Sunteți pe pagina 1din 5

Measuring self-concept across the life span: Issues and instrumentation.

Byrne, Barbara M. American Psychological Association, Washington, DC, US, http://www.apa.org/books [This book provides a] review of self-concept measures that can be used with individuals across the life span, from preschool through late adulthood. These measures were selected . . . according to the prevalence of their use in research and practice, their psychometric soundness, the strength of their theoretical base, and their demonstrable utility in a variety of research and practice situations. . . . For each measure there is a description of the instrument, the target population, the scale structure, administration and scoring procedures, normative data, and related psychometric research, as well as an evaluative summary and source information. Byrne also provides a comprehensive review of the literature related to 7 empirically testable models of selfconcept. Finally, the author identifies the most important psychometric issues related to measuring self-concept, describes the limitations associated with the current state of self-concept measurement, and points to promising directions for future research and application. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)

1. Measuring self-concept: The conceptual issues. By Byrne, Barbara M. Byrne, Barbara M., (1996). Measuring self-concept across the life span: Issues and instrumentation, Measurement and instrumentation in psychology (pp. 1-35). Washington, DC, US: American Psychological Association, xxiv, 297 pp. Abstract The intent of this chapter is to examine shortcomings in self-concept research. In particular, I first review problems of definition, related to the customary use of self terms. I then note how problems of definition at the conceptual level lead ultimately to methodological problems at the measurement level, thereby hindering construct validity research bearing on both the measuring instrument and the theoretical model of self-concept to which it is linked. Next, I describe seven empirically testable theoretical models of self-concept and identify which self-concept measures in the present volume are linked to each. Finally, I address the issue of importance/discrepancy ratings of self-concept. We turn first to the issue of self-concept definition. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)

2. Measuring self-concept: The psychometric issues. Measuring self-concept across the life span: Issues and instrumentation. Byrne, Barbara M.

Byrne, Barbara M., (1996). Measuring self-concept across the life span: Issues and instrumentation, Measurement and instrumentation in psychology (pp. 37-62). Washington, DC, US: American Psychological Association, xxiv, 297 pp. doi: 10.1037/10197-002

Abstract
This chapter contains a brief discussion pertinent to psychometric issues in self-concept measurement. More specifically, I begin with a description of the basic elements of reliability and validity. Readers who are familiar with the basic principles of reliability and validity may wish to circumvent this initial section and advance, instead, to the next section, which addresses the issue of appropriate instrument use in accordance with available normative data. I then discuss issues related to cross-cultural and developmental factors in measuring self-concept. Finally, I review different types of response bias typically associated with the self-report a approach to self-concept measurement. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)

3. Search for and selection of self-concept measures. Measuring self-concept across the life span: Issues and instrumentation. Byrne, Barbara M. Byrne, Barbara M., (1996). Measuring self-concept across the life span: Issues and instrumentation, Measurement and instrumentation in psychology (pp. 63-68). Washington, DC, US: American Psychological Association, xxiv, 297 pp. doi: 10.1037/10197-003

Abstract
For all instruments developed in 1990 or later, I requested psychometric data directly from the authors or commercial publishers. After a critical review of psychometric properties reported in these materials and in related journal articles, I made a final selection from this set of recently developed instruments. Consequent to this screening strategy, I selected 24 self-concept measures for inclusion in the present volume. The details are outlined related to each of these selection stages. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)

4. Measures of self-concept for young children. Measuring self-concept across the life span: Issues and instrumentation. Byrne, Barbara M. Byrne, Barbara M., (1996). Measuring self-concept across the life span: Issues and instrumentation, Measurement and instrumentation in psychology (pp. 69-84). Washington, DC, US: American Psychological Association, xxiv, 297 pp. doi: 10.1037/10197-004

Abstract
Presents measures of self-concept for young children (Preschool-Grade 2; ages 3-7 years). Of the 15 preschool measures found through the literature search, the Joseph Pre-School and Primary

