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Triple-Play Using IPoE for Voice, PPPoE for Data and Bridged Video on Multiple PVCs (without

Triple-Play Using IPoE for Voice, PPPoE for Data and Bridged Video on Multiple PVCs (without VLANs)

Date:

April 2008

Version:

v1.0

Abstract:

This Application Note provides technical information on the support of a Triple-Play scenario by Thomson Gateway products. First, a brief introduction to the basic concepts of Triple-Play is presented. Next, a tested and proven scenario shows how the Thomson Gateway can be integrated in a Triple-Play network. The presented scenario configures Thomson Gateway with an IPoE connection for voice traffic, a PPPoE connection for data traffic and a bridged connection for video traffic. RTSP and IGMP are used to support video and MGCP is the selected VoIP signalling protocol. This document describes the mechanisms that are used to set up the scenario, the configuration of the Thomson Gateway using CLI commands and an illustration of the resulting configuration. Next, a Thomson Gateway with this configuration is integrated in following network setups:

Triple-Play network setup with multiple PVCs and ATM DSLAM.

Dual-Play network setup with single PVC and ATM DSLAM.

Triple-Play network setup with single PVC and IP DSLAM.

Applicability:

This Application Note is relevant to all Thomson Gateway devices that support video (RTSP and IGMP snooping) and VoIP (MGCP).

Updates:

Thomson continuously develops new solutions, but is also committed to improving its existing products.

For more information on Thomson's latest technological innovations, documents and software releases, visit us at http://www.thomson-broadband.com

Chapter 1

1 Introduction to Triple-Play

Introduction

In this chapter, we give some background information on Triple-Play. Today, both telecom operators and cable operators are developing their networks to offer the Triple-Play service to the customer. In this introduction, we mainly focus on the delivery of the Triple-Play service by telecom operators using the DSL broadband access technology.

Delivery of multiple services

The term Multi-Play is a general term, used to refer to the delivery of multiple telecommunication services.

Following more specific terms are also used:

Dual-Play: the Dual-Play service refers to the delivery of two services. These services are:

 

Voice and data services in the case of telecom operators.

Video and data services in the case of cable operators.

Triple-Play: the Triple-Play service refers to the delivery of voice, video and data services over a common network infrastructure, with one subscription. To this end, operators add an additional service to their Dual-Play service:

 

Cable operators already provide video and data services and compete with telecom operators to provide voice services.

Telecom operators already provide voice and data services and compete with cable operators to provide video services.

Quadruple-Play: the Quadruple-Play service combines the Triple-Play service with the delivery of wireless services.

Triple-Play services

The term “Triple-Play service” covers a large collection of voice, video and data services, including:

Video telephony

IPTV, which is multicast video

Video on Demand (VoD), which is unicast video

Voice over IP (VoIP)

Gaming

Internet access (HTTP traffic)

E-mail

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Triple-Play DSL network infrastructure

Following illustration shows the typical DSL network infrastructure:

Subscriber’s Premises Local Loop Telephone Ethernet Company’s or Internet Service Provider’s Network Central
Subscriber’s Premises
Local Loop
Telephone
Ethernet
Company’s
or
Internet Service Provider’s
Network
Central Office
ATM Switches
PC
xDSL Modem
DSLAM
PC
xDSL Modem
Access Network
Internet
Edge
BRAS
Router
PC
xDSL Modem
DSLAM
PC
xDSL Modem

This DSL network infrastructure consists of the following key elements:

DSL modem

Digital Subscriber Line Access Multiplexer (DSLAM)

Broadband Remote Access Server (BRAS)

DSL modem

Traffic is sent from the subscriber’s device or network through a DSL modem. Next, traffic is sent to the other end of the line, which is located at the telephone company’s Central Office (CO). This line consists of the existing copper telephone wires, also called the “local loop” or “last mile”.

Digital Subscriber Line Access Multiplexer (DSLAM)

At the CO, the traffic is received by the DSLAM. The DSLAM aggregates the digital data streams coming from numerous DSL modems onto a single high-capacity uplink (ATM or Gigabit Ethernet) towards the Internet Service Provider (ISP). The DSLAM uses multiplexing techniques.

Different DSLAM types exist:

ATM DSLAMs: these DSLAMs have an ATM uplink port.

The first generation ATM DSLAMs are designed as simple Layer 2 ATM multiplexers. They provide a seamless transition from the last mile ATM Permanent Virtual Circuits (PVCs) to a single PVC in the ATM access network. This single PVC is used for all services.

The second generation ATM DSLAMs also have ATM switching capabilities. As a result, they support ATM Switched Virtual Circuits (SVCs) and all of the class of service, traffic shaping and traffic prioritization capabilities inherent with ATM. Different services can use different SVCs.

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Ethernet or IP DSLAM: these DSLAMs have an Ethernet uplink port.

In its simplest implementation, IP DSLAMs function as Layer 2 switches with a limited Layer 3 capability. They support Ethernet VLANs in combination with Ethernet multicast capability (IGMP snooping or proxy support).

The industry trend is definitely towards more advanced Layer 3 functionality on the IP DSLAMs.

Broadband Remote Access Server (BRAS)

The BRAS sits at the core of an ISP’s network, which is a business or organization that provides to customers access to the Internet and related services.

