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Assignment On Writing Styles Submitted to: Madam Marrium Azam Submitted by: Group Number 05 Session: 2K11 Subject:

English Department of Computer Science NFC IET MULTAN

Acknowledgement First Of All I Really Thankful to Allah who given a chance to me for this work.My Elder brother Muhammad junaid who give me very useful information to complete this assignment.My sister who give very helpful tips about Adverb.My friends who really help me to improve my English and complete this work without their help I could not complete this work.I thankful to Wikipedia and about.com who gave me lot of material about my topic.

Content 1: What is Writing Styles 2: Types of writing styles (i): Narrative Writing. (ii): Expository Writing. (iii): Descriptive Writing. 4:Explanation 5:Examples

Abstract
: A style reveals both the writer's personality and voice, but it also shows how she or he
perceives the audience, and chooses conceptual writing style which reveal those choices by which the writer may change the conceptual world of the overall character of the work. This might be done by a simple change of words; a syntactical structure, parsing prose, adding diction, and organizing figures of thought into usable frameworks. Certainly, there are similar and analogous questions of style and audience that exist in the choices of expressive possibilities in speech. The writer needs to tailor style to the situation. For example, the same person writing a letter to the same reader would use a different style depending on whether it is a letter of complaint, a letter of condolence, or a business letter. The author needs to decide whether the goal of the writing is to inform, persuade, or entertain. In fiction, the situation is the events that comprise the plot. Style must represent the author's personal expression of these events setting mood, and leading the reader to a subjective, nonliteral, emotional understanding of the subject.
Punctuation is now so standardized that it rarely is a factor in a writer's style. The same is true for gratuitous changes to spelling and grammar, unless the goal is to represent a regional or ethnic dialect in which such changes are customary

Writing Styles
Definition: Writing style is the manner in which an author chooses to write to his or her audience.

Explanation: A style reveals both the writer's personality and voice, but it also shows how
she or he perceives the audience, and chooses conceptual writing style which reveal those choices by which the writer may change the conceptual world of the overall character of the work. This might be done by a simple change of words; a syntactical structure, parsing prose, adding diction, and organizing figures of thought into usable frameworks. Certainly, there are similar and analogous questions of style and audience that exist in the choices of expressive possibilities in speech. The writer needs to tailor style to the situation. For example, the same person writing a letter to the same reader would use a different style depending on whether it is a letter of complaint, a letter of condolence, or a business letter. The author needs to decide whether the goal of the writing is to inform, persuade, or entertain. In fiction, the situation is the events that comprise the plot. Style must represent the author's personal expression of these events setting mood, and leading the reader to a subjective, nonliteral, emotional understanding of the subject.

Types of writing styles


Here are some types of writing styles.

1: Narrative Writing. 2: Expository Writing. 3: Descriptive Writing.

1: Narrative Writing.
Definition: Narrative Writing tells a personal or fictional experience or tells a story based on a real or imagined event.
Explanation: A narrative is a story containing specific elements that work together to create interest for not only the author but also the reader. This type of writing makes the reader feel as if her or she were part of the story, as if it was being told directly to him or her.

PLOT: The who, what, where, when, why, and how outline that gives the narrative direction. What is the story about?

Events unfold as they happen. y The frame of the narrative Beginning:

Enticing opening to capture readers interest. o Setting revealed. o Main characters introduced. o Conflict presented. End:

Tells how the resolution of the conflicts have affected the characters. o o No new characters or plot ideas introduced. Theme or message understood by reader. THEME: y A theme is a message revealed in the story.

It may be directly stated, like in a fable where the moral is told at the conclusion. y It may be indirect, leaving the reader to decide the storys message. y There can be more than one theme for a narrative. y Be sure to: * Revise Check for Content * Edit Check for Grammar, Usage, and Spelling

y 2: Expository Writing.
Def: Expository writing is writing that is designed to convey information or explain what is difficult
to understand.

Explanation: Exposition is a type of oral or written discourse that is used to explain, describe, give information or inform. The creator of an expository text can not assume that the reader or listener has prior knowledge or prior understanding of the topic that is being discussed. One important point to keep in mind for the author is to try to use words that clearly show what they are talking about rather then blatantly telling the reader what is being discussed. Since clarity

requires strong organization, one of the most important mechanisms that can be used to improve our skills in exposition is to provide directions to improve the organization of the text.

Pattern
Circumlocution Narrative Interspersion

Description
Depicts a pattern in which the speaker discusses a topic, then diverts to discuss a related but different topic. A pattern or a sub-pattern imbedded in other patterns in which the speaker or writer intersperses a narrative within the expository text for specific purposes, including to clarify, or elaborate on a point or to link the subject matter to a personal experience. When the speaker discusses a topic, then restates it using different words or symbolism. It is used to drive home a point and to give special emphasis to the text.

Recursion

Second Part is:

Pattern
Description

Description
The author describes a topic by listing characteristics, features, and examples

Cue Words
for example, characteristics are

Sequence Comparison

The author lists items or events in numerical or chronological order. The author explains how two or more things are alike and/or how they are different. The author lists one or more causes and the resulting effect or effects. The author states a problem and lists one or more solutions for the problem. A variation of this pattern is the question- and-answer format in which the author poses a question and then answers it.

first, second, third; next; then; finally different; in contrast; alike; same as; on the other hand reasons why; if...then; as a result; therefore; because problem is; dilemma is; puzzle is solved; question... answer

Cause and Effect Problem and Solution

3: Descriptive Writing.
An effective written description is one that presents a clear picture to your reader.

Explanation: A successful description uses vivid vocabulary, including colorful adjectives and figurative language. An interesting description attracts the readers attention.

Imagery:
Imagery is the use of words to create images, or mental pictures. Imagery helps you picture how something: * looks * sounds * smells * tastes * feels

Examples
Read this descriptive introduction from an informational text: Dark shapes glide through the night sky on silent wings, their sinister shadows outlined against the light of a full moon. Swooping down to the earth, they hover near houses and deserted buildings, breaking the peace of the night with their disturbing presence. Carriers of disease, drinkers of blood, companions of witches and demons, bats the very word brings a shiver of fear to most people. ~ Sylvia A. Johnson, Bats Description of the Wind Anybody could see how cold it got. The wind already had glass edges to it, stiffening muscles and practically cutting through the stitches of our clothes. When it blew, the chill stabbed our teeth like icicles, and our voices jiggled every time we talked. From Parrot in the Oven: Mi Vida by Victor Martinez

Things to Remember About Descriptive Writing Be specific, not vague. Elaborate (add more details and expand your ideas). Use vivid vocabulary (strong nouns, verbs, and adjectives).

Include details that relate to your five senses.


Punctuation
Punctuation is now so standardized that it rarely is a factor in a writer's style. The same is true for gratuitous changes to spelling and grammar, unless the goal is to represent a regional or ethnic dialect in which such changes are customary.