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8 15 December 2011
Vol 17 Issue 49
Leaving It All Behind
The Mazza family stops in Sree
Poornathrayeesa for a little rest and
recreation, India style, p. 34
The BEST of Montecito
Luckys Jennifer Brooks and FedExs Cynthia
Hiatt complete the REST of the BEST of
Montecito, p. 29
The Way It Was
Rancho Alegres transition from
homestead to weekend retreat to
wilderness camp, p. 26

COMMUNITY CALENDAR, P. 10 CALENDAR OF EVENTS, P. 40 GUIDE TO MONTECITO EATERIES, P. 42
The Voice of the Village SSINCE 1995S
Montecito filmmaker Gina
Abatemarcos documen-
tary on disappearing Arctic
island of Kivalina nears
completion, p. 6
MInEArdS
MIScELLAny
Real Estate View &
93108 OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY P.45
The Bakery is Back
Nearly 18 months after being destroyed by fire, owner Sepi Mashhoon vows to
reopen Xanadu by Christmas (story begins on page 12)
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 2 The Voice of the Village
'Villa La Quinta' ~ One of Montecito's 7 Crown Jewels
Newly Offered at $19,500,000
'Villa La Quinta' ~ One of Montecito's 7 Crown Jewels
Newly Offered at $19,500,000
Italian Country Home in Cima del Mundo
French Country Home with Golf Course Views
Offered at $5,950,000
French Country Home with Golf Course Views
Offered at $5,950,000
G.W. Smith French Normandy with Ocean Views
Offered at $3,850,000
G.W. Smith French Normandy with Ocean Views
Offered at $3,850,000
'Vista del Mundo' in Hope Ranch
Offered at $6,800,000
'Vista del Mundo' in Hope Ranch
Offered at $6,800,000
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Offered at $14,950,000
Panoramic Ocean & Island Views from Channel Drive
Channel Drive Contemporary
Offered at $19,950,000
Channel Drive Contemporary
Offered at $19,950,000
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 3
Call: (805) 565-4896
Email: danencell@aol.com
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8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 4 The Voice of the Village
Montecitos Oldest Fine Jewelry Establishment
1213 Coast Village Road, Montecito 805-969-6362 www.ahgaspar.com
ANNIE FENSTERSTOCK
todd reed
5 Editorial
Bob Hazard relates a tale of entrepreneurial woe and warns that price of over-regulation is dear
6 Montecito Miscellany
Montecito flmmaker Gina Abatemarco seeks funding to fnish documentary; students prosper
at Oprahs Leadership Academy For Girls; Tomas Schef celebrates completion of 14
th
book;
Daniel Craigs Kardashian rant; Santa Barbara Magazines fete at Villa Sevillano; S.B. Historical
Museum annual holiday bash; Westmonts Christmas Festival; Hlne Grimaud opens CAMAs
Masterseries; Womens Chorus and Chamber Choir of UCSB performs North; sold out Tallis
Scholars concert; Tribal Trust Foundation fundraiser
8 Letters to the Editor
John Macker boasts about daughter, original turkey feather getter; Tomas Van Steins blast
from the past; Dana Newquist presents Don and Helen Hathaway Memorial Tree; Matt
McLaughlin admires the late, great Judy Lewis; Penelope Bianchi applauds those involved with
new path on San Ysidro Road; Frank McGinity recalls recent trip to Athens
10 Community Calendar
MERRAG annual meeting; Coast Village Road block party; wine tasting at the Grotto; SB
Maritime Museum cocktail course; winter concerts; holiday tours of Casa del Herrero; Piglet
Willy world premiere; ASAP presents Kittypalooza; MBAR and MA meet; Tim Donnelly
speaks; David Krieger signs book; ongoing events
Tide Guide
Handy guide to assist readers in determining when to take that walk or run on the beach
12 Village Beat
Xanadu sets hopeful reopen date at December 20; Whodidily closes doors; trailer fre causes
Westmont evacuation; Montecito Aesthetic Institute combines spa with medical practice;
MUS students make Deans List
14 Seen Around Town
Betty Rosness receives Successful Aging Hero Award; BigSpeak bash celebrates new corporate
headquarters; annual Braille Auxiliary luncheon
20 Montecito Sportsman
Steelhead trout recovery sparks controversy between legal environmental advocates and local
angling community
21 Seniority
Ms Teel looks for life stories from seniors for segment on new weekly show on Channel 17
23 Sheriffs Blotter
TVs stolen from vacation rental; man possesses marijuana; grafti on Butterfy Beach sea wall
26 The Way It Was
Conclusion to Ms Beresfords two-part history on Rancho Alegre
29 BEST of Montecito
Te REST of the BEST of Montecito, and suggestions for next years survey
32 On Entertainment
Boston Symphony Orchestra returns after 58 years; SB Music & Arts Conservatory concerts; Silver
Follies dazzle at Center Stage; Trinity Backstage holiday beneft show; Song Tree Concert Series
34 Leaving it All Behind
Te Mazzas make unforgettable memories in India, taking part in an elephant-worshipping
festival
37 Your Westmont
Large crowds fock to the colleges new art exhibition; top student entrepreneurs show of
business plans
39 n.o.t.e.s. from downtown
Jim has a confession to make, and it aint pretty
40 Calendar of Events
Ongoing seasonal events; Dave Stringer at the library; Montecito School of Ballets annual
production; Santa Barbara Festival Ballet presents Te Nutcracker; David Burnhams one-night-
only performance; various holiday events around town; SB Chamber Orchestras upcoming
concert; screenwriter and flmmaker holiday mixer at Casa Blanca
42 Guide to Montecito Eateries
Te most complete, up-to-date, comprehensive listing of all individually owned Montecito
restaurants, cofee houses, bakeries, gelaterias, and hangouts; some in Santa Barbara,
Summerland, and Carpinteria too
43 Movie Showtimes
Latest flms, times, theaters, and addresses: theyre all here, as they are every week
45 Real Estate View
A look at the thirteen homes sold in Montecito in November
93108 Open House Directory
Homes and condos currently for sale and open for inspection in and near Montecito
46 Classifed Advertising
Our very own Craigslist of classifed ads, in which sellers ofer everything from summer
rentals to estate sales
47 Local Business Directory
Smart business owners place business cards here so readers know where to look when they need
what those businesses ofer
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
p.8 p.10 p.40
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 5 It will, I believe, be everywhere found, that as the clergy are, or are not, what they ought to be, so are the rest of the nation Jane Austen
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How the Rich Become the Poor
O
ver the Thanksgiving holiday, a longtime friend and former business
colleague visited us in Montecito. After retiring from a senior position
in a large global hotel company, my friend bought a small Colorado ski
mountain west of Denver near Idaho Springs and has spent the last six years
developing it into an affordable alternative snowboarding resort for kids and
families.
To minimize upfront costs, he purchased a used triple chairlift from Vail
Resorts, a used handle tow from Snowmass and a Magic Carpet surface lift
from Steamboat. He hired Planet Snow Design, the company that built the
snowboard super-pipe for the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, to design
an edgy snowboard proving ground for the young and indestructible, with a
wide variety of jumps, rails, boxes, pipes and stairs for melon grabs and switch
nose-slides. He added lights for night skiing and rock music, opened a ski
school, built a lodge, created an Internet caf and offered free parking and free
Wi-Fi access.
After six years, the resort employs nearly 100 workers as ski instructors, lift
operators, snow cat operators, ski patrol, food servers, gift shop employees and
equipment rental salespeople, but the first hint of trouble came when he decid-
ed to invest in snowmaking machines. The Environmental Protection Agency
(EPA) told him he could not use his own water to make snow because that water
was destined to be carried by the Colorado River to California. After spend-
ing half a million dollars in legal bills and environmental studies that delayed
opening for over a year, he finally convinced the bureaucrats that artificial snow
melts during the summer, and that his water will make it to the Colorado River
at a time when it is most needed by Californians, albeit after the Colorado kids
enjoy a season of snowboarding.
My friends next tiff came when a government inspector estimated that each
skier and snowboarder would produce 24 gallons of wastewater each day,
despite testimony from the Colorado Ski Association that similar resorts used
only 3 to 4 gallons per person, per day. Comparable resorts provide overnight
room stays, while my friends resort does not. Unconvinced, the bureaucrat
mandated no beer sales, no cafeteria sales and that the number of daily visi-
tors on the mountain be restricted. Three years after opening, daily compliance
reports showed that the generation of wastewater never exceeded one gallon
per person per day. After a three-year fight, a beer license was granted and food
could be served.
Making Room For Miniature Horses
Next came the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) inspectors who man-
dated all ski lifts be modified to accommodate seeing eye dogs for blind skiers
and snowboarders. When reminded that skiing with a seeing eye dog is illegal
in Colorado, ADA inspectors took the position that some blind soul might want
to take his service dog to the top of the mountain and walk down, so the lifts
were modified and operators trained to assist the dogs onto the lifts.
This year, a Department of Labor official expanded the list of service ani-
mals to include miniature horses (I promise I am not making this up). With
the stroke of a pen, miniature horses had to be accommodated. The ADA
inspector recommended installing a gondola large enough to accommodate
a miniature horse. Lift attendants noted that hoisting miniature horses onto
the lift would be in direct defiance of OSHA (Occupational Health & Safety
Administration) rules and would result in back injuries, and increased worker
comp costs.
The final nail in my friends coffin came with the passage of ObamaCare.
Ninety percent of employees are under the age of 30, and only six of the 100
employees have enrolled in the company healthcare plan, despite the fact that
the company pays 70% of the cost. With almost 100 seasonal and part-time
employees, the resort must now provide mandatory health insurance to all
employees, or pay a $3,000 per-person fine, at an added cost of $300,000 per
year.
The operation has never turned a profit, nor paid a return on my friends
multi-million dollar investment. A $300,000 unbudgeted expense against a mil-
lion dollars of gross revenue constitutes a formula for financial disaster.
The takeaway lesson from this tale of woe is that anyone who tries to open a
small business has to plan for a plethora of unnecessary rules, often written by
people with absolutely no business experience. The tendency by local, state and
federal government to correct every wrong in life by passing a law comes at a
price that in the end, no private employer will be able to afford. MJ
Editorial by Bob Hazard
Mr. Hazard is an Associate Editor of this paper and a former president of
Birnam Wood Golf Club
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 6 The Voice of the Village
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What is Your Dream Smile?
For some, its the Hollywood-style perfection that graces the covers of magazines. For others, its a more natural smile that reflects confidence from
having whiter, brighter and straighter teeth. Whatever your interpretation of your dream smile is, Dr Weiser can help. An LVI trained preferred dentist
and a member of the Extreme Makeover: Extreme Team, Dr Weiser designs beautiful smiles every day!
Your cosmetic options include:
Customized porcelain veneers made by world famous lab technicians
Zoom in office teeth whitening
Invisalign, the clear braces
Safe removal of mercury fillings
Laser dentistry for optimizing gum health
Mark T. Weiser D.D.S.
805. 899. 3600 1511 State Street www. boutique- dental. com
Aesthetic & Family Dentistry
I find myself smiling
more than I ever have
and I am so grateful!
Thank you Dr. Weiser.
Cara
If looking for a good cosmetic
dentist in Santa Barbara
almost everyone I know says to
go to Dr Mark Weiser. I am so
grateful for what he has done for
me and his sta are like family.
The added comfort and care
provided are just a bonus!
Changing Lives....One Smile at a time
Sue Maloney
805.899.3600 1511 State Street www.santabarbaradds.com
What is Your Dream Smile?
For some, its the Hollywood-style perfection that graces the covers of magazines. For others, its a more natural smile that reflects confidence from
having whiter, brighter and straighter teeth. Whatever your interpretation of your dream smile is, Dr Weiser can help. An LVI trained preferred dentist
and a member of the Extreme Makeover: Extreme Team, Dr Weiser designs beautiful smiles every day!
Your cosmetic options include:
Customized porcelain veneers made by world famous lab technicians
Zoom in office teeth whitening
Invisalign, the clear braces
Safe removal of mercury fillings
Laser dentistry for optimizing gum health
Mark T. Weiser D.D.S.
805. 899. 3600 1511 State Street www. boutique- dental. com
Aesthetic & Family Dentistry
I find myself smiling
more than I ever have
and I am so grateful!
Thank you Dr. Weiser.
Cara
If looking for a good cosmetic
dentist in Santa Barbara
almost everyone I know says to
go to Dr Mark Weiser. I am so
grateful for what he has done for
me and his sta are like family.
The added comfort and care
provided are just a bonus!
Changing Lives....One Smile at a time
Sue Maloney
805.899.3600 1511 State Street www.santabarbaradds.com
Monteci to nati ve and Real Estate Professi onal ,
Shandra Campbel l bri ngs smi l es to the faces of
her cl i ents as she gui des them on thei r j ourney
of becomi ng new homeowners. Shandras market
experti se echos Vi l l age Properti es Mi ssi on
Statement: Experi ence the Di fference because our
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for over 20 years and we woul dnt thi nk of seei ng
anyone el se. Hi s knowl edge, tal ent, and gentl e
manner are reassuri ng and no matter what the
procedure we know we can j ust si t back and rel ax.
Shandra Campbell
Its not to late to perk up your Holiday Smile !
Call my office and let me know what you need !
Journey to the North
Monte ito
Miscellany
by Richard Mineards
Richard covered the Royal Family for Britains Daily Mirror and Daily Mail before moving to New York
to write for Rupert Murdochs newly launched Star magazine in 1978; Richard later wrote for New York
magazines Intelligencer. He continues to make regular appearances on CBS, ABC, and CNN, and
moved to Montecito four years ago.
M
ontecito flmmaker Gina
Abatemarco, the daughter
of local realtor Frank
Abatemarco and his wife, Toni, is on
a mission.
For the past four years Gina, 29, has
been shooting on a tiny island in the
Alaskan Arctic that is slowly disap-
pearing due to climate change.
The result is a cinematic portrait of
todays modern Arctic and one of our
last Eskimo cultures, who are holding
on the best they can, she says. I just
finished shooting this summer and
need to find funding to complete the
project.
Gina, who graduated from the film
and television program at New York
Universitys Tisch School of the Arts
and worked as a personal assistant
to top director, Brian De Palma, is a
global traveler, having lived in Paris,
Berlin and even Sofia, Bulgaria.
My interest had never been the
environment. I was more of a roman-
tic. But the many reports on climate
change had a profound effect on me.
I thought it was devastating. Being
born in the eighties, we take natural
resources the air, forests and oceans
for granted.
Al Gores 2006 movie, An
Inconvenient Truth, had an impact and
a random news show in Los Angeles
on climate change really scared me. I
was quite depressed.
It was then she read an article in the
L.A. Times about Kivalina, an eight
mile long barrier island on the north-
west coast of Alaska, 120 miles above
the Arctic Circle in the Chukchi Sea,
where the 420 native Inupiaq worry
about their survival.
The island is disappearing, says
Gina, who has made five visits to
the remote location, a two and a half
day trek from New York via Seattle,
Anchorage and Kotzebue, the final leg
being on a six-seater seaplane. They
are losing their land, and as they lose
their land, theyre losing their identity.
It is very impoverished, with no
running water. It is becoming increas-
ingly overpopulated. But, having said
that, it is one of the most beautiful
islands Ive been to with an abun-
dance of whales, seals and walruses.
But, since 1953, its acreage has been
cut in half, and some scientists believe
it will be totally underwater within
ten years because of climate change
and severe coastal erosion.
This is the story of the first climate-
change refugees in America. These are
hunters, fishermen that dont know
how to survive in a city. You cant
just put them in a housing project in
Anchorage.
Now, after nearly half a decade of
shooting her first trip was financed
by a grant from the Berlin Film Festival
and subsequent visits by a Tisch
School alumni grant and the Tribeca
Film Institute , Gina has amassed 300
hours of footage and admits that edit-
ing the documentary, Kivalina People,
will be quite a nightmare.
It is truly an independent film,
adds Gina. It should have cost
around $200,000 if properly financed,
but it was shot for $50,000, a truly
micro budget. But I need to go back
one more time. It is three quarters
done.
Those wishing to support the docu-
mentary can contact Gina by e-mail at
gabatemarco@gmail.com. More infor-
mation about the project can be found
at thekivalinaproject.com.
Documentary maker Gina Abatemarcos Arctic
quest
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 7
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Prosperous Pupils
Beset with disappointing ratings
for her year-old OWN cable TV net-
work and plummeting ad revenue for
her eponymous Hearst glossy, O, the
Oprah magazine, TV talk show titan
Oprah Winfrey finally has some good
news to celebrate.
Four years after opening her $40 mil-
lion Leadership Academy For Girls in
Henley-on-Klip, near Johannesburg,
all 72 members of the schools first
graduating class have been accepted
to universities in South Africa and the
U.S., with more than a dozen receiv-
ing full scholarships.
Oprah, Im told, will be at the
sprawling campus next month for the
graduation ceremonies.
As the Montecito-based star says:
When you teach a girl, you teach a
nation....
Its Got Lots to do With It
Santa Barbara author Thomas
Scheff is one prolific writer.
Thomas, 82, a sociology professor
emeritus at UCSB, has just completed
his 14th book.
Its my second book aimed at a
popular audience and took me the
longest time to write, he says of
Whats Love Got to Do with It? The
Emotional World of Pop Songs.
It seeks to increase our understand-
ing of pop songs and their effects on
those who listen to them. In years of
teaching college students, I couldnt
help but notice that for many of them,
the songs held a special meaning, as
they did to me when I was their age.
Thomas, who held a bijou book
launch bash at Tecolote, the bustling
bibliophile bastion in the Upper
Village, adds: My idea was that col-
lecting and discussing pop song lyrics
with a student might be a way not
only of understanding the lyrics, but
Oprah finally has something to celebrate
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 8 The Voice of the Village
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Hattie Beresford Humor Jim Alexander, Ernie Witham, Grace Rachow Photography/Our Town Joanne
A. Calitri Society Lynda Millner Travel Jerry Dunn Sportsman Dr. John Burk Trail Talk Lynn P. Kirst
Medical Advice Dr. Gary Bradley, Dr. Anthony Allina Legal Advice Robert Ornstein
Published by Montecito Journal Inc., James Buckley, President
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Aubrey Was Number One
I
read the article regarding the
Cold Spring School Turkey Trot
winner (Our Town MJ # 17/48).
Congrats to Annabelle Tiller. Third
time in history. However, as the proud
father of the frst turkey feather
getter in Cold Spring School history,
Aubrey Macker (you can verify it on
the wall of the school offce), I would
like to toot her horn. She was the frst
in the long history of this event to get
the very frst feather.
Sorry for the toot, but dads have
to be dads. Its in our DNA when it
comes to our girls. Thanks.
The Proud Dad
John Macker
Montecito
Laguna Blanca
Secret Garden
I was pleased to read that the
Laguna Blanca Lower School received
a beautification award for its Secret
Garden (Montecito Beautification
Day 2011 MJ # 17/44). The dedication
was a lovely event and I was honored
to participate. My twin brother, Hugh
Carpenter, and I contributed a sundial
to honor our parents, Warwick and
Peggy Carpenter, who owned and ran
The Howard School for 27 years on the
site that is now Laguna Blanca Lower
School. We combined our fathers
background in math and our mothers
love of gardening in selecting the
memorial for the garden. I wanted
to emphasize that our parents were
not merely teachers at the school, but
owned it. (Although our father taught
math and English, and our mother
taught kindergarten and fourth grade
math, most of their efforts went into
managing the school.) The Howard
School was a school of about 85 day
students with a boarding capacity
of 12, and our parents were totally
dedicated to it and the students and
staff. Hugh and I considered ourselves
permanent boarders, and the school
was our home.
Thanks for making this correction.
Barbara (Carpenter) McDonald
Santa Barbara
I See Changes
My brother, Jeff Stein, bought this
post card the other day; he says it
depicts the Old Miramar depot. My,
how things have changed...
Thomas Van Stein
Santa Barbara
Lauding
The Land Trust
The Land Trust is one of the most
important charities I know of. What
could be more important than pre-
serving clean air, water, and natural
resources? Please donate to the Land
Trust.
I especially would like to see people
help to purchase land in Gaviota for
preservation and improving tourism.
As a volunteer for one of their prop-
erties, Arroyo Hondo, there are many
field trips to teach children about ecol-
ogy and examine threatened resources
firsthand. On one such outing we
found a Native American bead buried
in the soil and we discussed ancient
people. Identifying and counting
stream insects tells us how healthy the
water is; it is always above average
due to conservation which can only
help the trout come back from near
extinction.
There are many docent-led hikes
for people to enjoy where one may
learn about watersheds, food chains,
Chumash and California ranchero his-
tory, geology, plants and animals, or a
simple hike through unspoiled nature
can be enjoyed.
Please help the Land Trust preserve
the land and beauty of Santa Barbara
County! Send a tax-deductible dona-
tion or contact them and ask for a
copy of the Land Trusts planned giv-
ing brochure at: www.sblandtrust.org
805-966-4520 info@sblandtrust.org
Pam Rochell
Santa Barbara
Simply sicening
You use (sic) to undermine a let-
ter writer when he doesnt capi-
talize Republican (Romneys
Consistently Inconsistent Letters to
the Editor MJ # 17/48), yet you free-
ly use the epithet Democrat Party
in your editors notes? Thats some
quality (sic), unbiased (sic) journalism
(sic), if I ever saw it!
Craig Boehr
Montecito
(Editors note: Thanks for noticing; our
attitude is if Mr. Martins plan is to spin
everything pro-Obama from now until
election day 2012, the least he could do
would be to send us grammatically correct
emails TLB)
Christmas Tree
Almost Up
First, I want to thank everyone for
the advancement of this very impor-
tant tradition with your time, spirit
and money.
Formally, this was submitted to
County Parks as the Don and Helen
Hathaway Memorial Tree. We still
have one hurdle to cross, a meeting of
Parks on the 8th to approve the dona-
tion and planting.
Here is a picture of the tree that was
Warwick and Peggy Carpenter owned and ran
The Howard School (where Laguna Blanca Lower
School is now located) for 27 years
This young fir
tree has been
dedicated as
the Don and
Helen Hathaway
Memorial Tree,
and is about to
be planted at the
corner of North
Jameson and San
Ysidro Road
The flower
bedecked
Miramar train
depot circa
1900
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 9 Civilization is unbearable, but it is less unbearable at the top Dr. Timothy Leary
Come for Tea...Stay for the Shopping.
Tea and Trunk Show
Thursday, December 15th, 2pm 6pm
Bacara Lobby
Tea flights from across the globe,
paired with indulgent food tastings.
Informal fashion show & trunk show featuring jewelry designer Janet Heller.
Shop Bacaras 30 70% off one-day-only sale on designer brands
from the Luxury Boutique and Spa Boutique.
$35 per person
For reservations call 805-968-0100 or email RSVP@bacararesort.com
Tea tastings offered daily through the holidays, December 15-29.
Specializing in Fine Homes
Santa Barbara Design and Build is a company with integrity.
The estimate was fair, the work was exceptional, and the
remodel was done sooner than expected. We were extremely
pleased with the work and would recommend Santa Barbara
Design and Build to anyone
Montecito Resident
Don Gragg
805.453.0518
WWW.SANTABARBARADESIGNANDBUILD.COM
FREE CONSULTATION
Ca Lic # 887955
Concept to
Completion

Professionally
Drafted Home Plans

Board of
Architectural
Reviews
All Phases of
Construction
Entitlement

Custom quality
Construction
placed in the parking lot of Manning
Park this morning.
Once County Parks has approved,
the tree will be planted and the
inscribed rock will be placed beneath.
Best to all and Happy Holidays.
Dana Newquist
Montecito
(Editors note: And a Merry Christmas
to you, too! J.B.)
The Late,
Great Judy Lewis
I was sorry to read that Ms Judy
Lewis, the daughter of illegiti-
mate parents Clark Gable and Loretta
Young passed away November 25 in
Pennsylvania at age 76. In the mid-
1990s I was able to meet Lewis. I
was walking past the Miramar Hotel
and noticed the banquet rooms doors
were propped open. I spontaneously
entered. I took my chances with the
sponge cake and found a seat to hear
Ms Lewis tell her life story.
Lewis was a blonde woman and
happy indeed. I understand now that
her book she was promoting that
day, Uncommon Knowledge, was an
attempt to capture the natural pride
with which all humans are naturally
endowed. This pride, and a mere fun-
damental self-identity was denied
Lewis though, due to her mothers
disclaimer to Lewiss origin and
father Clark Gables cruel and abso-
lute absenteeism. Lewis announcing
to the world her discovered identity
seemed pivotal in her own healing
that day as I listened. Lewis glowed as
she told her story about who she was.
To read her book and understand her
complex dilemma would inspire most
people to count their lucky stars, for
the difficulty in understanding her
own parentage and the circumstances
of her conception was an intense bat-
tle for Lewis.
It would have been for anyone.
You see, Loretta Young, Judys
mother, was a budding actress when
she had an affair with actor Clark
Gable. Extreme lengths were taken
to keep Lewiss beginnings a secret.
From Lewiss birth in 1935 through
the first 19 months of her life, she
lived in orphanages so that Young
could continue her career. An affair
in those days could cause a starlet to
be considered cheap by her ador-
ing fans and a movie contract could
be rescinded.
A few months before her second
birthday, Judy returned to live with
her mother who for years said Lewis
had been adopted. Lewis began to
question her background at age 31,
five years after her fathers death.
Her fianc exclaimed, Its common
LETTERS Page 184
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 10 The Voice of the Village
in singing familiar seasonal carols. The
100-voice combined choirs are made up
of students ranging from 3
rd
grade through
high school. Please note that while the
concerts are free, online reservations are
recommended.
When: Friday, December 9 at 7 pm, and
Saturday, December 10 at 3 pm. Doors
open 20 minutes prior to the services.
Where: Trinity Episcopal Church,
1500 State Street
Info and reservations:
www.providencehallsb.org/lessons
SATURDAY DECEMBER 10
Piglet Willys World Premiere
Meet Miss Wilhelmina Whitewitch
at the Biltmore for the world premiere of
her childrens book, Piglet Willy, and a
beneft for the Montecito Union School PTA
and The Boys and Girls Club of America.
Richard Mineards is the voice behind
the recorded version of the book for the
Braille Institute, Los Angeles. The event
features a Queens Gourmet High Tea
(created by Alessandro Cartumini,
Executive Chef of the Biltmore), celebrity
guest readings of the book, croquet
games, exhibition of the original artwork,
and sculptures and hand-sewn toys created
by the author.
When: 12 pm to 3 pm
Where: The Biltmore,
1260 Channel Drive
Cost: $42 per person
Info and tickets: 708-3777
Kittypalooza
Animal Shelter Assistance Program
(ASAP) presents Kittypalooza, a
weekend celebration promoting cat and
kitten adoptions and raising awareness
and funds for homeless felines. The
festivities include an Adoption Fair
on Saturday, December 10 (save
50% on all adoption fees at the fair)
and an all-ages Rockin for the Kitties
Concert Benefit at The Creekside on
Sunday, December 11, with live music,
a horseshoe tournament, and raffle
drawings every thirty minutes.
Winter Concert
Students from Laguna Blanca Lower School
sing holiday favorites
When: 6:30 pm
Where: Spaulding Auditorium, Hope
Ranch campus, 4125 Paloma Drive
FRIDAY DECEMBER 9
Holiday Tours
Special holiday tours of Casa Del
Herrero, a National Historic Landmark in
Montecito, show off the circa-1925 home
decorated in its Christmas fnery. Visitors
will enjoy a 90-minute Docent-led tour
of the Casa, Gardens and Workshop,
plus seasonal refreshments cookies
fresh from the oven and hot spiced cider.
These are the only tours before the Casa
reopens in mid-February, and reservations
are required.
When: Wednesdays, Fridays, and
Saturdays at 10 am and 2 pm through
Saturday, December 17
Where: 1387 East Valley Road
Cost: $20 per person, ages 10 and older
Reservations: 565-5653
Service of Lessons and Carols
Providence Hall singers and musicians,
joined by the Laudate Youth Chorus and
the El Montecito School Chorus, present an
annual program of traditional Christmas
music and Scripture readings, with many
opportunities for the audience to join
THURSDAY DECEMBER 8
MERRAG Annual Business Meeting
MERRAG is a network of trained volunteers
that work and/or live in the Montecito
area prepared to respond to community
disasters during the critical frst 72 hours
following an event. The mutual self-
help organization serves Montecitos
residents with the guidance and support
of the Montecito Fire, Water and Sanitary
Districts. Next years Board will be elected
and a budget will be adopted.
When: 10 am
Where: Biltmore Santa Barbara,
1260 Channel Drive
Info: Geri, 969-2537
Coast Village Road Block Party
Take a stroll on Coast Village Road while
taking advantage of special treats, offers,
and one-day-only deals at selected shops.
Participating stores include Susan Pitchers
dressed and ready, Shine Blow Dry Bar,
French Lessons, A.H. Gaspar, and Red
Studio.
When: 11 am to 5 pm
(If you have a Montecito event, or an event that concerns Montecito, please e-mail kelly@montecitojournal.net
or call (805) 565-1860)
Community Calendar
by Kelly Mahan
Montecito Tide Chart
Day Low Hgt High Hgt Low Hgt High Hgt Low Hgt
Thurs, Dec 8 1:08 AM 2.3 7:28 AM 5.9 02:44 PM -0.3 09:15 PM 3.6
Fri, Dec 9 1:40 AM 2.4 7:59 AM 6 03:16 PM -0.5 09:50 PM 3.6
Sat, Dec 10 2:13 AM 2.4 8:31 AM 6.1 03:49 PM -0.6 010:26 PM 3.6
Sun, Dec 11 2:46 AM 2.5 9:04 AM 6.1 04:23 PM -0.7 011:04 PM 3.6
Mon, Dec 12 3:23 AM 2.6 9:38 AM 6 04:59 PM -0.6 011:44 PM 3.7
Tues, Dec 13 4:03 AM 2.6 10:16 AM 5.7 05:37 PM -0.4
Wed, Dec 14 12:28 AM 3.7 4:53 AM 2.7 10:57 AM 5.4 06:17 PM -0.2
Thurs, Dec 15 1:15 AM 3.9 5:57 AM 2.8 11:47 AM 4.9 07:00 PM 0.1
Fri, Dec 16 2:05 AM 4.1 7:20 AM 2.7 12:49 PM 4.2 07:46 PM 0.5

THURSDAY DECEMBER 15
Winter Concert
Cold Spring School students
perform Winter Sing concert
When: 11 am and 7 pm
Where: 2243 Sycamore
Canyon Road
FRIDAY DECEMBER 16
Lecture and Luncheon
The Dream Act and the effort to
repeal it will be discussed by
California Assemblyman Tim
Donnelly at the Montecito Hope
Ranch Republican Womens Club
monthly luncheon at the Montecito
Country Club. Roadblocks Facing
the Republican Minority in the
California Legislature - Hopes for
the Future, is the topic of the talk
by Assemblyman Donnelly, who
represents the 59th District in San
Bernardino County. He is the author
of the current petition to rescind
AB131 (the Dream Act) which
allows students who are in the
U.S. illegally to pay in-state tuition
and receive fnancial aid from
the state. The luncheon features a
special Christmas musical revue by
MJ columnist Erin Graffy.
When: Registration begins at 10:30 am, with the general meeting and installation
of offcers at 11 am and the luncheon at 11:45 am
Costs: $30 pre-paid or $35 at the door
Info: MHRRWC@gmail.com
Wine Tasting
Local winemaker Ernst Storm will pour
a selection of Storm wines including
sauvignon blanc, pinot noir, and syrah
When: 4:30 pm to 7 pm
Where: Liquor & Wine Grotto,
1271 Coast Village Road
Cost: $1
Pirate Potables
Just in time for the holiday season,
learn to mix seafaring-themed drinks
from award-winning bartender and
mixologist, Mandy Chinn. The Santa
Barbara Maritime Museum hosts the
two-hour course, Grog, Ale and
Pirates Blood: A Holiday Maritime
Cocktail Class, where Mandy will show
participants all the steps for making the
drinks, and students will then have the
chance to sample the concoctions and
take home recipes.
When: 6 pm to 8 pm
Where: 113 Harbor Way, Suite 190
Cost: $15 (members), $20 (non-members)
Info: 962-8404 or www.sbmm.org
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 11 If there was less sympathy in the world there would be less trouble in the world Oscar Wilde
1230 COAST VILLAGE CIRCLE C
MONTECITO CA 93108
TOLL FREE 855-839-9900
PHONE 805-845-9292 FAX 805-845-9262
Lic #958733 Bonded & Insured


www.artandelements.com

lNTERlOR DESlGN
LANDSCAPE DESlGN
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
ARCHlTECTURAL SERVlCES

RESlDENTlAL & COMMERClAL

1230 COAST VlLLAGE ClRCLE "C MONTEClTO CA 93108
TOLL FREE 855-839-9900 PHONE 805-845-9292 FAX 805-845-9262
Lic #958733 Bonded & lnsured


!"#$ %&' ()*&&$ &%' +,&#-./+-$ ,&
www.artandelements.com
INTERIOR DESIGN
LANDSCAPE DESIGN
GENERAL CONTRACTORS
ARCHITECTURAL SERVICES
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
Maricel Hines
designer/general contractor & mom
When: Adoption Fair on Saturday from
10 am to 4 pm, beneft concert on Sunday
from 1 pm to 9 pm
Where: Fair will be held at ASAP,
5473 Overpass Road in Goleta, concert at
The Creekside, 4444 Hollister Ave
Cost: Beneft concert, $10 per person
Info: 683-3368 or www.asapcats.org
MONDAY DECEMBER 12
MBAR Meeting
Montecito Board of Architectural Review
seeks to ensure that new projects are
harmonious with the unique physical
characteristics and character of Montecito.
Today the board will look at a new home
on Miramar Beach Drive, a new home and
garage on Fernald Point Lane, an addition
to a home on the Westmont campus, a
new garage on Mountain Drive, a remodel
and addition on Eucalyptus Hill Road, and
several other agenda items.
When: 2 pm
Where: Country Engineering Building,
Planning Commission Hearing Room,
123 E. Anapamu
Cold Spring School Board Meeting
When: 6 pm
Where: 2243 Sycamore Canyon Road
Info: 969-2678
TUESDAY DECEMBER 13
Montecito Association Meeting
The Montecito Association is committed to
preserving, protecting, and enhancing the
semi-rural residential character of Montecito
When: 4 pm
Where: Montecito Hall,
1469 East Valley Road
FRIDAY DECEMBER 16
Winter Sing
Students, teachers and parents at Montecito
Union School spread holiday cheer
When: 9:30 am, 10:45 am
and 12:45 pm
Where: MUS Auditorium,
385 San Ysidro Road
SATURDAY DECEMBER 17
Book Signing at Tecolote
David Krieger will sign his book,
Speaking of Peace. Krieger is the founder
of the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation.
When: 5 pm to 6:30 pm
Where: Tecolote Book Shop,
1470 E. Valley Road
Info: 969-4977
ONGOING
MONDAYS AND TUESDAYS
Art Classes
Beginning and advanced, all ages and by
appt, just call
Where: Portico Gallery,
1235 Coast Village Road
Info: 695-8850
TUESDAYS AND THURSDAYS
Adventuresome Aging
Where: 89 Eucalyptus Lane
Info: 969-0859; ask for Susan
WEDNESDAYS THRU SATURDAYS
Live Entertainment at Cava
Where: Cava, 1212 Coast Village Road
When: 7 pm to 10 pm
Info: 969-8500
MONDAYS
Story Time at the Library
When: 10:30 to 11 am
Where: Montecito Library,
1469 East Valley Road
Info: 969-5063
Connections Early Memory Loss
Program
Where: Friendship Center,
89 Eucalyptus Lane
Info: Susan Forkush, 969-0859 x15
TUESDAYS
Boy Scout Troop 33 Meeting
Open to all boys ages 11-17; visitors
welcome
When: 7:15 pm
Where: Scout House, Upper Manning
Park, 449 San Ysidro Road
THURSDAYS
Pick-up Basketball Games
He shoots; he scores! The Montecito Family
YMCA is offering pick-up basketball on
Thursdays at 5:30 pm. Join coach Donny
for warm-up, drills and then scrimmages.
Adults welcome too.
When: 5:30 pm
Where: Montecito Family YMCA,
591 Santa Rosa Lane
Info: 969-3288
FRIDAYS
Farmers Market
When: 8 am to 11:15 am
Where: South side of Coast Village Road
SUNDAYS
Vintage & Exotic Car Day
Motorists and car lovers from as far away
as Los Angeles and as close as East Valley
Road park in front of Richies Barber Shop
at the bottom of Middle Road on Coast
Village Road going west to show off and
discuss their prized possessions, automotive
trends and other subjects. Ferraris,
Lamborghinis and Corvettes prevail, but
there are plenty other autos to admire.
When: 8 am to 10 am (or so)
Where: 1187 Coast Village Road
Info: sbcarscoffee@gmail.com MJ
santabarbara
stickers.com
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 12 The Voice of the Village
A
fter close to 18 months
following an electrical fre that
shut down Xanadu Bakery in
Montecito, the beloved French bakery
will reopen its doors later this month.
The bakery, which has been located
in the Vons shopping center since
1982, will be up-and-running for the
holidays, says owner Sepi Mashhoon.
Im ready! she exclaimed during a
recent interview.
Mashhoon, along with her hus-
band Mike, purchased Xanadu
in September 2008. Less than two
years later, in July 2010, an electrical
fire in the shopping complex forced
them to close the bakery indefinitely.
They were basically starting from
scratch, with new building permits,
new plans, and new inspections, said
contractor Maricel Hines, who rede-
signed the bakery with business part-
ner Hugo Garcia; their new office, Art
& Elements design, recently opened
on Coast Village Circle.
The revamped bakery, which Art
& Elements has designed from the
ground up, will feel warm and cozy,
reminiscent of a French caf, says
Hines. It will feel very European,
with dark wood paneling and tables
topped with various granite colors,
she says. The bakery will hold 40-50
seats, with many of them on the out-
side patio. In addition to the vari-
ous cases holding Xanadus baked
goods, a coffee bar is also slated to be
installed.
The bakery is my baby, laughed
Mrs. Mashhoon when we visited the
unfinished space earlier this week.
During our interview, at least half a
dozen Vons shoppers stopped to chat
with us after noticing work being
done on the bakery. Is Xanadu com-
ing back? more than one of them
excitedly asked. Hines says she fields
that question several times per day:
It was, and is, a Montecito staple.
People are thrilled its coming back.
Mashhoon adds, We feel very lucky.
Its been a year and a half and our
customers are still so loyal.
Xanadu was originally opened in
the space currently occupied by Little
Alexs. The family who started the
bakery owned it for 26 years before
the Mashhoons, who also operate
Foodland Market in Santa Barbara
and own a produce brokerage, bought
it. I had always loved buying my
cakes and things there, and I always
thought it would be fun to own a
bakery, Mashhoon said. After pur-
chasing the bakery, running it became
a full-time job for her; she worked
behind the counter seven days a week.
I love chatting with my customers,
and decorating cookies! she laughs.
BIRNAM WOOD RESIDENCE
Rarely available extremely spacious residence in Birnam Wood Golf Club, Montecito, on the 3rd fairway! 3 bedrooms/3.5 bath. Features include: 30+ ft art gal-
lery, inviting master suite wing, elegant & grand library w/gorgeous cherry wood cabinetry/book shelves, gallery walls w/strategic lighting, new lap pool & spa.
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Steve Slavin
Estates Director
www.SantaBarbaraLuxuryHomes.com steve@steveslavin.com 805.886.3428
DRE# 00493760
Xanadu to Reopen
Village Beat
by Kelly Mahan