The specific tasks of a BRAS include:

Aggregation point: the BRAS aggregates the output from multiple DSLAMs in the access network.

Router: the BRAS routes traffic into an ISP’s backbone network.

Session termination: the BRAS provides the logical termination of PPP sessions. These may be PPP over Ethernet (PPPoE) or PPP over ATM (PPPoA) encapsulated sessions.

Subscriber management functions: the BRAS provides the interface to authentication, authorization and accounting (AAA) systems. The BRAS is also responsible for assigning session parameters such as IP addresses to the clients. The BRAS is the first IP hop from the client to the Internet.

Policy management and QoS: at the BRAS, an ISP can insert policy management and IP Quality of Service (QoS).

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2

Triple-Play Scenario

2.1

Scenario Overview

Network architecture

Following illustration shows the network architecture of the considered Triple-Play scenario:

Network Setup Options

Tripple-Play - multiple PVCs - ATM DSLAM

Setup Options Tripple-Play - multiple PVCs - ATM DSLAM ATM DSLAM Dual-Play - single PVC -

ATM

DSLAM

Dual-Play - single PVC - ATM DSLAM

ATM DSLAM
ATM
DSLAM

Tripple-Play - single PVC - IP DSLAM

IP
IP

DSLAM

Video Services DHCP Server Video Server TR-069 ACS for Video - Unicast - Multicast ATM
Video Services
DHCP Server
Video Server
TR-069 ACS
for Video
- Unicast
- Multicast
ATM
BRAS
& Router
Video Service
FTP, HTTP Servers
Router
Data Service
Router
DNS and SNTP Server
ATM
RADIUS
Voice Service
Router
WWW
Data Services
Voice Network
DHCP Server
Call Agent
for Voice
Voice Services
Fast Ethernet/
Gigabit
Ethernet

Network setup options

A single configuration is used for the three network setup options. The Thomson Gateway is configured with an IPoE connection for voice traffic, a PPPoE connection for data traffic and a bridged connection for video traffic.

Three network setup options are integrated with a single full services backbone network. This enables each customer to use the same routers and servers to access the offered services, regardless of the available number of PVCs and DSLAM type.

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The classification is based on the services offered to the customer, the number of PVCs and the type of DSLAM:

Triple-play network setup with multiple PVCs and ATM DSLAM

Dual-play network setup with single PVC and ATM DSLAM

Triple-play network setup with single PVC and IP DSLAM

Digital Subscriber Line Access Multiplexer (DSLAM)

In the network, two types of DSLAMs are used:

IP DSLAM: the IP DSLAM uses MAC Address Classification to classify the different streams (data, voice and video). Next, the streams are routed over different VLANs towards the BRAS, where these VLANs are terminated.

ATM DSLAM: the ATM DSLAM uses ATM multiplexing and multiplexes all received PVCs into a single PVC on its uplink. This PVC is terminated in the BRAS.

Broadband Remote Access Server (BRAS)

The BRAS also serves as a Router. Three virtual routers have been configured in the BRAS:

Video Service Router for video traffic

Data Service Router for data traffic

Voice Service Router for voice traffic

These virtual routers are totally isolated from each other. This isolation provides security and non- interference between the three types of services (data, voice and video).

The BRAS and its three virtual routers provide access to the different services via different service VLANs. For example, one VLAN is used between the Video Service Router and the Video Server, another VLAN is used between the Data Service Router and the FTP Server, and so on.

Provided services

The services that are available in the network are:

Data services

Voice services

Video services

Remote CPE management

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2.2 Thomson Gateway Configuration

Single configuration

A single configuration is used for the three network setup options.

Target configuration scheme

In order to set up the scenario, we configure the Thomson Gateway as shown in following illustration:

DHCP Server

LAN_private

DHCP Relay DHCP Client IP Router IP LocalNetwork PPP Internet VoIP ETH PPP Relay Module
DHCP Relay
DHCP Client
IP Router
IP LocalNetwork
PPP Internet
VoIP
ETH
PPP
Relay
Module
OBC
ETH Bridge
1234
ethport
FXS
1234
ethif
ATM
ATM
ATM
ATM
ATM
atm_Internet
atm_voice
atm_v_video
atm_v_igmp
atm_v_ctl
PVC
PVC
PVC
PVC
PVC
pvc_Internet
pvc_voice
pvc_v_video
pvc_v_igmp
pvc_v_ctl
Voice
Data
Video
Analogue
PC
STB
br_Internet
br_voice
br_v_video
br_v_igmp
br_v_ctl

Phone

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2.3 Practical Realization

Mechanisms

To set up this scenario, we use following mechanisms:

ATM QoS

Labels for IP forwarding, labels for IP packet classification, IP QoS queuing

DHCP server for the data PC

DHCP client on behalf of the analogue phone

Detection of the STB

IGMP snooping for multicast video

SNTP and DNS

MGCP as VoIP signalling protocol

CWMP for remote CPE management

Configuration overview

Following configuration steps have to be performed to configure the Thomson Gateway for this scenario:

1 Configure ATM QoS and the ATM interfaces.

2 Configure IP QoS.

3 Configure the necessary interface architecture on the Thomson Gateway.

4 Configure the LAN IP addresses.

5 Configure the video services.

6 Configure the data services.

7 Configure the voice services.

8 Configure remote CPE management.

9 Save the configuration.

These steps are described in following subsections, explaining the used Command Line Interface (CLI) commands.

