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Red Deer College Alumni Community Magazine Balancing Wellness and a Hectic Schedule 8 Building Trust,
Red Deer College Alumni Community
Magazine
Balancing
Wellness
and a Hectic
Schedule
8
Building Trust,
Building Relationships
18
Going Green,
Growing Strong
Fall 2007
Page 4

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook 2
Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook 2

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

Contents

Fall 2007

www.rdc.ab.ca

4

Cover Story

Balancing Wellness and a Hectic Schedule

6

In Conversation

With Ron Woodward, Red Deer College President

7

Message from the Alumni Chairperson

Darcy Notland

8

Inquiry

Building Trust, Building Relationships

10

Shelf Life

Chinook Christmas

11

Minds Eye

Chris Ellertson

12

Insights

The Fit Generation - Are Today’s Youth Fit Enough?

14

Profile

Denise Fredeen is a Go Girl!

15

Perspective

Mona Leavitt

16

Rewarding Reflections

For the Ultimate in Balance, Focus on Others

18

Developments

Going Green, Growing Strong!

20

RDC Around the World

Opening Doors in Honduras

22

Noteworthy

Red Deer College News and Accomplishments

24

Class Notes

News from RDC Alumni

26

RDC Calendar

Editorial comments or ideas? Seeking permission to reprint? Contact the Executive Editor at (403) 343-4023 or e-mail notebook@rdc.ab.ca

Cover: Alumna and former Red Deer College staff member Suzanne Blackwell; now an instructor with the Yoga Alliance of Red Deer.

now an instructor with the Yoga Alliance of Red Deer. Alumni Executive Chairperson Darcy Notland UNTR

Alumni Executive

Chairperson Darcy Notland UNTR – BPhysEd ‘93 Past Chairperson Duane Smethurst Pre-Chiro ’78 & ‘80 1st Vice - Chairperson Jeremy Jablonski BusAdmin Dipl ‘03 2nd Vice - Chairperson Mitzi Gentile Nursing Dipl ‘88

Directors Patti Husted Rehab Serv Dipl ‘83 Lisa Klein Hosp & Tour Dipl ‘06 Bus Admin Dipl ‘04 Cheri Konsmo (Students’ Association Rep.) Kenton E. Biffert Alumni and Development Coordinator SOWK ‘99, TPER ‘02, BEd ‘04 Michael Donlevy, Associate Vice-President, Red Deer College Ex-Officio: Ron Woodward, President, Red Deer College

Mail Agreement

• NOTEbook, Red Deer

College Alumni Community

Magazine © Red Deer College 2007

Return Undeliverable Canadian Addresses to:

Red Deer College Box 5005 Red Deer, AB CANADA T4N 5H5

PM40010033

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NOTEbook

Publisher Red Deer College, Joyce Fox

Managing Editor ITS Design & Printing Inc., Lorne Veleti

Executive Editor Lee Ann Waines UNTR – Educ ‘98

Editor

Richard Deschenes

Contributor Kenton E. Biffert SWOK’99, TPER ‘02 UNTR – Educ ‘04

Research & Writing (except as noted) Lorne Daniel and Shannon Kernaghan

Graphic Design

Kathy Matejka

Printing ITS Design & Printing Inc.

Photography (except as noted) Dwight Arthur

Advertising Manager Sandra Dahms and Fran Veleti To advertise call (403) 358-5503

Distribution Fran Veleti

Any reproduction of contents without written consent of the Publisher is prohibited. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors, changes or omission may occur.

Bal

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

ancing Wellness and a Hectic Schedule

A nxiety, sleeplessness, depression and knee- jerk anger. Lorna Milkovich, RN, BN, MBA, says that when you don’t obtain balance, the warning signs will manifest in

your relationships as well as your physical

and mental health.

Milkovich knows plenty about the need for balance. She’s Executive Director of the Rocky Mountain House Primary Care Network, a nurse, a published author and a screenwriter. She also offers seminars and workshops, two of which were held last May at the College’s Finding Balance: A Women’s Event. In her book Vitality and Vitals: My Health and Lifestyle Journal, co-authored by Bev Whitmore, Milkovich says that many choices we make relate to how we balance our body, mind and spirit. Uncover values and priorities The first step is to ask yourself some pertinent questions:

Do you nourish your

body with food, activity and sleep? Are your life choices guided by your values and priorities? Does your life have a sense of purpose? Do you feel connected to yourself and to others? In considering lifestyle choices, Milkovich uses the iceberg model: “Our health is like that navigational nightmare where only the top 10 percent is visible. But what’s going on underneath makes all the difference.” She discovers more about a person’s values and priorities

by asking what would be important if they had only five years, or five months, to live. Suddenly, the material things fall away and the focus shifts to family and friends. Why so busy?

While prioritizing your schedule, try to reduce or delegate some of that busyness; otherwise, parts of your life will be neglected. Make time for your spiritual growth through meditation, reading, journal writing, prayer and yoga.

A friend of hers was

asked to join a prestigious committee, which to most would have been an honour. But, for this friend, time for family and fitness is a highly rated

value, while prestige isn’t,

so the woman declined the

offer. This resonates with people when Milkovich warns about answering “yes” too quickly. Intuitive leaps Suzanne Blackwell UNTR - Educ ‘85 was another presenter at the Finding Balance event. She offered a jujitsu session, and in last summer’s Yoga Summer Intensive she led a session that demonstrated how

yoga and martial arts have similar elements. Blackwell suggests that you find an activity with many levels to it, as is the case for yoga and martial arts. Both have a physical workout as well as emotional and spiritual aspects. If you’re going to spend three hours a week training, choose an activity that has it all. As importantly, choose activities you truly enjoy to help you maintain them over the long term. Activities don’t have to be complex – even dog walking, for instance,

don’t have to be complex – even dog walking, for instance, Bestselling authors Lorna Milkovich and

Bestselling authors Lorna Milkovich and Bev Whitmore

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

“I’ve learned that you can’t have everything and do everything at the same time.”

takes you outside, and lets you spend time with your pets. Physical activity is a great way to clear your head and make you more efficient and focused. Take a class during your lunch break. You’ll accomplish more work when you return to the office because your brain and your body will function better. If Blackwell is stymied by a mental challenge, she can focus more clearly and come up with a solution after some physical activity. “When you’re pouring over a problem, your mind gets bogged down,” she explains. “Everything works better after a break and you get those intuitive leaps.” Blackwell worked at the College from 1989 until this year when she said goodbye as Program Administrator Coordinator for Science, Health, Sport, & Education. Fitness and wellness are still key words in her company, New Leaf Training and Life Balance. In addition to setting up training programs for competitive athletes, she teaches yoga, cycling, cross country skiing and martial arts. Managing your energy level

The Dynamics of Energy

Negative

High

High Negative

High PositiveThe Dynamics of Energy Negative High High Negative • Angry • Invigorated • Fearful • Confident

• Angry

• Invigorated

• Fearful

• Confident

• Anxious

• Challenged

• Defensive

• Joyful

• resentful

• connected

Low Negitive

Low Positive

• Depressed

Relaxed

• Exhausted

Mellow

• Burn out

Peaceful

• Hopeless

Tranquil

• defeated

Serene•

• Burn out • Peaceful • Hopeless • Tranquil • defeated Serene • Low Positive
• Burn out • Peaceful • Hopeless • Tranquil • defeated Serene • Low Positive

Low

Positive

Instructor Dennis Eisenbarth offers several Continuing Education courses designed to encourage change and improve performance. In his Working Smarter, Not Harder course, the focus is time and energy management for busy people.

Oprah Winfrey, O Magazine, April 2003

For those who strive to find balance in their lives, he explains the “Dynamics of Energy.” Picture a square with four quadrants. On the top right is an area called High Positive where we feel invigorated and joyful, where we do our most meaningful work and play our best sports. The box below is Low Positive. That’s where we’re relaxed and feel tranquil. “Research indicates that the most productive people toggle between high positive and low positive,” says Eisenbarth, who has a Masters in Adult Education. “What people don’t realize is that we have to go back and forth every hour and a half to two hours. You can’t sustain a high positive forever or you get burned out.” The High Negative on the left upper is where we’re angry or upset. Low Negative, conversely, is where we feel low energy – depressed and discouraged. Eisenbarth teaches that we end up in Low Negative when we try to spend eight hours in High Positive. The mistake people make is failing to disconnect and relax for a few minutes. People don’t take this concept seriously enough. “‘If I keep pushing, I’ll get it done,’ they figure. Instead, they can’t sustain any kind of efficiency.” Stress: a self-fulfilling prophecy

In his course Managing Stress and Avoiding

Burnout he delves into attitudes and belief systems.

Stress usually comes from our own internal stressors,

not external ones such as family or work load. What

makes stress internal is how we perceive those pressures. Simply put, if we perceive that we can cope with

high pressure or a lot of work, we’re better able to

accomplish it. Voila. A self-fulfilling prophecy.

“Most people are scared to think about what change

could look like so they don’t think about it,” says Eisenbarth, who has taught business management courses at the College for six years. Education can provide the motivational tools required to make a lifelong change. “We have to think about it long before we ever do anything. Doing something might be to attend one of my courses.” A small step to a big difference.

before we ever do anything. Doing something might be to attend one of my courses.” A

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

In

Conversation

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook In Conversation With Ron Woodward, Red Deer College President What

With Ron Woodward,

Red Deer College President

What does Red Deer College do to promote a work/life balance? We at the college have come to the realization that a balance between our people’s work and their lives is not only important so that they can do their jobs well; it is also an important operating strategy. Healthy people are happy people and happy people are productive people. An atmosphere condusive to this will help us to attract new talent and will promote the retention of our existing employees. How will College leadership encourage this commitment? By encouraging our leaders to practice this personally or ‘walk the talk’, we are hoping that our employees will follow their examples. We want to create a sense within the College community that looking after yourself can be an important part of doing your job well. As part of their performance objectives, the senior leadership are all required to develop their personal work/life balance

in some way. This will help to send a message that this is important. And if our staff can provide a positive example to our students it will affect both their learning experience and hopefully their lives. Ideally, this will also spill over into the broader community. How will the Building Communities Through Learning enhance the work/life balance? Our longer term plans for facilities are critical in helping to inspire our employees to seek a balance between their personal and professional lives. Two facilities are being proposed, and we are working with the government to develop a strategy for their construction. One is the Sport and Wellness Centre which will siginificantly increase the amount and kind of activities available to our internal and external communities. A gym, field house, ice surface and yoga and dance studios are all being considered in the plans. The other is a Health Education Centre. This will dramatically expand the variety of programs available to a larger number of students. And while we often see health as a treatment of illness, our focus will be on preventitive wellness strategies. A formal partnership with the David Thompson Health Region has been established to support this. Wellness in life is not a course or a program or a campaign – it is about what you do everyday. This is the core of our focus and intention.

do everyday. This is the core of our focus and intention. Interviewed and Written by Lee

Interviewed and Written by Lee Ann Waines

Did You Know?

Red Deer College Alumni receive a discount at the Train Station. Call 342-3139 or e-mail: leah.beeton@rdc.ab.ca for more information

Alumni receive a discount at the Train Station. Call 342-3139 or e-mail: leah.beeton@rdc.ab.ca for more information

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

Mes

Greetings! I hope the summer has seen each of you fair well. Hopefully you took some time from your busy schedule to relax, reflect and rejuvenate. That’s what this edition of Notebook is all about. One of the aspects of living a healthy lifestyle is to have a strong social support system. Taking time to build and foster friendships, to connect and network, and to construct new bridges not only rejuvenates our inner self, but it sharpens our senses and

Wouldn’t it be great to know what talents and interests your former classmates have developed, or what business or service he/she is involved in We’re implementing NETCommunity. As a member of our community, you will receive exclusive benefits such as searchable online directories, online registration for member-only events, manageable email subscriptions, online profile, and address update capabilities, as well as personalized content and communication from us. Our launch date for NETCommunity will be March 2008. Watch our web site (www.rdc.ab.ca/alumni) for updates and exciting announcements in the coming months. In the meantime, I’d like to remind you of Welcome Back Alumni Weekend taking place November 2 & 3, 2007. This weekend is guaranteed to offer you several chances to catch up with your old College friends! Be sure to mark this date on your calendar and I look forward to seeing you then.

Kind Regards, Darcy Notland Chair, RDC Alumni Association

UNTR – BPhysEd ‘93

Notland Chair, RDC Alumni Association UNTR – BPhysEd ‘93 I pick up my new name tag

I pick up my new name tag from the office. Kenton E. Biffert:

Alumni Development Coordinator. Gold. Looks the same as my

old ones.

Students’ Association (SA) election attention grabs; speaking at Convocation;

giving tours of the

college

Flashbacks of

yes,

it feels like

sage from the Alumni Chairperson

of yes, it feels like sage from the Alumni Chairperson Alumni Chairperson, Darcy Notland, owner of

Alumni Chairperson, Darcy Notland,

owner of Elite Sportswear

imagination. Your Red Deer College Alumni Association is working hard on ways to keep you connected with your fellow alumni.

Fos

tering Connections

Welcome Kenton E. Biffert, Alumni Development Coordinator

Welcome Kenton E. Biffert, Alumni Development Coordinator coming back home after a little time away. Red

coming back home after a little time away. Red Deer College has seen a lot of me over the years. I’ve graduated from Theatre Studies (Acting), and earned a degree in the Bachelor of Eduation and a diploma in the Social Work programs. During this educational journey I was able to serve students

and the college as the SA Internal VP, SA President, Recruitment Clerk, Education Undergraduate Society President, Assistant in the Arts Centre, trouble maker on a skateboard; and now I’m the Alumni Coordinator. I’ve developed many relationships, friendships and partnerships here that have made a significant impact on my life. Now, as I am heading down a new fork in my life journey, I hope to inspire you also to remember your connection to RDC. My vision is to facilitate and develop an affinity between you and the College. To reach that vision, I have many goals: setting up opportunities for new alumni, implementing NetCommunity ( an on-line forum to connect and reconnect with past alumni and professors), and working with the different faculties to connect with their alumni. My RDC student experience was packed with memories and friendships. It is a privilege to be a part of this family again.

Kenton E. Biffert SOWK ’99, TPER ‘02, BEd ‘04

friendships. It is a privilege to be a part of this family again. Kenton E. Biffert

Bui

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

lding Trust, Building Relationships

Teaching Patients How to Care for Themselves

8

W endy Wheeler BSNR ’95 believes that teaching patients how to care for themselves is imperative, though timing is a major challenge. “We can give people all the information,

but if we don’t get them at the right moment, it’s not meaningful. Take the issue of smoking – if you’re not interested in quitting or even thinking about quitting, the material that we give you will go straight into the garbage. And if we talk birth control to a young woman about to terminate a pregnancy, none of those

facts are useful.”

Wheeler has been a Nursing instructor at the College since 2001. She also works a casual position in the maternity ward at Red Deer Regional Hospital and as a Clinical Nurse Specialist in Calgary’s Women’s Health Centre. Cultural sensitivity Another challenge involves new Canadians. Wheeler says that some of the resources available for central Albertans don’t necessarily work for people with a different cultural or language background. Being culturally sensitive and competent is an important goal.

culturally sensitive and competent is an important goal. Valerie Trotter BSNR ’94 works with a resident

Valerie Trotter BSNR ’94 works with a resident at Bethany CollegeSide

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

Seniors who perceived low levels of stress in their lives were approximately twice as likely to be in good health as those who had high stress levels (62% versus 32%).

For this reason, the College helps students expand their knowledge by offering international courses and travel opportunities (read more on the Honduras study tour in RDC Worldwide). As well, practicums in the community help students learn about appropriate teaching practises with new Canadian clients. On the hospital’s maternity unit, Wheeler recognizes the need for patient-specific information. For example, there’s no point talking to a new mom about baby baths when she’s more concerned with how she’ll manage a newborn and a three-year-old at home. Checklists are fine if you go beyond and ask the clients what they really want to know. That’s how relationships are strengthened and trust is built. Wheeler often refers to the saying: “Nobody cares what you know until they know that you care.” Proactive health promotion Wheeler says that health promotion doesn’t receive a lot of money because it’s difficult to justify what hasn’t happened. “Projects like cardiac health get money because you can show some statistics, and we’re beginning to see that if we have healthy pregnant moms, we’re having healthier babies. But over the long term, if we have healthier babies, will they be better educated children? That’s tougher to track.” Wheeler has a couple of positive suggestions: increase the number of family nurses to help patients negotiate the health care system, have more Nutritionists, Physiotherapists and Geriatric Nurse Specialists. Their services are invaluable. Educate the care providers According to Valerie Trotter BSNR ‘94, you make the best decisions throughout your life based on first-hand knowledge. As Administrator for Bethany CollegeSide, Trotter encourages residents to be active in their life management. “We try to help them identify the important factors that lead to a satisfying life, and then we help them organize those factors for a life that makes sense.” While that sounds logical enough, it’s a multi-layered challenge – you must educate the residents and the people providing the care. “When you talk about education, you discover various

Health Canada, 2005 Annual Report

levels. We have so many people interacting on a regular basis, people with diverse backgrounds, histories and preferences. That means there are diverse expectations from the residents, their family members and the care providers.” A work in progress The subject of expectations is a significant one at Bethany CollegeSide. Expectations are the focus of all interactions, whether at staff meetings or with the Resident Council. Take the word “home”. While Trotter describes Bethany as a resident’s home, the meaning can be different to everyone. To a resident, home means they can make all the decisions about how they live. But they live in a communal environment so there are varying expectations such as how they take their medications and where they can smoke. Because of the individual interpretations, there has to be ongoing discussion about that meaning within the context of a continuing care centre. “It’s a work in progress,” says Trotter. “Understanding where we’re headed and what we’re trying to achieve has been a major objective. As an administrative team, our role is to provide our staff with support through coaching, guidance and resolution of problems. We want to do this with them, not for them.” Trotter sees promising results from each of the groups – residents, families and staff – as they start to take ownership. “A clearer understanding of how the system works and how the funding works helps everyone add new angles to their perspective,” she adds. “It’s not an us versus them mentality. We’re all in it for the same reason and working towards the same goals, but we all have common barriers and strengths. Identifying those common barriers and strengths is what brings it all together.”

barriers and strengths is what brings it all together.” CollegeSide, an innovative living and learning environment,

CollegeSide, an innovative living and learning environment, opened on campus in 2004 and provides increased learning opportunities for students. This extended-care housing facility is the result of a unique partnership between the David Thompson Health Region, the Bethany Care Society and Red Deer College.

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook She lf Life Shelf Life showcases the published work of

Shelf Life

Shelf Life showcases the published work of a Red Deer College alumni, faculty, staff member or student in each issue.

alumni, faculty, staff member or student in each issue. Red Deer College Visual Arts Instructor and

Red Deer College Visual Arts Instructor and Alum, David More, provided the illustrations for the book Chinook Christmas, written by Rudy Wiebe. Following, he shares his account of the project’s creation…

Long an admirer of Rudy Wiebe’s work, you can imagine my enthusiastic response when Dennis Johnson inquired if I would be interested in illustrating Chinook Christmas. Dennis confided in me that I was not his first choice…that had been the famous ceramic portrait artist, Joe Fafard. Our RDC Permanent Art Collection has a piece by Joe Fafard, the wonderful portrait of actor Donald Sutherland. Joe had politely declined, and I was quite honoured to come in as second string. Chinook Christmas is based on Rudy

come in as second string. Chinook Christmas is based on Rudy Wiebe’s childhood and luckily for

Wiebe’s childhood and luckily for me, when meeting Rudy and looking at photos of him as a child, I realized I had the perfect model, my brother’s oldest son…just about the spitting image. Working with Tim Wynne-Jones the editor in Ontario, we drafted up the roughs and settled on the sequence of images. With the drawings in hand we held a photographic modeling session in which my young nephew struck the required poses. To maintain the genetic visual link I used youthful pictures of my nephew’s mother and she became our protagonist’s older sister in the book. Getting a chance to work in concert with someone as skillful and gifted as Rudy Wiebe was one of the highlights of my illustrating career. I have been very fortunate in being paired up with fascinating authors, editors and publishers…the other most notable connection being humourist Eric Nicol and with whom I have collaborated on six books. Nowadays, I concentrate mostly on painting and can look back fondly on the harried life of an illustrator.”

books. Nowadays, I concentrate mostly on painting and can look back fondly on the harried life
books. Nowadays, I concentrate mostly on painting and can look back fondly on the harried life
books. Nowadays, I concentrate mostly on painting and can look back fondly on the harried life

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

Min

Minds Eye showcases the artistic work of a Red Deer College alumni, faculty, staff member or student in each issue.

of his pants, oilfield style”. Shown here is “Norse Man”, a hand carved soapstone piece - the first of three, but the only one currently completed. This piece was purely experimental. Tools were hand-made from welding rods, heat formed and used intensely from roughing out to sanding and finishing. During its creation, the nose was broken off once which resulted in everything having to be moved and started over. The experience has helped Ellertson in his transition to working with steel – particularly as it is difficult to find facilities suitable for carving soapstone. After working in the trade for seven years, the artist is now a Welding Instructor at the College. He hopes to someday incorporate soapstone, steel and perhaps wood in a multi- media format. He works to move forward creatively and

technologically in his role here at the College.

wood in a multi- media format. He works to move forward creatively and technologically in his

ds Eye

technologically in his role here at the College. ds Eye Chris Ellertson WELD ’01 a Red

Chris Ellertson WELD ’01 a Red Deer College Welding Instructor, recently had his work featured at a showing at the Jubilee Auditorium in Calgary. “Catharsus” was a direct product of the artist spending long days working in the oilfield. The hours, cold weather, and a need to release creativity were inspirational. Between the actual carving, Ellertson attempted to sketch his ideas, but in his own words, he generally “flew by the seat

the actual carving, Ellertson attempted to sketch his ideas, but in his own words, he generally
Insights Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook The Fit Generation - Are Today’s Youth Fit

Insights

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

The Fit Generation - Are Today’s Youth Fit Enough?

M ichelle Roth UNTR - BA Rec Admin ’96, Program Coordinator for Kevin Sirois Fitness

Centre, says

that today’s

youth aren’t anywhere near fit. According to 2004 statistics from the

or an economic standpoint. We want healthy kids and adults.”

Cheap, easy and unhealthy Unfortunately, it’s all too easy to eat an unhealthy diet. It’s no surprise that people who lead busy lives often head to the processed food aisle, or to the drive-through window

of a fast food restaurant. To worsen the problem, Roth believes that lower socio- economic groups can’t afford what constitutes healthy food, such as fresh fruits and vegetables. Restrictive budgets aside, this pattern of “cheap and easy” encompasses all demographics. “It’s easy to stop at McDonalds and grab something on the go. The media is so powerful with product endorsement, and everything is super-sized and oversized.” Wanted: one balanced lifestyle Every level of society benefits from knowing how to lead a balanced lifestyle, which includes good nutrition, portion

Over the past 20 years, levels of obesity among Canadian children aged seven to 13 nearly tripled.

Canadian Institute for Health Information

(Directions, Fall 2003)

Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute, only 21% of Canadian teenagers are active enough to meet international guidelines for optimal growth and development. Childhood obesity has become a buzz word in the health industry. Health Canada and Alberta Health and Wellness are channeling considerable dollars into programs that battle childhood obesity, and are encouraging young people to get active and learn how to eat healthy foods. These agencies are also helping parents and educators address this dilemma. “Hopefully that effort will solve some of the problems and reduce the obesity rates, because if we don’t,” says Roth, “the long-term impact of our health care system will be a grim reality.” Roth explains how the risk of people being obese or overweight in adulthood increases if they’re obese or overweight in childhood. “That’s going to tax our already taxed system. This doesn’t bode well from a community

Twenty-six percent of two- to 17-year-olds were overweight or obese in 2004. Low consumption of vegetables and fruit was associated with excess weight, and as screen time (watching TV, playing video games, using a computer) increased, so did the likelihood that young people would be overweight or obese.

Health Reports – Statistics Canada, August 2006

obese. Health Reports – Statistics Canada, August 2006 Children and youth benefit from regular physical activity

Children and youth benefit from regular physical activity and healthy nutritional choices

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

control and healthy activities. Through education, there’s a role for everyone to play. The responsibility begins with parents and peers, continues by way of the community, and finally extends to the province and the nation. But it’s not all bleak and Roth has every reason to feel optimistic. How can the Kevin Sirois Fitness Centre (KSFC) help? The options are extensive. Choose from appraisal services (fitness testing), fitness programs, the Be Fit for Life Centre and the annual Go Girl event for Grade 5 girls in Red Deer. Roth is determined to raise awareness. Besides the KSFC, she says, there are numerous opportunities for our youth to be active in their community, whether through yoga or circuit training. Of course, there are also playgrounds and green space and kilometres of trail systems. “We’re in a good position because we’re in the preventative department. While healthcare must react, we can be proactive in addressing the current issues. That means we’re able to change lives by overcoming any barriers – real or imagined – that prevent people from getting active and

staying active.”

prevent people from getting active and staying active.” Kevin Sirois was on his way to becoming

Kevin Sirois was on his way to becoming one of the few Canadians to compete in both the Winter and Sum- mer Olympics in the same year. He was a speedskater and a cyclist who held several Canadian records in both sports. He strived for excellence, competing in the 1972 Winter Olympics in Sapporo, Japan. As a member of the Canadian Olympic Cycling Team, he was training for the 1972 Summer Olympics, when he was killed in a cycling accident near Ponoka. The Kevin Sirois Centre at Red Deer College is named in his honour.

he was killed in a cycling accident near Ponoka. The Kevin Sirois Centre at Red Deer
he was killed in a cycling accident near Ponoka. The Kevin Sirois Centre at Red Deer

Pro

file

Profile features an alum who has returned to RDC as a faculty or staff member.

Denise Fredeen is a Go Girl!

Denise Fredeen (nee Klein) BEd ’99, wants girls to become active at a younger age, not to wait until they’re teenagers. As the Be Fit For Life (BFFL) Coordinator at the Kevin Sirois Fitness Resource Centre since 2002, her life has revolved around fitness. One event she’s especially proud of is the annual Go Girl event. “Several years ago I met with elementary schools and we identified that girls in Grade 5 either take up physical activity or drop off at this point,” she says. “We wanted to create an event where they can try a variety of activities.” Last May, 597 girls spent the day at Red Deer’s Collicutt Centre participating in everything from yoga and tennis to soccer and basketball. One girl tried karate for the first time at a Go Girl event and she has since completed several of her belts and entered competitions across the province.Fredeen is an enthusiastic role model. “Not only do I teach this within my job but I incorporate healthy living into my lifestyle.” Through the Be Fit For Life Centre at Red Deer College, she continues to fuel children’s enthusiasm for fitness by visiting schools and offering fun programs that teach them how to stay active. The network’s mission (there are nine BFFL Centres in Alberta) is to help Albertans lead healthy active lives.

in Alberta) is to help Albertans lead healthy active lives. Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

lead healthy active lives. Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook Denise Fredeen, Red Deer College Be

Denise Fredeen, Red Deer College Be Fit For Life Coordinator

“I try to get across that busy people can bring fitness into their work place and their home lives. It doesn’t have to be difficult – play with your kids at the park instead of watching them!”

You go, girl!

kids at the park instead of watching them!” You go, girl! The Be Fit for Life

The Be Fit for Life Network is made up of nine regional centres focused on providing services, programs and resources to promote the health benefits of active living and physical activity. The BFFL Network is funded by Alberta Tourism, Parks, Recreation and Culture via the Alberta Sport, Recreation, Parks and Wildlife Foundation and hosting post-secondary education institutions. Schools, communities and workplaces are welcome to access these services.

Did You Know?

Registered students and staff are eligible to participate in the Green Campus Carpool- ing program. As a registered participant of the program, you will qualify for incentives offered (including one free public parking space per month and automatic entry into prize draws). A minimum of two individuals constitutes a carpool. For more informa- tion, visit www.rdc.ab.ca/greencampus

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

Per

spective

Lifelong learning – the key to self care

Pursuing her dreams has been Mona Leavitt’s NURS ’81, Fine Art ’00 key to achieving wellness. As a two-time alumnus of Red Deer College, I have fond memories of my post-secondary experience. My Nursing Diploma course (’81) was intense, stressful and exciting. Coming from a long family of nurses,

I recall my mom quietly complaining of the aching

of nurses, I recall my mom quietly complaining of the aching Tobacco Reduction/Student Wellness Coordinator, Mona

Tobacco Reduction/Student Wellness Coordinator, Mona Leavitt

legs and back that I assumed was part of the job. I also remember her dedication to shift work and unpaid overtime; there were moments when I wondered if I was up for the task. After working part-time as a nurse for several years and

seeing my girls off to school, I pondered what life still had in store for me. I’d always loved art but considered it a somewhat decadent lifestyle - one that couldn’t provide an income-earning career. I was also aware of “starving artists.” School counselors, my parents and many others felt the same way about art as a vocation. Nevertheless,

I longed to attend art school, so I and enrolled in the

Bachelor of Fine Art Program at the College. I continued to work part-time as a nurse in the hospital to support my art “habit”. That enabled me to enjoy life as an art student on my days off, even if achieving my goal meant short sleeps and perseverance. “What are you going to do with a fine art degree?” people asked along my journey. One person said, “So what you’re saying is that you’re good at being a student.” But education has opened my mind to life’s possibilities

and has changed me as a person. Now I see things differently and attribute this perception to adult learning.

I encourage every student to enjoy their experience at the College – I certainly did. After ten years, I completed my Bachelor of Fine Art degree with a minor in Psychology from the University of Calgary (with Distinction) in June of 2006. Now I work at Red Deer College in the Health, Safety and Wellness Centre as a Tobacco Reduction and Student Wellness Coordinator. I believe I bring a creative enthusiasm to my job while

Over the past several years, the Tobacco Reduction Program has successfully provided information and ideas, motivation and guidance to Red Deer College students. The program’s goal is to offer skills for student wellness, and to assist in reduction, cessation, and decrease the likelihood of people starting tobacco use.

striving to help students achieve their goals. We emphasize self care through our Alcohol Screening, Depression Screening and Tobacco Reduction Program. The latter program received a 2007 Barb Tarbox Award of Excellence in Tobacco Reduction, Non Profit Category, which was presented by the Honourable Dave Hancock, Minister of Health and Wellness on World No Tobacco Day. I discovered that being a student and pursuing my passion for art was my form of self care. We should always follow our dreams, no matter how crazy they may seem to

others.

for art was my form of self care. We should always follow our dreams, no matter

16

Re

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

warding Reflections

For the ultimate in balance, focus on others

By Whitney Anderson Kinesiology ’07

During the 43rd Convocation Ceremony last June, the Governor General’s Academic Medal was awarded to Whitney Anderson, a graduate of the Kinesiology and Sport Studies Diploma Program. The Medal is presented to the student with the highest academic standing after completing the final year of a diploma- level, post-secondary program. Throughout her studies at the College, Whitney proved that success involves not only a high academic standing but a balance that nurtures health and wellness.

With an interest in sports and the human body all through high school, my path easily led me into Kinesiology. Finding a healthy balance was always important to me. To help me physically and mentally – especially to relieve stress – I had a gym membership at the Train Station and regularly worked out between classes. Going with a workout partner was even more

between classes. Going with a workout partner was even more Governor General Academic Medal winner, Whitney

Governor General Academic Medal winner, Whitney Anderson

motivating. For me, part of that healthy balance while at the College included making friends and getting myself out there. I believe it’s always good to establish a social group. And of course my family provided lots of emotional support. Some of my courses were also valuable on a personal level. One of the fitness and wellness courses in my first year covered everything from physical to mental to emotional health. That gave me a strong knowledge base. The most satisfying experiences often involved the relationships I built with teachers and students. We were

a close group. As well, a practicum I did at Children’s Services guided me towards Pediatric Physiotherapy.

But it’s easy to get caught up and focus entirely on school.

I discovered that the most gratifying moments would

happen when I pursued other challenges, ones that took me away from books and classes. Last March, for example, I took part in an event with Big 105.5 FM/Tim Hortons Snow Camp for special needs children. We went away for a three-day weekend in Kananaskis Country. There, I was “buddied” with a little girl who had a prosthetic limb and together we took part in many fun activities. My greatest fulfillment was seeing how these kids didn’t let their disabilities bother them, or slow them down. I’m sure I learned more from the little girl than she learned from me. It was a really cool weekend and taught me to be less focused on myself.

Whitney is currently enrolled at the University of Alberta, pursuing a Bachelor’s Degree in Physical Education, followed by a Masters in Physiotherapy.

the University of Alberta, pursuing a Bachelor’s Degree in Physical Education, followed by a Masters in
the University of Alberta, pursuing a Bachelor’s Degree in Physical Education, followed by a Masters in

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook 17
Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook 17

18

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

18 Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook Third year Automotive Services Technician student, Christina finds fulfillment

Third year Automotive Services Technician student, Christina finds fulfillment and finan- cial stability in her career

Dev

elopments

News of the Red Deer College expansion.

career Dev elopments News of the Red Deer College expansion. Growing strong! The concept of health

Growing strong!

The concept of health and wellness journeys beyond bodies, beyond minds. It extends to the community. If people are able to study and work where they live, that state of wellness keeps growing. Right here at home. Your College: Building Communities Through Learning is expanding facilities, programs and scholarships through its largest growth initiative in College history.

Meeting needs.

More people are needed to enter the trades and manufacturing sectors now, to gain the skills and

a ticket, I’ll always

have something to fall back on.” The trades have a proven track record in her family: both her grandfather and father became Journeyman ASTs.

While the validation of a trade and

experience for tomorrow. Your College is meeting this urgency and advancing education with the opening
experience for tomorrow. Your College is meeting this
urgency and advancing education with the opening of
a strong labour
a new Welding Shop and a new Automotive Service
Technician (AST) building.
Christina Atkins exemplifies a learner in hot pursuit of
a career, one that brings both fulfillment and financial
stability. She is an AST Apprentice in her third year.
“This trade is helping me accomplish my goals and prove
to the world that I can achieve whatever I want. With
forecast are tangible rewards, Atkins says she also has a
great time in class, enjoying the support and friendship of
peers and instructors.
The College continues to foster wellness – by enabling
learners to reach their career goals and stay in their
community to train.
Healthy bodies and minds. Healthy buildings. Healthy
campus.
Proactive and green-friendly
From the beginning, health and
wellness have been vital aspects of
the “Green Campus initiative.” An
environmental focus is being integrated
with every phase of the expansion. Four new
Centres – Trades & Technology, Innovation in
Manufacturing, Business Enterprise and Visual
Art – will share infrastructure wherever possible.
This is not only cost-effective but encourages skill-
sharing, collaboration and creativity.
Building Communities Through Learning is
demonstrating environmental leadership by
meeting the criteria to achieve LEED (Leadership
in Energy and Environmental Design) certification.
Highlights of the project include energy efficiency and
conservation, minimized water consumption, and
recycling strategies that emphasize waste reduction.
“Being good stewards of our land and development, we
a number of options such as increased awareness of Red
feel it’s important to demonstrate leadership by including
a sustainability component,” says Director of Facilities
Doug Sharp.
Sharp, also Chair of the Green Campus Task Group,
explains that a challenge connected with growth is the
additional demand for parking. Your College is exploring
Deer Transit, a car pooling program, shared parking and
improved pedestrian/bicycle access.
Soon, coming to class will be more environmentally
friendly. Bus shuttles from outlying communities are
being proposed – students, faculty and staff who live in
Lacombe, Ponoka, Innisfail and Sylvan Lake can benefit
from the regular service.
With smart transportation strategies, doubling the number
of students won’t mean doubling the number of vehicles
arriving at the College, doubling the parking or building
expensive parkades.

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

Advertorial

What Is YOUR Skin Eating?

Written by Charlene Wieler, Natural Health Consultant

W Women who use make-up on a daily basis,

according to recent research are absorbing

nearly 5 pounds of chemicals a year into their

Many M researchers warn that absorbing

chemicals through our skin is more dangerous

than swallowing them. This is attributed to the

fact that anything that we put into our mouths

Today, T thanks to progressively more informed

consumers, even high profile vitamin

companies are jumping to consumer demand

bodies. Striving to look our best, many of us use more than 20 personal care products in a day. But the shocking reality of our dependence on typical store-bought skin care and cosmetics amounts to a cocktail of 4lbs.

6oz. of hazardous chemicals being absorbed into our bodies through our skin.

broken down by the enzymes in our saliva

is

and stomach. But through our skin, there is no protection, and once these chemicals are

absorbed, they get directly into our bloodstream.

for safe cosmetics. Yet, when carefully researched, you might discover that they too contain ingredients extracted with chemical solvents, making them toxic and potentially carcinogenic. Simply looking for the words

‘natural’ or ‘organic’ won’t guarantee the

 

What’s more, a recent survey of more than 2,300 women conducted by public health and environmental organizations found that the average adult female uses nine personal care products daily, exposing herself to 126 chemicals every day.

Some researchers suggest that women use too many products, and question if our cosmetics are really necessary. Sounds like something our male counterparts might imply, but what they fail to realize is that women, the beautiful beings that we are, enjoy taking care of our skin while defying the laws of aging, and ultimately we like the glitz and glamour of our daily cosmetics!

We worry about contaminating our earth but what are we absorbing daily through our skin?
We worry about
contaminating our earth
but what are we absorbing
daily through our skin?

What are the potential health hazards of these chemical toxins? Acrylamide, found in some foundations, hand creams and shaving creams has been linked to mammary tumors in laboratory research. Formaldehyde, found

in some mascara, nail hardener, shampoo, blush and anti-aging cream has been classified as a probable human carcinogen by the

Environmental Protection Agency. And

cosmetics you buy are really safe. So buyer beware.

Fortunately, there is one company of integrity amongst the abundance of pseudo organic products. And their policy of using only 100% natural and organic ingredients, free from synthetics and impurities, assist our bodies in restoring harmony and balance. Every ingredient is beneficial to your skin’s health, right down to the preservatives and antioxidants. So natural and full of goodness, not only do their ingredient lists sound delicious and good enough to eat, but once applied, you can actually feel their energy and vitality feeding your skin! Experience their products just once, and trust me, there’s just no going back.

Discover beauty without guilt, preserving not only our environment, but our precious children and the health of future generations. Yes, you can look and feel beautiful without the hormone-disrupting, toxic chemicals. Discover personal care products that resonate harmoniously with your body. Your skin will LOVE YOU for it!

Many of these synthetic compounds have been linked to side effects ranging from skin irritation, to premature ageing, birth defects, and even cancer. Thus, an increasing number of researchers are now cautioning us to question the products we put on our skin.

We can no longer simply assume that the chemicals they contain are safe. The overwhelming majority of ingredients in personal care products have never been assessed for safety, so the magnitude of their potential adverse effects is unknown. Of the small minority that have been studied, some are listed by government agencies as known or probable carcinogens, or reproductive toxins.

Of O the 10,500 chemical ingredients used in

personal care products, only 11 percent have

been safety assessed. These assessments were

 

not conducted by government officials, but rather by a panel funded by manufacturers, as the cosmetics industry polices the safety of its own products. In fact, there are no government regulations in place that require safety testing of ingredients or products before they arrive on store shelves, and ultimately into our bodies.

phthalates, a group of industrial chemicals found in many popular brands of hair spray, deodorant, fragrance, hand and body lotions have been shown to cause reproductive birth defects in laboratory animals, particularly males, and in lab studies are speculated to be involved in the rise of testicular cancer in humans. Researchers have also found measurable concentrations of 6 different parabens in 20 human breast tumors, and as

result, parabens are being researched as a potential link to breast cancer.

a

A After years of research due to multiple

chemical sensitivities, my purpose is not

to alarm you, but rather empower you to

make healthier choices! Invest your money where your health is. Start by reviewing the ingredients of your current products, then make the switch to safe skin care and truly healthy cosmetics.

A About the Author: Charlene Wieler is a

natural health consultant, avid researcher

and prolific writer with strong ethics. She and

her husband of 13 years live in Red Deer, and are on a mission to empower individuals to take personal responsibility for their health. Together with her husband, Charlene speaks regularly in cities across Canada on the topic of achieving vibrant health. Employed full-time as a health consultant, Charlene is a testimony to the power of the body to heal itself having successfully eliminated so-called incurable ovarian cysts, uterine fibroids and endometriosis from her body through natural means, without the use of surgery or medical intervention. Her husband, also a health consultant, healed himself from asthma, IBS and Crohn’s disease naturally.

himself from asthma, IBS and Crohn’s disease naturally. Armed with this new knowledge, don’t you think

Armed with this new knowledge, don’t you think it’s time for you to discover a new you that glows with renewed vitality? For more detailed information, or for a free 15-minute consultation, please write to realnaturalgirl@yahoo.ca or telephone (403) 755-0797. I’d be delighted to assist you in your journey of discovering a happier, healthier, more radiant you!

 
 

20

RDC

Worldwide

Opening doors in Honduras

W hen Nursing instructors Alma Funk

and Maureen Matejka journeyed

to Honduras, they had no idea the

experience would be so moving. Part

of their thrill was working alongside

eight keen Red Deer College students. For Funk NURS ’71, an instructor at the College for 16 years, this trip has been a dream for two decades. After years of working through a myriad of “hoops and loops,” the dream finally became a personal joy. From April 28 to May 13, 2007, the group immersed themselves in the culture of Cirriboya, an area populated since the early 1600s. The course objective? To provide opportunities for students to develop cross- cultural communication and cultural competency skills through primary health care principles. Despite any communication barrier, students interacted with the village children by way of laughter and games. Through a partnership with CAUSE Canada (Christian Aid for Under-Assisted Societies Everywhere), the doors of Cirriboya swung open. CAUSE is an international relief organization that strives to empower communities

relief organization that strives to empower communities Students performing a puppet show (with giant puppets from

Students performing a puppet show (with giant puppets from the NGO CAUSE CANADA) to teach about HIV/AIDS awareness and stigma

Students working side by side with the Garifuna women in the Yucca fields

Students washing yucca after peeling it
Students washing yucca
after peeling it

Students plucking and cleaning a chicken

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

and cleaning a chicken Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook RDC students teaching hand washing to

RDC students teaching hand washing to elementary school children.

and individuals in disadvantaged regions. The agency was vital in helping plan the course logistics. They also provided a translator fluent in English, Spanish and Garifuna, a language spoken along the northern Caribbean coast. “We had planned projects to go into, and CAUSE was there to follow up,” says Matejka, RNMN, an instructor at the College for six years. “With donated money, we bought materials to build a fence around the school, to make a safer playground. Before we left, we hired a contractor to build it and CAUSE will follow through to make sure it’s completed.”

“This trip was a life-changing experience. From eating turtle to drinking coconut milk on the beach to seeing dolphins, to challenging myself beyond boundaries I didn’t know I had. And the children were a highlight for me. Whether or not you speak Spanish or Garifuna, the kids take a liking to you because you show initiative to establish relationships.”

Leia Schaber 3rd year Nursing student, BScN Program

The group learned about coconut reforestation – recent crops have been wiped out from lethal yellowing disease. The aim is to reforest with a disease-resistant coconut. Non-stop is the best way to describe the pace. Students worked alongside a women’s co-op that plants and processes yucca to make cassava, a starchy root used in making bread. Next, they travelled to several health centres in the area, two of them accessible only by boat. “We visited schools and did health promotion activities such as hand washing and teeth brushing,” says Matejka. “HIV is a big problem so our students put on a process theatre puppet show to teach about HIV and AIDS awareness to grades K-4.” In 2008, the instructors intend to return to Central America with increased enrollment - they hope to bring as many as 14 students on their next expedition to the region. Adventure. Activities. Rewarding results. For those who desire a first-hand opportunity to live and work with people from another culture, unforgettable memories are guaranteed in Cirriboya.

opportunity to live and work with people from another culture, unforgettable memories are guaranteed in Cirriboya.

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

REGULAR SEASON HOME GAME RDC 2007-08 ACAC SCHEDULE Basketball Volleyball Queens Hockey October October October
REGULAR SEASON HOME GAME
RDC 2007-08 ACAC
SCHEDULE
Basketball
Volleyball
Queens Hockey
October
October
October
26
Friday
vs SAIT 6:30 pm
19 Friday
vs
BC
6:30 pm
11
Thursday vs NAIT 7:00 pm
November
20 Saturday
vs
BC
12 Noon
18
Thursday vs UofC 7:00 pm
2
Friday
vs
MRC
6:30 pm
November
25
Thursday vs MRC 7:00 pm
16
Friday
vs
LCC
6:30 pm
3
Saturday
vs
King’s
5:00 pm
November
17
Saturday
vs
LCC
12 Noon
9
Friday
vs
MRC
6:30 pm
1
Thursday vs MacE 7:00 pm
January
17
Saturday
vs
MacE
5:00 pm
15
Thursday vs SAIT 7:00 pm
11
Friday
vs
MHC
6:30 pm
23
Friday
vs SAIT 6:30 pm
22
Thursday vs NAIT 7:00 pm
12
Saturday
vs
MHC
12 Noon
January
January
19
Saturday vs SAIT 5:00 pm
12
Saturday vs SAIT 5:00 pm
10
Thursday vs NAIT 7:00 pm
26
Saturday
vs
MRC
5:00 pm
18
Friday
vs
GPRC
6:30 pm
17
Thursday vs UofC 7:00 pm
February
19
Saturday
vs
GPRC
12 Noon
24
Thursday vs SAIT 7:00 pm
15 Friday
vs
BC
6:30 pm
25
Friday
vs
King’s
6:30 pm
31
Thursday vs MRC 7:00 pm
16 Saturday
vs
BC
12 Noon
February
February
2
Saturday
vs
MRC
5:00 pm
7 Thursday vs MacE 7:00 pm
• Game times are for Queens, with Kings
to follow
8
Friday
vs
MacE
6:30 pm
• Games played in the Red Deer Arena
• Games played in the RDC Lion’s Den
Game times are for Queens, with Kings
to follow
Games played in the RDC Lion’s Den
GET YOUR
TICKETS NOW!
Presenting sponsor of Red Deer College Athletics Alumni Homecoming
and Social - November 3rd, at the Farside
For More Information Call 342-3497
rdc athletics ticket hotline
403.342.3497
or purchase tickets at the door
www.rdc.ab.ca/athletics
Call 342-3497 rdc athletics ticket hotline 403.342.3497 or purchase tickets at the door www.rdc.ab.ca/athletics 21

Not

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

e Worthy

News and accomplishments of alumni, faculty, staff mem- bers, students and Red Deer College departments.

Collicutt Energy Services signed a memorandum of understanding with Red Deer College pledging that each will dedicate resources to promote opportunities for Collicutt staff and RDC students through new technical programming. As a result, the College will develop and support a Natural Gas Compression and Power Energy Generation Technician program, as well as providing technical and soft-skills training to Collicutt’s human resources department.

In conjunction with RDC Financial Services, the Registrar’s office set up a pre-payment system for student fees in Apprenticeship programs this August. Because all fees are now paid one month in advance, the students’ first day can now be used for learning rather than administrative paperwork.

The 2007 Golf Classic raised more than $70 000 for student bursaries. This was a 14% increase from last year’s event. Over 800 students received funding from this

year’s event. Over 800 students received funding from this program in the 2006/2007 year thanks to

program in the 2006/2007 year thanks to the generous support of Alberta businesses and donors.

In May, Red Deer College was recognized at AADAC’s

Barb Tarbox Awards of Excellence Ceremony in Edmonton for their tobacco reduction program. The program, led by Mona Leavitt NURS ’81, Fine Art ‘00 increases awareness of the harmful effects of smoking and encourages students to lead healthier lifestyles.

Red Deer College welcomes a Tim Hortons location to the campus this fall. The kiosk, housed in the Forum, will partner with Upper Crust (sandwiches and other).

The Government of Alberta is investing an additional $18 million in Red Deer College’s Building Communities Through Learning (BCTL) project. The additional funding will go toward the new centres for Trades and Technology and Innovation and Manufacturing being completed, equipped and ready for learners by September 2008. These centres are part of the first component of the College’s BCTL project, which also includes centres for Business Enterprise and Visual Art.

A Green Campus Task Group has recently been formed to help fulfill the College’s commitment to being a leader in the area of sustainability. Initiatives will include recycling programs, LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification for new buildings, numerous energy and water conservation initiatives, and the exploration of transportation alternatives in order to reduce the number of vehicles being driven to campus every day.

The College is experiencing enrollment increases this year, particularly in Apprenticeship Trades and Continuing Education. Overall, the number of students in certificate, diploma and university degree programs is expected to be similar or slightly higher than last year.

Fourth year Red Deer College Motion Picture Arts student Julie Debeljak had her short film, Caffeine Infidelity included in the eleventh annual LA Shorts Fest.The film was also shown at the last Calgary International film Festival where it was nominated for an Alberta Centennial award.

was also shown at the last Calgary International film Festival where it was nominated for an

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook 23
Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook 23
Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook 23

Cla

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

ss Notes

Have an announcement? If you’ve attended Red Deer College, place your news in Class Notes for FREE. This is a great way to share the news of your marriage, new family members, a new home, career or educational success! Photos are welcomed, but will be used as space permits.

Send us your Class Note and receive a five dollar gift certificate redeemable at the Red Deer College Bookstore. Submissions can be sent by e-mail to notebook@rdc.ab.ca or by mail to: Alumni Relations, Red Deer College, 100 College Blvd., Box 5005, Red Deer, AB T4N 5H5

John Rathwell BUGN ’85 is the Branch Manager of four Dundee Securities offices in central Alberta. He and his wife Monna have three terrific kids. They live on an acreage south of Red Deer and they enjoy numerous activities, including boating, sledding, horses, hockey, in- line skating and skiing. As a hobby, John enjoys collecting cars.

Since graduating in December of 1996 with a Recreation Administration Diploma, Les Waite has worked at John Wilson Elementary School as an Education Assistant. In 1998, he started with the Youth and Volunteer Centre as a Camp Counselor, worked as a Program Coordinator, and is now the Community Programs Manager. This role

and is now the Community Programs Manager. This role oversees the Boys and Girls Clubs and

oversees the Boys and Girls Clubs and Big Brothers/Sister of Red Deer and surrounding communities. In 1998, he married Angela Waite (nee Anderson) SOWK ’99 who became a full-time employee with Heritage Family Services. She began as a front-line worker, and she is now the Program Coordinator of the Youth Assessment Centre. They took in a foster child in 2001, who was then 14 years old, and he has become

a part of their family. Since then, they have had two

children. Both Les and Angela work at additional part-time positions. Les works for Prairie Bus Lines as a relief Bus Driver and Angela has worked for Red Deer College for 10 years as the Head Scorekeeper for RDC Basketball. Their hobbies include camping, hiking, skiing/snowboarding, quadding, traveling, and spending time together as a family.

Since graduating in 2000 with a Diploma in Music, Kristine Nielsen has gone on to complete her Bachelor

of Music at the University of Alberta, majoring in piano performance. Following convocation, Kristine spent six months traveling throughout Europe, prior to accepting

a position working at The Banff Centre’s Paul D. Fleck Library and Archives. Here, she thoroughly enjoyed

sharing and building on her musical expertise with many visiting and resident musicians. Returning to Edmonton in the fall of 2005, Kristine has been active in the areas of private studio teaching, as well as accompanying for a number of ballet conservatories, church congregations and choirs. It is her love of working with young children that has rallied her to further her studies in the field of education. Kristine is presently starting her first year in the University of Alberta’s Bachelor of Education After-Degree Program, Elementary Route.

of Education After-Degree Program, Elementary Route. Andrea Simpson (nee Klooster) BSCN ’01 began working at

Andrea Simpson (nee Klooster) BSCN ’01 began working at the Red Deer Hospital in orthopedic surgery immediatly folllowing graduation. She took time in 2001- 2002 to do mission work in Africa on the Mercy Ships and to visit many other countries. In 2004, she married Harry Simpson. The couple have made their home in Red Deer where they enjoy fishing, camping and hiking. She is presently working on a medical unit that specializes in renal failure with a group of wonderful nurses.

Travis Hamm WELD ’02, after completing his

nurses. Travis Hamm WELD ’02 , after completing his journeyman certification, Travis got his B-Pressure ticket.

journeyman

certification, Travis got his B-Pressure ticket. He then bought a welding truck and started a welding business. In his own words, “It’s

a tough living. It’s

boom and bust, but I

enjoy it.” He is still living in Red Deer. He has

a ten year old son,

named Dylan, who is a great kid. Travis enjoyed his time at RDC, and would like to invite his friends to look him up on Facebook.

who is a great kid. Travis enjoyed his time at RDC, and would like to invite

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

Are the supplements in your cupboard designed according to the ‘Laws of Nature’? If not,
Are the supplements in your cupboard designed according
to the ‘Laws of Nature’? If not, your best intentions and hard
earned dollars are being flushed away, literally!
‘Supplementing With Success’ is much more than just popping
pills, but rather, ensuring that your body can utilize and
absorb the supplements you consume.
Just one example is how your body cannot absorb vitamins
without minerals, minerals without proteins, and proteins
without enzymes
there’s just no exception
to that rule!
For more hidden
truths, or for advice on
how to ‘Supplement
Successfully’ call
Charlene at (403)
755-0797 for your 15-
minute complimentary
consultation.
755-0797 for your 15- minute complimentary consultation. Stay Connected E-mail your update to us at alumni@rdc.ab.ca
755-0797 for your 15- minute complimentary consultation. Stay Connected E-mail your update to us at alumni@rdc.ab.ca

Stay Connected

E-mail your update to us at alumni@rdc.ab.ca or complete this form and return it to our office. When we receive your information, we will send you a five dollar gift certificate redeemable at the Red Deer College Bookstore.

Name: (First) (Middle) (Last) Maiden Name Student ID Number:

Program & Year:

Spouse’s Name:

Is your spouse a Red Deer College Alumnus? Their Student ID Number:

Program and Year:

E-mail:

Phone:

Home Address:

City:

Prov:

Employer/Occupation:

City:

Postal Code:

Prov/State:

Yes

Would you like to receive Alumni updates via email?

No

Yes

No

Your updated news for “Class Notes” to be published in Notebook:

The personal information that you provide will be used by Community Relations for the purposes of publication in the Alumni magazine, ongoing contact, research and fundraising. The information will be protected in compliance with the provisions of the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act of Alberta. If you have any questions about the collection and use of this personal information, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

Signature:

Date:

Red Deer College Alumni Relations Box 5005, Red Deer, AB T4N 5H5 Phone: (403) 342-3308 Fax: (403) 343-4080 Toll Free 1-866-ALUMNI-1 (1-866-258-6641)

RDC

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

Calendar

Events Calendar

All dates subject to change. www.rdc.ab.ca/community_relations for more information.

All dates subject to change. www.rdc.ab.ca/community_relations for more information.

2007

October

17

Perspectives: Canada in the World 11th Annual International Wine Auction and Dinner RDC Alumni Association

Welcome Back Weekend 4th Annual Red Deer College Wine Tasting Festival Meet the President Brunch RDC Open House Alumni Kings/Queens Games Alumni Athletic Social Performing Arts Alumni Revue Alumni Annual General Meeting

October 20

November 2-4 Friday, November 2

Saturday, November 3

November 5

November 20

Student Awards Ceremony Report to the Community Breakfast

2008

January 19

11th Annual Affairs of the Arts

March

14

Perspectives: Canada in the World Donor Recognition Celebration Distinguished Alumni

March 30

April 12

-

Nominations close

Alumni Legacy

-

Nominations Close

close Alumni Legacy - Nominations Close Did You Know? Alumni automatically receive a disability

Did You Know?

Alumni automatically receive a disability waiver of premium with their insurance policy through Johnson Inc? This covers your insur- ance payments for up to six months.

Performing Arts Calendar

Dates and Performances are subject to change. www.rdc.ab.ca/showtime for more information.

2007

October 20

 

Faculty Showcase 2007

November

1

Symphonic Winds

November 7 Nov. 22 – Dec. 1 November 25-26

Rotary Seniors Concert Little Shop of Horrors Jazz in the Studio

December 7

 

Sounds of the Season

2008

February 10

 

Dale Wheeler Piano Plus…

February 14 – 16, 20 – 23 February 22

Noel Coward’s Hay Fever Arkatzi Chill Party

February

28

 

Symphonic Winds

March 1

Jazz on Mainstage

March

8

Divas Around Town

March

26-29

Blood Wedding

March 29 April 3 April 9 – 12

 

That’s Entertainment A Touch of Class A Winter’s Tale

Blood Wedding March 29 April 3 April 9 – 12   That’s Entertainment A Touch of
Blood Wedding March 29 April 3 April 9 – 12   That’s Entertainment A Touch of
Blood Wedding March 29 April 3 April 9 – 12   That’s Entertainment A Touch of

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook

Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook 27
Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook 27
Fall 2007 • RDC Alumni NOTEbook 27

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