Flam- beau May 4. Allen’s sentence was with- held and he was placed on probation for five years. Con- ditions of his probation include: one year in the coun- ty jail, AODA assessment and treatment, random testing, full-time employment or school, follow-through on any counseling as deemed neces- sary by the agent, 50 hours of community service per year with an organization promot- ing positive goals, supplying a DNA sample, not to possess or consume intoxicants and no taverns. He will receive credit for 161 days served in jail. Lara K. Williams, 34, of Lac du Flambeau, entered a no- contest plea to amended charges of misdemeanor pos- session of marijuana and mis- demeanor bail jumping, and was found guilty during a plea and sentencing hearing last week. She also was convicted of misdemeanor theft. A charge of possession of an ille-

of misdemeanor theft. A charge of possession of an ille- gally obtained prescription was dismissed but

gally obtained prescription was dismissed but was read in at sentencing. She was origi- nally charged with two felonies, manufacturing or delivery of marijuana and felony bail jumping. Williams’ sentence was withheld and she was placed on probation for 24 months with the following conditions:

continued AODA treatment and counseling as deemed nec- essary by the agent, she must apologize to the victim, and she is fined the statutory amount on each count, includ- ing $163 on the possession of marijuana conviction and $326 on the bail jumping conviction. Darin J. Diver, 21, of Lac du Flambeau, charged with attempting to flee or elude a traffic officer Sept. 12 in Lac du Flambeau, had an initial appearance adjourned to Nov. 7 at 10 a.m. Joyce Ann Knox, 59, of St. Germain, who was convicted of forgery and theft-false rep- resentation in 2004, had a probation review hearing adjourned to Dec. 15 at 1:30 p.m. She was sentenced Nov. 23, 2004, to 60 months in the Wisconsin Prison System, including 24 months of con- finement and 36 months of extended supervision. She also received four years of pro- bation and was to pay restitu- tion of $1,234.89. Stephen M. Prout, 26, of Eagle River, charged with operating a motor vehicle without the owner’s consent May 17 in the town of Wash- ington, was not present for a preliminary hearing last Mon- day. Judge Nielsen issued a warrant bond of $5,000 cash.

Sunday, Oct. 23

- 2:29 a.m. - A one-vehicle

accident was reported on Highway 45 North near High-

way G in the town of Lincoln, involving Melissa M. Vermoch of St. Germain. Vermoch was cited for operating while intoxicated. Friday, Oct. 21

- 3:36 p.m. - A two-vehicle accident was reported on Highway 51, involving Melanie A. Alvarado and

Three Lakes Police This police department re- ported one 911 hang up, one vehicle accident, two vehicle/deer accidents, one ambulance request, one request for agency assistance, three disturbances, two reports of hazardous conditions, one

welfare check, one request for police services, three reports of suspicious circumstances, one theft and 13 traffic stops.

Eagle River Police Department sets guidelines for Halloween

The Eagle River City Coun- cil will not assign regular hours for trick or treating in the city of Eagle River for Halloween, Monday, Oct. 31. The police department asks parents to take their children to Northland Pines Middle School for the Eagle River Lions Club’s Hallogras chil- dren’s Halloween party. This year’s event will run from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 31. For those who do trick or treat door to door in the city, the police department encourages going only to residences where a porch light is turned on, and recommends not disturbing

residents who aren’t participat- ing in trick or treating. Parents are encouraged by the department to make sure children can see clearly through any masks they may be wearing and to incorporate reflective material in the cos- tumes, if possible. Police say parents should also examine all treats prior to allowing their children to consume them. “Children should be warned against entering the residence of strangers, and the use of flashlights while walking to increase visibility is recom- mended,” said Chief of Police Mark Vander Bloomen.

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WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

NEWS

Three Lakes board report

Portion of Rice Lake Road to remain closed until frost

BY ANTHONY DREW

NEWS-REVIEW ASST. EDITOR

Unsafe conditions resulting from excess water on Rice Lake Road in Three Lakes continue to plague the town crew, the Three Lakes Town Board heard during last week’s meeting. The road is a sand and gravel composite that was severely damaged by water and wind in 2010. This spring, additional water came over the boat landing and washed out the corduroy holding the road together. According to town crew member Brian Slizewski, ruts and erosion on the dirt road could keep it closed to vehicu- lar traffic until a frost stabi- lizes it, which could negative- ly impact hunters who use it during deer season. A large steel gate marks the closed portion of the road. “We could probably put another gate in at the 90- degree corner, and open that

section up unless it got wet,” said Slizewski. “But after the corner, there’s no way. We need to haul material.” The crew plans to work beyond the 90-degree corner once a frost establishes itself. Otherwise, the crew would risk destroying the part of the road that’s still intact, said Slizewski. “If we allow vehicle traffic on it, places like that are just going to get worse,” he said. With the upcoming winter weather, this could happen as soon as a couple of inches of frost are in the ground. How- ever, there is no estimate at this time for when the road may be reopened. In the meantime, vehicle traffic is permitted up to the gate. Town officials said they’re aware Rice Lake Road is a major entry point to the Thun- der Lake State Wildlife Area, and they hope the road can be opened in time for hunting season. “However, the safety of all those traveling on the road

must take precedence over pub-

lic access and will be the decid- ing factor as to when the road reopens,” said Three Lakes Town Chairman Don Sidlowski. Extensive restoration grad- ing by the town crew was com- pleted during the 2011 con- struction season. Reconstruc- tion on the road up to Thun- der Ditch is complete, but must become sufficiently dry or firm to allow for vehicular traffic, said town officials. In other action, the town board:

— heard a quarterly report

from Town Clerk Sue Harris

about the Three Lakes Park Commission;

— heard a quarterly report

and investment recommenda- tions from the management oversight team; — announced an annual budget public hearing is set for Tuesday, Nov. 29, at 5:30 p.m. in the Three Lakes Com- munity Building; — waived its regular November meeting in lieu of the annual budget hearing.

Three Lakes School Board approves budget revisions, counseling curriculum

BY ANTHONY DREW

NEWS-REVIEW ASST. EDITOR

The Three Lakes School Board approved budget revi- sions at a meeting last week, increasing the community ser- vice fund tax levy by $15,508 and decreasing the general fund levy by $388. A cessation of after-school study donations caused the change in the community ser- vice levy, while increases of $141 in special adjustment aid and $247 in exempt com- puter aid allowed the general fund levy to decrease. The overall levy was revised to reflect these changes and was approved at $7,807,108. Following a change in valuation for the 2011-’12 school year, the mill rate was set at 5.36. “Our valuation decreased by $7,150,429, which is a decrease of .49%,” said District Adminis- trator George Karling. “The proposed mill rate was 5.33, but with the change in valua- tion and the change in our levy, it will be 5.36.” Karling said the number was still lower than what he had seen in other districts. “And we’ll go lower with the last payment of our facility in April,” he said. “That will be a significant decrease.” The board also approved a new school counseling cur- riculum to follow state guide- lines, changing from the earli- er Wisconsin Developmental Guidance Model to the Wis- consin Comprehensive School Counseling Model.

Following a question from Karling asking if the district had indeed changed its guid- ance practices or simply the name, Three Lakes guidance counselor Gene Welhoefer said the actual changes were minimal. After reading the Wiscon- sin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) handbook, Welhoefer said he noticed the school was already following the majority of its guidelines. “It’s because we were a step ahead in a lot of cases,” said Welhoefer. “Our transition from the old curriculum to what we

put on paper was more of catch- ing up to what we were already doing and making sure we had

a document to show that.” Karling replied, saying that’s what he’d been driving

at with his original question. “When the developmental guidance model came out, the DPI people told me that we were two to three years ahead of the game in Three Lakes,” said Karling. School Board Clerk Tom Rul- seh showed some concern regarding the four-year grade benchmarks outlined in the new model, asking how progress is measured between those years. “We do annual assess- ments,” said Welhoefer. “Just like the classroom teacher who is doing pretests, post- tests and observations to see

if they’re effective, we’re doing

the same thing. We just don’t have a green book for it.” In other news, Dean of Stu- dents Kris Brown said Three Lakes School now has Web access available for visitors.

The board set next month’s meeting for Wednesday, Nov. 16, at the Sugar Camp School.

“Sowing seeds of peace and justice in the here, in the now.” NOVEMBER CALENDAR Mondays,

“Sowing seeds of peace and justice in the here, in the now.”