Self-concept Screening Test (JPPSST; Joseph, 1979) and the Pictorial Scale of Perceived Competence and Social Acceptance (PSPCSA; Harter & Pike, 1983) were considered to be the most psychometrically adequate for use with this young population. Both instruments use a pictorial format that is accompanied by an oral clarification of item content and method of response by the examiner. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved) 5. Measures of self-concept for preadolescents. Measuring self-concept across the life span: Issues and instrumentation. Byrne, Barbara M. Byrne, Barbara M., (1996). Measuring self-concept across the life span: Issues and instrumentation, Measurement and instrumentation in psychology (pp. 85-124). Washington, DC, US: American Psychological Association, xxiv, 297 pp. doi: 10.1037/10197-005

Abstract
1. Discusses measures of self-concept for preadolescents (grades 3-8; ages 8-12 years). Measures include the following items: Academic Self Description Questionnaire I, Perception of Ability Scale for Students, Multidimensional Self Concept Scale, PiersHarris Children's Self-Concept Scale, and the Self Description Questionnaire I. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)

6. Measures of self-concept for adolescents. Measuring self-concept across the life span: Issues and instrumentation. Byrne, Barbara M. Byrne, Barbara M., (1996). Measuring self-concept across the life span: Issues and instrumentation, Measurement and instrumentation in psychology (pp. 125-168). Washington, DC, US: American Psychological Association, xxiv, 297 pp. doi: 10.1037/10197-006

Abstract
1. Discusses measures of self-concept for adolescents (grade 9-12; ages 13-19 years). Measures include the following items: Academic Self Description Questionnaire II, Physical Self-Description Questionnaire, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Multidimensional Self Concept Scale, and the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)

7. Measures of self-concept for adults. Measuring self-concept across the life span: Issues and instrumentation. Byrne, Barbara M.

Byrne, Barbara M., (1996). Measuring self-concept across the life span: Issues and instrumentation, Measurement and instrumentation in psychology (pp. 169-219). Washington, DC, US: American Psychological Association, xxiv, 297 pp. doi: 10.1037/10197-007

Abstract
1. Discusses measures of self-concept for adults. Measures include the following items: Dimensions of Self-Concept (Form H), Body Esteem Scale, Physical Self-Perception Profile, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Adult Self-perception Profile, Self Description Questionnaire III, Self-perception Profile for College Students, Tennessee Self-concept Scale, and The Self-perception Genesis Method. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)

8. Measures of self-concept for special populations. Measuring self-concept across the life span: Issues and instrumentation. Byrne, Barbara M. Byrne, Barbara M., (1996). Measuring self-concept across the life span: Issues and instrumentation, Measurement and instrumentation in psychology (pp. 221-238). Washington, DC, US: American Psychological Association, xxiv, 297 pp. doi: 10.1037/10197-008

Abstract
1. Provides readers with information related only to instruments appropriate for use with persons having learning disabilities and hearing impairments. Although each of the instruments described below is still in need of substantial research to establish more firmly the psychometric soundness of its scores with the intended populations, they nonetheless stand as valuable self-concept measures in this area of research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved) 9. Self-concept measurement: State of the art and future directions. Measuring selfconcept across the life span: Issues and instrumentation. Byrne, Barbara M. Byrne, Barbara M., (1996). Measuring self-concept across the life span: Issues and instrumentation, Measurement and instrumentation in psychology (pp. 239-257). Washington, DC, US: American Psychological Association, xxiv, 297 pp. doi: 10.1037/10197-009

Abstract
1. Discusses self-concept measurement. Topics discussed include the following: State of the art of self-concept measurement, weaknesses in self-concept measurement, nonoptimal methodological strategies, inattention to cross-cultural factors, and future directions in self-concept measurement. Also provided are the following recently developed self-report

measures: Arts Self-perception Inventory, Music Self-Perception Inventory, and the Reading Self-Concept Scale. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved)