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KENYATTA UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTING INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY NAME: SUNTU SHALDON LEPARAN

REG.NO. I31/OL/4138/2006 EMAIL: suntusha@yahoo.com MOBILE NUMBER: 0726 242 523 PROJECT TITLE: KENYA POLICE COLLEGE EXAMINATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM UNIT CODE: SIT 400 UNIT TILE: PROJECT TASK: PROJECT PROPOSAL SUPERVISOR: MR. STEPHEN WAITHAKA Date Submitted on 8/01/2012
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Table Contents

Table Contents.................................................................................................i LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS..............................................................................iii CHAPTER ONE.................................................................................................1 1.0 INTRODUCTION.........................................................................................1 1.1 Background of the Study.......................................................................1 1.2 The Problem Statement ........................................................................1 1.3 Objectives of the Project........................................................................3 1.4 Scope and Limitation of the Study.........................................................3 1.5 Justification of the Study........................................................................4 CHAPTER TWO.................................................................................................5 2.0. LITERATURE REVIEW................................................................................5 2.1 Definition of Management Information Systems....................................5 2.2 Innovation of Information Communication Technology in Higher Education.....................................................................................................6 2.3 Genesis of the University Academic Management System (AMS); Strathmore University..................................................................................6 2.4 Role of Information Systems in Higher Educational Institutions ............8 2.5 Information Literacy in Kenya................................................................9 2.6 Trend of Information Systems ...............................................................9 2.7 Conclusion...........................................................................................10 CHAPTER THREE............................................................................................10 3.0 METHODOLOGY.......................................................................................10 3.1 Development Approach.......................................................................10 Raymond Lewallen. (2005). Outline both the advantages and disadvantages of waterfall model as follows;.............................................11 Advantages ...............................................................................................11 i

Simple and easy to use..............................................................................11 Easy to manage due to the rigidity of the model each phase has specific deliverables and a review process.............................................................11 Phases are processed and completed one at a time..................................11 Works well for smaller projects where requirements are very well understood.................................................................................................11 Disadvantages...........................................................................................12 Adjusting scope during the life cycle can kill a project..............................12 No working software is produced until late during the life cycle................12 High amounts of risk and uncertainty........................................................12 Poor model for complex and object-oriented projects................................12 Poor model for long and ongoing projects.................................................12 Poor model where requirements are at a moderate to high risk of changing ................................................................................................................... 12 3.2 Data collection Techniques.................................................................12 3.2.1 Interviews......................................................................................12 3.2.2 Published Documents....................................................................12 3.2.3 Questionnaires ..............................................................................13 3.3 Implementation tools and system testing ...........................................13 3.3.1 Implementation tools.....................................................................13 3.3.2 System testing...............................................................................13 3.4 Budget Estimate and Time Schedule...................................................14 3.4.1 Budget Estimate............................................................................14 3.3.2 Time schedule................................................................................15 REFERENCES.................................................................................................16

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LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
Serving Officer refers to police officers who are working in various stations, divisions or formations who have not done police law examinations Recruit refers to a newly recruited person undergoing training to become a fully qualified police officer Course men refers to trained officers who have attended a course or promotion

HTC - stands for higher training course. A course attended by senior police officers to become gazette officers Gazetted officers refers to a police officer with the rank of superintendent of police and above KEPOCEMS Instructor stand for Kenya Police College Examination Management System A police officer who teaches candidates at the college and earns instructors allowance. Instructors Allowance Money paid as an allowance for being an instructor

GSU Training School - A college for training general service unit officers.

CID Training School A college for training plain clothes investigators officers.

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CHAPTER ONE 1.0 INTRODUCTION


Kenya Police Force was started in 1897 during the construction of Kenya Uganda Railway. There was little training. In 1931 Mr. R.C.B. Spicer reviewed the police training. 1n 1948 Nairobi depot was established and transferred to Kiganjo, Nyeri as an Italian were camp and renamed Kenya Police Training School. In 1965, the institution was renamed Kenya Police College with a mandate to train police constables. Later, the Higher Training Course was introduced to train senior officers with two messes A and B. A mess was for gazzeted officers while B mess was for members of Inspectorate. 1.1 Background of the Study The college since its establishment maintains its candidate records manually using huge registers, books and files. In particular, candidates are examined and their examination records are filed up and stored in cabinets. In addition to this, a police officer personal file is opened to store his or her information. On completion of the course, each officer has to carry his file to the new station for administrative purposes. In case the officer is promoted to next rank, the file is taken to college for course progressive reports purposes. During each course examinations must be done and candidates graded. A copy of examination results filed in the personal file and another copy kept in the college training file. The college also sets inspectorate examinations to serving officers countrywide which is mandatory after their confirmation. Many officers end up not getting their results published in the provincial weekly ordered because of errors emanating the process is done manually. The college realizes the use of Information Communication Technology as an essential entity for record keeping. The college needs a system to automate the entire life cycle of examination process. In this regard, the college needs a system to computerize it examination records for easy retrieval and better storage of its examination records. 1.2 The Problem Statement The Kenya Police College fully employs manual system in its day to day operations where huge registers, files and books have to be maintained. Its population
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normally varies from time to time due to new recruits joining the service or course men attending various courses and after the course, they are posted to new stations or their currents stations. The college use paperwork in recording and storing the information of recruits and course men. With this way of operation, the college realizes wastes which occasionally occur as a result of cancellation of errors made on the paper during compilation. The recruits or course men do exams but they are not able to know their marks or grade on time since computation of marks take too long time to be completed by the instructors. The instructors mark a lot of answer booklets and the same time calculating grades using calculators or actual summing up of figures on a paper attained by each recruit or course men. This consumes a lot of time. In many occasions the recruits or course men may not get their results due to compilation errors emerging from human errors. The files, registers or books can be destroyed with fire or other forms of natural disasters. Double entries of records are inevitable to manual work since it is difficult to realize this repetition. The cost of buying stationeries is high. Although installation of the proposed system might be high but bit by bit saving of money allocated for several books, files and register will set capital be other projects. In manual operation, related records cannot be merged together; several files, registers or books have to be perused in order to come up with information. Opening page by page is cumbersome and this slows down the users motivation. The proposed system will solve the above barriers by fastening examination life cycle process. The user will only feed the data and the system generates grades as well as recommendation. The use of primary key will also solve the problem of double entry and data reduplication. The college database will store several tables under one name and the front end will accommodate modules for each item hence there will be no need of searching data on several files or registers.

1.3 Objectives of the Project To develop system that will replace the current manual system in use hence cutting down numerous stationeries cost hence accumulating funds for the college that will be used for other purposes. To develop a system which will integrate examination records in same storage

location for easy retrieval hence enhancing a user friendly environment unlike in manual systems where several files have to be opened and kept separate to store records for each item e.g. one file for examination fee and another for examination results. To develop a system that will generate examination results, examination

statement fee and student Biodata when required for decision making. To develop a system that will reduce the manual power needed to perform the

examination management process by generating appropriate grade as per the marks entered. 1.4 Scope and Limitation of the Study The Kenya Police College Examination Management System will accommodate the following module Examination Results, Examination Fee Statement, Student Biodata, Units list and System Users. It will also generate reports on Examination results and Examination Fee Statement for candidates. The proposed system will integrate the records into one common database. The proposed system will not accommodate the following modules:

The system will not have the payroll module hence it will not generate pay in lips for the recruits who are undergoing treatment.

The system will not capture the staff, recruits or course men health records since it lacks this module.

This system will not be used to manage library resources since it lacks this module.

The system will not be used to run transport section in college. This module does not exist. The vehicles details and operation records is still manual despite the presence of the proposed system.

The system will not handle human resource management in the college. The Kenya Police College System will be a stand alone system. This means that it is

not available worldwide. Users who are far from the college compound cannot access the system. In future it should be networked in order to be fully effective. In order for the system to be effective the above modules need to be infused into the system to computerize these important activities in the college 1.5 Justification of the Study The design and implementation of Kenya Police College Examination Management System (KEPOCEMS) will be an efficient system because:The system will be use by the college staff to enhance faster processing of examination records and generating examination fee statement and results for the candidates. The system documentation will be use as a learning material for both students and programmers developing management systems in future and should be placed in the college library. The systems will be economical to the college. It is very essential because the main
goal of the proposed system is to have economically better result along with increased efficiency. Cost benefit analysis is usually performed for this purpose. It is the comparative study of the cost verses the benefit and savings that are expected from the proposed system. Since the organization is well equipped with the required hard ware, the project was found to be economically. Economic advantage will result due to reduced purchasing of stationeries. This bit by bit saving will accrue money that will cater for system installation.

The proposed system will ensure data security since users have to be registered to the system and given usernames and passwords to log onto the system. Roles will also be assigned to each user to make system audit easier.
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Due to technology advancements particularly application of computers, the system will perfectly, brings them into play. Automation will seek to improve both efficiency and effectiveness to the day to day operation of the any business or non business entity. The college faces stiff completion from GSU training school and CID training school since they offer same service particularly in promotional courses of course men. There will be need to creatively device ways of staying on top. The implementation of the system will give it a competitive advantage over its competitors. This will build the image of the college.

CHAPTER TWO 2.0. LITERATURE REVIEW


2.1 Definition of Management Information Systems Management information system is a term given to the discipline focused on the integration of computer systems with aims and objectives on an organization. MIS can also be defined as information systems that gather, store, process and distribute data associated with different departments of the organization, the data processed should be
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relevant and valuable information generated from the data is later used for decision making and for management purposes. This research highlights the need for management information systems in examination field, its benefits and weaknesses. It application includes strategic support and data processing. 2.2 Innovation of Information Communication Technology in Higher Education During the conference in Malawi 2007 on implementing an academic management system (AMS) in the case of Strathmore University, (Wanyembi, 2002) note that the effects of emerging technologies, more so ICTs, are being felt across the world, in various business organizations including universities. African universities have since realized that to improve efficiency and quality of service, they will need to adapt to using ICTs. Academic institutions are now automating core functions such as student admission process, estate management, fees payment, examination records management and library services among other functions. The onset of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) is changing the way universities work. Customers (student, sponsor, employer or supplier) are demanding for more accurate information and faster services. Students, for example, would like to check for their fee balances, enroll in their respective courses, pay fees and maybe print their results on-line away from campus. (Acosta, 2004) agrees that the demand to automate university processes is becoming important in line with university quality assurance. However, with the high costs of Integrated Academic Management Systems (IAMS) on the market, African Universities must find alternative ways of meeting their customers expectations within their constrained budgets.

2.3 Genesis of the University Academic Management System (AMS); Strathmore University In 1996, Strathmore University developed an in house system to manage student records to help store and retrieve data such as student bio data, fees payment, sponsors information, admission statistics and performance in examinations. The system was developed and deployed on a FoxPro platform supported by an access database for the professional courses on offer then. However, with the onset of degree programmes, the
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FoxPro system was rendered inefficient and the university needed to upgrade to a more efficient system. The degree programmes were administered in an access environment using Microsoft Excel software to extract and analyses the data. Inefficiencies in this environment motivated the university to search for an automated integrated system that would fully address the needs of the university in line with its Information and Communications Technology (ICT) strategic plan 2005 to 2010. The university ICT strategy is to improve the university administration processes through automation as well as improve availability of ICT resources through improved budget and or cost structure. To address the strategy, the university needed a system that would address both current as well as changing future university needs. The university ICTs are planned to be strategically used to leverage efficient decision making hence impact positively on the academic productivity through better learning, teaching and research approaches. Strathmore borrowed its system from the University of Narvara which had four well developed modules namely, the administration module, lecturer module, student module and tutor/mentor module. The system was suitable for the management of academic programmes in any standard university. However the system needed customization to meet the university unique requirements. After the customization of the system it generated the following benefits to the Strathmore University. More efficient and faster processes related to the entire student life cycle Greater management control in line with university strategic plans over the processes at the university that have resulted in higher performance in all areas. Increased customer satisfaction due to faster processing and accurate data capture and analysis Better performance in collection, management and reporting of student debtors.

2.4 Role of Information Systems in Higher Educational Institutions ICTs in higher educational institutions have come about from developments in corporate businesses where ICTs have been incorporated into organizational functions to improve their performance. (Tusubira & Mulira, 2005), having extensively studied operations of Makerere University (Uganda), argue that at the organizational level, the integration of ICT in organizational functions has been brought about by three main factors: increased efficiency, cost effectiveness, and competitiveness. The efficiency brought about in universities can be realized in areas of easy access to student and staff records, data on assets of the institutions as well as efficiency in front office operations and management of key processes like admissions and examinations (Tusubira & Mulira, 2005). (Katz 2001) asserts that the information and communication technology (ICT) infrastructure is likely to influence and even shape the nature of higher education institutions and the practices of faculty and administrators. Faculty, parents, staff and students are demanding more information from the HEIs inform of grades, loan payment and tracking, class registration, and contract administration thus expecting information systems of HEIs to operate automatically, integrated and accessible to users 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. Katz also points out that information resources and tools can be invoked to help guide increasingly complex and consequential institutional decisions through tools provided by the systems. HEIs are investing in systems that make it relatively easy and cost effective to acquire, store and manage volumes of information about institutions stakeholders. For (Wanjohi, 2006) information systems bring about faster and better decision making given the unlimited access to high quality and well maintained information resources. He adds that competitiveness can also be seen in the return on investment (ROI). ROI though hard to quantify for many institutions could be seen from the cost savings in paperwork, loss of important documents always on transit in manual process, and the increased staff morale. Systems get the institution to a level of elegance and pride, which can be seen, for example, through online/offline access to records such as examination grades for students, access to learning material through an electronic learning environment. (Newmann, 1994). Laudon (2003) while commenting on the role of information systems in organizations indicates that ICTs provide tools for data
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collection, analysis, storage and dissemination to support decision making in organization. 2.5 Information Literacy in Kenya The Kenyan government has stated that the achievement of an informationbased society is one of the main priorities in order to realize national development goals and objectives for wealth and employment creation (Poghisio, 2008). Similarly, information literacy is a concept that has been recognized as a development enabler in Kenya. The government considers education the sine qua non condition for acquiring ICT skills in order to create dynamic and sustainable economic growth (Wims & Lawler, 2007). The quality and efficiency of ICT application in Kenya can only be achieved by means of capacity building through research and development, which are elements of information skills (Kandiri, 2006). Similarly, it has been recognized that information literacy is essential for national development (Kenya National Bureau of Statistics, 2007). Ayoo and Otike (2002) take a very critical stance and maintain that the formulation of an information policy in Kenya is hampered by the lack of information skills, mainly among top policy makers, which results in making the wrong choices of ICTs. Information policy should be supported by providing education, running literacy programmes and training with the participation of all information stakeholders: the government as information generating agents, the information professionals as information processors and disseminators and citizens as the information consumers (Kamar, 2006). The ICT and Education survey reveals the need to address information literacy when implementing ICTs in education, mainly due to a deficit in human resource capacity (Farrell, 2007). 2.6 Trend of Information Systems Clement Nyandiere, (2007) note that trends across the world show a growing demand for information systems for educational institutions. Many of them have been running manual systems, pushing paperwork, for ages. They have had cumbersome working procedures and this has led to low productivity occasioned by highly inept manual
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systems. Many of the higher educational instructions (HEIs) have implemented one form of computer-based information system (CIS) or other to manage their academic and management needs. 2.7 Conclusion Literary, the introduction of ICTs in analyzing, collecting, processing, retrieving and storing data has increased the efficiency, cost effectiveness and competitiveness. This has lead to easy management of student records or any other kind of record management required by an organization. (Clement Nyandiere, 2007) stated that Information systems are essential to any learning institutions for increasing production. Other authors have also discussed the essential of having information systems to replace the pushing paperwork, in day to day operations. The Kenya Police College needs an examination management system to assist in fastening data processing and for quick decision making.

CHAPTER THREE 3.0 METHODOLOGY


3.1 Development Approach The development approach used will be waterfall model. The researcher adopted this method because it allows departmental and managerial control. A schedule can be set with deadlines for each stage of development and a product can proceed through the development process like a car in a wash, and theoretically, be delivered on time. Development will move from project planning, through requirement analysis & definition, system & software design, implementation & unit testing, integration &
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system testing and operations & maintenance. Each phase of development will proceed in strict order, without overlapping or iterative steps.

Project planning

Requirement Analysis & Definition System & Software design Implementation & Unit Testing Integration & System Testing Operations & Maintenance

Fig 1: General overview of Waterfall Model. Raymond Lewallen. (2005). Outline both the advantages and disadvantages of waterfall model as follows; Advantages Simple and easy to use Easy to manage due to the rigidity of the model each phase has specific deliverables and a review process. Phases are processed and completed one at a time. Works well for smaller projects where requirements are very well understood.
Helps to determine the project cost and time schedule

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Disadvantages Adjusting scope during the life cycle can kill a project No working software is produced until late during the life cycle. High amounts of risk and uncertainty. Poor model for complex and object-oriented projects. Poor model for long and ongoing projects. Poor model where requirements are at a moderate to high risk of changing 3.2 Data collection Techniques The data collection methods to be used will include; interviews, published documents and Questionnaires.

3.2.1 Interviews
The researcher will conduct face to face communication with the respondents. This method will be conducted on recruits, servicemen and course men. They will tape information to clearly show the benefits of the proposed system and the current manual system in use. This will enable the researcher to collect data since people will like to talk than to write. It also helps to obtain confidential reports. It will also enable the researcher to seek clarification and brings to the forefront those questions, that, for one reason or another, respondent do not want to answer.

3.2.2 Published Documents


Published documents are the documents that are used in the day to day running of the college operations. The published documents will assist the researcher to obtain specific information for reference purpose, used as a bench mark against which the findings of a research will be tested and used as the sole source of information for the research. These published documents will help the researcher in designing the database. This method is less costly, enables the researcher to verify the findings based on primary data and extends researchers space and time. These documents will be collected from junior and senior training wing directors of studies.

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3.2.3 Questionnaires
The researcher will use this method to gather information from individuals. The researcher will administer questionnaires by mail, telephone, using face-to-face interviews, as handouts, or electronically (i.e., by e-mail or through Web-based questionnaires). This method will allow the researcher to get feedback from a large number of participants i.e. the recruits in a class, allow each respondent the opportunity to provide anonymous feedback on their experience. The data collected will be analyzed with an aim of coming up with the system requirements and design. 3.3 Implementation tools and system testing

3.3.1 Implementation tools


The implementation tool to be used will includes the following: I. Database The database to be used will be MySQL because of its flexibility, speed and ability to store large databases. MySQL is also an open source software.

II.

Programming Language

This programming language to be used will be Visual Studio. Net because it is ease to learn - the syntax is simpler than other languages, the visual environment is excellent and it's widely used and, therefore, well understood.

3.3.2 System testing


During testing of the system the following methods will be used: i. Unit testing
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The system will undergo an individual unit test. The source codes will be tested to determine if they are fit for use.
ii.

User Acceptance Testing This will be carried out to obtain confirmation that the system meets the users

specifications iii. Functional testing This is a type of black box testing that will base its test cases on the specifications of the software component under test. Functions will be tested by feeding them with input and examining the output. 3.4 Budget Estimate and Time Schedule

3.4.1 Budget Estimate


No. ITEM 1 2 3 4 Laptop Research Transport Documentation Total Table 1 QUANTITY UNIT PRICE(Ksh.) TOTAL COST(Kshs) 1 37,200 37,200 1 5,000 5,000 2,000 2,000 2,000 3000 3000 3000 46,200

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3.3.2 Time schedule Work Feasibility study Proposal writing Requirements analysis System Analysis Design Development Integration and test Project Documentation Final Presentation Table 2 Start 10.8.11 25.8.11 17.9.11 24.9.11 1.10.11 13.10.1 1 1.1.12 26.2.12 21.3.12 Finish 18.8.11 15.9.11 23.9.11 30.9.11 12.10.1 1 30.12.1 1 24.1.12 20.3.12 27.3.12 Aug 2011 Sep 2011 Oct 2011 Nov 2011 Dec 2011 Jan 2012 Feb 2012 Mar 2012

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REFERENCES
BOOKS
1. Acosta, F R. (2004) Information Technology Strategic Plan of Olivarez College

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2. Ayoo, P. & Otike, J. (2002) Factors Hampering the Formulation of a National

Information Policy in Kenya, Library Review, 51, 7, 350-357.


3. Farrell, G. (2007) Survey of ICT and Education in Africa: Kenya Country Report.

Nairobi, Kenya, 1-14.


4. Katz, R. N. (2001) The ICT Infrastructure: A Drive for Change EDUCAUSE Review. 5. Newmann, S. (1994). Strategic information systems Competition through information

Technologies. New York: Macmillan,


6. Nyandiere, C. (2007) & Laudon (2003). Increasing role of computerbased information

systems in the Management of higher education institutions. Strathmore University Press: Nairobi, 26-39. 7. Tusubira, F. F. & Mulira, N. (2005). Integration of ICT in Higher Education Institutions: Challenges and best practice recommendations based on experience of Makerere University & Other organizations. Makerere University.
8. Wanyembi, G. (2002) Application of a model for improving ICT management: a case

study International Academy of Information Management, Delft University, 1-11. URLS


1. Wikipedia: Systems Development Life Cycle. Retrieved from

www.wikipedia.org/wiki/Systems_Development_Life_Cycle .
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http://codebetter.com/raymondlewallen/2005/7/13/software-development-life-cyclemodels.

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4. Understanding the Pros and Cons of the Waterfall Model of Software Development:

retrieved from www.techrepublic.com/article/understanding-the-pros-and-cons-of-thewaterfal-model-of-software-development/6118423


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JOURNALS
1. Kamar, N. (2006) Factors Hindering Effective Management of Government Information

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M.S.S.A.M. a. Uonbi (Ed.) Nairobi: University of Nairobi. Retrieved from http://www.ejisdc.org/ojs2/index.php/ejisdc/article/viewFile/613/296


3. NWT & Nunavut Literacy Councils. (2008). Proposal Writing Guide. Retrieved from

http://www.toolsforcommunitybuilding.ca/propwritgd.pdf .
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http://www.mariosalexandrou.com/definition/project-objective.asp .
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http://www.digital.library.strathmore.edu/xmlui/bitstream/handle/123456789/1148/Cleme nt%20Nyandiere.pdf?sequence=4

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