Xanadu owner Sepi Mashhoon announces the
bakery will reopen before Christmas
Before and after: Xanadu Bakery sustained major damage last summer after an electrical fire
VILLAGE BEAT Page 194
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 13
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F O U R S E A S O N S B I L T MO R E H OT E L I 8 0 5 . 9 6 9 . 3 1 6 7 I MO N T E C I T O, C A 9 3 1 0 8
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Awa r d Wi n n i n g B u i l d e r s S i n c e 1 9 8 6
GIFFIN & CRANE
GE NE R A L C ONT R A C T OR S , I NC
Vi si t Our Websi te
www. Gi ffi nAndCrane.com
Phone (805) 966-6401 License 611341
gcr03785_MJ_2011_52weeks_FNL2.indd 6 2/22/11 3:04 PM
FINE GIFTS AND HOME DCOR
B
JANI E
1482 East Valley Road, Montecito, CA
805 969-4400
Montecitos Upper Village
Featuring Carr Vineyards wine tasting
and Trunk show
Thursday, December 8th 4 6pm
Come celebrate the season with us and we'll help you with some of your holiday gift selections. We're
introducing the Julia Knight collection of beautiful handcrafted enamel and mother of pearl serving
pieces, bar and giftware.
Gift with your purchase
Complimentary gift wrap
Wine and refreshments
Register to win a beautiful Julia Knight 16" Peony Oval Bowl!
Janie B Gifts and Fine Furnishings
1482 East Valley Road, Studio 36
Montecito's Upper Village
805.969.4400
Featuring Carr Vineyards wine tasting
and Trunk show
Thursday, December 8th 4 6pm
Come celebrate the season with us and we'll help you with some of your holiday gift selections. We're
introducing the Julia Knight collection of beautiful handcrafted enamel and mother of pearl serving
pieces, bar and giftware.
Gift with your purchase
Complimentary gift wrap
Wine and refreshments
Register to win a beautiful Julia Knight 16" Peony Oval Bowl!
Janie B Gifts and Fine Furnishings
1482 East Valley Road, Studio 36
Montecito's Upper Village
805.969.4400
Featuring Carr Vineyards wine tasting
and Trunk show
Thursday, December 8th 4 6pm
Come celebrate the season with us and we'll help you with some of your holiday gift selections. We're
introducing the Julia Knight collection of beautiful handcrafted enamel and mother of pearl serving
pieces, bar and giftware.
Gift with your purchase
Complimentary gift wrap
Wine and refreshments
Register to win a beautiful Julia Knight 16" Peony Oval Bowl!
Janie B Gifts and Fine Furnishings
1482 East Valley Road, Studio 36
Montecito's Upper Village
805.969.4400
Come celebrate the season with us and well help you with some of your holiday gift
selections. Were introducing the Julia Knight collection of beautiful handcrafted
enamel and mother of pearl serving pieces, bar and giftware.
Gift with your purchase Complimentary gift wrap Wine and refreshments
Register to win a beautiful Julia Knight 16 Peony Oval Bowl!
Janie B Holiday Open House
Featuring Carr Vineyards wine tasting
and Trunk show
Thursday, December 8th 4 6pm
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 14 The Voice of the Village
T
he Center for Successful Aging
(CSA) presented a Catered
Savoir Affaire at the Rincon
Beach Club, whose owner donated
the space. The Beach Club was flled
with some of Santa Barbaras fnest
caterers and wineries twelve of
each with enough tastes to satisfy the
most discerning palate. The Honorary
Chair was Chef Michael Hutchings,
sometimes known as Mozart in the
kitchen, with all the proceeds going
to CSA.
Congresswoman Lois Capps did
the honors of giving Betty Rosness
the Successful Aging Hero Award.
This is the third year the award has
been given; Larry Crandell and Eric
Boehm are the two past awardees.
Ive never won one at this age. Im
an Independent that always votes for
Lois, Betty exclaimed after receiving
the award. She then followed with
some advice: Have a belly laugh at
least once a day.
Betty was honored for her many
years of service to our community.
After moving to Goleta in 1968, she
not only raised five children but
also worked on behalf of cityhood
for Goleta. Besides serving on many
boards, she has received multiple hon-
ors, like the Santa Barbara County
Woman of the Year, The News Press
Lifetime Achievement award, and the
Westmont Medal, which recognizes
her integrity, service, compassion,
responsibility, faithfulness, discipline
and generosity. No wonder she is
so deserving. After retiring, Betty
wrote her memoirs, dedicating them
to her family. It has recently been pub-
lished under the title, The Carpenters
Daughter.
Besides the silent auction, Geoff
Green kept the bidding lively for
Ms Millner is the author
of The Magic Make
Over, Tricks for Looking,
Thinner, Younger,
and More Confident
Instantly! If you have an
event that belongs in this
column, you are invited to
call Lynda at 969-6164.
Seen Around Town
by Lynda Millner
A Carpenters Daughter Honored
President of the Center
for Successful Aging
Board Bobbi Kroot,
with executive direc-
tor Gary Linker and
event coordinator Ann
Moore at the Rincon
Beach Club. The Center
provides free senior
support groups and
peer counseling, and
other programs dedi-
cated to the wellbeing
of seniors.
Frank Newton, editor of the Successful Aging newspaper, with CSA committee members La Shon
Kelley, Jeanne West and Rachel Bishar at the CSA event, which included an award presentation and
live auction
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8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 15
items like a private dinner for eight
with John Downey. The planning
committee for the event was Rachel
Bishar, Lynda Fairly, Gayle and
Marty Golden, La Shon Kelley, Bobbi
Kroot, Chris Levine, Ann Moore and
Jeanne West.
The new clinical director, Dr. Gary
Linker, feels that loneliness is the big-
gest enemy of successful aging. Thats
what the CSA is all about. The center
offers a wide variety of programs,
activities and experiences that cover
all aspects of aging. Trained volun-
teers make daily phone calls to seniors
to check on their safety and wellbe-
ing if they have no friends or family
nearby. The Peer Counseling Program
is provided by age 50-plus volunteers
who have learned basic counseling
skills. They are the same generation as
those they counsel.
No fee is charged for any of CSAs
services. For more information or to
make a referral, call 963-8080.
BigSpeaks New Digs
President and CEO of BigSpeak,
Jonathan Wygant, told the audience
at the new corporate headquarters
(across from La Cumbre Mall), We
have been in Santa Barbara for eigh-
teen years but many locals dont know
us. To rectify that, he invited the
business community to a reception
to celebrate the new digs. There were
cocktails, canaps and conversations
with top executives from around the
Central Coast.
BigSpeak represents a list of top gun
speakers who service Fortune 500 and
1000 companies and can command
fees in excess of $40,000. They also
have expert consultants and trainers
whose fees are more affordable, start-
ing around $2,000. There are many
arenas from humor and entertain-
ment to sales and marketing. Some of
the clients include Jonathan Winters,
Jack Canfield, Deepak Chopra, M.D.,
Marianne Williamson and Barbara
DeAngelis, Ph.D. You Oprah fans
may recognize the name Stedman
Graham as well.
This evening we were in for a treat
with the former President and CEO
of the Campbell Soup Company
Douglas Conant addressing us. Many
of the speakers have written bestsell-
ing books and Conants is TouchPoints.
Most CEOs are not born, theyre
made. They work hard. They need to
be tough-minded and tender-hearted
with people, he stated. The reoccur-
ring theme was how you treat people
even though at times its messy when
you have to replace them.
I couldnt resist asking about those
gravity fed soup can holders that are
now in supermarkets. As a shopper
who has eaten Campbell soups all my
life and has struggled to find what I
was looking for, they are an amazing
innovation. You can find the soup so
easily now! Douglas had to admit that
the idea was brought to them. It didnt
come from within the company, but it
was under his watch.
The other speaker was David
Allen who is a renowned productiv-
ity expert and best selling author of
Getting Things Done. He has worked
with the largest firms in the world,
and his techniques work for all kinds
of clients and organizations. They can
learn how to deal with the ever-accel-
erating pace of change and how to
retool their organizations to deal with
this change. I could use the pace of
change part.
Other VIPs attending were Russell
Bishop, Marilyn Tam, Bill Hawkins,
Jeff Salz and Ursula Lamberti. Books
ROLEX OYSTER PERPETUAL AND DATEJUST ARE TRADEMARKS.
OFFICIAL ROLEX JEWELER
SEEN Page 164
CSA honoree Betty Rosness and honorary chair
Chef Michael Hutchings at the Catered Savoir
Affaire. This year marks the third year for the
Successful Aging Hero Award.
Speaker David
Allen with
Jonathan Wygant,
President and
CEO of BigSpeak,
along with speaker
Douglas Allen at
the open house for
the new BigSpeak
corporate headquar-
ters on South Hope
Avenue
Living the Life of
Your Dreams author
Marilyn Tam and
What Got You Here
Wont Get You There
author Bill Hawkins
with executive coach
Ursula Lamberti at
the BigSpeak bash
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 16 The Voice of the Village
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more information about all this speak-
ers bureau does, log on to www.
BigSpeak.com or call 965-1400.
Braille Auxiliary
Luncheon
The annual meeting and luncheon
for the Braille Institute Auxiliary of
Santa Barbara at La Cumbre Country
Club was especially exciting this year
with surprise royalties and residuals
from the late Gladys Nicholls trust.
When that was added to the Wood
Claeyssens Foundation and the Elaine
Stepanek estate donations plus the
Auxiliary funds, it came to a whop-
ping $1,281,382.00. President Joanie
Kelly joked, I had to get help writing
the check. Id never written a check
for a million dollars before. The
check was presented to local director
Micheal Lazarowitz by 2011 event
chair Pat Andersons, assistant chair
Jo Thompson and Joanie.
Michael responded, This Auxiliary
is making a different in all three coun-
ties. Jo Thompson, who will head up
the 2012 annual polo event aided by
Charlene Nagel, told us, The new
name is the Braille Institute Auxiliary
of Santa Barbara Annual Invitational
Polo Match and Luncheon. The theme
will be China and the title, Chinese
Chukkers. Everyone applauded
Charlenes brilliant pun.
The president of the Braille Institute
of America based in Los Angeles,
Les Stalker, was the keynote speaker
who apprised us of new happenings
such as publishing Braille books on
demand. He wants all blind kids to be
able to be Scouts if they choose. Books
on demand can make this possible. As
he said, Braille was founded in 1919
and is supported by volunteerism.
The slate of officers for the
upcoming year is Joanie Kelly, Jo
Thompson, Charlene Nagel, Beth
Leddy, Diane Pannkuk, Carol
Schlek, Gloria Slaughter, Patricia
Kruse, Joann Rodrigue, Suzanne
Bock, Sandy DeRousse and Jean
Von Wittenburg.
Keep up the good work ladies, and
well see you all at the polo fields
August 4, 2012! MJ
Braille benefit
assistant chair
Jo Thompson
with Braille
president Joanie
Kelly and ben-
efit chair Pat
Andersons at
their annual
new members
luncheon pre-
senting over a
million dollar
check to the
Braille Institute
Past presidents of the Braille Institute Carol Wenzlau, Sandy DeRousse, Caryl Crahan, Eunice Fly and
Meg DiNapoli looking lovely at the luncheon, held at the La Cumbre Country Club
SEEN (Continued from page 15)
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In the spring he is preparing to teach
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Shaken and Stirred
The Kardashians have made mil-
lions from living their lives in the
public eye thanks to their E! TV reality
shows.
But one person who is less than
impressed is British actor Daniel
Craig, who has launched an astonish-
ing foul-mouthed rant at the brood,
headed by Kim Kardashian, in next
months GQ magazine.
The James Bond star lambasted the
clan and criticized those who sell
themselves and then make demands
about their private lives.
Craig, 43, who has just started film-
ing the 23rd 007 film Skyfall, says: I
think theres a lot to be said for keep-
ing your own counsel.
Its not about being afraid to be
public with your emotions or about
who you are and what you stand for.
But if you sell it off its gone.
You cant buy it back you cant
buy your privacy back. Ooh I want
to be alone. . . Weve been in your
living room. We were at your birth.
You filmed it for us and showed us
the placenta, and now you want some
privacy?
Referring to the Kardashians, who
gathered en-masse in Montecito
for Kims nuptials to athlete Kris
Humphries in August, Craig says:
Look at the Kardashians, theyre
worth millions. I dont think they were
that badly off to begin with, but now
look at them.
You see that and you think what,
you mean all I have to do is behave
MISCELLANY Page 244
MISCELLANY (Cont'd from page 7)
Octogenarian author Thomas Scheff digs deep
into pop culture
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 18 The Voice of the Village
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P r i s c i l l A
F o s s e K
June 25 July 30
Artists Reception: Thursday, June 25, 5 - 7pm
Fine
Art
1485 East Valley Rd, Montecito 805.969.0524
Museum
Quality
Framing
P r i s c i l l A
F o s s e K
June 25 July 30
Artists Reception: Thursday, June 25, 5 - 7pm
Fine
Art
1485 East Valley Rd, Montecito 805.969.0524
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Framing
P r i s c i l l A
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June 25 July 30
Artists Reception: Thursday, June 25, 5 - 7pm
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LORRY HUBBARD IS PLEASED TO PRESENT
THE WATERCOLOR PAINTINGS OF
TOM HUBBARD 19312011
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2011
5: 00 7: 00 P. M.
WINE AND CHEESE
knowledge, Judy. Your father is Clark
Gable. When Lewis confronted her
mother, Young finally admitted the
truth to Lewis.
At the time of Lewiss conception,
Gable was married to Maria Franklin
Prentiss Lucas Langham, a Texas
socialite. She was his second of five
wives. Sadly, Gable visited Lewis only
one time, when she was 15. One time.
My hope as a man and person is to
be as strong and assertive as the late,
great Judy Lewis.
Matt McLaughlin
Santa Barbara
Safe Route To School
Distress
It distresses me that so much criti-
cism is heaped on the safe way to
school path on San Ysidro Road. I
think it looks wonderful. The accusa-
tions of cactus is simply not true.
Not one cactus, not even one.
The plants are mostly succulents
(a far cry from cactus) and they
are absolutely not planted willy
nilly. These plants, interspersed with
rosemary will fill out to be a beautiful
landscape design... I am sure everyone
will be very, very pleased in less than
a year when these plants fill in!
I see great sensitivity with the path.
Decomposed granite is a wonderful
and subtle surface, as well as a surface
that can absorb water and not send it
off to the sewers.
Furthermore, the ramps on the cor-
ners are concrete dyed to match the
decomposed granite pathways. I saw
all the red alerts of the concrete
before it was stained and the empty
planting beds. It turns my stomach.
This is just ignorance and knee-jerk
negatives in my opinion. Let them
complete the painting before casting
aspersions. Good grief!
Because of the involvement of the
many people in Montecito, this will
be a beautiful and safe route to school.
These plantings will mature into
lovely landscaping; you just watch.
They are very carefully planted and
will mature into lovely landscaping
in keeping with our local landscape;
they just wont need irrigation. This
landscape was thoughtfully and
beautifully planned. I have no knowl-
LETTERS Page 284
LETTERS (Continued from page 9)
Judy Lewis was
the daughter
of Clark Gable
and Loretta
Young, a couple
that Matt
McLaughlin
derides as
illegitimate
parents
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 19 Life seems but a quick succession of busy nothings Jane Austen
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VILLAGE BEAT Page 224
Xanadu offers over 100 different
types of cookies, 90 different types of
cakes, and various pastries, Danishes,
and other sweet treats, as well as a full
breakfast and lunch menu. Xanadus
chef, pastry chef, and bakers will be
back, and the menu will not change,
Mashhoon says. We like the menu
the way it is. Its a new store, with a
much needed facelift, but the same
menu, she said.
The Art & Elements crew is working
hard to have the shop ready to open
the week before Christmas. The dry
wall has just been finished, with cos-
metic work to be tackled next in the
2,000-sq-ft space. The Argentinean-
born Hines, who has been a contractor
in Santa Barbara for the last fifteen
years, tells us she has crews on site 24
hours a day to ensure a December 20th
opening.
I really wanted to be open by
Christmas, so I can get back to deco-
rating hundreds of Christmas cook-
ies, said Mrs. Mashhoon. She says
she is also looking forward to get-
ting back in touch with her regular
customers. Ive missed Xanadu. Im
ready to reopen and see everyone
again! she said.
Xanadu is located directly across
from Vons in the shopping center on
the corner of Coast Village Road and
Hot Springs Road. The target open-
ing date is December 20. Once open,
Xanadu will be open 5:30 am to 7:30
pm, seven days a week.
Whodidily Closes
Montecitos cupcakery, Whodidily,
closed its doors late last Friday night,
after serving the community for over
three and half years. Owner Wendy
VILLAGE BEAT (Continued from page 12)
Montecito contractors Maricel Hines and Hugo
Garcia have redesigned the bakery for its opening
later this month
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 20 The Voice of the Village
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No Fishing Allowed?
A
local battle erupted in Santa
Barbara last week that puts
legal environmental advocates
at odds with the local angling
community. Both sides seem to want
the same thing a steelhead recovery
in local streams but one group
wants to approach it from a legal-
protection angle and the other from
a responsibility-recreational rights
angle. The Environmental Defense
Center (EDC), a nonproft public-
interest environmental law frm
located in Santa Barbara, presented
a letter in June to the California
Department of Fish and Game
Commission of which local resident,
Richards Rodgers, is President,
requesting, immediate action to
close these (various) waterways (in
Southern California) to all fshing
in order to protect the Southern
Steelhead I emphasize closed to
all fshing, even catch and release.
The Commission met November
16
th
in Santa Barbara to take up this
issue. During the meeting, an EDC
spokesperson said that their position is
to no longer press for an Emergency
closure but, will continue to monitor
the Commissions normal process
of closure, which continues into June.
Other comments were heard from
the DF&G representatives and the
public represented by Cal Trout, The
Southwest Council of the Federation
of Flyfshers, The Sespe Flyfshers and
the Santa Barbara Flyfshers.
Basically, the fly-fishing community
of Santa Barbara is about as envi-
ronmentally responsible as it gets.
Their historical practice of catch and
release is legendary and they are
among some of the leading advocates
of conservation, healthy habitat for
fish and responsible practices in fish-
ing. Catch and release (C&R) of fish
is regularly performed by fly-fishers
based on the premise of protecting
fish while experiencing them through
fishing; practicing their art through
stealth, ecological knowledge, care-
fully designed equipment and a lit-
tle luck. With fly-fishers, C&R has a
high standard where small feathered
hooks with no barbs are employed
so as to make extracting the hook
easy and non-injurious, the fish is
carefully landed, sometimes photo-
graphed, gently held in the water and
resuscitated in the current until the
fish recovers his strength and swims
away free. Fly-fishers especially are
up-in-arms because they feel that
their ability to fish is being taken
away from them, the very people who
enjoy and experience the fish and
protect them. They feel that they can
be a positive force in educating others
about the best practices for respon-
sible fishing and can help protect the
fish on these streams from unlawful
practices by their very presence and
good example. But, since it is virtu-
ally impossible to distinguish between
a rainbow trout and an endangered
steelhead, all fishing may need to
stop. At the end of the Commissions
discussion, it was pretty well agreed
that the matter would be carefully
reviewed before final actions of clo-
sure are taken on the Sespe, Sisquoc
and Matilija streams.
The Endangered Species Act is
Federal law so the State Commission
must be in compliance when it comes
to protecting the Southern California
Steelhead. But, did the drafters of
this law envision the cessation of all
fishing in order to save fish? These
beautiful fish have important genetics
making them resilient enough to sur-
vive the drought and flood environ-
ment of Southern California. But, does
that mean no one can do any kind of
fishing until that one species is not
listed as endangered someday in the
future, maybe decades? It is assumed
that stopping all fishing will take pres-
sure off the steelhead but, will it actu-
ally? Will it, in fact, take responsible
anglers off the streams only to be
replaced by poachers? There are dif-
fering points of view about how best
to achieve the steelhead recovery in
our free-flowing streams that run to
the sea but right now, that issue is in
the lap Mr. Richards and the California
Fish and Game Commission.
For more information or your feed-
back, contact me at: john@jsburk.
com MJ
MONTECITO
SPORTSMAN by Dr. John Burk
Dr. John Burk is
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Take a Sentimental Journey
Through Storytelling
SENIORITY
by Patti Teel
Patti Teel is the com-
munity representative for
Senior Helpers, providers
of care and comfort at a
moments notice. She is
also host of the Senior
Helpers online video
show. www.santabar
baraseniors.com. E-mail:
patti@pattiteel.com.
O
ur stories make up our lives.
And when we share our
stories, we share our lives.
For thousands of years, people from
diverse cultures around the world have
passed on their traditions, beliefs, and
advice through storytelling. Ancient
cultures shared their stories around
the campfre and in more recent times,
stories have been shared around the
kitchen table or in our own living
rooms. When our loved ones share their
stories, they pass down their wisdom
and allow us to know them more
completely: as children, teenagers,
and young adults. My grandmothers
stories not only gave me the chance to
know her as a whole person, they also
helped me to understand what it means
to be an American. She told me stories
about her long and arduous voyage to
America, what it was like to arrive at
Ellis Island, and the subsequent train
ride to Omaha, where she and her
family settled. She vividly described
what it was like to start school before
she learned how to speak English. Her
teacher thought she was slow until
my grandmother had her turn at the
chalkboard and was able to proudly
demonstrate that she knew the answers
to all the math problems. By sharing
her stories, my grandmother linked her
past to the present and one generation
to another.
As so often happens, research even-
tually validates what weve known
all along, that telling our stories has
tremendous value. In the past decade,
research has proven that reminiscence
is an important part of healthy aging
and wellness. Reminiscence therapy
has become a popular tool for thera-
pists and it has been found to reaffirm
a sense of identity, uniqueness, self-
worth and accomplishments. It also
positively impacts health lowering
physical pain and depression, work-
ing the brain, and increasing life satis-
faction. Gerontological nurse Joan M.
Lappe compared self-esteem scores of
two groups of institutionalized elderly
in an experimental study. The research-
er compared two randomly assigned
groups of nursing home residents. One
group discussed current events, while
the other focused on reminiscing. Her
results showed that the reminiscing
group scored significantly higher on
the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale.
Most of us wish that we had recorded
our parents and grandparents stories
so that they could be passed on from
generation to generation. Your story is
important. It matters to your children
and to your childrens children. Find a
way to tell your story, whether through
the written word, or an audio or video
recording. You can do it yourself or hire
a company that specializes in personal
history services. A few personal his-
tory services in Santa Barbara include
Looking Glass Life Stories, Telling Your
Story, Life Chronicles of Santa Barbara,
Boehm Biography Group, and my own
small business, Recordings to Go.
Home Videos
I have the honor of hosting a new
weekly show on Channel 17 (ten-
tatively scheduled to begin airing
in January), which will feature local
seniors sharing their real life stories.
I invite you to send me a brief email
about a story youd like to share. If
selected, I will come to your home
with a videographer and your story
will be taped for the shows segment
entitled, Sentimental Journey. Your
story can involve any memories that
made an impact on you during your
lifetime. It could be a romantic story
about your first kiss, a military expe-
rience, friendships, a favorite pet, or
a million other experiences that only
you can provide.
In Santa Barbara and Montecito,
we have many famous residents who
have glamorous stories to share. Some
people may think that their lives are
ordinary by comparison. But everyone
has something to share, whether it
involves traveling the globe or simply
watching a garden grow. My mother
lived a humble life but her stories were
treasures that allowed me to catch a
glimpse of the world through her eyes
and taught me to see the beauty in
the small graces, such as a blooming
rose or a ripe tomato. I hope youll
consider giving us the chance to see the
world through your eyes by sharing
one of your treasured stories. MJ
Your story is important. It matters to your children and to your
childrens children. Find a way to tell your story, whether through the
written word, or an audio or video recording.
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 22 The Voice of the Village
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Jones tells us several factors contrib-
uted to the decision to close the store;
she says it was a decision several
months in the making.
Jones, who is expecting her fourth
child early next summer, says the
main reason for the closure is to spend
more time with her family. [Closing]
is such a great thing for my family; it
takes a ton of commitment to own a
bakery, she said.
Jones and her husband, Dave, com-
mitted countless hours to running the
cupcakery, and say now its time to
commit to their family. Before leas-
ing the Coast Village Road store, the
Joneses kitchen-shared with a catering
company in Bakersfield. Baking cup-
cakes is a part of who we are, so we
will definitely miss it, she said.
Wendy says although the store
proved financially successful, the last
three months were the slowest since
opening in 2008. The couple had a
hand in opening a second cupcakery
in downtown Santa Barbara last year,
but are no longer affiliated with that
store.
The Joneses will continue to live in
the area, but Wendy says she is not
Whodidily Cupcakes closes its doors after more than three years on Coast Village Road
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 23 Men are more moral than they think and far more immoral than they can imagine Sigmund Freud
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VILLAGE BEAT Page 254
compiled by Flora Kontilis from information supplied by Santa Barbara County
Sheriffs Department, Carpinteria Division
SHERIFFS
BLOTTER
Burglary at Vacation Rental on Butterfly Lane
Monday, 28 November, 11 am Deputy Springer was dispatched to a resi-
dence on Butterfly Lane in response to a burglary report. The victim told
Springer that her home had been robbed several times over a three-week
period. She first noticed the crime in the first week of November; she was
cleaning her rental home and noticed the kitchens TV was missing. The
victim told Springer that she usually leaves the propertys doors open after
clients leave to air out the home; the victim suspects that is why the first
crime occurred.
The victim cleaned her property again on November 27; at this time, she left
the windows open and the doors unlocked. She returned to the residence on
November 28 and found the living room glass door left open; she told Springer
that she did not leave the door open the previous day. She searched the home
and found the TV missing from the master bedroom.
The victim stated she would lock the windows and doors of her property
from now on. A report was taken.
Possession of Marijuana
Thursday, 1 December, 10:06 pm Deputy Lampe contacted a man on El Bosque
Road near Las Tunas Road. Upon speaking with the man in his vehicle, Lampe
observed a strong odor of marijuana. The man confirmed the possession, tell-
ing Lampe, Its in the center console. Lampe searched the mans vehicle and
found a marijuana bong behind the drivers seat and a small green plastic medi-
cal container. The marijuana was taken and booked at the Carpinteria Sheriffs
Station. Lampe learned that the man purchased the marijuana in Santa Barbara.
Lampe issued the man a citation and released him on the scene.
Graffiti Found at Butterfly Beach
Monday, 5 December, 10:14 am Deputy Johnson was dispatched to Butterfly
Beach on Channel Drive to investigate a vandalism report. Upon arrival,
Johnson spoke with the director of security from a hotel on Channel Drive.
The director told Johnson the hotel received several complaints about graf-
fiti on the sea wall. Hotel security last surveyed the beach area on Friday,
December 2; the security director suspects the vandalism occurred sometime
Sunday night. Even though the sea wall is not the hotels property, hotel staff
assists in maintenance for the county. A maintenance crew from the hotel
removed the graffiti. A report was taken. MJ
fulfilling special orders for cupcakes.
We love it here, we arent going any-
where! she said.
Land Use Weighs in
on YMCA
At this months Montecito
Association Land Use meeting, the
committee presented comments to
YMCA representatives regarding the
Ys proposed expansion. We think
its only fair going in, that you know
what the position of the Montecito
Association is, said Land Use Chair
Dave Kent.
The committee has reviewed the
plans several times, and hosted a com-
munity forum in August to hear from
the public. The proposed plan includes
the expansion of the main building
into a second story, construction of a
new natatorium building with a new
indoor pool, a new preschool build-
ing and an 11,020-sq-ft gymnasium
to cover the existing sports court on
the property. The project will add
significantly to the square footage of
the YMCA, bringing the building area
from 11,540 square feet to 32,471.
The comments, presented in the
form of a letter, included specific
concerns regarding architecture and
design, and compatibility with the
residential character of the surround-
ing community. Other issues include
intensity of use and associative impact
on neighbors, as well as traffic impacts
on San Ysidro Road. The architecture
is contemporary and industrial, and
is not in keeping with neighborhood
compatibility, Kent read from the
letter.
The committee has major concern
about size, bulk and scale of the proj-
ect. They recommended lowering the
main building height and the height
of the gymnasium. The letter also
mentioned parking, noise and light-
ing issues.
The most significant issue the
Land Use Committee pointed out is
increased traffic on San Ysidro Road.
They asked that traffic studies be con-
ducted, using realistic membership
numbers which reflect more intensive
use of the facilities. This community
isnt looking for a regional YMCA.
The intent is that the YMCA is to serve
the community of Montecito, Kent
said.
The Land Use Committee asked
YMCA reps to revisit and modify the
design to be more compatible with
the Montecito Community Plan. After
tweaking the words of the letter, the
committee voted to formally send it.
Committee member Bob Short vetoed
the letter, calling the tone of it antago-
nistic.
We want to provide the needs
weve been asked for. We want to keep
working with you, said capital com-
mittee chair Tim Werner, explaining
that the expansion is due to member-
ship demand.
The YMCA has yet to submit an
application for expansion to Santa
Barbara County.
Trailer Fire
On Wednesday, November 30 at
10:53 pm, Montecito Fire Protection
District responded to a report of a
trailer fire on East Mountain Drive.
Upon arrival, Montecito Fire person-
nel found a 20-foot travel trailer fully
engulfed in flames; it was put out less
than 20 minutes later.
Montecito Fire did not issue any
evacuations, but nearby at Westmont
College, Risk Management person-
nel voluntarily evacuated students to
the gym. We decided to evacuate all
students to the gym after we factored
in the strong winds and the potential
for a fast-moving fire to spread to
campus, says Scott Craig, Westmont
spokesman. Students displayed the
same admirable cooperation and good
sense they demonstrated in 2008 and
accomplished the evacuation and
return easily and without incident.
Rumors have been swirling on cam-
pus that the trailer that went up in
flames was a known crystal meth lab,
but Santa Barbara Sheriff Lieutenant
Kelly Moore tells us there is no crimi-
nal investigation at this point. He did
say a female occupant of the trailer
told on-scene responders different sto-
ries about how the fire started, and
that Sheriffs detectives are clarifying
her statements.
MFPD has yet to release their find-
ings on the cause and origin of the fire.
Weve received no indication that
this is a criminal case, Moore said.
In addition to three MFPD engines,
one rescue engine, one ambulance,
and several command vehicles were
also on scene. The female occupant of
the trailer was transported to Cottage
Hospital with minor injuries. Other
agencies on scene included Santa
Barbara City Fire Department, Santa
Barbara County Sheriffs Department,
and AMR.
In Business: MAI
Montecito Aesthetic Institute (MAI)
on Coast Village Road may have only
opened its doors in August, but its
founder, Dr. Joe Chang, has been
making a name for himself for over
a decade. Dr. Chang says he is the
only surgeon in the area performing
oculoplastic (eyelid) surgery full time.
Before focusing on oculoplastics, Dr.
Chang performed 3,500 cataract sur-
geries before the age of forty.
Montecito Aesthetic Institute is the
perfect place to combine a medi-spa
with a medical practice, Dr. Chang
said in a recent interview. He took over
a year to design MAI, which is located
in the former home of Waterworks.
I wanted to build something beauti-
ful, not medical, he said. The space
features clean lines and a modern feel,
with modern art pieces hanging on
the walls, sponsored by local galler-
ies and artists. MAI offers a variety
of medical and non-medical aesthetic
services, including cosmetic injec-
tions, non-surgical facelifts, laser hair
removal, dermal remodeling, photo
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 24 The Voice of the Village
FOR VOTING THE GRANADA THEATRE
BEST PLACE TO SEE A PERFORMANCE
THEATER LEAGUE PRESENTS
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like (expletive deleted) on television
and then you pay me millions?
In the meantime, Humphries, 26,
has responded to Kims petition for
divorce by asking for the 72-day-long
marriage to be annulled.
He filed papers at the weekend in
a L.A. Superior Court on the grounds
of fraud.
A source told celebrity website TMZ
that Humphries feels betrayed by
Kim, 31, believing she used him as
part of a cynical business venture.
He reportedly believes his wife
never intended on staying married to
him, but needed to boost ratings on
her reality show.
Stay tuned...
Soire at Sevillano
Tout le monde turned out for Santa
Barbara Magazines Christmas mega-
bash at Villa Sevillano, a short gallop
from the Santa Barbara Polo Club.
The six-bedroom, 10,378-sq-ft man-
sion, set on 22 exquisitely groomed
acres including its own polo field-,
is the former home of New York entre-
preneur, Michael Rothbard, and his
wife, Jasmine, currently on the market
for $21.5 million through Suzanne
Perkins at Sothebys.
Its quite a spread, she gushed, as
fellow realtor Randy Solakian, for-
ever to be known as the man who
sold Oprah her 42-acre estate, cast an
eagle eye.
Children from Janet Adderleys
popular Youth Ensemble Theater
performed songs from Lionel Barts
Oliver their next production at the
Lobero in the spring , as well as tra-
ditional carols.
Among those quaffing the cham-
pagne and downing the canaps,
prepared by Mitchell Sjerven and
his crew from the Wine Cask, were
Jennifer Smith Hale, Gina Tolleson,
Wendy Foster, Fred Gowland, Steve
and Caroline Thompson, Corinna
Gordon, Sam Roddick, Thomas
Caleel, Brian King and Mary Ellen
Tiffany...
Remember the Magic
Santa Barbara Historical Museums
courtyard was fulsomely festive for
the annual Remember the Magic
holiday party, which had 150 guests,
including, appropriately enough, 22
children, who busied themselves rid-
ing the miniature carousel and stock-
ing up at the colorful and extremely
well supplied candy bar.
Unfortunately, executive director
David Bisol, who normally plays a rol-
licking Father Christmas, was unable
to make the popular soire, but the
Rudenko School of Dance suitably
entertained with a Disney produc-
tion, while the Merry Wreath Consort,
garbed in their Celtic best, welcomed the
guests, including Lawrence and Astrid
Hammett, president Eleanor Van Cott,
John Woodward, Warren and Marlene
Miller, Jane Mueller and Peter Hilf...
Hark! The Westmont Angels Sang
Westmont Colleges seventh annu-
al Christmas Festival at the First
Presbyterian Church was absolutely
heaving with a long waiting list for
tickets, even with three performances.
With the full force of the colleges
musical talent on display, including
the orchestra, womens and mens
chorale, and the chamber singers, the
two-hour concert was a wonderful
blend of traditional carols and, the
piece de rsistance, the Yuletide por-
tion of George Frideric Handels 1741
oratorio, Messiah, under the baton
of Michael Shasberger, who shared
conducting duties during the perfor-
mance with Grey Brothers, JoAnne
Wasserman and Steve Hodson.
It was a suitably rip roaring kick-off
to the festive season...
Master Pianist
The multi-faceted and charismat-
ic French pianist Hlne Grimaud
opened the 30th anniversary of
CAMAs Masterseries at the Lobero.
Grimaud, 42, who regularly appears
with some of the worlds most promi-
nent orchestras, played an eclectic pro-
gram, kicking off with Mozarts Sonata
No. 8 in A minor and concluding the
first half with Bergs Sonata, Op.1.
The concert, played on two differ-
ent Steinways, came into its own after
the intermission with Liszts Sonata
in B minor, wrapping with Bartoks
Romanian Folk Dances of Hungary, a
suite of short pieces based on the music
of ethnic Romanians in Transylvania.
It portends a most splendid and
enticing season...
Northern Notes
St. Anthonys Seminary Chapel
couldnt have been a more appropri-
MISCELLANY (Continued from page 17)
MISCELLANY Page 314
007 star, Daniel Craig, blasts the Kardashians
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 25 In America, the young are always ready to give to those who are older than themselves the full benefits of their inexperience Oscar Wilde
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VILLAGE BEAT Page 304
VILLAGE BEAT (Continued from page 23)
facials, skin maintenance, massage,
make-up application, eyelash exten-
sions, hair restoration and more.
Dr. Chang, who lives part time in
Bakersfield and runs a practice there,
is a Board Certified ophthalmolo-
gist who completed his residency at
UCLAs Jules Stein Eye Institute after
receiving his undergraduate and med-
ical degrees from Emory University.
He consults patients at MAI and per-
forms upper and lower eyelid sur-
geries at Cottage Hospital and Santa
Barbara Surgical Center. The pro-
cedures are often done for patients
whose vision is impaired because of
droopy eyelids. The doctor, along
with three Registered Nurses who
work with him, offers non-surgical
treatments to treat medical and non-
medical conditions, including Botox,
Dysport, Xeomin, and other fillers.
Dr. Chang is also involved in chari-
table care, donating his services to
non-profits including Surgical Eye
Expeditions (SEE) International and
Advanced Center for Eye Care (ACE),
Dr. Joe Chang of Montecito Aesthetic Institute
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 26 The Voice of the Village
reveal lights numbered according to
each bedroom. When Storkes guests
wanted something, they flipped a
switch, the light would light, and a
servant would scurry to attend to the
visitor. Storke also constructed a reser-
voir and filtration system at the top of
the hill to provide reliable water to the
house and gardens.
Wartime Refuge
In 1942, the Japanese attacked the
Ellwood Oil Fields. Anna La Chapelle
Clark, widow of William Andrews
Clark, became concerned for the safe-
ty of her family and her staff. The
army had set up a camp in the Santa
Barbara Cemetery, cannons pointed to
the sea, and patrols walked the bluffs
on her property above East Beach on
the lookout for Japanese submarines
and planes. Also, as wartime shortag-
es and rationing became more severe,
she wanted to ensure that her staff at
Bellosguardo would have the supplies
they needed as well a place of refuge
in the event of another attack. She
convinced Thomas Storke to sell his
ranch to her.
She renamed the ranch Rancho
Alegre and installed Nils Slim
Larsen as caretaker. He insured that
ranch livestock supplemented the
produce grown at the estate in Santa
Barbara. Dairy cows from the ranch
provided milk that was churned into
butter for the use of her staff. Though
the Clarks rarely, if ever, visited the
B
ack in 1884, various members
of the Step family homesteaded
the land along the northside of
the mountains across from todays
Lake Cachuma (see last issue). Time
passed and Mary and William Henry
Step gave up raising stock and retired
to their California bungalow in Santa
Ynez. He sold his ranch to Thomas
More Storke, founder of the News-
Press, in March 1937. Storke also
bought up the Ilenstine lands (cousins
to the Steps) and renamed the ranch the
TMS Ranch or Pasatiempo. Storke built
a new ranch house for his weekend
retreats and proceeded to entertain his
many friends and acquaintances.
In 1923, Joseph R. Drake, head of
the Montecito Water Department and
assistant to Max C. Fleischmann, had
arranged for the local Boy Scout Troop
to acquire a portion of land high up
Tequepis Creek. There they estab-
lished Camp Drake, which adjoined
the TMS Ranch.
Storke was a charter member of Los
Rancheros Visitadores and in 1939, the
Rancheros spent the night at Camp
Drake. The Rancheros yearbook for
the ride said, At Camp Drake, the
horses and coaches were jammed into
a narrow canyon. Each Ranchero
camp had to find a knoll or bluff on
which to set up for the night and the
writer likened them to cliff dwellings.
Thomas M. Storke, Santa Barbara
publisher, whose Ranch the TMS is
just below Camp Drake, was the offi-
cial host for the night.
Storkes new hacienda had plenty
of room and spectacular views. On
the south side, a covered patio was
warmed by a fieldstone fireplace and
looked out on the large built-in bar-
beque and pool. On the north side, the
meadow sloped down gently past the
caretakers cottage and horse barn. A
stonewall and olive trees still line the
drive.
Inside, six bedrooms and three and
a half baths provide plenty of space
for entertaining overnight guests. The
large living room and adjoining open
den each have fireplaces constructed
of limestone shale quarried on the
property. One closet in the den houses
a little copper-topped bar. A small,
mirrored door opens to the kitchen
so the staff could service the bar. It
is rumored that a plate inscribed by
visiting Rancheros once had a place of
honor here.
In the kitchen, a panel opens to
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Movie cowboy Leo Carrillo, humorist and author Irvin Cobb, and Tom Storke enjoy a moment on the
front porch of Rancho Pasatiempo circa 1940
The Way It Was
by Hattie Beresford
Rancho Alegre: Pasatiempo
Ms Beresford is a retired
English and American his-
tory teacher of 30 years in
the Santa Barbara School
District. She is author of
two Noticias, El Mirasol:
From Swan to Albatross
and Santa Barbara
Grocers, for the Santa
Barbara Historical Society.
This is part two of a two-part story
When Thomas More Storke purchased the ranch from William Henry Step in 1937, he built a rambling
ranch house in which to entertain his friends and fellow Rancheros (Photo courtesy of Hattie Beresford)
Nils Slim Larsen, for whom the meadow is
named, became superintendent of Rancho Alegre
when Anna Clark purchased the ranch and con-
tinued his stewardship of the land under the
Boy Scouts (Photo courtesy of Ron Walsh and Los
Padres Council of the Boy Scouts of America)
The famous copper-topped bar at Rancho Alegre
reflects program director Ron Walsh (Photo
courtesy of author)
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 27
ranch, Barbara Doran, whose father
Albert Hoelscher was the superinten-
dant of Bellosguardo, remembers an
idyllic childhood of picnics and birth-
day parties at the ranch house, riding
the trails, and boating and swimming
in the reservoir.
After the war, Storke wanted to
buy his ranch back, but Anna Clark
refused to sell it. Consequently,
Storke bought another ranch nearby
and named it Pasatiempo as well.
After Anna E. Clark died in 1963,
Huguette Clark, according to her
mothers wishes, deeded Rancho
Alegre to Mission Council of the Boy
Scouts of America. Her one stipula-
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8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 28 The Voice of the Village
edge of who did it. The pathway is
lovely, and I know the reason it is
so lovely: it is the involvement of so
many Montecito citizens providing
input and working with the Federal
people. I am actually hoping that
these Federal people learned some
lessons from this project that can be
passed on to other cities and towns. It
is going to be gorgeous.
I just hope people will watch this
lovely pathway develop and mature. I
think it will become a great source of
pride for Montecito and for the chil-
dren who do walk to school (and there
are many who will now). They will
see a beautiful, sustainable landscape
design develop and mature.
I say Bravo to all involved.
And I also say Bravo to the people
of Montecito who saved so many
trees, who changed the surface of the
path and made it so lovely. This is
the beauty and the continuance of the
beauty of Montecito.
I think it is a winner all around.
Penelope Bianchi
Montecito
P.S. I am afraid all my prayers could
not save that beautiful and magnifi-
cent oak tree in front of Scott Hogue
Florist behind San Ysidro Pharmacy. It
is looking as dead as a door nail (my
Grannys words), but I am still asking
everyone to talk to it. It cant hurt
and it might save the tree.
Report From Athens
When we checked into our hotel
in Athens, the hotel clerk assured us
that all was calm in Athens. George
Papandreou had stepped down and a
responsible government was now in
place. It was the communists who
were behind the demonstrations, he
said. Unions fight decreases in pay
and benefits; students protest lack
of opportunity, and ordinary peo-
ple resist reforms and tax increases.
Sounds familiar. We needed to see
for ourselves, so we walked the four
blocks to Syntagma Square where the
Greek Parliament building is located
and where tens of thousands had dem-
onstrated earlier that week. Everything
was, indeed, back to normal. How long
normal will last is a question. Greece
has an unemployment rate of over
17%. The rate is 42% for those under 24
years of age.
But our mission in visiting Greece
was more to explore the wonderful
ancient history of this country. One
could say true civilization started here
over 3,000 years ago. Our first stop
was the remaining structure of the
Parthenon. It is the greatest symbol
of the glory of ancient Greece situated
at the highest point in Athens. With
seventeen columns on each side, it
was the largest temple ever completed
in Greece and dates back to 438 BC.
Just below the Parthenon is the new
and long awaited Acropolis Museum,
which now houses over 4,000 artifacts
from ancient times. Ironically it is quite
a modern building with natural light
recreating outdoor conditions. It was
designed by architect Bernard Tschumi
with Michael Photiadis, and inaugu-
rated in the summer of 2009.
There, of course, were several more
interesting museums and sites in
Athens but Ill only mention one more.
We observed the running of the classic
marathon through the streets of Athens.
Athletes from all over the world come
here in November to participate, and
for good reason: this is where the first
marathon was run, in the year 490 BC.
The town of Marathon is the site of
one of the most celebrated battles in
world history, where a small group of
Greeks defeated a much larger force of
Persians. After the battle, a runner was
sent to Athens, exactly 42 km away, to
announce the victory. After shouting,
We won, he collapsed and died. This
is the origin of todays marathon race.
Our final leg into antiquity took us
to the town of Olympia and the origin
of our modern day Olympics. The
games started here in 776 BC and con-
tinued for 1,000 years before their abo-
lition by Emperor Theodosius in AD
394. The games were held every four
years in honor of Zeus and lasted five
days. Competition included wrestling,
chariot and horse racing, wrestling,
discus, javelin, long jump and run-
ning. All races were performed in the
nude and no women were allowed. We
were able to stand on that same track
and observe the stadium where the
competition took place. In 2004, when
the Olympics took place in Athens,
the shot put event was allowed in this
stadium. Close by near the Temple of
Zeus, the Olympic flame is lit every
four years, signaling the beginning of
the Olympic Games.
We moved on to other ports in
Turkey and Italy on our Oceania cruise
ship. And we bade farewell to Greece,
saddened by their recent troubles, but
enlightened by their history.
Frank McGinity
Montecito
Simply The BEST
Thank you for your Best of Montecito
series. Good ideas for holiday shop-
ping. Plus, recognition for some great
people. Thanks also for recognizing the
Friends of the Montecito Library, doing
important work in challenging times.
Hope a future BEST of ... rec-
ommends an optometrist or ophthal-
mologist. Some neighbors are suffer-
ing civic myopia. Whats worse than
sour grapes during the Thanksgiving-
Christmas season? Maybe its vision
problems.
As we recently celebrated Veterans
Day, some who should know bet-
ter zinged nasty personal attacks at
Supervisor Carbajal (our only elect-
ed County official to have served in
uniform). Why? Because he hasnt
stepped in to fight the Americans
with Disabilities Act, which requires
the new San Ysidro walking path be
legally accessible.
Thats our top priority, right?
With thousands of Americans
still deployed on two foreign fronts,
the economy in the sorriest shape since
the 1930s, the new Miramar hotel on-
hold, the Santa Maria Jail stuck (because
our northerly brethren decline to pay
for it), our Lompoc housing program
in scandal, our County budget in peril,
our CVR and upper village merchants
hurting, the state dumping prisoners
here, and Caltrans dragging its heels at
delivering a timely, attractive 101 proj-
ect, why shouldnt Supervisor Carbajal
drop everything to stop the disabled
from traveling safely along San Ysidro
Road?
Is this a joke?
What about disagreeing without
becoming disagreeable? Why must
some peevish people attack others
just for having a different perspec-
tive? Folks they dont even know.
In my twenty-five plus years of area
civic and policy work, Ive rarely met
a public servant more honest, friendly,
open, hard working than the County
Public Works Dept.s maligned Matt
Dobberteen.
His duties encompass the entire
County. Budget cuts have reduced his
work group by 70%. Yet he soldiers on,
with great efficiency and productiv-
ity, trying to see each job through, and
provide timely, accurate information to
all who seek it.
Are there no parents left in
Montecito? Why this anger against
parents whose alleged fault is a
desire for their children to be able to
walk or bike safely along San Ysidro,
the way that they did when they were
little? Isnt that something every par-
ent wants for their children to be
safe going to school or play on our
communitys streets?
Is it Salud Carbajals fault that traf-
fic volumes and speed-readings on San
Ysidro approach all-time highs? Are
those speeders all paparazzi dashing to
cover the short-lived Kardashian busi-
ness merger? Was it Matt Dobberteen
who made that nanny, racing to pick
up her charges after school, crash her
vehicle off San Ysidro (near 14 chil-
dren) a few years ago?
Nefarious COAST? Whose annual
prize for community service honors
Montecitos gentlemanly, upbeat civic
volunteer, the late Barry Siegel? Whose
sinister vision statement is Better
transportation for all?
I would like to say that Ms Lieff and
Mr. Boehr came to the dedication of the
Jake Boysel Bike Crossing, near the site
where a promising schoolboy going to
school, was killed by a speeder.
Like to say that the Mahers were
at Franklin School, where parents
mourned Sergio Romero, killed in
a crosswalk a few weeks ago, and
demanded public officials improve
what theyre doing to prevent this
from happening again.
To say that they attended the last
four Montecito and County meetings
updating the status of the San Ysidro
path. Or that theyre out there every
morning with radar guns, helping the
Sheriff slow speeders down on San
Ysidro, and across Montecito.
Like to, but I cant. Because they
werent.
In this time of grave recession, with
so many businesses just hanging on,
and County resources stretched to
the limit, is it possible that there are
good-hearted Montecitans whose par-
amount issue is that part of the San
Ysidro public right of way is being
reclaimed to protect our children, and
to provide safe passage to people who
just feel like taking a walk?
I pray not.
Can we no longer oppose a mes-
sage (or project) we dislike, without
publicly attacking the messenger, or
impugning their motives?
I wish health and happiness this fall
to all our Montecito neighbors and
merchants, to all our school children
and their parents, to all our visitors
and guests. I wish it to all our public
servants too, including Salud Carbajal
and Matt Dobberteen, whether I always
agree with them or not.
Life is tough enough as it is, without
all this rancor over little things.
Bring on a BEST Optometrist, and
Ill vouch some of our upset writers
a credit, so they can improve their
vision, to see more clearly that what
makes Montecito special is our people,
not whether a path meets ADA stan-
dards.
Lee Moldaver
Santa Barbara
(Editors note: All we can add is that we
believe it is good that citizens debate issues,
even those as mundane as construction
of a Safe Route To School. That federal
funds were used to create the San Ysidro
Pathway is indeed troublesome to many,
including us. J.B.) MJ
LETTERS (Continued from page 18)
Frank McGinity made sure to bring along some
provocative reading material on his recent trip to
Greece
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 29
W
hat began as a readership survey of what readers thought were the
BEST things about Montecito that we thought could be covered in
one special issue turned into a four-week-long assessment of the
BEST of Montecito. And, this is the last in the series: Montecitos BEST Hostess
and Delivery Woman.
As for the BEST of everything else, we have a number of categories that
need to be analyzed and perhaps zeroed in on as possible selections for next
years survey.
For example, we received a number of entries honoring Lana Marm for
her unique ad campaign featuring local women wearing her clothes. But,
how could we select her campaign as the BEST advertising? We couldnt,
and cant, but there ought to be a way to acknowledge her efforts. Wendy
Foster was voted BEST window display, and perhaps we should have
included that as a separate category; we probably will next year. Ditto
with the BEST bank teller (Katy at SBB&T, although were kinda stuck on
Mary), BEST Art teacher (Jordan Pope), BEST breakfast (Jeannines), BEST
dessert (the Farm Cake at Pierre Lafond), BEST eyeglass service (Irwin at
Occhiali), BEST firearms instructor (Dale Lowdermilk), BEST hair straight-
ener (Julietta at Dadiana), BEST merchant (Doug at Village Hardware).
Other BESTS may include: kids birthday party space, mailman, postal clerk,
manicurist, martini, omelet, pharmacist, Pilates instructor, server, salesper-
son, salsa, etcetera.
There were many choices outside Montecito too: Enterprise Fish Company
at 225 State Street received the most votes for BEST Happy Hour (Monday
through Friday, from 4 to 8 pm, Sunday from 7 pm until closing), but since
the restaurant is not in Montecito, we had to pass it by, but well certainly
follow up with a separate story. Discounted prices on oysters, steamed clams,
scallop bruschetta, lobster bisque and the like, along with reduced-price beer,
cocktails, margaritas and (house) wine apparently make this a destination for
downtown denizens. Coming in second was Blushs 3 to 7 pm Happy Hour
(every day!) further up at 630 State Street. The Waterfront Grills outdoor patio
was voted BEST view; Caf del Sol (in Montecito) came in second in this cat-
egory (Pierre Lafond won for BEST Outdoor Patio, but well include BEST
view next year).
Expect to be surprised next year. In the meantime, what follows are the
REST of the BEST of Montecito, as selected by our readers.
Hostess WitH tHe . . .
If Jennifer Brooks lengthy blonde locks and big friendly smile look vaguely
familiar to even casual Luckys customers, it is because she has been the main
hostess at Luckys for the past eight and a half years. Jennifer attended MUS
from third grade through sixth grade. Her father, Steven Brooks, is a local
jeweler; Brooks Jewelers was a local landmark for many years; it is now the
Montecito Cafs spillover bar at the southeast corner of Coast Village Road
and Olive Mill and an integral part of the Montecito Inn. Jennifers mother, Sue
Brooks, has been sales manager at Montecito Journal for the past fifteen years.
After MUS, Jennifer attended SBJH, SBHS, SBCC, UCSB and back to City
College. I have almost five degrees, she says. Art History, Studio Art, Liberal
Studies, almost to the end of Graphic Design, and Multi-Media Arts.
After being asked how it is that she hadnt made the transition from hostess
to server, as most do, Jennifer replies that she simply enjoys what she does. I
really just like working here, she says, doing what I do. I dont see myself as
a server.
When asked if she was looking to take over Eric Maldonados job as maitre
d she laughs heartily. Hes the best at what he does; I dont think anyone else
could fill those shoes, she says, catching her breath between laughs.
We wondered too, what was the most difficult thing shes ever had to do as
hostess. That would be to separate divorces from each other; keep them in
separate parts of the restaurant when they really want to be in the same room,
she says. Youve got a couple who were married, for example, and used to
come here all the time and sat at a certain table. Now they still both want that
same table. Ive got to politely say to them that they might be happier some-
where else in the restaurant.
As far as treating celebrities differently from regular customers, Jennifer
says it isnt really from celebrity to non-celebrity; certain customers demand
certain things. We are happy to give that to them. We dont treat celebrities dif-
ferently, unless they are close friends of ours, but thats the same way we treat
other close friends of the restaurant. Some people come in several times a week
Why was it that none of all the pious ever discovered psycho-analysis? Why did it have to wait for a completely godless Jew? Sigmund Freud
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Jennifer Brooks,
selected by
MJ readers as
Montecitos BEST
Hostess, grew
up in Montecito,
attended MUS
and other local
schools, and is cur-
rently designing
a book cover for
Luckys maitre d
Eric Maldonados
mystery thriller,
The Onyx Spark Job
by Journal Staff
and some of them are celebrities, but theres no special treatment because of
what they are. And, most of them are not high maintenance that come in here.
Most of them are pretty easygoing and its great to be around them.
So, what does she eat and/or like at Luckys?
Pepper Steak. I love our Pepper Steak with a cognac green peppercorn sauce.
I think its fantastic.
Her favorite drink?
The Lemon Drop. Its perfect. Theres nothing wrong with the Lemon Drop.
Its just made with Citron vodka, we make our own sweet and sour, sugar
rimmed (shaken in a martini glass). Very simple. Not too sweet; not too tart.
As for what the future may hold, Jennifer says what shed like to be is a
graphic designer. She is currently working on a cover for a murder-mystery that
Eric Maldonado has written (The Onyx Spark Job, set in San Francisco circa 1987,
is available at Smashwords.com. Eric calls it a hardboiled spiritual misadven-
ture in the form of a found document.) She has also designed posters for a local
deejays program called Punk On Vinyl.
I could not do my job without Jennifer, says Eric, who happened by during
the interview. With thirty years in this industry, he adds, shes the BEST host
Ive ever seen. She handles so many things, so I can concentrate on the most
important parts of my job; she handles everything else, and then does the most
important parts of her job.
Best Delivery Woman
Upbeat, all-business, and out-of-her-way helpful Cynthia Hiatt voted
Montecitos BEST Delivery Woman has been with FedEx for 23 years.
She was born in Patterson, near Modesto, in California and grew up in
Santa Clarita. She and her husband, Steve St. Germain, were married four
years ago at the Santa Barbara Yacht Club. Cynthia, who lives in Buellton
and doesnt have a boat, explains that, I asked one of my customers if she
would sponsor me and she gladly did. The couple met at FedEx, where he
was a courier, then a dispatcher, and who now works for Citrix in Goleta.
We conducted our interview at the Montecito Journal offices on Coast Village
Circle during one of Cynthias short breaks.
BEST OF MONTECITO Page 364
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 30 The Voice of the Village
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Ermei Shefflin proudly shows off her Deans List
certificate, as well as the medal around her neck,
signifying that she has received the honor two
years in a row
MAI is a
multi-faceted
aesthetic
center, says
Dr. Chang
an organization which he founded
to help people in underserved com-
munities.
The Institute focuses on profession-
alism, quality, and customer service,
says Chang. The only way well sur-
vive in this community is if we pro-
vide the best results with the best
customer service, he said. He says
he hopes to build a reputation in
Montecito and Santa Barbara, one cli-
ent at a time. The aesthetically pleas-
ing space even features a VIP entrance
and waiting room, for clients wanting
more privacy.
MAI staff includes Registered
Nurses Jane Williamson, RN, Sara
Joseph, RN, and Cheryl McPherson,
RN. Other staff includes makeup
and eyelash artist, Shannon Loar-
Cot, aestheticians Kelly Merritt and
Danny Neifert, and massage therapist
Victoria Sargasso. The newest addi-
tion is Dr. Rodriguez, who special-
izes in hair restoration. Site manager
Alana Clumeck oversees scheduling
and the reception area.
MAI is located at 1150H Coast
Village Road in Montecito, and is
open seven days a week. The Institute
hosts art exhibits and special events
throughout the year; visit www.mon
tecitoaesthetics.com or call (805) 565-
5700 for more information.
MUS Deans List
by Lily Buckley
Thirty-two deserving students were
presented with certificates last Friday
at a morning assembly at Montecito
Union School, signifying their names
being added to the Deans List. Dave
Williams, Dean of Students at MUS,
started the Deans List last year to
recognize and honor students who
excel academically, and who exem-
plify the qualities described in the
student pledge: responsibility, kind-
ness, respect, and integrity. Teachers
are able to select one student to be
added each month, and the students
who have made the list this year
are: Ermei Shefflin, Monica Nitka,
Angie Cummings, Else Guerrand-
Hermes, Lauren Mills, Nicholas
Richmond, Olivia Powell, Nicholas
Siemens, Margo Nahabedian, Lulu
Blau, Rell Kyle, Tynan Stork, Beck
Dehlsen, Cory Williams, Drake Rabin,
Hannah Ziouani, Devin Pai, Dino Ise,
Romy Davies, Blake Siemens, Cassie
Hughes, William Dunaway, Rachel
Carrillo, Shantinath Smyth, Claire
Tolles, Jasmin Chapman, Monique
Welch, Tate Stussy, Bella Holland,
Heidi Hatton, Paloma McKean, and
Grace Fuss. MJ
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 31 It is absurd to divide people into good and bad; people are either charming or tedious Oscar Wilde
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ate venue when the Womens Chorus
and Chamber Choir of UCSB com-
bined for the first time in many years
to perform North, featuring the
music of Canada, Finland, Norway,
Denmark and Estonia.
The vocalists, under the conduct-
ing talents of Helena von Rueden,
Michael Vitalino and Michel Marc
Gervais, sang a wonderful mixed
bag of songs by a variety of compos-
ers.
One piece even featured the pop-
ping of a blown-up paper bag, while
another sounded like the wailing of
banshees.
A brave program, indeed...
The Scholars Soar
Over at Our Lady of Sorrows
Church, UCSBs Arts & Lectures con-
cert featuring the 39-year-old English
choral group, the Tallis Scholars, was
a sell-out.
The ten-strong troupe, who I used
see regularly at the Church of St.
Mary the Virgin in Manhattan, just
improves with age under director
Peter Phillips, more than justifying
its description as one of the worlds
leading exponents of Renaissance
sacred music.
With an exquisite clarity and puri-
ty of sound, the choristers, who per-
form 70 concerts each year around
the globe, sang 11 pieces, including
Magnificats from 13th and 14th
century composers John Taverner
and Hieronymus Praetorius, and a
more contemporary work, Hymn
to the Virgin, from Benjamin
Britten.
The scholars, who had the privi-
lege of performing in Romes Sistine
Chapel in 1994 to mark the final stage
of the restoration of Michelangelos
magnificent frescoes a broadcast
that was made simultaneously on
Italian and Japanese television ,
are scheduled to make two more
visits to America during the next 12
months.
Catch them if you can...
Mayan Fundraiser
Barbara Savage, founder and
president of the Tribal Trust
Foundation, opened the doors of
her charming adobe home to raise
funds for the native Mayans in
southern Mexico.
Its to help them preserve their arts,
tribal cultures and improve their way
of life, says Barbara, who was selling
jewelry, ceramics and photographs by
Montecito-based world traveler, Lisa
Field-Elliot.
Hopefully, well get around
$30,000, which goes a very long way
in that part of the country....
Sightings: Emmy-winning actor
William Daniels picking up his Java
jolt at Pierre Lafond... Carol Burnett
sitting at her usual fireplace table at
Luckys... Billy Baldwin and wife,
Chynna Phillips, perusing the menu
at China Palace
Pip! Pip! for now
Readers with tips, sightings and
other amusing items for Richards
column should e-mail him at rich
ardmineards@verizon.net or send
invitations or other correspondence
to the Journal MJ
MISCELLANY (Continued from page 24)
3823 Santa Claus Lane CarpinteriaA 93013
Invite you to our
4th Annual Jewelry Trunk Show
Saturday, December 10th, 10-4p.m.
Dont miss this one day only event!
p o r c h
805.684.0300
Hummingbird
805.684.5800
+
Tribal Trust
Foundation
founder
Barbara
Savage at
her home
with Theo
Helmstadter
of Green
River Pottery
at the
foundation
fundraiser
(Photo: Lisa
Field-Elliot)
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 32 The Voice of the Village
I
ts been 58 years since the Boston
Symphony Orchestra last played
a concert in Santa Barbara, which
is a very long time. But not quite as
long as the 86 years prior to 2004 that
the Boston Red Sox spent without
winning the World Series, a number
just about any Bostonian including
many members of the orchestra
knew all too well.
And thats not the only similarity
between the two New England insti-
tutions. After suffering the worst col-
lapse in the history of baseball at the
end of last season, the Red Sox fired
their manager, and then spent more
than two months securing a replace-
ment, an absurd amount of time
when you consider it took the world
champion Cardinals only two weeks
to secure a new skipper. But again,
that pales in comparison to how long
it will take the BSO to replace its
helmsman after music director James
Levine resigned in September. The
symphony has already begun the
search, auditioning conducting can-
didates in a process that might well
take two years to complete, not unlike
the Santa Barbara Symphonys own
search for a new leader that brought
Nir Kabaretti to town several years
ago.
Maybe the Red Sox should try
something like what were doing,
Malcolm Lowe, BSOs concertmaster
for the past 28 years, said over the
phone a few days before the Boston 9
965-5555
www.vnhcsb.org
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Concertmaster Malcolm Lowe returns to Santa Barbara with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the first
visit for the orchestra in 58 long years (Photo: Michael J. Lutch)
Boston is Back
On Entertainment
by Steven Libowitz
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 33 Selfishness must always be forgiven you know, because there is no hope of a cure Jane Austen
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ENTERTAINMENT Page 414
settled on Bobby Valentine as its new
manager, and not completely in jest.
Have them come in and do a guest
stint, test them out for few weeks
before actually getting hired.
Which brings us to Thursdays
concert at the Granada Theatre, with
Ludovic Morlot serving as guest con-
ductor just down the road from his
new home as the music director at the
Seattle Symphony. Morlot is new to
the west coast, but not at all unfamil-
iar to the BSO, having been a member
since 2001, when he was a conducting
fellow at Tanglewood with the legend-
ary music director Seiji Ozawa, and
later an assistant under Levine. Hell
already have two weeks of experi-
ence conducting the BSO back home
in Boston, albeit with a different pro-
gram, by the time the ensemble makes
it out west.
Lowe discussed the changes at the
orchestra and more in our telephone
interview.
Q. The BSO had a tough tenure with
James Levine due to his ongoing health
issues. How difficult had that been hav-
ing to respond to last minute substitu-
tions, etc. and how has it affected the
orchestra?
A. It was difficult, theres no getting
around that. There were times when
we really wished for and wanted to
have James Levine there. It was some-
what frustrating to prepare programs
and have them not pan out. When that
happens, a project that takes a lot of
time, the continuity with one person,
the whole point of the project like
when we were supposed to play all
the Beethoven symphonies it chang-
es the perspective. It takes on a differ-
ent meaning for the orchestra, and all
the preparation has a different slant
and interpretations from the conduc-
tor, so it forces you to adapt and do
something you know you wouldnt be
doing if hed been there. So it is frus-
trating. But I dont think it was neces-
sarily bad for the orchestra in terms of
how we play. Hes left a tremendous
legacy of excellence in orchestral play-
ing. I know as the concertmaster I
feel very comfortable with almost any
conductor who comes to us. But the
work James Levine did with us when
he was here was quite fruitful. And
one of the true tests of a music direc-
tor is the influence they have on the
orchestra as a whole that you can do
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 34 The Voice of the Village
T
here are certain experiences,
certain moments, in each of
our lives that simply cannot
be forgotten or duplicated. These
wrinkles in time can be had anywhere,
anytime, of course, but the fact is that
our little excursion has produced a
steady stream of them that I all of us,
hopefully will remember forever.
Some of those moments are mem-
orable because they are shockingly
horrifying, like the time when Kate,
then three years old and genuinely
astonished by the wonder that is a fine
Italian gelato (her first), shouted Nazi!
through a sugar-crazed grin at the
woman behind the counter in a quiet
but crowded parkside gelateria, rather
than Gratzie!, as we had practiced so
hard for weeks. (Weve cleared that
up.) Others are memorable for their
purity and innocence, like when Lily
whispered in my ear I can see the
whole world from here, Daddy, as I
held her close and we looked over
Manhattan at sunset from the Empire
State Building before we boarded our
flight for Dublin all those months ago.
Still others for their beauty, like my
wife smiling on the Rialto Bridge in
Venice in a waning light or relaxing,
not knowing I could see her from afar,
on a park bench in Paris watching the
world pass by. The list goes on and on.
For me, though, few places have
produced so many indelible images as
India, from the breathtaking view of
the Taj Mahal from across the Yamuna
River at sunset to the street scenes in
Delhi and from the beaches of Goa
to the backwaters of Kerala. It seems
that all of our chins are badly bruised
from the near-constant parade of jaw-
dropping sights and smells and tastes
set to the wild cacophony that seems
to permeate every hour of every day
here.
In a fitting end to our time in
India, we spent our last night at Sree
Poornathrayeesa, an ancient Hindu
Temple outside of Fort Kochi, witness-
ing a mind-boggling festival focused
on worshipping elephants with jew-
els, prayer, fire, music and food (my
understanding). Few tourists were
present we spotted only a couple in
a crowd of thousands and the whole
scene was so fascinating, so beautiful,
so genuinely real, that I can confidently
say that none of us will forget it.
There was beautiful classical
Indian music in what appeared to
be a centuries-old stable or barn of
some sort, with inhabitants dressed
in their finest sarees (women) and
dhotis (men), singing along and danc-
ing. There were twenty caparisoned
elephants decked out in jewels and
Leaving It
All Behind
Unforgettable India
by Matt Mazza
Oldest daughter Lily standing in a small jungle village on an island accessible only by boat deep in the
backwaters of Kerala. The Mazzas took a tour of the backwaters aboard an old rice boat and then trans-
ferred to an ancient wood canoe complete with an Indian gondolier, for lack of a better word (some
call this area the Venice of the East), for smaller waterways.
One of the jungle villages main industries is cultivation and production of palm wine or toddy from
the sap in the stem of the flower on palm trees. They build rudimentary ladders made of coconut
shells and fibers up the sides of palm trees to make the collection process easier. Kate is seen here
effectively participating in the Indian liquor industry. According to Matt, the palm wine (toddy) does
not taste particularly good and smells even worse.
Matt was a lawyer up until June 2011, when he closed up shop and left
Montecito with his wife and kids to travel around the world. Read his (and his
family's) full story in the newest edition of the Montecito Journal (glossy edition), on newsstands now.
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 35
necklaces and bells that rivaled the
collection of any Montecito socialite.
(Clarification: I am not likening any
Montecito socialites to bejeweled ele-
phants; I meant only to communicate
the beauty of the elephants and their
appointments.) There was fire, drum-
ming, royals, peasants and holy men,
all walking together, barefoot in the
sand and dirt, artfully dodging fresh
mounds of elephant dung while try-
ing to get as close to the magnificent
beasts as possible to pray and show
their dedication. It was sweltering hot
with a ton of humidity, and the people
were packed tightly together, soaked
with sweat, and yet they laughed and
talked and played and held hands
with the kids on their shoulders and
the elders and dizzying crowd around
them.
And there we were, the Mazzas from
Santa Barbara, right in the middle of
the whole thing, sweating, shaking
hands and laughing and talking about
California, our kids Lily and Kate
continue to be a huge draw here, our
house, my profession and who knows
what else.
The hours flew by and we left late,
stopping only on the advice of Vishnu,
our rickshaw driver-turned-guide-
turned-friend, for some cauliflower
fried in a red paste on the street and
a lime and sugar-cane drink to wash
it down before heading back to Fort
Kochi over countless bridges and
moonlit country roads in the open air.
Sleep came easy.
I will miss India but will always
hold it close, ready to be recalled,
vividly, ready to be savored again and
again.
It has been truly unforgettable.
If you are interested in talking to Matt
or, perhaps more likely, anybody else in
the Mazza family, feel free to email any of
them at towheadtravel@gmail.com. And
if you are interested in a more detailed
account of their journey to date, check out
their website and Matts blog at www.
towheadtravel.com. MJ
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The stars of the show that walked around the temple in a long procession while people followed and
prayed to them, preceded by holy men with painted faces and bare chests
Just one of the caparisoned elephants (there were around twenty of them). Matt walked right up to the
elephant with Lily on his shoulders to capture this close-range shot.
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 36 The Voice of the Village
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Her father was a surveyor for the State of California.
He helped build the California aqueduct and Castaic
Lake; thats how we ended up in Santa Clarita,
Cynthia says. She found her way to Santa Barbara via
a romance. I met a guy, she laughs. Why does any
girl find a way out of her hometown? But I was looking
to move anyway, she adds.
Ms Hiatt began working for the Youth Conservation
Corps upon graduation from high school, setting up
campgrounds and doing a little work for the Forest
Service. She says she was going to be a Forest Ranger
but decided it ultimately didnt pay enough, at least it
didnt then, which was thirty years ago. So, I started
tinting windows, putting film on windows. Its very
tedious and meticulous, she says, and its inside
[work] and I didnt want to be inside.
A friend of hers worked for FedEx; she applied, got
the job, and has been there ever since. She delivers
about eighty packages a day and picks up a lot
of documents by virtue of the nature of the kinds of
businesses along Coast Village Road: title companies,
real estate, banks, lawyers, etc. Her route runs from
the bird sanctuary beginning at Stella Mares along
the beach to the end of Fernald Point and covers Coast
Village Road and the residential area up to Hot Springs
to Casa Dorinda, and most of the hedgerow up to
Montecito Union School.
Oh, about that out-of-her-way helpful part: Nearly
five years ago, a FedEx plane came in a little late and
Cynthia had a box to deliver that read Live Lizard
Inside, with holes poked into it. She
thought Oh my God, this poor little
creature, and left right away to deliver
what turned out to be a bearded drag-
on to a five-year-old.
Just a few weeks ago, UPS driv-
er Daryl Hansen (Montecitos BEST
Delivery Man) spotted what he
believed was an iguana on a wall
across the street from where this per-
son lived. He took a picture of it with
his phone and showed it to Cynthia.
Iguanas dont belong here, she
thought and after looking at the
photo realized it was probably the
bearded dragon shed delivered to
the little girl five years ago. So I
went up there and knocked on the
door and asked the woman if her
bearded dragon had escaped.
Yes, it got out a week ago, the
woman replied.
So, we started looking for it and
couldnt find it, but they put food out
for Beardy and were able to recap-
ture it.
Cynthia stays in shape by doing
a lot of water sports, water skiing,
whatever is outdoors; she also lifts
about a thousand pounds a day (in
packages).
Her favorite place, other than home,
is Summerland Beach: I take my
lunches in Summerland a lot of the
time she says. Sometimes I just stay
in the truck, but if its nice outside, Ill go down to the beach. She also recent-
ly discovered that theres nobody over by the Miramar right now, and it is
just fantastic, next to the railroad tracks.
When asked about the competition UPS mostly she chides Daryl and
says they like to think theyre competition, but theyre really not, with
only a piece of her tongue in her cheek. She says she thought about working
for UPS but prefers the FedEx uniforms: I dont like brown, she laughs.
What with running up and down stairs over a hundred times a day, we
wondered about her shoes. She can wear any kind of shoes, she notes, but
they must be black. Currently shes pleased with a sporty pair of Asics;
before that, a pair of Under Armours were really comfortable.
Before saying good-bye, we asked if she ran into unhappy customers.
Sometimes, she admits. What makes most people unhappy is when
deliveries are late and theyre frustrated because they had an appointment
or something. But the delays when they occur are usually because of bad
weather somewhere.
Also, she admits, some people get upset because we take up two spaces
when we park, but its all for safety. When you go to back out the angle is a
lot better, she explains as she backs out of our parking lot, throwing a big
smile our way. MJ
FedEx driver Cynthia Hiatt, voted BEST Delivery
Woman, has an easygoing nature but when on
the job she is determined to get those packages
delivered on time and in good shape, especially
the live ones
BEST OF MONTECITO (Continued from page 29)
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8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 37
Development, a class taught by David
Newton, Westmont professor of entre-
preneurial finance.
Students get a real-life experience
pitching a start-up venture to highly
seasoned entrepreneurs and inves-
tors, says Newton, who founded the
colleges entrepreneurship program
in 1990.
Students have been developing
their business plans since August
29. The final four ventures are: Rhee
Corporation, a college dorm-furni-
ture cooperative; CRUX, a multi-per-
son discount service for small busi-
nesses; Pacific Coast Skateboards,
which provides longboard skate-
boards for Hong Kong commuters;
and the Outdoor Exchange, a web-
site to purchase and sell sporting
goods.
The outside judging panel includes:
Susan Block, investment banker at
Block-Bowman & Associates; Eli
Eisenberg, founder and CEO of
Straight Line Management; Barry Fay,
president at McConnells Ice Cream
and owner at Montecito Growth
Advisors; Dave Goldmuntz, former
managing director at Union Bank of
Switzerland and Salomon Brothers
London; and Jason Spievak, CEO
at RingRevenue and former CFO of
Callwave. MJ A
bout 350 people attended
the opening of 5X5:
An Invitational at the
Westmont Ridley-Tree Museum
of Art on November 30, including
more than a hundred of the artists
who contributed to the unique show.
The exhibition, which is on display
through December 16, features more
than 450 fve-inch-square works of art.
The pieces range from highly fnished,
still-life paintings in oil on canvas to
lighthearted cartoons by well-known
graphic artists.
People were very enthusiastic
about the quality and diversity of the
work, says Chris Rupp, museum col-
lection manager and guest curator of
the exhibition. Many people told me
that it was a show they would have to
come back and see multiple times to
take in.
The featured artwork is available for
viewing purchase through an online
auction (www.westmontmuseum.
org/5x5) with proceeds benefitting
the museum. Computers are also
available in the museum to use for
bidding. The auction, a first for the
Westmont Ridley-Tree Museum of Art,
closes Friday, December 16, at 5 pm.
Snacks in the Balance, a pre-study
painting by Scott Fraser, has been the
first to receive a four-figure bid in the
auction. Fraser, a realist painter with
a delightful sense of humor, recent-
ly completed a similar painting that
was sent to his main gallery in San
Francisco.
The piece, Learn to Draw, by
John Baldessari, an internationally
known conceptual artist, and Figure
Drawing by John Nava, famous
for tapestries he created for the new
Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels
in Los Angeles, are also receiving
attention in auction bidding.
Life is never fair, and perhaps it is a good thing for most of us that it is not Oscar Wilde
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Hundreds of people stood shoulder to shoulder to see the new exhibition at the Westmont Ridley-Tree
Museum
David Newton teaches
an Entrepreneurship
and New Venture
Development class;
students enrolled in the
class will be competing
to earn one of four final
spots in the Collegiate
Entrepreneurship
Business Plan
Competition on Thursday
Top College
Entrepreneurs to
Unveil Plans
Twenty entrepreneurship stu-
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secure one of four final spots in the
22nd Annual Westmont Collegiate
Entrepreneurship Business Plan
Competition, Thursday, December 8
at 5 pm in Hieronymus Lounge at
Westmonts Kerrwood Hall. The com-
petition is free and open to the public.
Eight student venture teams sub-
mitted business plans for prelimi-
nary screening, but only the top four
have been invited to make formal
presentations at the final competi-
tion. The 20 students are enrolled in
Entrepreneurship and New Venture
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 38 The Voice of the Village
Today, the meadow below the main
ranch house is named in his honor.
Rancho Alegre and the
Outdoor School
When the Boy Scouts acquired 214
acres of Rancho Alegre, they sold
Camp Drake to the Camp Fire Girls
of Ventura. Today, Camp Drake is
called Circle V Ranch, and belongs
to the Society of St. Vincent de Paul
of Los Angeles who began their sum-
mer camp program for underserved
children of Los Angeles, Ventura and
Santa Barbara counties in 1954.
Meanwhile, back at Rancho Alegre,
Mission Council raised money from
various organizations to create a new
camp, which opened in 1965. By 1969,
the camp boasted 11 campsites with
dry pit latrines, piped drinking water,
and a seven-acre lake with boating
and canoeing facilities. The Santa
Barbara Foundation donated $23,000
for an Olympic-sized swimming pool
complete with dressing rooms (both
of which were recently renovated for
$110,000). Campers enjoyed archery
ranges, a campfire bowl, a fossil
excavation site, horse riding facility,
hiking and nature trails, and much,
much more. In 1969, the cost for
use of the camp was free to Mission
Council members and was 25 cents a
day per person to all others.
In the 1980s, the Outdoor School
of Santa Barbara, created by the
Santa Barbara County Department
of Education in 1952, found a perma-
nent home at Rancho Alegre. Their
mission is to help develop commu-
nity and environmental steward-
ship through first-hand experience
with nature. Run by the Los Padres
Council of the Boy Scouts of America,
the school serves 4,000 local 5
th
and
6
th
graders a year in addition to BSA
camps, weekend retreats and sum-
mer camps for various other organi-
zations.
Today, Storkes ranch house, which
is some distance from the main camp
up on the hill, is occupied by BSA
Los Padres Council program direc-
tor, Ron Walsh, who oversees the
operations of the camp. He and his
wife appreciate the historic nature
of the house and the amazing vis-
tas from their living room window.
They strive to keep the ranch house
authentic and well maintained. Up at
the cafeteria on the hill, Ron has pre-
served the camps history with dis-
plays of Camp Drake and the early
days of Camp Rancho Alegre.
From homestead to weekend
retreat, from war time refuge to
wilderness camp, the Step-Ilestine-
Oakley families would be glad to
know that the lands which sustained
them continue to sustain others by
helping develop a respect for nature,
others, and oneself.
(Sources not mentioned in text:
News-Press 18 September 1983 article
by Karen OHara; Campers Guide
to the Santa Barbara Area 1969;
Obituaries, County Land Records
and Maps; BLM Land Records;
Stanley journals of Ranchero Rides;
Great Registers; U.S. Census infor-
mation; California Editor by Thomas
More Storke; History of Santa Barbara
County by ONeill; Stage Coach Days
in Santa Barbara County by Walker
Tompkins; article by Bob Burtness.
Special thanks to Ron Walsh, pro-
gram director for Rancho Alegre
for the information and tour; John
Crockett of the Santa Ynez Historical
Society for assistance and photo; and
Barbara Hoelscher Doran for photos
and interview.) MJ
View from the front porch of Rancho Alegre in 1954 shows horses and sheep grazing in the meadow
(Photo courtesy of Barbara Hoelscher Doran)
Today, while only a remnant of the white picket fence remains, the meadow still slopes gently down-
ward, offering vast views of the mountains across the valley (Photo courtesy of author)
Today the reservoir is circled by cattails but still supplies the ranch with water via a new pumping sys-
tem (Photo courtesy of author)
In 1954, the reservoir was reed-free and used for recreation as well as a source of water for the ranch
(Photo courtesy of Barbara Hoelscher Doran)
WAY IT WAS (Continued from page 27)
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whose sentimental
mega-hits Lets Keep
The X in Xmas,
and the even bigger
Everybody Knows
There Aint No Sanity
Clause have bright-
ened childrens holi-
days for more than
thirty years
I
n the more than ffteen years that
Ive penned this column, Ive pretty
much played it safe. Ive tried not
to ruffe anyones feathers (except
one misstep with gardeners back in
1999), or step on toes (excluding the
column about taking dancing lessons
with Lora). But there comes a time
when any writer worth his salt has
to stick his neck out and stand up
for what he believes. I may alienate
some readers with this column. I may
lose some friends. Heck, I may even
lose my lucrative employment at this
newspaper, but if I ever want to look
myself in the mirror again, I can no
longer hide. Im just going to state
my position and take whatever comes
my way. Here goes I love Christmas
carols. No, thats not strong enough. I
love Christmas carols more than Mel
Torm loves chestnuts roasting on
an open fre, more than Irving Berlin
wants a white Christmas, more than
Rudolph loves fog.
I realize that the above statement
means one of two things either Ive
had a wonderful childhood (every
writers worst nightmare) or Im a silly
imbecile (every Alexanders eventual
revelation), but whew, now that Ive
confessed I feel the weight of Santas
sack is off my shoulders. I love all
Christmas carols, from the traditional
O Come All Ye Faithful, to the goofy
Walking In My Winter Underwear,
to Elton Johns haunting rendition of
I Saw Daddy Kissing Santa Claus.
Over the years its been hard for
me to sit back and hold my tongue
when my contemporaries grumble
about Christmas decorations popping
up in October, or when they com-
plain about hearing Christmas carols
in November. Ive always felt shame
for my pre-holiday glee and won-
dered all these years if there wasnt
someone, anyone, out there that felt the
same way that I do Christmas mer-
riment should start around the time
of National Sneak Some Homegrown
Zucchini On Your Neighbors Porch
Day (August 8
th
), and be in full swing
by the time our President pardons the
White House turkeys (that would be
the White House Thanksgiving tur-
keys not the presidential cabinet).
Its not just Christmas carols
that I love. I love everything about
Christmas. I love Christmas trees,
Christmas presents, Christmas pud-
ding, Christmas parties, Christmas
cards, Christmas presents, Christmas
decorations, Christmas movies,
Christmas Island, and did I mention
Christmas presents? I especially love
Santa Claus. Whats not to love? Santa
is someone I look up to and try to
emulate. Hes kind, jolly, generous,
good with reindeer, and has a body
type I can relate to.
Santa doesnt succumb to the pres-
sures of Mrs. Claus or the Bravo
Channel to become something trendy
or metro-sexual. He is what he is
round and beautiful. Im sure some
people, especially Californians, would
rather he forgo the tradition of eat-
ing cookies and milk at every stop on
Christmas Eve. Theyd probably pre-
fer he have rice cakes or plain Greek
yogurt washed down with Pellegrino,
but no, he still requests double-choc-
olate chip oatmeal cookies or snicker-
doodles with a tall glass of moo-juice
(and I happen to know that he prefers
whole milk, not any of that 2% crap).
And how can we argue with him? I
mean, the man is 437 years older than
Shelly Lowenkopf and he can still pull
an all-nighter.
I suppose the thing I like most about
Christmas is Christmas spirit. With
the exception of the occasional pep-
per spraying, random shooting, or
group trampling on Black Friday, most
people are just a little bit kinder dur-
ing the holiday season. And Christmas
carols are what sets the mood for such
spirit. Who can be mean while listen-
ing to The Little Drummer Boy?
Who can avoid being a little more gen-
erous with Christmas Shoes playing
in the background? Who among us
can hold back tears while listening
to Grandma Got Run Over By A
Reindeer?
Therefore, stop grousing about the
Christmas carols and start enjoying
them. Maybe even find the courage
to hum, whistle, or even sing along.
Sure, some people will look at you like
youre an inebriated Charlie Sheen on
a rant, but so what? Be sure to follow
those few crabby individuals home
and write down their address so next
August 8th you can deliver a truck-
load of homegrown zucchinis to their
front porch. MJ
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 40 The Voice of the Village
ONGOING
Ongoing seasonal events The South
Coast Railroad Museums festive miniature
railroad turns into the Candy Cane Train
in December, a tradition that dates back
nearly 20 years. Following the train ride,
be sure to visit the Toy Trains and Teddy
Bears exhibit inside the museum. WHEN:
1-3:45pm weekends, 2-3:45pm weekdays,
through Saturday, December 24 WHERE:
300 N. Los Carneros Rd., Goleta COST:
$4 INFO: 964-3540... Sing-along with
Craig Newton, who will share favorite
holiday songs for all ages from a variety
of cultures performed on the mandola,
guitar, tin whistle, djembe and more at a
series of free concerts for the whole family.
WHEN: 10:30am Thursday, December 8 at
the Carpinteria Library, 5141 Carpinteria
Ave (684-4314) and again 6pm the same
evening at the Solvang Library, 1745
Mission Drive (688-4214). Also 10:30am
Saturday, December 10 at the Eastside
Library, 1102 East Montecito Street (963-
3727)... Ojai Center for the Arts faithful
adaptation of Frank Capras classic flm
Its a Wonderful Life is performed as a
1940s radio broadcast with live onstage
sound effects. WHEN: 7:30pm Fridays and
Saturdays, through December 17, plus 2pm
Sunday, December 11 WHERE: 113 South
Montgomery Street COST: $10-$20 INFO:
640-8797 Trinitys 28th annual Advent
Organ Series continues with free concerts
from 3:30-4:30pm on Sundays, December
11 and 18 at Trinity Episcopal Church,
1500 State Street INFO: 965-7419... The
extremely popular Trolley of Lights in
which the Santa Barbara Trolley normally
driven by tourist destinations in the daytime
instead offers a nighttime trek through
myriad Santa Barbara neighborhoods
which offer the most luminous and pervasive
holiday displays begins its 12th annual
nightly run of 90-minute tours on Friday
night. WHEN: 6:30pm nightly through
December 23 WHERE: Departs from Wheel
Fun Rentals, 22 State Street COST: $14-
$23 INFO: 965-0353 or sbtrolley.com If
four-wheelin it is more your thing, DeeTours
Jeep Limos Holiday Lights Tour offers a
similar nightly trek around town seeking
the best Christmas displays for the second
consecutive year. WHEN: 5:45 & 7:15
nightly, December 12-23 WHERE: Departs
from foot of Stearns Wharf, Cabrillo
Boulevard and State Street COST: $10-$20
INFO: 448-8425
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9
Two decades of dance Montecito
School of Ballets 20th annual production
of its original holiday charmers The Night
Before Christmas and Les Patineurs features
the schools performers plus dancers from
SBCC, UCSB and the community at large.
Night, which is based on the famous
Christmas poem, opens with a beautiful
Victorian party and after the guests leave,
the family settles down for a long winters
nap. Sugarplums dance, toys come to life
during the night, and we even see a visit
CALENDAR OF EVENTS
Note to readers: This entertainment calendar is a subjective sampling of arts and other events taking place in the Santa Barbara
area this week. It is by no means comprehensive. Be sure to read feature stories in each issue that complement the calendar. In
order to be considered for inclusion in this calendar, information must be submitted no later than noon on the Wednesday prior
to publication. Please send all news releases and digital artwork to news@montecitojournal.net and/or slibowitz@yahoo.com
by Steven Libowitz