NOVEMBER

CALENDAR

Mondays, 9-10 a.m., Walking Meditation, upper level of Many Ways

of Peace, a weekly practice that teaches us that peace is every step.

Saturday, Nov. 5, 7 p.m., Peace Java Jam and Open Mic, “Eco Jam,” coming together to speak for the Earth. Bring your instruments, your

voices, your eco-poetry and environmental songs. Jam following the open mic. Refreshments available for sale.

Wednesdays, 11:30 a.m.-12:55 p.m., Many Ways of Peaceful Yoga

with Betsy Schussler, $8 per session, 50% goes to the peace center. Upper level of Many Ways of Peace.

Wednesday, Nov. 9, 6:30 p.m., Women War and Peace, a dialogue

about the five-part special series on PBS that ends Nov. 8. While women are the primary victims of war, they are also the primary hope for peace. Mary Jo Berner hosts the discussion focused on actions we can take to support women’s movements for peace throughout the world.

Visit our website www.manywaysofpeace.org to print our calendar and for more information. Please preregister at 715.480.4697 or info@manywaysofpeace.org.

Many Ways of Peace

217 S. Main Street, Downtown Eagle River

A project of the MJ Berner Foundation for Peace and Justice, Inc. P.O. Box 189, Eagle River, WI 54521. Your tax-deductible contributions make our programming possible.

tax-deductible contributions make our programming possible. Land O’ Lakes Recreation Co., formerly known as Ramesh

Land O’ Lakes Recreation Co., formerly known as Ramesh Motorsports, is now open in Land O’ Lakes. Customer sales, service and support will be offered by Ron Ramesh, seated at center,

along with, from left, new general manager George Haviar, office manager Andrea Haviar, Tom Taubensee and Chad Ramesh. --Staff Photo By Madeline Mathisen

Land O’ Lakes Recreation Co. to offer equipment, accessories and service

Land O’ Lakes Recreation Co. is now open and a grand opening is scheduled Satur- day, Oct. 29, at its showroom, located at 1702 N. Highway 45 in Land O’ Lakes. Formerly known as Ramesh Motorsports, the business will provide power sports equipment, accessories and service for a variety of outdoor recreational needs. The new owners stated they have a goal of the very best in customer service and satisfaction, and will offer Ski-Doo and BRP Can-Am all- terrain vehicles and the new Can-Am side-by-side units. In addition, they will ser- vice and sell Ski-Doo snowmo- biles and Snapper mowers

and tractors, along with Stihl chain saws and lawn and gar- den equipment. A showroom of clothing and accessories also will be offered. The business is located on the snowmobile, all-terrain vehicle and bicycle trails that connect Land O’ Lakes and Michigan. The new general manager is George Haviar, and Andrea Haviar will run the office. Tom Taubensee also is a new addi- tion to the staff and will give his attention to providing cus- tomer service. Ron Ramesh, former owner, will continue to support the operation with his knowledge and customer service but will work fewer hours at the store.

Chad Ramesh, Tina Beer, Pete Otterpohl and Josh Horst also will continue to provide customer service and support for each North Woods season. The new staff enjoys out- door activities, which include snowmobiling, fishing and rid- ing bikes and all-terrain vehi- cles. Business hours are Mon- days through Saturdays from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays and later hours will be by chance or appointment. The public is welcome to subscribe to the company’s email newsletters at lolrec.com. For more information, con- tact (906) 544-2040, mgr@lol- rec.com or lolrec.com.

email newsletters at lolrec.com. For more information, con- tact (906) 544-2040, mgr@lol- rec.com or lolrec.com.

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

7A

OUTDOORS

A cure for pheasant fever close to home

FEW THINGS in God’s great creation rival the beauty of a ring- necked pheasant, the monster of upland game birds that was trans- planted into America long ago. The rooster pheasant may not be as hardy or as quick in flight as the ruffed grouse, but they excel in many other ways. Their colors are stunning, from the red/green head and white-ringed neck to a body full of some of the most unique feather colors and patterns on the face of the Earth. Whether stand- ing tall on the ground or in flight, the rooster’s long tail really makes it a spectacle to see. As a game bird, the pheasant is the king of open cover. Their abili- ty to outrun hunters and dogs is legendary and, in flight, they explode with startling speed and, quite often, nerve-testing cackling that is more like a “ha-ha, you can’t catch me.” Despite their bright colors, the rooster pheasant is a master of concealment. It can snake into and hide in a tuft of grass that you’d think could hardly conceal a robin, letting hunter and dog walk right past — often remaining hidden, but sometimes exploding from cov- er and escaping on the backtrack. So it’s no wonder that pheasant fever is in full swing right now, pursued nationally by hundreds of thousands of hunters. The chal- lenges of the sport bring people to the Dakotas, Iowa and other states in droves. This is one fun bird to chase with family and friends. For those who can’t make it out West to hunt the truly wild birds, there is put-and-take pheasant hunting. It may not mimic the expansive landscapes and breath-

In the Outdoors By Kurt Krueger
In the
Outdoors
By
Kurt Krueger

taking sights of western roosters flushing a dozen or more at a time, but it certainly serves a pur- pose that is as basic as the sport itself. Whether you go to some public hunting area in southern Wiscon- sin or a game farm, the excitement of chasing ringnecks is a universal draw for young and old, experi- enced and inexperienced. At the moment a rooster flushes from the tall grass, cackling for all it’s worth, it doesn’t matter what state you are in or whose land your boots are planted on. It’s all about getting the shot- gun barrel on that bird, swinging smoothly and touching off a shot when instinct tells you it’s right. The big benefit of put-and-take pheasant hunting on a game farm is the convenience — something that works even when the work schedule is tight. And what a great place to take a rookie hunter or a young dog, where either can get a taste of pheasant country close to home. It’s perfect when you have a one-day window to hunt, and that was the story last Thursday for the scribbler and his son, Brian, who ventured to Heritage Hunt Club in Laona for what has become an annual father-son out- ing.

On this day, a dog trainer from Three Lakes was working German

shorthair pointers in one field and

a former school superintendent we

know was blasting at pheasants in another field. The star of the show — the one that would turn the chase part into a productive hunt — was a 22-month-old black Labrador retriever named Gracie. Though she’s only in her second season, her flushing and retrieving skills are second to none. During the morning hunt, she found three roosters that others had wounded and lost. She has a nose for bird scent that’s as good

as any dog we’ve hunted over and, because she hunts close, we get to shoot at everything she flushes. Heritage Hunt Club, managed

by Bill Belland, offers a farm with

a diversity of cover types and field

sizes. He’s been stocking nothing but roosters in recent years, which are always a lot more fun to chase than hens. A warm and somewhat wet summer has produced some awe- some cover on the farm that really holds the birds. And the cornstalks that grace a few of the fields actu- ally contain cobs this year, so the birds don’t have to go anywhere else to find food. The farm offers an inside facility for cleaning birds and some groups take advantage of Belland’s clean- ing expertise. You can learn more at their website:

heritagehuntclub.com. Nothing in Wisconsin can replace the excitement of a west- ern hunting trip, especially if your goal is to escape the routine and get out of town for several days.

to escape the routine and get out of town for several days. Son Brian hoists some

Son Brian hoists some rooster pheasants at Heritage Hunt Club as nearly

--Photo By The Author

2-year-old Gracie, the workhorse, stands ready.

But this state does offer some great pheasant hunting, including the vast public lands of southern Wisconsin that are stocked with roosters from the State Pheasant Farm at Poynette. Closer to home, we have places like Heritage Hunt Club. What my son Brian and I expe- rienced on a cold, windy day last

week will never be forgotten. It was hours of walking in pheasant country for the privilege of watch- ing more than 20 big roosters flush from cover. The hunting preserve at Connor Farms in Laona is apt- ly named, for it is helping keep the state’s hunting heritage alive and well.