2.3.1 ATM QoS and ATM Interfaces

ATM QoS book

First, ATM QoS Connection Traffic Descriptors (CTDs) are defined. In addition to the default CTD, two other CTDs are defined, one for voice traffic and one for IGMP control traffic:

=>:atm qosbook ctdadd name=tx_voice conformance=CBR peakrate=120 =>:atm qosbook ctdadd name=tx_v_igmp conformance=CBR peakrate=22

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Next, these CTDs are used to define two new ATM QoS profiles, stored as ATM QoS book entries. Each profile uses the default CTD for the downstream direction. Indeed, the Thomson Gateway must make sure that an appropriate QoS profile is applied to each ATM connection in the upstream direction, but Thomson Gateway is not in command of the QoS profiles applied to the ATM connections in the downstream direction. This is the responsibility of the telecom operator.

=>:atm qosbook add name=video_igmp txctd=tx_v_igmp rxctd=default =>:atm qosbook add name=voice txctd=tx_voice rxctd=default

ATM phone book

The ATM phone book contains the ATM connections. Following five entries are added to the ATM phone book (the VPI/VCI values are indicative):

=>:atm phonebook add name=pvc_Internet addr=8.35 =>:atm phonebook add name=pvc_voice addr=0.65 =>:atm phonebook add name=pvc_v_video addr=0.48 =>:atm phonebook add name=pvc_v_igmp addr=0.49 =>:atm phonebook add name=pvc_v_ctl addr=0.50

ATM PVCs

The ATM interfaces can be created on top of the phone book entries. If no QoS book entry is specified for an ATM interface, the default QoS profile is used. The upper layer protocol for the ATM interfaces is set to MAC (Ethernet), as these ATM interfaces will be connected to the bridge.

=>:atm ifadd intf=atm_Internet =>:atm ifconfig intf=atm_Internet dest=pvc_Internet ulp=mac =>:atm ifattach intf=atm_Internet

=>:atm ifadd intf=atm_voice =>:atm ifconfig intf=atm_voice dest=pvc_voice qos=voice ulp=mac =>:atm ifattach intf=atm_voice

=>:atm ifadd intf=atm_v_ctl =>:atm ifconfig intf=atm_v_ctl dest=pvc_v_ctl ulp=mac =>:atm ifattach intf=atm_v_ctl

=>:atm ifadd intf=atm_v_video =>:atm ifconfig intf=atm_v_video dest=pvc_v_video ulp=mac =>:atm ifattach intf=atm_v_video

=>:atm ifadd intf=atm_v_igmp =>:atm ifconfig intf=atm_v_igmp dest=pvc_v_igmp qos=video_igmp ulp=mac =>:atm ifattach intf=atm_v_igmp

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2.3.2 IP QoS

Label for voice traffic

A label is used to assign a user-friendly name to classified types of connections. By default, a number of

labels are already defined in the Thomson Gateway. In addition, a new label is created for voice traffic:

=>:label add name=voice-only

This label is configured as follows: the default internal QoS class of packets with this label is set to 14. The internal QoS class of the ACK segments of the TCP connection is also set to 14. These internal QoS classes are assigned regardless of the class value already assigned by Layer 2. The label will apply to the initiator stream, the returning stream as well as to the child connections. The label will also be copied to all child connection streams in the same direction:

=>:label modify name=voice-only classification=overwrite defclass=14 ackclass=14 bidirectional=enabled inheritance=enabled

Classification rules

A classification rule determines the criteria that allow to give a specific label to a packet.

Following classification rules are inserted in the chain rt_user_labels. Labels assigned by these rules can be used in the IP forwarding table. The rules state that all packets coming from the local IP interface group and with service MGCP, MER-DHCP or RTP must be labelled with the label voice-only.

=>:label rule add chain=rt_user_labels index=1 name=mgcp-voice srcintf=local serv=mgcp label=voice-only =>:label rule add chain=rt_user_labels index=2 name=dhcp-voice srcintf=local serv=mer_dhcp label=voice-only =>:label rule add chain=rt_user_labels index=3 name=rtp-voice srcintf=local serv=rtp label=voice-only

Similarly, following classification rules are inserted in the chain qos_user_labels. Labels assigned by these rules are used for IP packet classification.

=>:label rule add chain=qos_user_labels index=1 name=mgcp-voice srcintf=local serv=mgcp label=voice-only =>:label rule add chain=qos_user_labels index=2 name=dhcp-voice srcintf=local serv=mer_dhcp label=voice-only =>:label rule add chain=qos_user_labels index=3 name=rtp-voice srcintf=local serv=rtp label=voice-only

IP QoS queues

IP QoS is enabled for the ATM PVCs for voice and data traffic. As a result, these ATM PVCs have six IP QoS

queues. These IP QoS queues are configured as follows: the selected packet discard strategy in case of congestion is Tail Drop. The selected subqueue priority algorithm for voice traffic is Strict Priority Scheduling. This means that Strict Priority scheduling is used between all (six) queues. The higher the queue number, the higher the priority. For data traffic, Weighted Fair Queuing is used, which is the default configuration. In this case, WFQ scheduling is used between the four AF queues. The Real-time queue has priority over the AF queues, which have priority over the Best-Effort queue.