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9
Kirtan for the common
man Its not really
enough to say that Kirtan
singer Dave Stringer
is one of the most gifted
vocalists in the genre,
blessed with a fery, soulful
sound that can both erupt
with volcanic intensity
or entice like the soft
crackling of a freplace.
Whats more important
is that Stringer, a former
pop music professional,
takes the mystifying out
of the mysticism of Kirtan,
the call-and-response
devotional chanting in
Sanskrit that serves as both
meditation and prayer. He
blends traditional Indian
instruments with more modern sounds, but beyond that he also has an uncanny
ability to make the chants as accessible as everyday English, via his clear-headed
explanations and invitations (spoken and unspoken) to participate at any level without
embarrassment or expectations. Hence, beginners fnd the experience as profound
as long-time devotees, able to jump into the frenzy and fre at any moment or on
any level. Blending genres that include American gospel and jazz, Stringers high-
energy, high-vibe mantra music comes together like both that long lost musical coach
you treasured as a kid, and a spiritual leader guiding you to a higher plane. Paradise
Found and Bhakti Babe bring Stringer back to town tonight, in the unlikely venue of
the public library. The books will be rocking! WHEN: 8pm WHERE: Faulkner Gallery
at Santa Barbara Public Library, 40 East Anapamu Street COST: $20 in advance,
$25 at the door INFO: www.paradise-found.net

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 10
Nutcracker at the
Arlington Musical
artists get hot, then
not. Tastes in fashion
evolve. Movies burn up
the screen for a month
and are forgotten a few
months later (what flm
won the Academy Award
last year?). Presidents
come and go... even
peoples opinions of
the same president
changes in short order.
But The Nutcracker lives on! Year in and year out, going back to the mid-1970s,
Santa Barbara Festival Ballet has presented its massive production of Tchaikovskys
classic ballet, the magical journey of darling (if a bit spoiled) pre-teen Clara and her
Nutcracker Prince to the Kingdom of Sweets. The only local production to feature
a full live symphony orchestra, Festivals Nutcracker again features a slew of locals
in the cast of dancers, actors, musicians and behind-the-scenes crew all of whom
spend the better part of the rest of the year getting ready for this weekend plus
some very special guest artists. This year the grand pas de deux will be danced by
Michele Wiles, a principal with Ballet Next and an American Ballet Theater Gold
Medal Winner, as the Sugar Plum Fairy, with Carlos Molina, also of American
Ballet Theater, as the Cavalier. And make sure to get the little ones out to the
courtyard during intermission to meet their favorite characters live in person. WHEN:
2:30 and 7pm Saturday, 2:30pm Sunday WHERE: Arlington Theatre, 1317 State
Street COST: $25-$54 INFO: 963-4408
from eight tiny reindeer and their driver,
jolly St. Nick. Patineurs is inspired by the
famous ballet choreographed by Frederick
Ashton for the Royal Ballet of England, and
portrays the strength, grace and humor of
skaters on the ice. WHEN: 7:30pm Friday,
2pm Sunday WHERE: Lobero Theatre,
33 West Canon Perdido Street COST:
$24 general, $20 students/seniors, $16
children INFO: 963-0761 or www.lobero.
com
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 10
Holiday happenings Goleta Valley
Historical Societys Holiday at the Ranch
is an open house with Santa Claus and
his festively clad rein-goats, plus live
music, tours, crafts, and more. WHEN:
11am-4pm Saturday & Sunday WHERE:
304 North Los Carneros Road, Goleta
COST: $2-$5 INFO: 681-7216...
The Santa Barbara Botanic Gardens
Holiday Nature Craft Family Workshop
is fun for the whole family as the
education staff leads guests in creating
old-fashioned craft items like wreaths,
ornaments, wrapping paper and more
using materials gathered from nature.
WHEN: 10am-12noon WHERE: 1212
Mission Canyon Road COST: $30 for
a family of 4 ($7 additional persons);
discounts for members INFO: 682-4726
or www.sbbg.org... Solvangs Community
Nativity Pageant is an elaborately staged
presentation of the Biblical nativity
story, featuring live animals and live
musical accompaniment. WHEN: 5 &
7pm WHERE: Solvang Festival Theater,
420 2nd Street, Solvang COST: free
INFO: 688-6144
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 11
Tis the season Santa Barbaras
annual Parade of Lights enters its second
quarter-century with more of the same:
a late-afternoon festival on the harbor
complete with Santas Village, ten tons
of snow and holiday music followed by
the early evening spectacle of 30-50
decorated and bedazzled boats parading
out from the harbor, down to East Beach
and up the west side of the pier before a
short freworks display in the harbor closes
out the festivities. WHEN: 3-7pm WHERE:
Harbor Way COST: free INFO: 564-
5530... The Santa Barbara Jazz Societys
annual Holiday Potluck Party is now open
to the public! The informal party features
a throbbing rhythm section (Brendan
Statom on bass and Mike Rosen on
drums) while trumpeter-composer Jeff
Elliott serve as emcee, calling up to the
stage the various musicians in attendance
for an open jam session quite different from
the organizations typical monthly fare at
SOhO. Wine, beer, soft drinks and dessert
are provided; bring an entre, side dish or
appetizer for the potluck. And dont forget
the instruments. WHEN: 1-4pm WHERE:
Butler Event Center, 3744 State Street
COST: $15 members, $20 guests, $7 for
performing musicians and students INFO:
569-3367 or www.sbjazz.org... Christmas
with Santa Barbara Noel Carolers,
featuring special guest Debbie Denke
on piano, is a beneft for Santa Barbara
Vocal Jazz Foundations Music Education
Programs. WHEN: 7:30pm WHERE:
Free Methodist Church, 1435 Cliff Drive
COST: $20 INFO: 729-2627... The
Edelweiss Choir of Santa Barbara presents
Weihnachtskonzert, its annual concert of
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 41 The voice of the intellect is a soft one, but it does not rest until it has gained a hearing Sigmund Freud

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 10
Burnham up Broadway star David
Burnham was last seen on the New
York boards in the mega-hit musical
Wicked playing Fiyero, a role that
he originated in the developmental
workshops of the show. Birnham is also
an original Broadway cast member of
the musical The Light in the Piazza, and
he performed both on the Tony Awards
and the PBS telecast Live From Lincoln
Center, as well as the national tour,
where he received the prestigious Helen
Hayes Award for Best Actor, as well
as the Best Actor Garland Award for
his portrayal of Fabrizio. Going back
further, Birnham frst gained critical
acclaim when, after a two-year search,
he was chosen to replace Donny
Osmond as Joseph in the national tour
of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor
Dreamcoat, for which he won the
Dramalogue Award. Birnham teams
up with musical director Mark Vogel
a BMI award-winning composer
(Raising Helen), music director and producer who has worked with artists ranging
from Natalie Cole to the Beach Boys for a one-night-only musical performance
called A Broadway Holiday as part of Rubicon Theatre Companys Broadway
Cabaret Series, where he will sing a selection of solos from an array of Broadway
hits sprinkled with holiday favorites. Following the performance, guests are invited to
mingle with the star in a holiday themed reception. WHEN: 7pm WHERE: 1006 E.
Main Street, Ventura COST: INFO: 667-2900 or www.rubicontheatre.org

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 13
Bizet, Beethoven & Bax Its
probably not what classical music
lovers mean when they refer to The 3
Bs, but after tonight, it might be. The
Santa Barbara Chamber Orchestras
next concert features the vibrant
pianist Alessio Bax performing
Beethovens Piano Concerto No.
5 (The Emperor), one of the more
popular pieces in the repertoire as
evidenced by the fact that its also
the work performed by Chinese
pianist Hong Xu with the Santa
Barbara Symphony three weeks ago
(so much for the myth of cooperative
programming). Bax, who also played
Mozart with the SBCO last May, has
earned some rave reviews for his
focused attack, with Gramophone
noting that his playing quivers
with an almost hypnotic intensity.
After intermission, Maestro Ohyama
conducts the ensemble in Georges
Bizets brilliant First Symphony in C
Major. WHEN: 7:30pm WHERE:
Lobero Theatre, 33 West Canon
Perdido Street COST: $42 & $47
INFO: 963-0761 or www.lobero.com

traditional Christmas music sung in English,
German, Norwegian and other languages
WHEN: 3pm WHERE: Trinity Lutheran
Church, 909 North La Cumbre Road
COST: $12 INFO: 682-1537
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14
Holiday mixer As if screenwriters
and other flmmakers ever needed
an excuse to imbibe, tonights event
sponsored by Screenwriters Association
of Santa Barbara, The Table Santa
Barbara, Indiecoop: Co-operative of
Independent Santa Barbara Producers,
and Santa Barbara Filmmakers brings
the celluloid heroes together for an night
of networking, drinking, eating, laughing
and maybe even meeting new people
who can help you with your projects. And
its a darn good excuse to check out the
new Casa Blanca Restaurant & Cantina
on lower State Street, too! WHEN: 5-7pm
WHERE: 330 State Street INFO: 845-
8966 MJ
ENTERTAINMENT Page 444
anything other conductors want you
to do and the orchestra gives back
to the guest conductors. We did that
we sound good. So I do think the
orchestra has gained certain strengths
because of all the changes in schedule.
Do you think in some ways the orches-
tra is perhaps more prepared than usual
because of having to adapt these last few
years?
Thats probably true. Weve gained
some strength because of the changes
in schedule, so thats a good observa-
tion.
When Levine resigned as of September
first, was it more relief or disappoint-
ment?
Everyone would have their own
feelings about it, of course, but I think
the orchestra as a whole moved on
surprisingly quickly. For me personal-
ly I was surprised at how we just went
on about our business and got ready
for the next phase of our existence. It
wasnt non-stressful, by any means,
but people didnt really dwell on it.
Because of how it occurred physical
issues rather than artistic differences
it wasnt traumatic. It helped us accept
and move forward.
I know youre on the search committee
for the new music director. While I dont
think youll go into specifics, can you
speak in generalities of what you are going
to look for?
I think that with the orchestra as
with any major orchestra that has
a lot of history its important to
find a director that has a broad, in-
depth historic view of music in gen-
eral. Whats particular to the BSO is
Tanglewood, the summer festival that
is also a school. Leonard Bernstein
was a student there, for example, one
of a long list of tremendous musicians
who went there. [What we want is]
someone who is aware of that legacy,
who can do something very special
going forward from his or her own
point of view.
Can we talk about the program youll
be playing here in Santa Barbara? How
were the choices made? Can you give me
your take or insight on the specific works?
And I think its particularly interesting
that youll be playing Berliozs Roman
Carnival Overture, which was also per-
formed when the BSO last visited Santa
Barbara fifty-eight years ago.
[In general], every time I sit down
to play a program that has a scope
to it, theres always some music that
reaches back. The Berlioz is a piece
that is very old and dates far back,
and has been performed in Boston for
years. Its great to play with an orches-
tra like that, one that has the his-
tory. Its nice to do a tour like this and
bring it to a community that doesnt
stretch that far back in terms of its
own music making. Hopefully well
communicate some of that meaning to
everyone.
Theyre all beautiful pieces that
have their own character. Certainly
one of the challenges of this program
and its the only time were doing that
program in that configuration on the
tour is going from Berlioz to Mozart,
jumping forward to Bartok and then
the Wagner in isolation from the oth-
ers, diving into different styles and
epochs. We rehearse these programs
here at home, and they just need some
perfecting as we get out to the west
coast.
Do any of the pieces particularly speak
to you?
As concertmaster, my focus is
always the whole program. There may
be moments that are special to me, but
I have to bring the same presence and
focus to every work that we present.
I have to try to have tunnel vision for
each piece at the moment.
This is the first extended West Coast
tour for the BSO in quite a few years.
How is it for the musicians to travel out
here?
I think it will be great fun. We have
some time in San Francisco, which
is wonderful. The other cities that
we play and the series that were
involved in are very popular and part
of the main cultural life of the commu-
nities. Thats very exciting for us to be
a part of that.
You will be playing under conductor
Ludovic Morlot. How is that relationship
going so far?
He made a wonderful impression
on us when he was assistant con-
ductor, and at Tanglewood. Hes an
extremely jaunty person, very nice
and very musical. So were all looking
forward to working with him to do
this tour.
In these tough economic times that have
caused a lot of consternation and worse at
other leading orchestras, the BSO seems to
be not just surviving but thriving. Whats
the secret?
I think great care on the part of our
trustees and overseers and manage-
ment. And the orchestra itself: we
take a lot of pride in our playing and
the feeling of protectiveness that the
whole organization has is quite perva-
sive here. Its really helped us to sur-
vive in a very solid way the financial
impact of the last few years or decade.
Im really proud of everyone here for
how theyve managed and had the
foresight to handle the issues before
they were a problem.
You come from a family of musicians,
your brother is a concertmaster in Canada
ENTERTAINMENT (Continued from page 33)
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 42 The Voice of the Village
Bella Vista $$$
1260 Channel Drive (565-8237)
Featuring a glass retractable roof, Bella Vis-
tas ambiance is that of an elegant outdoor
Mediterranean courtyard. Executive Chef
Alessandro Cartumini has created an inno-
vative menu, featuring farm fresh, Italian-
inspired California cuisine. Open daily for
breakfast, lunch and dinner from 7 am
to 9 pm.
Cafe Del Sol $$
30 Los Patos Way (969-0448)
CAVA $$
1212 Coast Village Road (969-8500)
Regional Mexican and Spanish cooking
combine to create Latin cuisine from tapas
and margaritas, mojitos, seafood paella
and sangria to lobster tamales, Churrasco
ribeye steak and seared Ahi tuna. Sunfower-
colored interior is accented by live Span-
ish guitarist playing next to cozy beehive
freplace nightly. Lively year-round outdoor
people-wat ching front patio. Open Monday-
Friday 11 am to 10 pm. Saturday and Sunday
10 am to 10 pm.
China Palace $$
1070 Coast Village Road (565-9380)
Montecitos only Chinese restaurant, here youll
fnd large portions and modern dcor. Take out
available. (Montecito Journal staff is especially
fond of the Cashew Chicken!) China Palace also
has an outdoor patio. Open seven days 11:30 am
to 9:30 pm.
Giovannis $
1187 Coast Village Road (969-1277)
Los Arroyos $
1280 Coast Village Road (969-9059)
Little Alexs $
1024 A-Coast Village Road (969-2297)
Luckys (brunch) $$ (dinner) $$$
1279 Coast Village Road (565-7540)
Comfortable, old-fashioned urban steak-
house in the heart of Americas biggest
little village. Steaks, chops, seafood,
cocktails, and an enormous wine list are
featured, with white tablecloths, fine
crystal and vintage photos from the 20th
century. The bar (separate from dining
room) features large flat-screen TV and
opens at 4 pm during the week. Open
nightly from 5 pm to 10 pm; Saturday &
Sunday brunch from 9 am to 3 pm.
Valet Parking.
Montecito Caf $$
1295 Coast Village Road (969-3392)
Montecito Coffee Shop $
1498 East Valley Road (969-6250)
Montecito Wine Bistro $$$
516 San Ysidro Road 969-7520
Head to Montecitos upper village to indulge
in some California bistro cuisine. Chef
Nathan Heil creates seasonal menus that
$ (average per person under $15)
$$ (average per person $15 to $30)
$$$ (average per person $30 to $45)
$$$$ (average per person $45-plus)
MONTECI TO EATERI ES . . . A Gu i d e
include fsh and vegetarian dishes, and fresh
fatbreads straight out of the wood-burning
oven. The Bistro offers local wines, classic
and specialty cocktails, single malt scotches
and aged cognacs.
Pane Vino $$$
1482 East Valley Road (969-9274)
Peabodys $
1198 Coast Village Road (969-0834)
Plow & Angel $$$
San Ysidro Ranch
900 San Ysidro Lane (565-1700)
Enjoy a comfortable atmosphere as you dine
on traditional dishes such as mac n cheese and
ribs. The ambiance is enhanced with original
artwork, including stained glass windows
and an homage to its namesake, Saint Isadore,
hanging above the freplace. Dinner is served
from 5 to 10 pm daily with bar service extend-
ing until 11 pm weekdays and until midnight
on Friday and Saturday.
Sakana Japanese Restaurant $$
1046 Coast Village Road (565-2014)
Stella Mares $$/$$$
50 Los Patos Way (969-6705)
Stonehouse $$$$
San Ysidro Ranch
900 San Ysidro Lane (565-1700)
Located in what is a 19th-century citrus pack-
inghouse, Stonehouse restaurant features a
lounge with full bar service and separate dining
room with crackling freplace and creekside
views. Chef Jamie Wests regional cuisine is
prepared with a palate of herbs and vegetables
harvested from the on-site chefs garden.
Recently voted 1 of the best 50 restaurants in
America by OpenTable Diners Choice. 2010
Diners Choice Awards: 1 of 50 Most Romantic
Restaurants in America, 1 of 50 Restaurants
With Best Service in America. Open for dinner
from 6 to 10 pm daily. Sunday Brunch 10 am
to 2 pm.
Trattoria Mollie $$$
1250 Coast Village Road (565-9381)
Tre Lune $$/$$$
1151 Coast Village Road (969-2646)
A real Italian boite, complete with small but
fully licensed bar, big list of Italian wines, large
comfortable tables and chairs, lots of mahogany
and large b&w vintage photos of mostly fa-
mous Italians. Menu features both comfort food
like mama used to make and more adventurous
Italian fare. Now open continuously from lunch
to dinner. Also open from 7:30 am to 11:30 am
daily for breakfast.
Via Vai Trattoria Pizzeria $$
1483 East Valley Road (565-9393)
Delis, bakeries, juice bars
Blenders in the Grass
1046 Coast Village Road (969-0611)
Heres The Scoop
1187 Coast Village Road (lower level)
(969-7020)
Gelato and Sorbet are made on the premises.
Open Monday through Thursday 1 pm to 9 pm,
12 pm to 10 pm Friday and Saturday, and 12
pm to 9 pm on Sundays. Scoopie also offers a
full coffee menu featuring Santa Barbara Roast-
ing Company coffee. Offerings are made from
fresh, seasonal ingredients found at Farmers
Market, and waffe cones are made on site
everyday.
Jeannines
1253 Coast Village Road (969-7878)
Montecito Deli
1150 Coast Village Road (969-3717)
Open six days a week from 7 am to 3 pm.
(Closed Sunday) This eatery serves home-
made soups, fresh salads, sandwiches, and its
specialty, The Piadina, a homemade fat bread
made daily. Owner Jeff Rypysc and staff de-
liver locally and cater offce parties, luncheons
or movie shoots. Also serving breakfast (7am
to 11 am), and brewing Peets coffee & tea.
Panino
1014 #C Coast Village Road (565-0137)
Pierre Lafond
516 San Ysidro Road (565-1502)
This market and deli is a center of activity in
Montecitos Upper Village, serving fresh baked
pastries, regular and espresso coffee drinks,
smoothies, burritos, homemade soups, deli
salads, made-to-order sandwiches and wraps
available, and boasting a fully stocked salad
bar. Its sunny patio draws crowds of regulars
daily. The shop also carries specialty drinks,
gift items, grocery staples, and produce. Open
everyday 5:30 am to 8 pm.
Village Cheese & Wine
1485 East Valley Road (969-3815)
Whodidily Cupcakes
1150 Coast Village Rd (969-9808)

In Summerland / Carpinteria
The Barbecue Company $$
3807 Santa Claus Lane (684-2209)
Cantwells Summerland Market $
2580 Lillie Avenue (969-5894)
Corktree Cellars $$
910 Linden Avenue (684-1400)
Corktree offers a casual bistro setting for lunch
and dinner, in addition to wine tasting and
tapas. The restaurant, open everyday except
Monday, features art from locals, mellow music
and a relaxed atmosphere. An extensive wine
list features over 110 bottles of local and inter-
national wines, which are also available in the
eatery's retail section.
Garden Market $
3811 Santa Claus Lane (745-5505)
Jacks Bistro $
5050 Carpinteria Avenue (566-1558)
Serving light California Cuisine, Jacks offers
freshly baked bagels with whipped cream
cheeses, omelettes, scrambles, breakfast bur-
ritos, specialty sandwiches, wraps, burgers, sal-
ads, pastas and more. Jacks offers an extensive
espresso and coffee bar menu, along with wine
and beer. They also offer full service catering,
and can accommodate wedding receptions to
corporate events. Open Monday through Fri-
day 6:30 am to 3 pm, Saturday and Sunday
7 am to 3 pm.
Nugget $$
2318 Lillie Avenue (969-6135)
Padaro Beach Grill $
3765 Santa Claus Lane (566-9800)
A beach house feel gives this seaside eatery
its charm and makes it a perfect place to
bring the whole family. Its new owners added
a pond, waterfall, an elevated patio with
freplace and couches to boot. Enjoy grill op-
tions, along with salads and seafood plates.
The Grill is open Monday through Sunday
11 am to 9 pm
Slys $$$
686 Linden Avenue (684-6666)
Slys features fresh fsh, farmers market veg-
gies, traditional pastas, prime steaks, Blue Plate
Specials and vintage desserts. Youll fnd a full
bar, serving special martinis and an extensive
wine list featuring California and French wines.
Cocktails from 4 pm to close, dinner from 5 to
9 pm Sunday-Thursday and 5 to 10 pm Friday
and Saturday. Lunch is M-F 11:30 to 2:30, and
brunch is served on the weekends from 9 am
to 3 pm.
Stackys Seaside $
2315 Lillie Avenue (969-9908)
Summerland Beach Caf $
2294 Lillie Avenue (969-1019)
Tinkers $
2275 C Ortega Hill Road (969-1970)
Santa Barbara / Restaurant Row
Andersens Danish Bakery &
Gourmet Restaurant $
1106 State State Street (962-5085)
Established in 1976, Andersens serves Danish
and European cuisine including breakfast,
lunch & dinner. Authentic Danishes, Apple
Strudels, Marzipans, desserts & much more.
Dine inside surrounded by European interior
or outside on the sidewalk patio. Open 8 am to
9 pm Monday through Friday, 8 am to 10 pm
Saturday and Sunday.
Bistro Eleven Eleven $$
1111 East Cabrillo Boulevard (730-1111)
Located adjacent to Hotel Mar Monte, the
bistro serves breakfast and lunch featur-
ing all-American favorites. Dinner is a mix
of traditional favorites and coastal cuisine.
The lounge advancement to the restaurant
features a big screen TV for daily sporting
events and happy hour. Open Monday-
Friday 6:30 am to 9 pm, Saturday and Sunday
6:30 am to 10 pm.
Chucks Waterfront Grill $$
113 Harbor Way (564-1200)
Located next to the Maritime Museum, enjoy
some of the best views of both the mountains
and the Santa Barbara pier sitting on the newly
renovated, award-winning patio, while enjoy-
ing fresh seafood straight off the boat. Dinner is
served nightly from 5 pm, and brunch is offered
on Sunday from 10 am until 1 pm. Reservations
are recommended.
El Paseo $$
813 Anacapa Street (962-6050)
Located in the heart of downtown Santa Bar-
bara in a Mexican plaza setting, El Paseo is the
place for authentic Mexican specialties, home-
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 43 Men always want to be a womans first love; women like to be a mans last romance Oscar Wilde
Gloria Kaye, Ph.D.
314 East Carrillo Street, Suite 10
Santa Barbara, California 93101
805-701-0363 or 805-966-6104
drgloriakaye@aol.com
www.drgloriakaye.com
Helps relieve anxiety and tension
associated with pain.
Pain relief from emotional and
physical scarring.
Break-through techniques gives
hope to the hopeless conditions.
Hands on Healing Specialist
Dr Kayes treatment has relieved my shoulder
pain and helped me avoid surgery. I have
been experiencing pain and limited range of
motions for many years. Freeing my shoulder
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indebted to Dr. Kaye for her healing hands.
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made chips and salsa, and a cold margarita
while mariachis stroll through the historic
restaurant. The dcor refects its rich Spanish
heritage, with bougainvillea-draped balconies,
fountain courtyard dining and a festive bar.
Dinner specials are offered during the week,
with a brunch on Sundays. Open Tuesday
through Thursday 4 pm to 10 pm, Friday and
Saturday 11:30 am to 10:30 pm, and Sunday
10:30 am to 9 pm.
Enterprise Fish Co. $$
225 State Street (962-3313)
Every Monday and Tuesday the Enterprise
Fish Company offers two-pound Maine Lob-
sters served with clam chowder or salad, and
rice or potatoes for only $29.95. Happy hour
is every weekday from 4 pm to 7 pm. Open
Sunday thru Thursday 11:30 am to 10 pm and
Friday thru Saturday 11:30 am to 11 pm.
The Harbor Restaurant $$
210 Stearns Wharf (963-3311)
Enjoy ocean views at the historic Harbor
Restaurant on Stearns Wharf. Featuring prime
steaks and seafood, a wine list that has earned
Wine Spectator Magazines Award of Excel-
lence for the past six years and a full cocktail
bar. Lunch is served 11:30 am to 2:30 pm
Monday-Friday, 11 am to 3 pm Saturday and
Sunday. Dinner is served 5:30 pm to 10 pm,
early dinner available Saturday and Sunday
starting at 3 pm.
Los Agaves $
600 N. Milpas Street (564-2626)
Los Agaves offers eclectic Mexican cuisine, us-
ing only the freshest ingredients, in a casual and
friendly atmosphere. Serving lunch and dinner,
with breakfast on the weekends, Los Agaves fea-
tures traditional dishes from central and south-
ern Mexico such as shrimp & fsh enchiladas,
shrimp chile rellenos, and famous homemade
mole poblano. Open Monday- Friday 11 am to
9 pm, Saturday & Sunday 9 am to 9 pm.
Mir $$$$
8301 Hollister Avenue at Bacara Resort & Spa
(968-0100)
Mir is a refned refuge with stunning views,
featuring two genuine Miro sculptures, a top-
rated chef offering a sophisticated menu that
accents fresh, organic, and native-grown in-
gredients, and a world-class wine cellar. Open
Tuesday through Saturday from 6 pm
to 10 pm.
Olio e Limone Ristorante $$$
Olio Pizzeria $
17 West Victoria Street (899-2699)
Elaine and Alberto Morello oversee this
friendly, casually elegant, linen-tabletop eatery
featuring Italian food of the highest order. Of-
ferings include eggplant souff, pappardelle
with quail, sausage and mushroom rag, and
fresh-imported Dover sole. Wine Spectator
Award of Excellence-winning wine list. Private
dining (up to 40 guests) and catering are also
available.
Next door at Olio Pizzeria, the Morellos have
added a simple pizza-salumi-wine-bar inspired
by neighborhood pizzerie and enoteche in
Italy. Here the focus is on artisanal pizzas and
antipasti, with classic toppings like fresh moz-
zarella, seafood, black truffes, and sausage.
Salads, innovative appetizers and an assort-
ment of salumi and formaggi round out the
menu at this casual, fast-paced eatery. Private
dining for up to 32 guests. Both the ristorante
and the pizzeria are open for lunch Monday
thru Saturday (11:30 am to 2 pm) and dinner
seven nights a week (from 5 pm).
Pierre Lafond Wine Bistro $
516 State Street (962-1455)
The Wine Bistro menu is seasonal California
cuisine specializing in local products. Pair
your meal with wine from the Santa Barbara
Winery, Lafond Winery or one from the list
of wines from around the world. Happy
Hour Monday - Friday 4:30 to 6:30 pm. The
1st Wednesday of each month is Passport
to the World of Wine. Grilled cheese night
every Thursday. Open for breakfast, lunch
and dinner; catering available.
www.pierrelafond.com
Renauds $
3315 State Street (569-2400)
Located in Loreto Plaza, Renauds is a bakery
specializing in a wide selection of French
pastries. The breakfast and lunch menu is
composed of egg dishes, sandwiches and
salads and represents Renauds personal
favorites. Brewed coffees and teas are organic.
Open Monday-Saturday 7 am to 5 pm, Sunday
7 am to 3 pm.
Rodneys Steakhouse $$$
633 East Cabrillo Boulevard (884-8554)
Deep in the heart of well, deep in the heart of
Fess Parkers Doubletree Inn on East Beach
in Santa Barbara. This handsome eatery sells
and serves only Prime Grade beef, lamb, veal,
halibut, salmon, lobster and other high-end
victuals. Full bar, plenty of California wines,
elegant surroundings, across from the ocean.
Open for dinner Tuesday through Saturday at
5:30 pm. Reservations suggested on weekends.
Ojai
Maravilla $$$
905 Country Club Road in Ojai (646-1111)
Located at the Ojai Valley Inn & Spa, this
upscale eatery features prime steaks, chops
and fresh seafood. Local farmers provide fresh
produce right off the vine, while herbs are har-
vested from the Inns herb garden. The menu
includes savory favorites like pan seared diver
scallops and braised beef short ribs; dishes are
accented with seasonal vegetables. Open Sun-
day through Thursday for dinner from 5:30 pm
to 9:30 pm, Friday and Saturday from
5:30 pm to 10 pm. MJ
+ Denotes Subject to
Restrictions on NOPASS
SPECIAL ENGAGEMENTS
I nf ormat i on Li st ed
f or Fri day t hru Thursday
December 9 t hru 15
877-789-MOVIE
metrotheatres.com
Tuesday, Dec. 13 - 1:00 pm
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EVENTS AT THE ARLINGTON:
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8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 44 The Voice of the Village
and your son is a concert pianist. How
important was it for your son to carry on
the tradition?
Actually, my son plays jazz I told
him the other day its hard to make it
as a jazz pianist and he may want to
do something else. But, unfortunately,
its what he has inside him. Its almost
like a curse. You cant escape it. Its
what youre born with. When its been
a part of your everyday existence from
a very early age its hard to choose to
do something else. The artistic pursuit
is a huge lure, and once youre on the
road, its hard to leave. It has great
joy and great pain along the path. It is
what it is. But we love it.
More Classical
The performers in Sundays Santa
Barbara Music & Arts Conservatory
chamber music concert cant compare
to the Boston Symphony Orchestra
players in experience. After all, the
SBMAC youngsters are just 5-19 years
old, but some have already set their
sights on destinations as prestigious
as Boston or other lauded orchestras.
The chamber concert, at the Fe Bland
Forum on the Santa Barbara City
College campus, features works by
Arensky, Mendelssohn, Mozart and
Schubert, while the Virtuosi String
Orchestras will perform on Sunday,
December 18 at Lotte Lehmann Hall
on the UCSB campus, with works by
Albeniz, Respighi, Strauss, Telemann,
Vivaldi and more. Tickets to both
shows from the music mentoring
organization are free. Call 751-6227 or
visit www.sbmac.org.
The Razzle Dazzle
Returns!
If youre female and over 40 in
Hollywood, you might as well hang
up your acting shoes because the juicy
parts for older actresses are few and
far between. But in Santa Barbara, at
that age youll have to wait another
decade to join the Silver Follies, the
troupe of over-50 dancers and singers
who have mounted full-scale musicals
in venues around town and enter-
tained at retirement homes and other
senior facilities for the past eight years.
Now, after a two-year hiatus, the
Silver Follies, ne the Razzle Dazzle
Dancers, are back with another
Christmas spectacular, being pre-
sented December 13-17 at the Center
Stage Theatre. You Cant Stop the
Christmas Beat is choreographed
and directed by Cathie Hetyonk and
features the senior troupe a dozen
dancers and six singers, including
three males plus six more pre-teen-
age girls known as Follies Kidz, in a
show theyre calling a happy, snap-
py, eclectic mix of traditional holiday
fun with a Broadway musical twist.
Its a lot of traditional Christmas
songs with quite a few Broadway
show tunes thrown in, all woven
together by the play, explained
Nancy King, who goes by Queenie
in the show and has been a member
of Silver Follies since the get-go. Its
heavy on song and dance with a little
bit of story.
While some of the dancers have pro-
fessional experience, most like Santa
Barbara-native King performed as
amateurs either as youngsters or in
community theater, opportunities that
dried up when the Civic Light Opera
left town and only touring shows fea-
tured musical roles for mature adults.
We come from all walks of life,
said King, who like another Follies
dancer was a banker for many years.
We have a realtor, a school bus driv-
er, a teacher, and a nurse. Were just a
very diverse group that comes togeth-
er over the same commitment to danc-
ing and performing, and that we love
to do it.
Indeed, commitment is the oper-
ative word, as the Follies meet to
rehearse twice a week year-round,
even if the major shows may be
months away. Its like going back
to a childhood dream, King said. I
thought Id be that little girl who went
off to Hollywood and had a life in the
theater. But real life got in the way and
at eighteen I had to give it up. So its
coming back to reliving that dream.
Were all just so happy to be doing
this. Its not a job. It just fun.
The high-energy requirement of the
production might seem taxing to most
folks of retirement age, but for the
Follies dancers and singers, it has an
opposite effect. It really helps keep
us young, King said. Were all very
young-looking and I think this helps.
People are always remarking that its
not possible that were as old as we
are.
Like the others Follies, King doesnt
hide her age (66, which she says is
exactly the average of the 12 perform-
ers). Were proud of it. Truly proud.
Weve made it through life and were
proud of who we are and what we do.
(The Silver Follies perform You
Cant Stop the Christmas Beat at
8pm December 13-17 at Center Stage
Theatre, upstairs in Paseo Nuevo.
Tickets cost $30. Call 963-0408 or visit
www.centerstagetheater.org.)
Pop Notes
Local luminaries: Trinity Backstage
founders/producers Doug Clegg
and Kate Wallace are joined by Matt
Cartsonis and special guests for
the annual holiday benefit show in
the round on Saturday night. The
three-some and others will sing
songs of the season and from the
heart solo and in combination at
Trinity Episcopal Church beginning
at 8pm... Also on Saturday night,
Santa Barbara jazz vocalist Kimberly
Ford, who also plays mandolin,
guitar and conga drums, heads a
quartet featuring bassist Randy
Tico, guitarist Ray Pannell and pia-
nist George Friedenthal for a survey
of song styles from bluegrass to jazz
at Live Oak Unitarian Universalist
Congregation as part of the Song Tree
Concert Series. MJ
ENTERTAINMENT (Continued from page 41)
The Santa Barbara Music & Arts Conservatory, comprised of members five to nineteen years old, pres-
ents two concerts this holiday season (Photo: Rina Winter)
Randy Tico, Kimberly Ford and George Friedenthal collaborate for the Song Tree Concert Series on
Saturday night co-sponsored by the Live Oak Unitarian Universalist Congregation
The Silver Follies relive childhood dreams, leaving their previous day jobs behind to dazzle audiences at
Center Stage Theatre after a two-year hiatus
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 45 The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel must be intolerably stupid Jane Austen
Montecito Sold
Real Estate View
by Michael Phillips
Michael is the owner-
broker of Phillips Real
Estate, and is a Montecito
Planning Commissioner.
He can be reached at
969-4569 and info@
MichaelPhillipsRealEstate.
com
T
here were 13 sales in Montecito
in November. This represents
6% of the 220 properties
available for sale here and at this rate
it will take three years for all to sell;
an active market will clear in months.
It seems the basic rules of supply and
demand still apply and the result is
the fundamental market weakness we
have been experiencing in the high-end
market of which Montecito has more
than its share. Real estate data, as we
know, must not only be viewed locally,
it must also be viewed by price sector to
be properly understood. At the current
rate of sales, our red hot $2m and
below group, which represents 54% of
all sales in November, would exhaust
inventory in 10 months; the high-end
$5m and up group will require 5.8
years. It is a market for buyers and the
following properties found agreement
with one in November.
Properties by the Beach
Three buyers chose properties by
the beach. A very dated three-bed-
room on Fernald Point sold in one
day to its adjacent neighbor to the
east. This is not by the beach, but very
much on the beach, enjoying 73 feet of
south-facing beachfront. The agreed
upon price for this to-be demolished
house and half acre was $8.25m. This
works out to the remarkable price of
$113,013 per beachfront foot. Location
cubed indeed.
On Miramar Beach, a three-bed-
room tri-level on the sand with decks
on all levels and separate guest suite
with separate entrance, sold for
$4.65m after 65 days on the market.
At 1,695-sq-ft, the cost per square foot
is $2,448.
At the end of April, a 2bd/2ba
Montecito Shores redone condo with
a great kitchen entered the market
for $1.425m. It sold for $1.1m and at
1,795-sq-ft, the cost per square foot is
$613. A swimming pool, tennis court
and walks on Hammonds Beach are
included with a monthly association
fee of $975.
Birnam Wood Golf Club
A formally designed 5,000-sq-ft
three-bedroom Mediterranean in the
Birnam Wood golf community built
in 1991 on 1.27 acres with a pool and
a three-car garage originally listed for
$5.295m in late June, sold for $3.9m.
Add $80k for membership and about
$900 per month for homeowners dues.
Freehaven, Cima Linda and Deerpath
View Properties
A three-bedroom, 3,600-sq-ft. single
story contemporary closed escrow
after just one day on the market for
$3.1m, $200k off from its original
price. Pool and ocean views from a
nice elevation level on the south side
of East Valley Road.
Strong ocean and island views
are present from every room from
this 4bd/4ba, 3,700-sq-ft redone
Mediterranean above the bird ref-
uge on Cima Linda. It includes a
pool, tropical gardens and an orchard.
Originally asking $2.295m, it settled
at an even $2m after 45 days on the
market.
Deerpath is off Alston Road in the
Eucalyptus Hill community. Here a
south-facing, ocean view, 1950s, 2,300-
sq-ft ranch style home sitting above
the harbor on a third of an acre with
three bedrooms and a remodeled
kitchen closed for $1.395m, first ask-
ing $1.595 one hundred days ago.
Stone Meadow, and East Valley
Off Picacho Lane on Stone Meadow
Lane is a 3,200-sq-ft, 1960s ranch style
with vaulted, beamed ceilings, three
bedrooms, a separate guest suite and
mountain views. Listed at $2.150m,
it closed at $2.111m. It last sold in
1996 for $910,000. Across East Valley
Road from Birnam Wood and near
the turn for the Valley Club, is an
English country style early 1950s,
3,800-sq-ft 5bd/5ba with beamed ceil-
ings throughout and a separate guest
house and artist studio. First offered
at $2.795m in mid October, it closed
at $2.6m. Three years ago exactly, this
home sold for $3.9m, a difference of
32.5% and a major adjustment for sell-
ers in this new market.
Middle and Coyote Roads
On Middle Road a two story, wood
shake, country cottage near Hot
Springs Road built in the 1890s, with
a local river stone fireplace, a loft with
an original hay door, and a second
floor master bedroom sold on the
18th. At 1,563-sq-ft on 0.21 acres, with
two bedrooms and three baths, it sold
for full price at $1.195m after just eight
days on the market. It was last pur-
chased in 1995 for $479,000.
On Coyote Road at East Mountain
Drive on 2.8 acres, a 2,600-sq-ft neo-
Spanish colonial built in 1981 with
three bedrooms and a remodeled
kitchen was auctioned for $1.01m. It
last sold in 2007 for $2.15m.
Circle Drive and Spring Road
Near Westmont College on Circle
Drive, a 1,400-sq-ft, three-bedroom
in average condition on 0.18 acres
sold as a short sale in four days for
$735,000, and a gated three-bedroom
Mediterranean townhouse-condo on
Spring Road near Depot also sold
quickly in foreclosure for $921,500. MJ
If you have a 93108 open house scheduled, please send us your free directory listing to realestate@montecitojournal.net
93108 OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY

SATURDAY DECEMBER 10
ADDRESS TIME $ #BD / #BA AGENT NAME TELEPHONE # COMPANY
189 East Mountain Drive By Appt. $4,950,000 2bd/5ba Frank Abatemarco 450-7477 Sothebys
83 Seaview Drive By Appt. $1,395,000 2bd/2ba Joyce Enright 570-1360 Prudential
1944 Jameson Lane C By Appt. $529,000 3bd/2ba Bunny DeLorie 570-9181 Prudential

SUNDAY DECEMBER 11
ADDRESS TIME $ #BD / #BA AGENT NAME TELEPHONE # COMPANY
189 East Mountain Drive By Appt. $4,950,000 2bd/5ba Frank Abatemarco 450-7477 Sothebys
700 Lilac Drive 1-4pm $4,300,000 3bd/3ba Joe Stubbins 729-0778 Prudential
83 Seaview Drive By Appt. $1,395,000 2bd/2ba Joyce Enright 570-1360 Prudential
1511B E Valley Road 1-4pm $1,195,000 2bd/2ba Brook Ashley 689-0480 Prudential
1925 Barker Pass Road By Appt. $949,000 3bd/2ba SiBelle Israel 896-4218 Prudential
1944 Jameson Lane C 2-4pm $529,000 3bd/2ba Bunny DeLorie 448-9171 Prudential
visit us on the web
www.montecitojournal.net
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 46 The Voice of the Village
J.C. MALLMANN
CONTRACTOR
( 805) 886- 3372
BONDED FULLY INSURED
LIC # 819867
DRAINAGE SYSTEMS
IRRIGATION
EROSION CONTROL
LOW VOLTAGE LIGHTING
WATER SYSTEMS
LANDSCAPE INSTALLATION
WATER SERVI CES
Montecito tutor for hire. History, English,
College prep, study skills. Experienced.
Local. UCSB MA. Tom, 805.680.7772
trw805@me.com
ALTERATIONS/SEWING
SERVICES
Torn, damaged? Dont throw your favorite/
sentimental clothing away. Let me fx them!
Alterations, mending, ironing. 684-7009 or
453-9510 ubear1@yahoo.com
FUR SERVICES
Remodeling, Repair, Alterations
Relining, Insurance Appraisals
Cleaning, Consulting
Ursulas Fur Studio 962-0617
PERSONAL/SPECIAL SERVICES

Give your home, offce or garage a
tune-up! Let me help you simplify and
reorder any space that needs attention.
Together well create practical, personalized
solutions to your organizing challenges!
Adjustable rates. Will consider barter. Call
David toll free at (855) 771-4858 or write
davidtheorganizer@gmail.com.
A passion for organizing.
SELL VALUABLES Anonymously.
Experienced eBay and Craigs List seller in
Montecito is your personal trading assistant
for photographing, description, pricing,
posting, customer service, and arrange pick
up or shipping. For consultation call 805-
969-6017
or email: discreetmarketing@cox.net

POSITION WANTED
Property-Care Needs? Do you need a
caretaker or property manager? Expert Land
Steward is avail now. View rsum at: http://
landcare.ojaidigital.net
Experienced Personal Assistant/
Companion
Health care management, driving, shopping
& bookkeeping. Long time resident.
Excellent references. 682-6905 or
cell 570-0235.
Part-Time Personal Assistant:
Professional with Graduate Degree seeks
to help you with scheduling appointments,
running errands, and your other daily
activities.
Please call Mareike (805) 570-5368
Personal assistant/caregiver
Presently working for an agency, looking
for private work. Live-in/out. Full range of
experience in personal & household care.
Articulate, upbeat. 10 yrs exp. Background
checked. Excellent local refs.
Call (805) 450-8266
ESTATE/MOVING SALE SERVICES
ESTATE & MOVING SALE SERVICES: I
will handle your estate moving sale for you;
effcient, experienced, knowledgeable.
Call for detailsElizabeth Langtree
733-1030
THE CLEARING HOUSE
708 6113 Downsizing, Moving & Estate
Sales. Professional, effcient, cost-effective
services for the sale of your personal
property Licensed. Visit our website:
www.theclearinghouseSB.com
REAL ESTATE SERVICES
Tested... Time &
Again
Nancy
Langhorne
Hussey
805-452-3052
Coldwell Banker /
Montecito
DRE#01383773
www.NancyHusseyHomes.com
Real
Estate
Appraisal
Estate,Trust,Portfolio
Mgmt,Lending
Rhodes &
Associates
805-636-1526
CRhodesAppraisal@aol.com
SHORT/LONG TERM RENTAL
CARMEL BY THE SEA vacation getaway.
Charming, private studio. Beautiful garden
patio. Walk to beach and town. $110/night.
831-624-6714
POLO CONDO in Carpinteria.
1 Bd furnished. Available Nov 1
st

$2000/mo.
Yearly lease.
Susie 684-3415
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
Location! Location! Location!
One of a kind artistically designed custom
home by Don Pedersen.
Spacious rooms, soaring 20+ ceilings,
lots of architectural interest, great home for
entertaining with multiple sets of French
doors opening to an expansive veranda.
Includes a charming 2 bdrm guest cottage
on a lushly landscaped lot. Great location
near the shops & restaurants of Montecitos
Lower Village and Butterfy Beach!
$2,699,000.
Pat Saraca, Distinctive Real Estate
805-886-7426
HOLIDAY/FESTIVE SERVICES
Need a Santa Claus for Christmas
Parties, Personal, Business, Schools.
Anytime, any place. 15 yrs experience. Call
Santa ( Richard) 845-2044 or 280-2564
stnick4hire@gmail.com
Ho! Ho! Ho! Montecito Santa for Hire
Experienced. Great local references.
Tom, 805.680.7772
trw805@me.com
ITEMS FOR SALE
Special Gift
Collectors Porcelain Doll-15 named Emily
in a white christening lace dress. Original
box, perfect for an 8,9 or 10 year old. $110
or reasonable offer. Call after 4 pm.
805-563-2526.
BEAUTIFUL OCEAN coast RAY
STRONG painting, 30x36. 962-9486
am or pm
FLORAL DESIGN SERVICES
Shelley Bello Design
NYC designer new to town.
Flowers and decor for your holiday
festivities.
Holiday decorations
Flowers for your parties
Weekly fowers for your home
www.sbdnyc.com 646.784.0244
HEALTH SERVICES
Take a break from concerns about guests
and gifts... treat yourself to a soothing
deep Swedish massage in the comfort of
your own home. Experienced professional
creates a safe, healing, spiritual environment
with music and organic oils. Ask about Gift
Certifcates and packages, too! Call Scott
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
(You can place a classifed ad by flling in the coupon at the bottom of this section and mailing it to us: Montecito Journal, 1206 Coast Village Circle, Suite D, Montecito, CA 93108. You can also FAX your ad to us at: (805) 969-6654.
We will fgure out how much you owe and either call or FAX you back with the amount. You can also e-mail your ad: christine@montecitojournal.net and we will do the same as your FAX).
Hunter, Licensed Massage Therapist: 805-
455-4791
PILATES - Good for the body, good for the
soul. Relaxed, effective lessons at home.
Beginner to advanced. Also benefcial for
osteoporosis, fbromyalgia, back pain... And
it is fun! Certifed instructor with 17 years
experience. Contact Deborah
452-0381 or debinsb@hotmail.com
Neil Friedman, LCSW
Adolescents, Individual, Couples, Family
Therapy PTSD, Depression, Life transitions,
Anxiety. Website: www.santabarbara-
therapy.com (805) 319-0304
SENIOR CAREGING SERVICES
Caregiver for elderly available, will come
to home for bathing, meal prep & running
errands. Several yrs exp with exclt refs. $20
hourly. Call Marie 805-729-5067
In-Home Senior Services: Ask Patti Teel
to meet with you or
your loved ones to
discuss dependable
and affordable
in-home care.
Individualized service
is tailored to meet
each clients needs.
Our caregivers
can provide
transportation,
housekeeping,
personal assistance and much more.
Senior Helpers: 966-7100
CULINARY SERVICES
Clean food. Vegan cook available for
families or limited parties. 284-2436
MACROBIOTIC FRENCH CHEF
If you need healthy foods, Mediterranean
Style or International Gourmet Cuisine for
your soiree, Please contact Chef Denis
310-913-4497 or by e-mail: dhmacrobio@
gmail.com
PETS / PET SERVICES
David & Melissas Doggie Daycare.
Large ranch property. Pet sitting day &
overnights, dog walking & exercising.
Grooming available. Care for cats, birds &
reptiles also. 805 684 -7303
COMPUTER/VIDEO
PHOTOGRAPHiC SERVICES
VIDEOS TO DVD TRANSFERS
Hurry, before your tapes fade away.
Only $10 each
969-6500 Scott
TUTORING SERVICES
PIANO LESSONS Kary and Sheila
Kramer are long standing members of the
Music Teachers Assoc. of Calif. Studios
conveniently located at the Music Academy
of the West. Now accepting enthusiastic
children and/or adults.
Call us at 684-4626.
8 15 December 2011 MONTECITO JOURNAL 47 It is easier to fight for ones principles than to live up to them Alfred Adler
WOODWORK/RESTORATION
SERVICES
Ken Frye Artisan in Wood
The Finest Quality Hand Made
Custom Furniture, Cabinetry
& Architectural Woodwork
Expert Finishes & Restoration
Impeccable Attention to Detail
Montecito References.
lic#651689
805-473-2343 ken@kenfrye.com
CLEANING SERVICES
Andres Residential & Commercial
Cleaning Service. Guaranteed best job
& lowest price in town.
Call 235-1555
ineedree@yahoo.com
GARDENING/LANDSCAPING
TREE SERVICES
Estate British Gardener Horticulturist
Comprehensive knowledge of Californian,
Mediterranean, & traditional English plants.
All gardening duties personally undertaken
including water gardens & koi keeping.
Nicholas 805-963-7896
High-end quality detail garden care &
design. Call Rose 805 272 5139
www.rosekeppler.com
GARDEN HEALER
Landscape & garden renovation +
maintenance. Estate/residential.
STEVE BRAMBACH
722-7429
Landscape Maintenance: over 30 yrs
experience.
Call Jim (805) 689-0461
GENERAL CLEAN UP/HAULING
Licensed specialist in maintenance,
weedwacking & avoiding fre hazards. No
job too big or small if your house looks
like a jungle. Call if you want a beautiful
landscape. FREE mulch included.
All while you save $!
Local over 20yrs exp. Jose Jimenez
805 636-8732.
PAINTINGS FOR SALE
BEAUTIFUL OCEAN coast RAY
STRONG painting, 30x36.
962-9486
am or pm
ADOPT A DOG
Snow is a 4 year old, deaf Boxer boy who
knows sign language and has worked with
a trainer specializing in dogs with hearing
impairments. He has a lot of love and
energy
to give to
a family
with older
children
and gets
along well
with other
dogs.
5480
Overpass,
805-681-
0561
adopt@
sbdawg.
org.
LOCAL BUSINESS DIRECTORY (805) 565-1860
Live Animal Trapping
Best Termite & Pest Control
www.hydrexnow.com
Free Phone Quotes
(805) 687-6644
Kevin OConnor, President
$50 off initial service
Voted
#1
Termite Inspection 24hr turn around upon request.
Tree, Plant
& Lawn
Treatments
Its Simple. Charge is $2 per line, and any portion of a line. Multiply the number of lines used (example 4 lines x 2 =$8) Add 10 cents per
Bold and/or Upper case character and send your check to: Montecito Journal, 1206 Coast Village Circle, Suite D, Montecito, CA 93108.
Deadline for inclusion in the next issue is Thursday prior to publication date. $8 minimum. Email: christine@montecitojournal.net
Yes, run my ad __________ times. Enclosed is my check for $__________
$8 minimum TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD $8 minimum
www.edwardjones.com
Your Source for
Tax-advantaged Income
Joseph M Kirkland
Financial Advisor
.
1230 Coast Village Circle
Suite A
Montecito, CA 93108
805-565-8793

www.edwardjones.com
Your Source for
Tax-advantaged Income
Joseph M Kirkland
Financial Advisor
.
1230 Coast Village Circle
Suite A
Montecito, CA 93108
805-565-8793

www.edwardjones.com
Your Source for
Tax-advantaged Income
Joseph M Kirkland
Financial Advisor
.
1230 Coast Village Circle
Suite A
Montecito, CA 93108
805-565-8793

www.edwardjones.com
Your Source for
Tax-advantaged Income
Joseph M Kirkland
Financial Advisor
.
1230 Coast Village Circle
Suite A
Montecito, CA 93108
805-565-8793

www.edwardjones.com
Your Source for
Tax-advantaged Income
Joseph M Kirkland
Financial Advisor
.
1230 Coast Village Circle
Suite A
Montecito, CA 93108
805-565-8793

Walk-Up
Take Out
Delivery
Catering
late night, Asian infused, city food
425 State St. 805.705.0991
Thursday - Saturday 11:30pm-2:30am
1101 State St
Santa Barbara
CA 93101
State and Figueroa
805.963.2721
a fne coffee and tea establishment
BILL VAUGHAN - Cell/Txt: 805.455.1609

Principal & Broker DRE LIC # 00660866
www.MontecitoVillage.com

Broker Specialist In Birnam Wood


STEVEN BROOKS JEWELERS
Custom Design Estate Jewelry
Jewelry Restoration
Buyers of Fine Jewelry, Gold and Silver
Confidential Meeting at Your
Office , Bank or Home
SBJEWELERS@GMAIL.COM (805) 455-1070
S
tonecraf
T i n t e r n a t i o n a l
Fabrication Installation Restoration
Granite Marble Limestone
183 North Garden Street
Ventura, California 93001
805.648.5241 fax 805.653.1686
info@stonecraftintl.com www.stonecraftintl.com
Lic. 810987
Tatiana's Pilates
Look & Feel Great
Tel: 805.284.2840
www.tatianaspilates.com
BASI-certied Pilates instructor
Fully equipped Pilates studio downtown Carp
5320 Carpinteria Ave. Suite F. Carpinteria,Ca 93013
Attorney Mark A. Meshot
For All Your Legal Needs
v
116 Middle Road
Montecito, California 93108
Telephone (805) 969-2701
I d r a t h e r b e c l i m b i n g G i b r a l t a r
L U C K Y S
s t e a k s / c h o p s / s e a f o o d / c o c k t a i l s
D i n n e r & C o c k t a i l s N i g h t l y , 5 t o 1 0 p m . B r u n c h S a t u r d a y & S u n d a y , 9 a m t o 3 p m .
M o n t e c i t o s n e i g h b o r h o o d b a r a n d r e s t a u r a n t . 1 2 7 9 C o a s t V i l l a g e R o a d M o n t e c i t o C A 9 3 1 0 8 ( 8 0 5 ) 5 6 5 - 7 5 4 0
w w w . l u c k y s - s t e a k h o u s e . c o m
P h o t o g r a p h y b y D a v i d P a l e r m o

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