Muskies Inc. sets enduro

The Headwaters Chapter of

Muskies Inc. will hold its 2011 Fall Enduro this Saturday, Oct. 29, with fishing during the day followed by dinner at Eagle River Inn & Resort. Paul Hansen, coordinator

of the event, said participants

do not have to be members of the Headwaters chapter. “We are opening the event up to anyone who would like to attend this end-of-season muskie fishing outing,” said Hansen. Participants can fish any lake in the area from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. and prizes will be awarded on the honor system. The cost is $15 for fishing and dinner. Dinner-only tick- ets are available for $10. The dinner at Eagle River Inn will include snacks, salad, broast- ed chicken, beef, potatoes, vegetables and dessert. Following fishing at 4 p.m.,

a social hour is planned at 5 p.m. and dinner at 6:30 p.m. There also will be raffles throughout the evening. In addition, anglers can sign up for a fish pot for $5 each. Hansen will take late registrations from 7 to 8 a.m. at Eagle River Inn Oct. 29. For more information, con- tact Hansen at (715) 617-4800.

Assembly bill would end T-zone

The Wisconsin Assembly passed AB 99 last week, a bill which eliminates Earn-A- Buck (EAB) and T-zones for deer hunting. State Rep. Tom Tiffany (R- Hazelhurst) of the 35th Assembly District co- authored the bill with Sen. Terry Moulton. “These Department of Nat- ural Resources (DNR) policies have been very unpopular,” said Tiffany. “In fact, the Con- servation Congress asked hunters whether they favored these policies and in all coun- ties in the state the sports- men and -women voted to have them removed.” Tiffany said policies like EAB and T-zones have driven hunters from the sport, hurt- ing businesses.

have driven hunters from the sport, hurt- ing businesses. SETTING THE DECOYS — With waterfowl on

SETTING THE DECOYS — With waterfowl on the move, a Canada goose hunter placed his

decoys in a corn-stubble field prior to hunting last Thursday evening. --STAFF PHOTO

Hunters may harvest deer with tags, collars

Wildlife researchers are looking for assistance from Wisconsin hunters who may harvest any of the more than 335 white-tailed deer marked with ear tags and radio collars during the archery and gun deer seasons. “These deer were marked back in January as part of a study to better understand how long deer live and how they die,” said Chris Jacques, a research scientist with the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Bureau of Science Services. “Hunters are free to harvest these marked deer. And if they do, we would like some basic information that shouldn’t take more than a minute to provide.” The requested information about marked deer includes:

— ear tag or radio collar number; — how, when and where the animal died or was har- vested; and

— the hunter’s phone num- ber, complete with area code. Hunters are asked to call Jacques at (608) 221-6358 to report this information. Jacques and his colleagues marked the deer in the north- ern counties of Rusk, Sawyer and Price, and the east cen- tral counties of Shawano, Waupaca and Outagamie 10 months ago as part of the buck mortality study spon- sored by the UW-Madison and -Stevens Point campuses, the Wisconsin Conservation Congress, Wildlife Restora- tion, Union Sportsmen’s Alliance, Whitetails Unlimit- ed, Applied Population Labo- ratory, Menn Law Firm, and private donations from Wis- consin citizens. “To date, we have not heard from any hunters who may have harvested a tagged deer,” Jacques said. “I do want to stress that you should treat these deer like any other you might see. They may be har-

vested, but the information that hunters provide is impor- tant to the future of our deer herd.” Jacques said researchers are monitoring weekly sur- vival status of radio-collared deer across east central Wis- consin, including 42 adult males, 32 adult females and 33 fawns. In the northern counties, researchers are monitoring the survival sta- tus of 44 adult males, 30 adult females and 11 fawns. While the DNR uses a deer population modeling system built upon sound science and data, Jacques said challenges remain, especially when it comes to predators. “Years ago, the presence of predators of deer wasn’t an unusual issue. However, that’s changed today as predator populations across Wisconsin are expanding and deer are sought by more than just the orange-clad hunters,” Jacques said.

Fishing with the Guides By George Langley Muskie, walleye fishing improving with cold Anglers are
Fishing with
the Guides
By
George Langley
Muskie, walleye fishing
improving with cold
Anglers are now into the late-fall period, with the
last-gasp fishermen and -women fishing for trophy
muskies and walleyes.
Water temperatures have fallen into the low 40s
throughout the area, and none of us would be sur-
prised at a serious cold front with snow sometime in
the near future. Even with the color long gone, this is
a great time to be outside and enjoy the fall weather
before the snow hits and winter is here.
A number of lakes in the area experienced some
more turnover with the sharp drop in temperatures in
the last 10 days, so be aware that some of the smaller
lakes might still be green. Avoid these lakes for fish-
ing if you can. They will provide great fishing when
they clear up, but if they look green, give them several
days before you come back to them.
Muskie fishing is getting great now, with the best
trophy weeks right ahead. With the water tempera-
ture in the low 40s, the fish have become much more
aggressive to any slow-moving bait, and deeper water
is becoming more productive on a daily basis. After
turnover, with the conditions we have now, the fish
can be anywhere from 5 to 50 feet. Use large, slow-
moving baits such as Bulldawgs or Suicks, and search
depths to locate fish. All lake types are providing good
muskie action at this point.
Walleye fishing has been good to very good in the
area. As these water temperatures have fallen, the
fish have solidified themselves in their fall patterns.
This means the holes and the deepest weeds on the
Chain. The number of fish in the holes is really con-
sistent and heavy at this point. You can usually locate
these fish with your electronics and successfully fish
for them with jigs and large fathead minnows. The
fish in the deep weeds are less numerous but larger
than those in the holes. We have a number of reports
of fish in the mid-20s being caught consistently on the
Chain at this time. On the deeper lakes, the walleyes
are pretty deep now. Anglers are catching fish in
water up to 38 to 40 feet, so don’t be afraid to try deep
water. Jigs with either large fatheads or redtail chubs
work best on these bigger lakes.
Northern action remains very good in the weeds
on all lakes. Larger minnows or chubs work very well,
and twitch baits or very small jerk baits are working
well for these fish.
Panfish action is now slowing, with few panfish
anglers braving the colder weather. We still see some
perch and crappie anglers out in the fall, but most pan-
fish anglers are now waiting for the ice fishing season.
It’ll be a great week for the walleye and muskie nuts.
Good luck and good fishin’.
SERVICE
EAGLE
OF:
SPORTS
/ EAGLE RIVER
GUIDES ASSOCIATION

8A

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

OUTDOORS

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS OUTDOORS EARLY BUCK — Hunter Mathison of Eagle River killed

EARLY BUCK — Hunter Mathison of Eagle River killed this

185-pound, 12-point buck at 6:15 p.m. Oct. 21 in the Sugar

Camp area using a bow.

--Contributed Photo

Cougar photographed on trail camera in Juneau

A photograph of a cougar taken last week in Juneau County in south central Wis- consin has been verified as legitimate by two wildlife biol- ogists with the state Depart- ment of Natural Resources (DNR). The photograph, taken at 9:21 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 16, clearly shows a young adult cougar moving against a nighttime background of native grasses. The camera was located a bit more than two miles north of Mauston. Two DNR biologists — Adrian Wydeven and Jon Robaidek — visited the site, interviewed the landowner, checked other photos in sequence on the camera and checked the background in the photograph against the actual location. “It’s obviously a cougar,” Wydeven said of the large, tawny cat in the photograph. “It’s good sized, most likely a young adult.” The landowner hadn’t checked the camera for sever- al days, but a time stamp on the photo established the date it was taken. While it is not possible to determine the gender of the cat using the photograph, Wydeven said it is likely this is a male cougar in search of new territory. This is the seventh time a trail camera has captured a cougar in Wisconsin, although three of these instances prob- ably involved the same cougar. DNR biologists have confirmed the presence of four individual cougars in Wiscon- sin during the past three years. However, Wydeven said that based on times, location and other evidence, it is likely

based on times, location and other evidence, it is likely Rob Grafwallner of Conover shot this

Rob Grafwallner of Conover shot this black bear in the Conover area Sept. 19. The bear was field dressed at 375 pounds. --Contributed Photo

that a minimum of six differ- ent cougars have visited Wis- consin since January 2008, when a cougar observation near Milton was confirmed by tracks and DNA tests of a blood sample. During the summer of 2010, the DNR investigated several reports of horses and livestock being injured by cougars in Juneau County. State and federal wildlife offi- cials investigated but were unable to find confirming evi- dence. Cougars are capable of incredible stealth and have been known to travel large dis- tances through populated areas without being detected. The four cougars that left DNA evidence in Wisconsin were all identified as young males with genetics that make it likely they originated in the Black Hills of South Dakota. DNR biologists believe all the sightings in Wisconsin are likely due to young male cougars traveling great distances in search of territory and mates. This past summer, DNA evidence confirmed that a cougar killed in a vehicle crash in Connecticut was the same “St. Croix cougar” that passed through Wisconsin. There is no evidence of cougars breeding in Wiscon- sin, Wydeven said. DNR officials emphasized that citizen observations are critical to cougar monitoring, and they are asking landown- ers and outdoor enthusiasts to become familiar with the “rare mammal observation form” on the DNR’s website at dnr.wi.gov. This and much more can be found by typing “cougar” into the search box on the home page, he said.