Chapter 2

For the ATM PVC for data traffic, the configuration of the queue AF 1 (queue 1) is modified as follows: explicit congestion notification for IP packets as well as the filtering of TCP ACK packets are enabled.

=>:ipqos queue config dest=pvc_Internet queue=1 ecnmarking=enabled ackfiltering=enabled

2.3.3 Configuring Interfaces

Ethernet interfaces on the bridge

The configuration of the Ethernet bridge and the Ethernet (LAN and WAN) interfaces includes following steps:

Configuration of the bridge: the use of a filter on the Ethernet WAN interfaces is disabled. As a result, all broadcasts are allowed to the WAN interfaces. An example of these broadcasts are the DHCP requests sent by the DHCP client on the Thomson Gateway.

=>:eth bridge config filter=none

Ethernet WAN interfaces on the bridge: five Ethernet WAN interfaces are created on the bridge. Each interface is connected to the corresponding ATM interface.

=>:eth bridge ifadd intf=br_Internet =>:eth bridge ifconfig intf=br_Internet dest=atm_Internet =>:eth bridge ifattach intf=br_Internet

=>:eth bridge ifadd intf=br_voice =>:eth bridge ifconfig intf=br_voice dest=atm_voice =>:eth bridge ifattach intf=br_voice

=>:eth bridge ifadd intf=br_v_ctl =>:eth bridge ifconfig intf=br_v_ctl dest=atm_v_ctl =>:eth bridge ifattach intf=br_v_ctl

=>:eth bridge ifadd intf=br_v_video =>:eth bridge ifconfig intf=br_v_video dest=atm_v_video =>:eth bridge ifattach intf=br_v_video

=>:eth bridge ifadd intf=br_v_igmp =>:eth bridge ifconfig intf=br_v_igmp dest=atm_v_igmp =>:eth bridge ifattach intf=br_v_igmp

Ethernet LAN interfaces on the bridge: by default, four Ethernet LAN interfaces are created on the bridge, namely ethport1, ethport2, ethport3 and ethport4. Each of these interfaces is connected to a physical interface, ethif1, ethif2, ethif3 and ethif4 respectively.

interface, ethif1, ethif2, ethif3 and ethif4 respectively. The data PC and the video STB are connec

The data PC and the video STB are connected to Ethernet LAN interfaces. It is not important which interfaces are used.

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IP interface

By default, the IP interface LocalNetwork is already created. The IP address 192.168.1.1 is assigned to this interface and the corresponding subnet routes are automatically added to the IP forwarding table. The IP address 192.168.1.1 is the preferred address for that subnet and is also the primary address for this IP interface.

=>:ip ipadd intf=LocalNetwork addr=192.168.1.1/24 addroute=enabled =>:ip ipconfig addr=192.168.1.1 preferred=enabled primary=enabled

PPPoE interface

By default, the bridge is added as an Ethernet interface to the PPP relay list and a MAC address is assigned to this interface.

A new PPP interface is created and connected to the PPP relay. The username and the password for PAP/ CHAP authentication are also specified:

=>:ppp ifadd intf=Internet =>:ppp ifconfig intf=Internet dest=RELAY user=user@inet password=pwdinet

A default route to the PPP interface is created by adding a dynamic entry for data traffic to the IP forwarding table. This dynamic entry is created in the IP forwarding table as soon as the PPPoE session is established:

=>:ppp rtadd intf=Internet dst=0.0.0.0/0 src=0.0.0.0/0 metric=10

Network Address Translation (NAT) is enabled on the PPP interface.

=>:nat ifconfig intf=Internet translation=enabled

Now, the PPP interface can be attached:

=>:ppp ifattach intf=Internet

2.3.4 Configuring LAN IP Addresses

DHCP selection rules

Only the DHCP requests sent by the data PC must be relayed by the DHCP relay towards the local DHCP server. Therefore, it is important to identify the different devices.

To this end, three DHCP selection rules are created, using the Vendor Class Identifier (VCI):

A rule for devices that are not an Integrated Access Device (IAD)

A rule for devices that are not a Set Top Box (STB)

A rule for devices that are a STB

=>:dhcp rule add name=not-myiad type=vci vci=!myiad match=exactly =>:dhcp rule add name=not-mystb type=vci vci=!mystb match=exactly =>:dhcp rule add name=mystb type=vci vci=mystb match=exactly

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DHCP server

The Thomson Gateway acts as a DH CP server for the data PC. To this end, the default DHCP pool LAN_private is used. The DHCP pool only leases IP addresses in response to DHCP requests received on the IP interface LocalNetwork.

The configuration of the DHCP pool is modified as follows: leased IP addresses are situated in the range from 192.168.1.3 through 192.168.1.200, all with a netmask of 24 bits. The IP address of the default gateway for the DHCP client is set to 192.168.1.1.

=>:dhcp server pool config name=LAN_private poolstart=192.168.1.3 poolend=192.168.1.200 netmask=24 gateway=192.168.1.1

The DHCP selection rule not-mystb is added to the DHCP server pool:

=>:dhcp server pool ruleadd name=LAN_private rulename=not-mystb

DHCP relay

By default, the DHCP relay is already enabled for the IP interface LocalNetwork. This means that the DHCP relay handles DHCP requests that are received on this interface.

When the DHCP relay receives a DHCP request, it looks in its DHCP relay forward list for an appropriate entry. Two entries are created:

The default entry LocalNetwork_to_127.0.0.1 is already created. The configuration is modified as follows: prior to forwarding a DHCP request to the DHCP server, the DHCP relay sets the gateway IP address field of the packet to 192.168.1.1, which is the IP address of the interface on which the DHCP request was received.

=>:dhcp relay modify name=LocalNetwork_to_127.0.0.1 addr=127.0.0.1 intf=LocalNetwork

giaddr=192.168.1.1

Similarly, a new entry LocalNetwork_mystb is created.

=>:dhcp relay add name=LocalNetwork_mystb =>:dhcp relay modify name=LocalNetwork_mystb addr=127.0.0.1 intf=LocalNetwork

giaddr=192.168.1.1

Following DHCP selection rules are assigned to the created entries in the DHCP relay forward list. As a result, only DHCP requests of a data PC or a STB are relayed to the DHCP server:

=>:dhcp relay ruleadd name=LocalNetwork_to_127.0.0.1 rulename=not-myiad =>:dhcp relay ruleadd name=LocalNetwork_mystb rulename=mystb

STB detection script

Following script is created. When the script is executed, information about the STB is added to the host manager. As a result, the user can see at the GUI pages that the STB is detected. The name of the script must start with dhcr_ in order to work.

=>:script add name=dhcr_stbdetect index=0 command="hostmgr add mac_addr $1 ip_addr=192.168.1.253 name=mystb type=set_top_box ipintf=LocalNetwork"

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This script must be executed when the entry LocalNetwork_mystb is hit. Therefore, the script is assigned to the entry as follows. Here, the name of the script must be entered without the dhcr_ prefix.

=>:dhcp relay modify name=LocalNetwork_mystb script=stbdetect

DHCP client

In order to access the Voice Network, the Thomson Gateway uses a DHCP client to obtain an IP address from the DHCP server in the Voice Service Router. Following configuration steps are necessary:

DHCP client: the DHCP client is configured to request an IP address for the IP interface LocalNetwork. When the DHCP client receives an IP address, entries are added to the IP forwarding table. Only packets with label voice-only are allowed to use these entries.

=>:dhcp client ifadd intf=LocalNetwork =>:dhcp client ifconfig intf=LocalNetwork label=voice-only =>:dhcp client ifattach intf=LocalNetwork

Options to be requested: the DHCP client requests following DHCP options:

=>:dhcp client rqoptions add intf=LocalNetwork option=dhcp-lease-time =>:dhcp client rqoptions add intf=LocalNetwork option=dhcp-renewal-time =>:dhcp client rqoptions add intf=LocalNetwork option=dhcp-rebinding-time =>:dhcp client rqoptions add intf=LocalNetwork option=subnet-mask =>:dhcp client rqoptions add intf=LocalNetwork option=default-routers =>:dhcp client rqoptions add intf=LocalNetwork option=domain-name-servers

Options to be transmitted: the DHCP client in its turn can also send DHCP options to the DHCP server, indicating desired configuration values. Following option/value pair is added:

vendor-class-id: the DHCP client indicates that it requests an IP address on behalf of a device with VCI = myiad.

=>:dhcp client txoptions add intf=LocalNetwork option=vendor-class-id value=(ascii)myiad

index=0

2.3.5 Configuration of Video Services

Introduction

All video streams (both multicast and unicast) are obtained from the same Video Server.

Multicast video: the Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) is used to support multicast video. The configuration of IGMP on the Thomson Gateway is described in this section.

Unicast video: the Real Time Streaming Protocol (RTSP) is used to support unicast video. The support of unicast video requires no extra configuration of the Thomson Gateway.

IGMP proxy

The Thomson Gateway uses the bridged scenario for the video services. Hence, the IGMP proxy mechanism is not used in this scenario.

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IGMP snooping

The configuration of IGMP snooping on the Thomson Gateway includes the following steps:

The use of IGMP snooping on the Thomson Gateway is enabled by default.

It is recommended to enable both Fast Immediate Leave and Explicit Host Tracking. The use of the combination of these mechanisms is important for high-bandwidth multicast groups and/or subnets with highly volatile group membership.

The port mode of the WAN interfaces related to video is set to Router. This assures all IGMP messages are sent over these interfaces.

=>:eth bridge igmpsnooping ifconfig intf=OBC fastleave=enabled exptrack=enabled =>:eth bridge igmpsnooping ifconfig intf=ethport1 fastleave=enabled exptrack=enabled =>:eth bridge igmpsnooping ifconfig intf=ethport2 fastleave=enabled exptrack=enabled =>:eth bridge igmpsnooping ifconfig intf=ethport3 fastleave=enabled exptrack=enabled =>:eth bridge igmpsnooping ifconfig intf=ethport4 fastleave=enabled exptrack=enabled =>:eth bridge igmpsnooping ifconfig intf=br_Internet fastleave=enabled exptrack=enabled =>:eth bridge igmpsnooping ifconfig intf=br_voice fastleave=enabled exptrack=enabled =>:eth bridge igmpsnooping ifconfig intf=br_v_ctl fastleave=enabled exptrack=enabled portmode=Router =>:eth bridge igmpsnooping ifconfig intf=br_v_video fastleave=enabled exptrack=enabled portmode=Router =>:eth bridge igmpsnooping ifconfig intf=br_v_igmp fastleave=enabled exptrack=enabled portmode=Router

2.3.6 Configuration of Data Services

Introduction

A Point-to-Point Protocol over Ethernet (PPPoE) session is used to access the data services. This PPPoE session is initiated by the PPPoE client in the Thomson Gateway and is terminated in the BRAS. The PPPoE server is located in the BRAS itself. The PPP request is authenticated in the external RADIUS server, by the use of either PAP or CHAP. Once the PPP request is authenticated, the BRAS gives an IP address from its PPPoE pool to the Thomson Gateway.

Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP)

The Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) is a simplified form of the Network Time Protocol (NTP), used to synchronize computer clocks in the Internet. The internal Thomson Gateway real time clock (SNTP client) will be synchronized with the NTP server:

Enable the SNTP service:

=>:service system modify name=SNTP state=enabled

NTP server : an NTP server is added to the NTP server list. To this end, the DNS name of the NTP server is specified, as well as the SNTP version of the NTP server:

=>:sntp add name=ntp.place.com version=3

SNTP client: the SNTP client on the Thomson Gateway is enabled by default.

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Domain Name System (DNS)

The configuration of the Thomson Gateway to use DNS and dynamic DNS is the default configuration.

2.3.7 Configuration of Voice Services

Introduction

In this scenario, the selected Voice over IP (VoIP) signalling protocol is the Media Gateway Control Protocol (MGCP). The MGCP protocol is used between the following two elements:

The Residential Gateway, also called Media Gateway, which is located in the Thomson Gateway.

The Call Agent, also called Media Gateway Controller or Soft Switch. The Call Agent is located in the Voice Network.

The transmission of the voice packets during the call is handled by the Real-time Transport Protocol (RTP) or the Real-time Transport Control Protocol (RTCP).

Voice over IP (VoIP)

In order to support Voice over IP, the following parameters must be configured:

First, the VoIP service must be enabled:

=>:service system modify name=VOIP_MGCP state=enabled

The port range that can be used by the RTP protocol is set from 30000 through 30200.

The IP address that the voice application must use is the address of a statically configured interface. In this scenario, the primary interface is set to the LocalNetwork interface:

=>:voice config rtp_portrange=30000-30200 static_intf=enabled intf=LocalNetwork

Assign to the VoIP packets (both the signalling/call control packets and the RTP/RTCP packets) a Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) with the value Expedited Forwarding (EF). This is the highest priority.

=>:voice qos config type=sign&control qosfield=dscp dscp=ef =>:voice qos config type=realtime qosfield=dscp dscp=ef

The Foreign eXchange Station (FXS) port supports an analogue line end point. The interdigit timer, i.e. the maximum allowable time between the dialling of digits, is set to 4 s.

=>:voice fxsport config interdigit=4000

In order to refer to the end point of a session, an end point identifier is used with format “local-endpoint- name@domain-name”. By default, the local-endpoint-name of the FXS port is aaln/1.

=>:voice profile add endpointname=aaln/1 voiceport=FXS status=enabled

It is also possible to connect a fax to the FXS port instead of an analogue phone. The selected method used for fax transmission is the T.38 method.

Chapter 2

Digital Signal Processor (DSP)

A correct configuration of the used codec and the country is important for the DSP:

Codec: in this scenario, the codec capability of the Thomson Gateway is configured to support codecs G.711 µ-law (North America and Japan) and G.711 A-law (Europe and the rest of the world). Both codecs have the highest priority of usage.

=>:voice codec config type=g711u priority=1 status=enabled =>:voice codec config type=g711a priority=1 status=enabled

Country : the DSP is also responsible for the tone genera tion. To this end, the DSP must be provisioned with the country in which the Thomson Gateway is located.

=>:voice country config country=france1

Media Gateway Control Protocol (MGCP)

The following MGCP parameters are configured:

Call agent: the callagentaddr parameter contains the IP address or FQDN (Fully Qualified Domain Name) of the primary Call Agent. In a similar way, a secondary Call Agent can be configured by the use of the parameter seccallagentaddr. If two Call Agents are configured, failover between Call Agents can be supported.

Failover: the failoverdelay parameter contains the value of the failover-timer. The failover-timer is the timer indicating when the failover must be triggered. The default value is 20 s.

Restart: the maxrsipdelay parameter indicates the maximum wait time, expressed in milliseconds, between the time when an end point comes up and when the corresponding Restart message is sent.

Password: the password parameter can be used for authentication of the Residential Gateway to the Call Agent. A single password is used for the Residential Gateway, thus for all end points. Here, no password is configured.

=>:voice mgcp config callagentaddr=voip.services.isp.be failoverdelay=20 maxrsipdelay=10000 password=\"\"

2.3.8 Remote CPE Management

Introduction

TR-069 (Technical Report 069), which is specified by the DSL-Forum, defines the CPE WAN Management Protocol (CWMP). CWMP is used for remote management of the Thomson Gateway.