“cougar” into the search box on the home page, he said. Debbie Meiners of Bartlett, Ill.,

Debbie Meiners of Bartlett, Ill., caught and released this crap- pie on a Vilas County lake Sept. 24 at 1:30 p.m. --Contributed Photo

Fight Invasive Aquatic Species Clean Boats / Clean Waters Volunteer (715) 365-2659

Fight Invasive Aquatic Species

Clean Boats / Clean Waters Volunteer (715) 365-2659

Snomo safety class set late December

The Frosty Snowmobile Club Inc. of Land O’ Lakes will conduct its 12th annual snowmobile safety class Wednesday and Thursday, Dec. 28 and 29, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Land O’ Lakes Town Hall, located at 4331 Highway B in Land O’ Lakes. Classes will be taught by Mike Keintz and Malcolm Wayne, Department of Natu- ral Resources (DNR) certified snowmobile safety instruc- tors, and assisted by several club members. All students are required to have a DNR customer identi- fication number, which can be obtained by calling the DNR customer service office at 1- (888) 936-7463 between 7 a.m. and 10 p.m. Participants must be at least 12 years old, and will

receive their safety certificate from the DNR by mail after successfully completing the course. There is no maximum age. Parents and adults are welcome to enroll and partici- pate as well. Class space is limited and advance reservations are required. The $10 course fee covers all necessary materi- als. Lunch will be provided each day. A parent or guardian must attend the class registration Wednesday, Dec. 28, from 8 to 9 a.m. to sign enrollment forms for all minors. Addition- ally, a parent or guardian must be available to pick up each minor student no later than 4 p.m. each day. For reservations, call (715) 547-8307 or email vette-

time1@yahoo.com.

call (715) 547-8307 or email vette- time1@yahoo.com. NICE MUSKIE — Dale “Musky Pete” Peterson of St.

NICE MUSKIE — Dale “Musky Pete” Peterson of St. Germain caught and released this 47-inch muskie Oct. 7 on an area lake using a sucker with a barbless circle hook. --Contributed Photo

Nonresident trail passes offered at over 725 outlets

Nonresident all-terrain vehicle and snowmobile oper- ators who come to Wisconsin to enjoy their trail riding have more than 725 outlets avail- able where they can purchase nonresident all-terrain vehi- cle (ATV) and snowmobile trail passes. The Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has recently added an additional 220 loca- tions where visitors to Wis- consin can purchase the non- resident trail passes. Wisconsin residents who register their ATVs or snow- mobiles in Wisconsin do not need trail passes to operate their machines on public trails, as registration fees help contribute to trail main- tenance costs. The $35 nonresident trail

pass was established in 1998 as a mechanism to ensure that people who do not regis- ter their machines in Wiscon- sin but who use Wisconsin trails help pay to maintain and police the trails. Nonresidents who need a Wisconsin trail pass can look up sales locations on the DNR web- site. Sales locations are located throughout Wisconsin as well as in Illinois and Minnesota. Along with issuing the non- resident trail passes, the regis- tration agents can renew ATV, snowmobile and boat registra- tions for Wisconsin and can transfer registrations to new owners. Customers walk out with decals in hand and have everything they need to legally operate their recreational vehicles in Wisconsin.

PHEASANT & QUAIL HUNTING Individual, Group & Corporate Rates Available, Overnight Lodging, Dogs Available
PHEASANT & QUAIL HUNTING
Individual, Group & Corporate
Rates Available, Overnight
Lodging, Dogs Available
SNOWMOBILERS,
HUNTERS & FISHERMEN
Rent your own lodge only minutes from the 100-
mile Snowmobile Trail for the week or the week-
end. Four bedrooms, two baths & a fully equipped kitchen
SPORTING CLAYS
10 STANDS
A Challenging Course in a Wooded Setting
For information & reservations, call
Heritage Hunt Club at:

1-877-332-7268 or 1-715-674-7043

1-STOP MUSKY SHOP For all your big-fish needs! ✳ Best Live Bait ✳ Huge Selection
1-STOP MUSKY SHOP
For all your big-fish needs!
✳ Best Live Bait
✳ Huge Selection
of Rods
St. Croix, Elk River,
Shimano, Fenwick,
Tooth Tamer, Okuma
✳ Outdoor Clothing
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Over 30 Years
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www.eaglesportscenter.com

Outdoors

Calendar

10/29/11 —

Nonresident raccoon season opens through Feb. 15, 2012.

10/31/11 — Deadline to purchase Lake Win- nebago system sturgeon spearing licenses.

Lake Win- nebago system sturgeon spearing licenses. 11/01/11 — Wild ginseng season closes. 11/05/11

11/01/11 —

Wild ginseng season closes.

11/05/11 —

Otter trapping season opens in all zones and runs through April 30 in the North zone and through March 31 in the central zone and south zone.

 

Beaver trapping season opens in the northwest zone (A), northeast zone (B) through April 30 and in the southern zone (C) through March

 

31.

11/07/11 —

Woodcock season closes.

11/09/11 —

Mourning dove season closes.

11/15/11 —

Trout and salmon fishing closes on downstream section of Lake Superior tributaries that remained open after Sept. 30.

11/17/11 —

Early archery deer season closes statewide. Reopens Nov. 19 through Jan. 8, 2012.

 

Fall turkey hunting season closes. Fall turkey season extension reopens in zones 1-5 Nov. 28 and runs through Dec. 31. (No late sea- son in zones 6 or 7.)

Fall crow season closes.

11/18/11 —

It is illegal to hunt with a firearm or bow the day before the gun deer season opens, except for waterfowl hunting or hunting on licensed game farms or shooting preserves or within the chronic wasting dis- ease management zone.

11/19/11 —

Regular gun deer season opens through Nov. 27.

 

Late archery season opens through Jan. 8, 2012.

11/22/11 —

Northern zone duck season closes.

11/27/11 —

Regular gun deer season closes.

1128/11

Muzzleloader deer season opens through Dec. 8.

Fall turkey season extension opens in zones 1-5 through Dec. 31.

11/30/11 —

Muskellunge season closes.

 

Turtle season closes.

Compiled by the Wisconsin DNR

dnr.wi.gov

Outdoor Women’s Group to see ‘Birds in Art’ Nov. 6

The Outdoor Women’s Group will visit the free “Birds in Art” show Sunday, Nov. 6, at Leigh Yawkey Wood- son Art Museum, located at 700 North 12th Street in Wausau. The show will include works in oil and watercolor, sculptures in wood, marble and bronze, as well as several outdoor pieces. Participants are asked to bring the necessary funds for a noon lunch at the 2510 Restaurant prior to the muse- um visit. Those interested in car- pooling from Eagle River should meet at the Visitors Center by 10:30 a.m. Partici-

pants also can meet at the Rhinelander Public Library for an 11:10 a.m. pickup. Rid- ers are asked to bring $7 for the drivers.

All new and former partici- pants are welcome to attend this outing. For more informa- tion or to reserve a seat, call Norma Yaeger (715) 477-1984 by Thursday, Nov. 3.

seat, call Norma Yaeger (715) 477-1984 by Thursday, Nov. 3. Wisconsin CCW (Concealed Carry) Classes Wisconsin

Wisconsin CCW (Concealed Carry) Classes

Wisconsin Certified Firearms Concealed Carry Instruction

Phone: 715-869-3374 Firearms Protection Agency Local Instructors

Classes Oct. 15, 22, 29 Classes Nov. 5, 12, 19, 26

Classes Oct. 15, 22, 29 Classes Nov. 5, 12, 19, 2 6 (sponsored by Sunshine For
Classes Oct. 15, 22, 29 Classes Nov. 5, 12, 19, 2 6 (sponsored by Sunshine For

(sponsored by Sunshine For Humanity, Inc., safety through education) SunshineForHumanity.com and WACFI.com

4924 This class DOES QUALIFY for the Wis. CCW Permit.

Concealed Carry Training Classes Learn More @ www.gwps.me State-Certified Class Taught by Dan Tomasoski Classes:
Concealed Carry Training Classes
Learn More @ www.gwps.me
State-Certified Class Taught by Dan Tomasoski
Classes: Oct. 29 - Park Falls • Oct. 31 - Hazelhurst
Nov. 1 - Land O’ Lakes • Nov. 2 & 3 - Wausau
Nov. 5 - Merrill • Nov. 7 - Eagle River
Comprehensive 7-hour course covers the practical application of the law
and how it applies to day-to-day carry, both open and concealed
• Conflict Avoidance
• Choosing a Defensive Handgun
• Safety
• Interstate Travel and More
Call Gun Works Precision Shooting
@ 715-367-1144 To Sign Up
Celebrating 10 years in Eagle River Taxidermy at its finest 804 E.Wall Street Eagle River,WI
Celebrating 10 years in Eagle River
Taxidermy
at its finest
804 E.Wall Street
Eagle River,WI 54521
L
T
D
JIM BEENKEN
TAXIDERMY
WildlifeExpressionsLtd.com
715-479-2034

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

9A

SPORTS

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS 9A SPORTS Notre Dame senior running back Alexander Lech ran

Notre Dame senior running back Alexander Lech ran through the Northland Pines defense for 283 yards on 28 carries. Diving for

Lech was No. 85 Tanner Perry, while No. 63 Tanner Beaman pur-

sued the play.

--Staff Photos By GARY RIDDERBUSCH

Bigger, faster, stronger

Notre Dame tops Eagles 35-0 in playoff game

BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH

NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR

Green Bay Notre Dame had too much senior power and dominated the Northland Pines Eagles 35-0 in a Level 1 WIAA Division 3 football game at Eagle River last Sat- urday night. The Notre Dame roster fea- tured 28 seniors, including running back Alexander Lech, who rushed for 283 yards on 28 carries. Notre Dame scored 21 first- half points and added two more touchdowns in the third quarter before the running clock took over throughout the fourth quarter. “We ended a great season with a tough loss to a very good football team,” said Pines coach Jason Foster. “ Our kids put forth a great effort, but we real- ly struggled to compete with the size, strength and speed Notre Dame had at most all of their positions on both sides of the ball. They controlled the line of scrimmage and that is where most games are won and lost.” After Pines had a three and out on its first possession, Notre Dame didn’t waste any time putting points on the board as Lech raced to the end zone on a 70-yard run on Notre Dame’s first play from scrimmage. Northland Pines had another three-play drive on its next series and following a Rich Mork punt, Notre Dame drove down the field and

scored on a 6-yard run by Lech to make it 14-0 with 3:13 remaining in the first quarter. After a Pines’ drive stalled at the Eagles’ 47-yard line and a Mork punt, Notre Dame was able to drive out to the 44-yard line, but Austin Ramesh recovered a fumble for Pines with 11:41 to go in the second quarter to give Pines new life. A Cooper Kerner to Ramesh pass gave the Eagles a first down at the Notre Dame 18- yard line, but the Eagles set- tled for a 30-yard field goal attempt by Mork that went wide left and Notre Dames maintained the 14-0 lead. Notre Dame again fumbled at the Eagles’ 37-yard-line on their next series, but the North- land Pines drive stalled at the 49-yard line and Mork had to punt with 4:43 on the clock. Less than two minutes lat- er, a Paul Allen pass to a wide open Forest Olsen covering 45 yards gave Notre Dame a 21-0 lead at the half. Notre Dame received the second-half kickoff and put the game away with a 67-yard scoring drive that ended with an 8-yard touchdown run by Lech. The opponent added one more third-quarter score on a 57-yard touchdown pass from Allen to Andrew Martzahl to make it 35-0 as time ran out in

To EAGLES, Pg. 10A

to make it 35-0 as time ran out in To EAGLES, Pg. 10A Northland Pines running

Northland Pines running back Austin Ramesh didn’t find many openings in the Notre Dame defense, but still ran for 104 yards on 24 carries. The junior also had three pass receptions for 33 yards, with all three passes coming from Cooper Kerner.

33 yards, with all three passes coming from Cooper Kerner. Northland Pines players walked off the

Northland Pines players walked off the field after a tough 35-0 loss to Green Bay Notre Dame in a WIAA playoff game Saturday night.

The Eagles still finished the season with a 6-4 record and have high expectations for next year, losing just six seniors.

Sports Sidelines By Gary Ridderbusch Pines basketball event to benefit future stars Many college basketball
Sports Sidelines
By Gary Ridderbusch
Pines basketball event
to benefit future stars
Many college basketball teams kick off the season
with special events for the fans on the first night of
practice as a way to build excitement for the upcom-
ing season.
Locally, the Northland Pines Basketball Association
(NPBA) is trying to build interest and excitement in
the basketball program at Northland Pines High
School, as well as the lower grades in the school dis-
trict.
The NPBA will host its first Northwoods Basketball
All-Star Event Saturday, Nov. 5, at the Northland
Pines High School field house for boys and girls in
second to eighth grades.
Participants will compete in events such as a skills
challenge, three-point competition, hot-shot event, free
throws, lay-up challenge and passing fancy.
The event is open to the public, as anyone can try
to qualify for a charge of $5 per event. All of the pro-
ceeds from the event will benefit youth basketball
through the NPBA.
Qualifying rounds will be held Saturday morning
and afternoon and the top qualifiers will compete in
the all-star event that night.
Every youth who attempts to qualify will receive a
T-shirt, and there will be trophies for first, second and
third place.
“Those who don’t qualify can still win,” said event
coordinator Tim Kruse. “For every event you try to
qualify for, you’ll get a raffle ticket to win an iPod to
be drawn during the event that evening.”
In addition to the competition, there will be a
shooting stars competition, which will include local
personalities Emmy Fink of Discover Wisconsin, Joe
Dufek of WJFW TV-12, Larry Snedden and others.
Organizers even talked yours truly into lacing up the
sneakers to take a few shots at the hoop.
Danceworks Unlimited and Northwoods Idol win-
ner Madeline Consoer and guests will provide enter-
tainment. In addition, there will be a silent auction
with signed memorabilia, games for children of all
ages, raffles and a chance to win $3,500 with one
three-point shot.
Not only will the event raise much-needed funds for
the NPBA, but it will raise excitement for Northland
Pines basketball. For details or to register, visit north-
woodsallstar.com or contact Kruse at (715) 891-1877
or rtkruse@aol.com.

Lady Jays finish ninth at Division 3 Sectional

The Three Lakes girls cross-country team concluded its 2011 season last Friday night, finishing ninth in team standings at the Division 3 Sectional meet hosted by Edgar High School at Nine Mile Recreation Area. The Edgar girls cross-coun- try team won the meet with 39 points, followed by Pittsville with 81. The top finisher for the girls was Tory Palmer of Pittsville in 15 minutes, 21 seconds. On the boys side, Marathon was first with 36 points, followed by Auburndale with 63. The top boys finisher was Andrew Studinski of Marathon in 17:01. “The atmosphere at the Sectional meet is always exciting,” said Three Lakes coach Laurie Levandoski. “Every runner toes the line, knowing this race determines whether or not they will advance for one more meet.” Caitlin Vreeland-Griffin was the first Three Lakes runner to cross the line, fin- ishing 18th overall with a time of 17:25. The time was her personal best for the year. “Caitlin ran a smart race and was careful not to get buried behind too many run- ners at the start,” said Levan- doski. “At Sectionals, everyone goes off the line quickly. We

spent a lot of time over the last week talking about our start and how to run a smart race at Sectionals.” Indi Yeager finished 39th overall for the Lady Jays with

a time of 18:25. “She was hoping for a bet- ter time for her final race of the season, but illness ham- pered her performance,” said Levandoski. “Indi put in an outstanding effort, despite not feeling well physically.” Bluejays harrier Sonya Westfall finished 48th with a time of 19:00, narrowly edging out a runner from Auburndale by 0.60 of a second. “This was a great finish for Sonya,” said Levandoski. “She knew the race wasn’t over until she crossed the finish line, and four racers were in a tight pack, with only 1.5 sec- onds separating the runners.” Jena Miles and Brooke Welch finished in 60th and 63rd places with times of 19:27 and 19:31, respectively, and rounded out the scoring for the Bluejays. Peyton Radaj fin- ished 78th with a time of 20:55. The top two teams and the top five individuals not on a qualifying team in each of the two races will move on to the WIAA State competition Satur- day, Oct. 29, at The Ridges Golf Course in Wisconsin Rapids.

Pines to host basketball camp

Northland Pines High School will host a Hoosier School of Basketball shooting camp and offensive funda- mentals camp Friday and Sat- urday, Nov. 11-12. The camp is designed to give future basketball players an opportunity to sharpen their basketball skills. “A great deal of time will be spent on each camper’s mechan- ics of their shot, footwork, com-

ing off of screens and the use of the dribble to create their shot,” said Northland Pines basket- ball coach Ryan Clark. The Hoosier School of Bas- ketball Fall Camp will again be directed by Hall of Fame coach Woody Wilson. Wilson will begin his 22nd season as

a college coach. For more information, con- tact Clark at (715) 477-0593 or (715) 550-0908.

10A

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

SPORTS

2011 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS SPORTS The Northland Pines Eagles cross-country team for the

The Northland Pines Eagles cross-country team for the 2011 sea- son included, front row from left, Sara Schaetz, Jordan Welnetz, Kylie Rhode, Taylor Neis and Emilie Robins; middle row, Katelynn Ritzer, Lexi Nelson, Shannon Lange, Maria Wait, Cali Sanborn and Alexis Schilling; back row, head coach Don Czarapata Jr., Cather-

ine Meilinger, Christian Svetnicka, Max Flanagan, Brett Hughes, Tyler Staege, Matt Kaitchuck and assistant coach Don Czarapata Sr. Missing from the photo were Lauren Czarapata, Tess Holperin, Dakota Klessig, Walker Nelson and Devin Sauvola. --Contributed Photo

Cross-country season closes for Northland Pines Eagles

Pines girls end season with Tomahawk loss

BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH

NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR

The Northland Pines Eagles volleyball team saw its season come to an end in the WIAA Division 2 Regional tournament last Tuesday at Mosinee. The sixth-seeded Eagles fell to the third-seeded Indi- ans in three straight games. Mosinee won game one 25- 13, followed by a 25-9 victory in the second game. The In- dians took the match with a 25-10 victory in game three. Pines finished the season with a 9-20 overall record under first-year coach Margo Rogers Anderson. The Eagles were 0-12 in the Great North- ern Conference (GNC), but will only lose two seniors from the varsity squad.

Mosinee lost to second- seeded Wittenberg-Birnam- wood in the second round of the Regional tournament. The Chargers won in four games, 25-21, 20-25, 25-17 and 28-26. Wittenberg-Birnamwood then lost to GNC champion Tomahawk in the Regional final in three straight games, 25-19, 25-14 and 25-18. The top-seeded Hatchets will now face Medford in the Sectional semifinal this Thursday, Oct. 27, at Tomahawk. The Raiders were seeded second in their Regional bracket. The Sectional final will be Saturday, Oct. 29, at New Richmond. The other two teams in the Sectional are Rice Lake and Altoona.

Bluejays, Knights end seasons with Regional volleyball losses

BY ANTHONY DREW

NEWS-REVIEW ASST. EDITOR

BY ANTHONY DREW

NEWS-REVIEW ASST. EDITOR

The Northland Pines cross-country team conclud- ed its season Saturday at the Sectional race at Irish Waters Golf Club in Free- dom, with the girls finishing 11th out of 15 teams. The boys team didn’t have enough runners to take a place in the team standings. Eagles runner Devin Sauvola finished eighth over- all with a time of 16 minutes, 38 seconds, narrowly missing his chance to advance to State competition. The top two teams and the top five individuals not on a qualifying team in each of the two races will move on to the WIAA State competition Saturday, Oct. 29, at The Ridges Golf Course in Wis- consin Rapids. “Because of the unique qualifying format for individ- uals to advance out of the

Eagles

FROM PAGE 9A

the third quarter. Neither team scored in the fourth quarter and Notre Dame advanced in the play- offs. Ramesh, a 2,000-yard rusher on the season, led the offensive attack for the Eagles with 104 yards on 24 carries. He also caught three Kerner passes for 33 yards. Defensively for the Eagles, Lucas Ferber had nine solo tackles and seven assists, Ramesh had seven solo tackles and eight assists, Alex Kornely had five solo tackles and three assists, and Tanner Beaman had five solo tackles, one assist and one quarterback sack. Northland Pines finished the season with a 6-4 overall record and were 4-2 in the WestPAC conference. It was the Eagles’ first home play- off game in five years. “I could not be more proud of our players and how far they have come this season,” said Foster. “They moved the program forward another level and we look forward to continued progress next sea- son. I would like to thank everyone in our school and community for all they have done to support Northland Pines Football this season.” The Eagles will lose just six seniors from this team, including Mork, Ferber, Mitch Elbe, Cody Heller, Tim Kopanski and Wyler Haynes.

Sectional meet, Devin fin- ished one place, and only three seconds shy of earning a trip to the State Champi- onship,” said Pines coach Don Czarapata Jr. For the girls, Emilie Robins was the first to cross the finish line, clocking a time of 15:52. “Emilie also missed quali- fying by the slimmest of mar- gins, just four places short,” said Czarapata. Both runners competed well, setting personal best times by more than 30 sec- onds. The coach said the two were at the same time pleased with their perfor- mances and disappointed in not qualifying. “However, their coaches and teammates were very excited and proud of both of their outstanding perfor- mances,” said Czarapata. Freshman Tyler Staege and Cali Sanborn ran per- sonal bests as well, finishing as Pines’ second-place boy

and girl respectively. “A total of five Northland Pines freshman either com- peted in the Sectional meet or were team alternates,” said Czarapata. “All of them have great potential and I look forward to seeing them compete during the next three years.” The team will lose nine seniors to graduation this school year, including five girls and four boys. Taylor Neis, Kylie Rhode, Jordan Welnetz and Sara Schaetz all participated in their final high school cross- country race. While Schaetz was an alternate for the meet, Neis, Rhode and Wel- netz finished with their best races of the season. “I am extremely gratified with how the season went,” said Czarapata. “If you look at our times, every single runner ended the season running minutes faster than they started. There were large improvements across

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The Three Lakes and Phelps girls volleyball teams both ended their seasons with first-round Regional losses to top-seeded teams. The No. 8-seeded Bluejays fell 3-0 to the No. 1-seeded Marathon in Division 3. The scores of the three games were 25-4, 25-12 and 25-9. Marathon went on to win the Regional championship and will face Spencer in a Sec- tional Thursday, Oct. 27, in Auburndale. The No. 8-seeded Knights

lost 3-0 to No. 1-seeded Tiger- ton in Division 4. The scores of the games were 25-4, 25-4 and

25-13.

Tigerton then defeated Elcho, but lost the Regional championship to Newman Catholic, which will face Assumption in the Thursday Sectional in Ashwaubenon.

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VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

11A

SPORTS

THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011 11A SPORTS TOURNEY CHAMPS — The local youth hockey

TOURNEY CHAMPS — The local youth hockey team known as the Wild Ones recently went undefeated in the 2001 division, competing against 11 other teams at the Greenheck Ice

Rink in Wausau for the Fall Classic 3-on-3 tour- nament. Showing their first-place trophies were, from left, Willie Francis, Rece Lila, Jack Rhode and Noah Miller. --Contributed Photo

POOL

THREE LAKES POOL

Results of 10/19/11 Team results: Bonnie’s Lakeside 11, Oneida Village 4; Jake’s I 11, Pine Isle II 4; Black Forest 10, Loon Saloon 5; Jake’s II 10, Briggs Bar 5; Legion Eagles 8, Pine Isle I 7; Irish Waters I 8, Wonder’s Pit Stop 7; Legion Ravens 8, Irish Waters II 7; Pine Lake Pub bye. Eight-ball runs: Mike Thrall, Rick

Maney. STANDINGS

W

L

JAKE’S II

31

14

BONNIE’S LAKESIDE

30

15

WONDER’S PIT STOP

18

12

PINE LAKE PUB

17

13

PINE ISLE I

25

20

LEGION RAVENS

24

21

BRIGGS BAR

23

22

IRISH WATERS II

22

23

JAKE’S I

22

23

ONEIDA VILLAGE

21

24

IRISH WATERS I

20

25

BLACK FOREST

20

25

LEGION EAGLES

18

27

LOON SALOON

15

30

PINE ISLE II

9

21

EAGLE RIVER WOMEN’S POOL LEAGUE

Results of 10/18/11

Results: Buckshots 3, Bucktale Inn 6; Tiny Tap 6, Uncle Kent’s I 3; Uncle Kent’s II 5, Smuggler’s Lounge 4. Five-ball runs: Barb Vugrinec, Vicky Muth. Eight-ball run: Dana Croker.

STANDINGS

W

L

TINY TAP

20

7

BUCKTALE INN

15

12

UNCLE KENT’S I

14

13

SMUGGLER’S LOUNGE

12

15

BUCKSHOTS

10

17

UNCLE KENT’S II

10

17

NORTHWOODS NINE-BALL LEAGUE

Results of 10/17/11

Team results: Pine Isle 7, Jake’s II 2; Uncle Kent’s I 7, Oneida Village 2; Eagle Lanes 5, Jake’s I 4; Club DeNoyer 5, Mud Creek Saloon 4; Boomers 5, Tiny Tap 4; Uncle Kent’s II bye.

Nine-ball breaks: Bob Kaczkowski,

Ken Smith.

STANDINGS

W

L

PINE ISLE

19

8

UNCLE KENT’S I

17

10

TINY TAP

16

11

CLUB DENOYER

15

12

JAKE’S II

13

14

EAGLE LANES

13

14

BOOMERS

12

15

MUD CREEK SALOON

8

10

JAKE’S I

8

10

UNCLE KENT’S II

7

11

ONEIDA VILLAGE

7

20

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5:30-11 Fri. & Sat. Hwy. 45,Three Lakes (715) 546-2277 SPORTSMAN’S HEADQUARTERS • Licenses • Beer Cave
5:30-11 Fri. & Sat. Hwy. 45,Three Lakes (715) 546-2277 SPORTSMAN’S HEADQUARTERS • Licenses • Beer Cave
5:30-11 Fri. & Sat. Hwy. 45,Three Lakes (715) 546-2277 SPORTSMAN’S HEADQUARTERS • Licenses • Beer Cave

SPORTSMAN’S HEADQUARTERS

• Licenses

• Beer Cave

• LP Gas

• Liquor

• Crawlers

• Leeches

• Registration Station

• 2- & 4-Cycle Oils

• Registration Station • 2- & 4-Cycle Oils WE HAVE MINNOWS! wild eagle corner store 1970

WE HAVE MINNOWS!

Station • 2- & 4-Cycle Oils WE HAVE MINNOWS! wild eagle corner store 1970 Hwy. 45

wild eagle corner store

& 4-Cycle Oils WE HAVE MINNOWS! wild eagle corner store 1970 Hwy. 45 (corner of Chain
& 4-Cycle Oils WE HAVE MINNOWS! wild eagle corner store 1970 Hwy. 45 (corner of Chain
& 4-Cycle Oils WE HAVE MINNOWS! wild eagle corner store 1970 Hwy. 45 (corner of Chain
& 4-Cycle Oils WE HAVE MINNOWS! wild eagle corner store 1970 Hwy. 45 (corner of Chain

1970 Hwy. 45 (corner of Chain O’ Lakes Rd.)

Eagle River

715-479-4688

HOURS: 6 A.M. TO 11 P.M. DAILY

Our team’s goal is to win you over!

CONVENIENCE STORE & MORE!

Bait - Tackle - Gas - Groceries - Spirits

#1 IN THE AREA FOR ALL YOUR CHAIN-SAW NEEDS

INDOOR WEATHER FORECAST

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BOX 458

1-800-359-0286

EAGLE RIVER, WIS.

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VILAS COUNTY

www.carrier.com www.rogerscontrol.com VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW Football Contest FORTHE SEASON: SPECIAL $ 250

NEWS-REVIEW

Football

Contest

FORTHE SEASON: SPECIAL $ 250 PRIZE All 17 weekly winners, plus all other players during
FORTHE SEASON: SPECIAL $ 250 PRIZE
All 17 weekly winners, plus all other players during the season (with valid entries)
who have perfect scores (16 out of 16) will be entered into a Playoff Contest. This
will be a one-time Bowl Game/Playoff Game Contest.The winner of the Playoff will
get a $250 gift certificate good at any (winner’s choice) full-season contest co-
sponsor.
Week 8 (Oct. 29-30 games) winner will be announced in the Wednesday, Nov. 2, newspaper.
Week 8 (Oct. 29-30 games) winner will be
announced in the Wednesday, Nov. 2, newspaper.
WEEK 8 DEADLINE: FRIDAY, OCT. 28, AT NOON
This year’s contest is the same as in 2010. Simply circle the winner of each game list-
ed. Game 1 has added importance. See Game of the Week notes. Each game represents
one point. A perfect score is 16 points. Be sure to fill in the Tiebreaker section. For any game
ending in a tie, or if a game is delayed, postponed or rescheduled for any reason, the point
will be thrown out. See rules below.
You must be at least 8 years old to enter. To enter, clip along the dotted line, then place
game entry in the container at the co-sponsor’s retail outlet. Entrants must list name, address
and phone number clearly
information must be legible. Illegible entries will be thrown
must be legible. Illegible entries will be thrown Please cut along dotted line Week 8 Games

Please cut along dotted line

Week 8 Games of Oct. 29 & 30

1
1

Game of the Week

Dallas at Philadelphia

2 Indianapolis at Tennessee

3 New Orleans at St. Louis

4 Miami at N.Y. Giants

5 Minnesota at Carolina

6 Arizona at Baltimore

7 Jacksonville at Houston

8 Washington at Buffalo

9 Detroit at Denver

10 New England at Pittsburgh

11 Cleveland at San Francisco

12 Cincinnati at Seattle

13 Michigan State at Nebraska

14 Wisconsin at Ohio State

15 Stanford at U. So. California

16 Purdue at Michigan

CIRCLE THE WINNING TEAM

Name

Address

City

State, ZIP

Day Ph.

(

)

Night Ph. (

)

City State, ZIP Day Ph. ( ) Night Ph. ( ) 1. The object is to

1. The object is to pick the winner of 16 games. Games will include professional and college games played Friday, Saturday or Sun- day. The weekly winner will be the entrant with the most points…

3.

16 being the most possible. The weekly winner must have the Game of the Week correct. If there is a tie, it goes to Tiebreaker I, the total points scored by both teams in the week’s designated

4.

game. If that fails to determine a winner, the judges will go to Tiebreaker 2, total offensive yardage from scrimmage in the des- ignated game. If there is still as tie, a drawing at the News-Review, Eagle River, will be used.

5.

2. No points are awarded on tie games, or in case any game is not played for any reason during the scheduled week. Should the

6.

out. Decisions of the Contest Judge (News-Review) are final.

Decisions of the Contest Judge (News-Review) are final. How to Play For each of the 16
Decisions of the Contest Judge (News-Review) are final. How to Play For each of the 16

How to Play

For each of the 16 games listed at left, circle the team you are picking to win.

Game of the Week

circle the team you are picking to win . Game of the W eek You must

You must correctly pick the winner of Game No. 1 to proceed in the con- test. If you miss Game 1, you cannot win the weekly contest, unless all entrants miss Game 1.

win the weekly contest, unless all entrants miss Game 1. FRIDAY, OCT. 28 DEADLINE: NOON TIEBREAKER
win the weekly contest, unless all entrants miss Game 1. FRIDAY, OCT. 28 DEADLINE: NOON TIEBREAKER
win the weekly contest, unless all entrants miss Game 1. FRIDAY, OCT. 28 DEADLINE: NOON TIEBREAKER
win the weekly contest, unless all entrants miss Game 1. FRIDAY, OCT. 28 DEADLINE: NOON TIEBREAKER
win the weekly contest, unless all entrants miss Game 1. FRIDAY, OCT. 28 DEADLINE: NOON TIEBREAKER

FRIDAY, OCT. 28 DEADLINE: NOON

all entrants miss Game 1. FRIDAY, OCT. 28 DEADLINE: NOON TIEBREAKER 1 Total points scored (both
all entrants miss Game 1. FRIDAY, OCT. 28 DEADLINE: NOON TIEBREAKER 1 Total points scored (both

TIEBREAKER 1

miss Game 1. FRIDAY, OCT. 28 DEADLINE: NOON TIEBREAKER 1 Total points scored (both teams) in

Total points scored (both teams) in Game of the Week

1 Total points scored (both teams) in Game of the W eek TIEBREAKER 2 Total offensive

TIEBREAKER 2

Total offensive yards (both teams) in game. (both teams) in game.

Deposit your entry at these sponsors

• Three Lakes Shell

• Wild Eagle

Friendship House Family Restaurant

Corner Store • Vilas County

News-Review

Trig’s Service Counter

• Paul’s Pump-’n-Pantry • Lumpy’s

• The Penalty Box

Paul’s Pump-’n-Pantry • Lumpy’s • The Penalty Box Congratulations Week 7 Winner Name Bob Burnett Eagle

Congratulations Week 7 Winner

Name

Bob Burnett

Eagle River

Winning Score

14 Points

Name Bob Burnett Eagle River Winning Score 14 Points Deposit your entry forms at the participating

Deposit your entry forms at the participating businesses listed below, or at the Vilas County News-Review office. Deadline is noon Friday unless otherwise stated.

FFOOOOTTBBAALLLL CCOONNTTEESSTT OOFFFFIICCIIAALL RRUULLEESS

accepted. Enter contest by dropping entry forms into the Contest

Container at participating co-sponsors, or by faxing to 715-479-

6242.

7. Weekly deadline for entry will be noon Friday, except when noted otherwise on the weekly entry form.

8. Neither this newspaper nor any co-sponsor will be responsible for illegible entry forms or those lost, stolen or damaged in any way.

9. Limit: one entry per person per week. Each entry must represent the original work of one entrant; group entries, systems or other attempts to enter multiple entries will be disqualified. Filling out extra forms and putting your friends’ or relatives’ names on them violates this rule. Any such entries are destroyed prior to grading.

News-Review make an error listing a game/games, those games will be thrown out, not counted.

Entering the Football Contest constitutes permission by the entrant for his or her name and photograph to be used for news and reasonable promotion purposes at no charge.

Employees of this newspaper and their immediate families are ineligible to participate. No entries will be accepted after the post- ed deadline.

Any inquiry about a protest of weekly results must be made by noon on the Friday following the announcement of the winner.The decision of the Contest Administrator is final.

No purchase is necessary. Facsimile game entry forms will be

12A

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 26, 2011

VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS

PUBLIC NOTICES

(Six Weeks, 10/26-11/30/11) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY Case No. 11-CV-111

Fifth Third Bank

Plaintiff,

vs. Martha J. Sullivan, Joseph E. Sullivan and Doshier & Gregson Inc.

Defendants.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a

judgment of foreclosure entered on May 27,

2011 in the amount of $295,769.63 the Sheriff

will sell the described premises at public auction as follows:

TIME: December 15, 2011 at 2:00 p.m. TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff at the sale in cash, cashier’s check or certified funds, payable to the clerk of courts (person- al checks cannot and will not be accepted). The balance of the successful bid must be paid to the clerk of courts in cash, cashier's check or certified funds no later than ten days after the court’s confirmation of the sale or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold ‘as is’ and subject to all liens and encumbrances. PLACE: On the front steps of the Vilas County Courthouse, Eagle River DESCRIPTION: Lot Two (2) of that Certi- fied Survey Map recorded in Volume 3 of Cer- tified Surveys, page 24 as Map No. 625, being

a part of the Southwest Quarter of the North-

west Quarter of Section Thirty-four, Town- ship Forty-two North, Range Ten East of the Fourth Principal Meridian, Township of Conover, Vilas County, Wisconsin. Parcel 2AA parcel of land to be added to Lot 2 of Certi- fied Survey Map No. 625 as recorded in Vol- ume 3 Certified Surveys, page 24 of Vilas County Records, being part of Lot 3 of said Certified Survey in Volume 3 Certified Sur- veys, page 24 of Vilas County Records and located in the Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SW 1/4 NW 1/4), Section Thirty-four (34), Township Forty-two (42) North, Range Ten (10) East of the Fourth Principal Meridian, Township of Conover, Vilas County, Wisconsin, and being more par- ticularly described as follows: Commencing at the Northwest corner of Lot 3 of Certified Survey Map No. 625 as recorded in Volume 3 CS, page 24, Vilas County records and being marked by an iron pipe on the Easterly right- of-way line of Old U.S. Highway 45, a Town Road and also being the centerline of a 40 foot wide easement as shown on said Certi- fied Survey and the PLACE OF BEGINNING, thence N 73° 52' 49" E 137.35 (N 73° 57'15" E of record) along the North boundary line of said Lot 3 and said centerline to a point

where said centerline will turn, thence con- tinuing N 73° 52' 49" E 80.31 feet (N 73° 57' 15"

E of record) along the North line of said Lot

3 to an iron pipe at the Northeast corner of said Lot 3, thence S 12° 35' 33" E 220.12 feet (S12° 30' 00" E 220.00 feet of record) along the East line of said Lot 3 to an iron pipe at the Southwest corner of said Lot 2, thence S 68° 23' 04" W 30.61 feet to an iron pipe on the West line of said Lot 3, thence N 12° 28' 16" W 159.27 feet (N12° 30' 00" W of record) along the West line of said Lot 3 to an iron pipe, thence S 65° 00' 00" W 245.43 feet (S 65° 00' 00" W 245.40 feet of record) along the South line of said Lot 3 to an iron pipe on the Easterly right-of-way line of said Old Highway 45, thence N 13° 54' 23" E 117.32 feet (N 13° 50' 15" E 117.40 feet of record) along the West line of said Lot 3 and also the Easterly right-of-way line of Old Highway 45 back to the place of beginning. This parcel is to be added to Lot 2 as men- tioned above.

PROPERTY ADDRESS: 4784 US Highway 45 Conover, WI 54519-9534 DATED: October 6, 2011 Gray & Associates, L.L.P. Attorneys for Plaintiff 16345 West Glendale Drive New Berlin, WI 53151-2841 (414) 224-8404 Please go to www.gray-law.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Gray & Associates, L.L.P. is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If you have pre- viously received a discharge in a chapter 7 bankruptcy case, this communication should not be construed as an attempt to hold you personally liable for the debt.

4945

(Six Weeks, 10/12-11/16/11) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY Case No. 2011-CV-192

JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Associa- tion, Successor by Merger to Chase Home Finance, LLC, successor by merger with Chase Manhattan Mortgage Corporation Plaintiff,

vs. Bernard J. Bader and Susan M. Bader Defendants.

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a judgment of foreclosure entered on August 12, 2011 in the amount of $138,677.44 the Sheriff will sell the described premises at public auction as follows:

TIME: December 1, 2011 at 2:00 p.m. TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff at the sale in cash, cashier’s check or certi- fied funds, payable to the clerk of courts (personal checks cannot and will not be accepted). The balance of the successful bid must be paid to the clerk of courts in cash, cashier's check or certified funds no later than ten days after the court’s confirmation of the sale or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold ‘as is’ and subject to all liens and encum- brances. PLACE: On the front steps of the Vilas County Courthouse, Eagle River DESCRIPTION: A parcel of land in Govern- ment Lot 4, Section 11, Township 43 North, Range 5 East, in the Town of Winchester, Vilas County, Wisconsin, described as fol- lows: Commencing at an iron pipe located on the East line of Government Lot 4 at a point 93.5 feet North of Southeast corner of said Government Lot 4; thence N 89° 17' W, 1724.7 feet to an iron pipe on the East shore line of Birch Lake, and this point to be the POINT OF BEGINNING of the land to be described; thence retracing steps S 89° 17' E, 1724.7 feet to the East line of said Government Lot 4; thence North along the East line of Govern-

ment Lot 4, 200 feet; thence N 89° 17' W, to the East shore line of Birch Lake; thence Southerly along the lake shore a distance of

200 feet, more or less, to the POINT OF

BEGINNING. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 7755 E Birch Lake Rd Winchester, WI 54557-9413 DATED: October 5, 2011 Gray & Associates, L.L.P. Attorneys for Plaintiff 16345 West Glendale Drive New Berlin, WI 53151-2841 (414) 224-8404 Please go to www.gray-law.com to obtain the bid for this sale. Gray & Associates, L.L.P. is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained

will be used for that purpose. If you have pre- viously received a discharge in a chapter 7 bankruptcy case, this communication should not be construed as an attempt to hold you personally liable for the debt.

4918

(Six Weeks, 9/21-10/26/11) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT VIL