CWMP supports communication between the following network elements:

Customer Premises Equipment (CPE), which is the Thomson Gateway in this scenario

Auto Configuration Server(s) (ACS), which is the TR-069 ACS in this scenario

The TR-069 ACS can be accessed over PPP in each of the three network setup options. To this end, the PPPoE session that is set up for the data services is reused. The PPPoE session is initiated by the PPPoE client in the Thomson Gateway and is terminated in the BRAS.

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Chapter 2

Enabling CWMP

In order to allow remote management of the Thomson Gateway by the TR-069 ACS, the use of CWMP on the Thomson Gateway is enabled.

=>:cwmp config state=enabled

HTTP session set up

The Thomson Gateway must be configured with the HTTP URL of the TR-069 ACS. This URL contains a host name instead of an IP address. Hence, DNS is used to resolve the IP address of the TR-069 ACS. The username and password are also configured to enable authentication of the Thomson Gateway by the TR-069 ACS:

=>:cwmp server config url=http://acs-server.com username=user password=pwd

Connection set up

The initiative to establish a connection can be taken by the CPE or the ACS. To enable ACS connection initiation, the path to reach the Thomson Gateway can be specified, as well as the username and the password the TR-069 ACS must use to log in:

=>:cwmp config connectionRequest=enabled connectionReqPath="" connectionReqUserName="" connectionReqPsswd="" connectionReqAuth=none

2.3.9 Save the Configuration

Save the configuration

To make your changes permanent, save the configuration as follows:

=>:saveall

18

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Chapter 2

2.4

Expected Results

2.4.1

Triple-Play Network Setup with Multiple PVCs and ATM DSLAM

Overview

An overview of the network setup “Triple-play network setup with multiple PVCs and ATM DSLAM”
An overview of the network setup “Triple-play network setup with multiple PVCs and ATM DSLAM” is shown
in following illustration:
Multiple
MAC Address
PVCs
Classification
Video Service
8/35
Router
pvc_Internet
0/65 pvc_voice
Data Service
Access Network
Router
0/50 pvc_v_ctl
Voice Service
ATM
0/49 pvc_v_igmp
Router
DSLAM
0/48 pvc_v_video
Thomson
BRAS
Gateway
ATM
& Router

ATM layer

In this network setup with multiple PVCs (ATM circuits), the PVCs are used as follows:

PVC 8/35 for data (PPP signalisation and traffic)

PVC 0/65 for VoIP (DHCP signalisation and traffic)

PVC 0/50 for video (DHCP/IGMP signalisation bidirectional unicast traffic and STB management)

PVC 0/49 for video (IGMP signalisation)

PVC 0/48 for video (Multicast traffic)

These ATM circuits are transported over the ATM DSLAM before these ATM circuits are terminated in the BRAS:

The PVC 8/35 for data is terminated in the Data Service Router.

The PVC 0/65 for VoIP is terminated in the Voice Service Router.

The PVCs 0/48, 0/49 and 0/50 for video are all terminated in the Video Service Router.

MAC addresses

The BRAS uses MAC Address Classification to classify the different streams. Next, the BRAS routes the different streams over different service VLANs in the backbone network.

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Chapter 2

Following MAC addresses are used:

Data streams use the default MAC address of the Thomson Gateway, that is the MAC address of the used PPP relay interface.

Voice streams use a local USB MAC address, that is the MAC address of the DHCP client in the Thomson Gateway.

Video streams use the MAC address of the STB itself.

Thomson Gateway

Following illustration explains how the data, voice and video streams are handled by the Thomson Gateway:

DHCP Server LAN_private DHCP Relay DHCP Client IP Router IP LocalNetwork PPP Internet VoIP ETH
DHCP Server
LAN_private
DHCP Relay
DHCP Client
IP Router
IP LocalNetwork
PPP Internet
VoIP
ETH
PPP
Relay
Module
OBC
ETH Bridge
Data
Voice
Video
1234
ethport
FXS
1234
ethif
ATM
ATM
ATM
ATM
ATM
atm_Internet
atm_voice
atm_v_video
atm_v_igmp
atm_v_ctl
PVC
PVC
PVC
PVC
PVC
pvc_Internet
pvc_voice
pvc_v_video
pvc_v_igmp
pvc_v_ctl
Voice
Data
Video
Analogue
PC
STB
br_Internet
br_voice
br_v_video
br_v_igmp
br_v_ctl

20

Phone T
Phone
T

The bridge itself makes no classification of the different streams. All streams are forwarded to all ATM PVCs.

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Chapter 2

2.4.2 Dual-Play Network Setup with Single PVC and ATM DSLAM

Overview

An overview of the network setup “Dual-play network setup with single PVC and ATM DSLAM” is shown in following illustration:

Single PVC IP Routing 8/35 pvc_Internet Access Network ATM DSLAM Thomson BRAS Gateway & Router
Single PVC
IP Routing
8/35
pvc_Internet
Access Network
ATM
DSLAM
Thomson
BRAS
Gateway
& Router
ATM

ATM layer

This network setup option enables the Thomson Gateway to use dual services over one PVC. Only the PVC 8 / 35 is active. This PVC is used to support the following services:

Data (PPP signalisation and traffic)

VoIP (Voice signalisation and traffic)

The ATM circuit is transported over the ATM DSLAM before this ATM circuit is terminated in the BRAS.

DHCP client

The DHCP client in the Thomson Gateway is not used and can be disabled by following command:

=>:dhcp client ifdetach intf=LocalNetwork

IP addresses

The BRAS forwards the streams based on their destination IP address. For example, MGCP traffic uses the IP address of the Call Agent as destination IP address.

IP addresses are assigned to the different end-user devices as follows:

The analogue phone itself has no IP address.

The data PC receives an IP address from the DHCP pool of the local DHCP server in the Thomson Gateway.

The voice traffic and the data traffic are sent over a single PPPoE session. The PPPoE client in the Thomson Gateway obtains an IP address from the PPPoE server in the BRAS.

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Chapter 2

Thomson Gateway

The following illustration explains how the data, voice and video streams are handled by the Thomson Gateway:

DHCP Server LAN_private DHCP Relay DHCP Client IP Router IP LocalNetwork PPP Internet VoIP ETH
DHCP Server
LAN_private
DHCP Relay
DHCP Client
IP Router
IP LocalNetwork
PPP Internet
VoIP
ETH
PPP
Relay
Module
OBC
ETH Bridge
Data
Voice
1234
ethport
FXS
1234
ethif
ATM
ATM
ATM
ATM
ATM
atm_Internet
atm_voice
atm_v_video
atm_v_igmp
atm_v_ctl
PVC
PVC
PVC
PVC
PVC
pvc_Internet
pvc_voice
pvc_v_video
pvc_v_igmp
pvc_v_ctl
Voice
Data
Analogue
PC
br_Internet
br_voice
br_v_video
br_v_igmp
br_v_ctl

22

Phone
Phone

The parts of the configuration that are not used are indicated in grey.

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Chapter 2

2.4.3 Triple-Play Network Setup with Single PVC and IP DSLAM

Overview

An overview of the network setup “Triple-play network setup with single PVC and IP DSLAM”
An overview of the network setup “Triple-play network setup with single PVC and IP DSLAM” is depicted in
the following illustration:
MAC Address
VLAN
Classification
Classification
Video Service
Data VLAN 11
Voice VLAN 12
Video VLAN 13
Router
8/35
Data Service
pvc_Internet
Access Network
Router
Voice Service
IP
Router
DSLAM
Thomson
BRAS
Gateway
& Router
ATM
Fast Ethernet / Gigabit Ethernet

ATM layer

In this network setup, all traffic is sent over a single PVC. This PVC is terminated in the IP DSLAM.

The PVC is used to support the following services:

Data (PPP signalisation and traffic)

VoIP (DHCP signalisation and traffic)

Video (DHCP/IGMP signalisation, bidirectional unicast traffic and STB management)

Video (IGMP signalisation)

Video (Multicast traffic)

MAC addresses

The IP DSLAM uses MAC Address Classification to classify the different streams. Next, the IP DSLAM maps each stream to the correct VLAN. The VLANs are terminated in the BRAS, which uses VLAN Classification instead of MAC Address Classification.

Following MAC addresses are used:

Data streams use the default MAC address of the Thomson Gateway, that is the MAC address of the used PPP relay interface.

Voice streams use a local USB MAC address, that is the MAC address of the DHCP client in the Thomson Gateway.

Video streams use the MAC address of the STB itself.

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Chapter 2

Thomson Gateway

From the point of view of the Thomson Gateway, the only difference between this option “Triple-play network setup with single PVC and IP DSLAM” and the option “Triple-play network setup with multiple PVCs and ATM DSLAM” is the number of active PVCs.

Following illustration explains how the data, voice and video streams are handled by the Thomson Gateway:

DHCP Server LAN_private DHCP Relay DHCP Client IP Router IP LocalNetwork PPP Internet VoIP ETH
DHCP Server
LAN_private
DHCP Relay
DHCP Client
IP Router
IP LocalNetwork
PPP Internet
VoIP
ETH
PPP
Relay
Module
OBC
ETH Bridge
Data
Voice
Video
1234
ethport
FXS
1234
ethif
ATM
ATM
ATM
ATM
ATM
atm_Internet
atm_voice
atm_v_video
atm_v_igmp
atm_v_ctl
PVC
PVC
PVC
PVC
PVC
pvc_Internet
pvc_voice
pvc_v_video
pvc_v_igmp
pvc_v_ctl
Voice
Data
Video
Analogue
PC
STB
br_Internet
br_voice
br_v_video
br_v_igmp
br_v_ctl

24

Phone
Phone

The parts of the configuration that are not used are indicated in grey.

E-DOC-CTC-20080411-0004 v1.0

Visit us at:

Coordinates:

Thomson Telecom

Prins Boudewijnlaan 47 B-2650 Edegem Belgium

Copyright

Prins Boudewijnlaan 47 B-2650 Edegem Belgium Copyright ©2008 Thomson. All rights reserved. The content of this

©2008 Thomson. All rights reserved. The content of this document is furnished for informational use only, may be subject to change without notice, and should not be construed as a commitment by Thomson. Thomson assumes no responsibility or liability for any errors or inaccuracies that may appear in this document. The information contained in this document represents the current view of Thomson on the issues discussed as of the date of publication. Because Thomson must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Thomson, and Thomson cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information presented after the date of publication. This document is for informational purposes only. Thomson MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT. The names of actual companies and products mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners.