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MARCH 28-APRIL 3, 2012
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INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Free tax assistance
AARP offers help in filing
taxes. PAGE 7
P r e - s o r t e d
S t a n d a r d
U S P o s t a g e
P A I D
B e l l m a w r N J
P e r m i t 1 5 0 1
P o s t a l C u s t o m e r
Theater
group to
perform
musical
By JULIE STIPE
The West Windsor Sun
Some of the cast of Hair-
spray at Mercer County Com-
munity Colleges Kelsey The-
atre may be new at theater, but
that doesnt make them any
less talented or enthusiastic.
I never did theater in high
school, said Taylor Pickett-
Stokes, who plays Motor-
mouth Maybelle in the musi-
cal. I always knew I wanted to
perform, but in high school, I
didnt really believe in my-
self.
Once she got to Mercer,
Pickett-Stokes began to ex-
plore theater, playing in pro-
ductions of The Tempest
and Rent, among others.
I guess you could kind of
say I like being the center of
attention, she said. I like
having the power to change
peoples emotions.
About Hairspray, Pickett-
Stokes said she likes its
spunkiness.
It has good leads for black
people, and it has a good over-
all theme, she said.
Set in the early 60s, the mu-
sical follows plump teenager
Tracy Turnblad, whose great-
est desire is to star on The
Corny Collins Show, a TV
dance program. Tracy eventu-
Schools team up for robots
By JULIE STIPE
The West Windsor Sun
MidKnight Inventors mentor
Michael Stevens hardly had a
choice to get involved in robotics.
Seven years ago, my daughter
came home from school and said,
Were going to start a robotics
club, Stevens said.
Hes been part of the group
ever since.
The club began at West Wind-
sor-Plainsboro High School North
as Royal Knights Robotics, but
two years later, it added students
from West Windsor-Plainsboro
High School South and became
the MidKnight Inventors.
That the club consists of stu-
dents from both schools is ex-
tremely unusual, as the schools
have separate clubs and teams for
every other activity.
Stevens is proud of the way the
team transcends the often-fierce
rivalry between High School
South and High School North.
In everything, we compete,
he said, except robotics.
The MidKnight Inventors cer-
tainly seem to be a testament to
what West Windsor-Plainsboro
high school students can do when
they join forces. Among other
awards, the team won the 2009
FIRST New Jersey regional com-
petition with the highest scoring
robot, and received an Engineer-
ing Inspiration award at both
the 2010 Boston regional competi-
tion and this years Mid-Atlantic
robotics district competition in
Pennsylvania.
The Engineering Inspiration
award, Stevens explained, is actu-
ally a more prestigious award
than thats given for placing first
JULIE STIPE/The West Windsor Sun
Abhishektha Boppana, left, of High School South, watches as Kelsey Stevens and Bhavish Yalamanchi,
seen in the background, wirelessly command the robot to prepare the basketballs for shooting.
please see MIDKNIGHT, page 4 please see HAIRSPRAY, page 9
2 THE WEST WINDSOR SUN MARCH 28-APRIL 3, 2012
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Its that time of year again
tax season.
For many people, filing tax re-
turns is a stressful and complicat-
ed process. It can also be an ex-
pensive one for those seeking pro-
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If you are a New Jersey resi-
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The AARP tax aide program
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unteers working to help senior
citizens file their yearly taxes at
local libraries has blossomed into
a program with 33,000 volunteers
nationwide, and more than 900 in
New Jersey alone.
These volunteers provide serv-
ices at 150 locations throughout
the state.
Another wonderful aspect of
this program is that any New Jer-
sey resident, regardless of age, or
AARP membership status, is eligi-
ble to participate. As long as you
are a full-time New Jersey resi-
dent, AARPs program is ready to
help on any standard tax return,
even if you live in NJ but work in
New York of Pennsylvania.
All volunteers are highly-
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Assistance is most effective
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It is also recommended partici-
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way, continues until April 17.
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at www.aarp.org. Once there, click
money at the left, then taxes,
and at the bottom of the page will
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THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR CALLING
US IN THE LAST FEW WEEKS.
Your support has been overwhelming, so much so, that we've
been able to negotiate an extension to our lease. This means
our doors will remain open for a few more days and you can
continue to take advantage of our sale pricing. Hurry in, the
best selections will go fast and our store is closing soon.
Mon-Sat 10AM-8PM Sunday 12PM-6PM
CASH CHECK
4 THE WEST WINDSOR SUN MARCH 28-APRIL 3, 2012
We are pleased to welcome our newest audiologist
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MidKnight Inventors aim for
The Chairmans Award
in the tournament.
It recognizes teams serving the
community through promoting
science, technology and engineer-
ing, through outreach and by edu-
cating the community.
The Chairmans Award,
which the MidKnight Inventors
have yet to win, is considered the
highest award that can be given,
and is awarded to the team that,
according to Stevens, lives,
breathes and totally exemplifies
the ideals of FIRST.
FIRST, which stands for For In-
spiration and Recognition of Sci-
ence and Technology, is a not-for-
profit organization that aims to
inspire youth and promote inter-
est in science and technology.
FIRST sponsors regional and dis-
trict robotics competitions and
championships for which teams
across the United States and in
other countries spend hundreds
of hours building robots.
FIRSTs competitions some-
what resemble a sports game.
They involve creating teams of
robots which play against each
other in a game designed by
FIRST.
This year, the game involves
shooting basketball-like foam
balls into hoops of different
heights (getting the ball into a
higher hoop garners more
points).
The MidKnight Inventors im-
pressive list of accomplishments
is even more amazing when you
consider what they have or per-
haps more appropriately, what
they have not had to work with.
We have not been able to raise
funds like other teams have,
Stevens lamented. We learn to
make do with what we have.
This is ironic, he noted, for an
area with such a high per capita
income.
Until 2009, the team went with-
out sponsors, supporting the proj-
ects with donations from private
entities and a NASA grant for be-
ginning teams.
For two seasons, the team even
had an ersatz build site in a stu-
dents garage, yet still managed to
collect awards, including a
judges award for Excellence on
a Low Budget.
Although still far from being
flooded with funds, the Mid-
Knight Inventors have since
picked up a number of sponsors.
Supporting them for the 2012 sea-
son are Bristol-Myers Squibb, the
Princeton Plasma Physics Labo-
ratory, SRI International and
Lockheed Martin, among others.
Some of these sponsors,
Stevens said, have done more
than just donate money.
Employees from some of the
organizations, including SRI In-
ternational and Lockheed Mar-
tin, were so interested by the proj-
ect they began volunteering their
expertise.
Many of the volunteers who
mentor the team could probably
build a robot by themselves (one
mentor from SRI, Stevens said,
has a Ph.D. in robotics), but
Stevens stressed mentors try to
stay as hands-off as possible, to
provide the best experience for
the kids.
On our team, we really allow
kids to fail, Stevens said.
On some teams mentors do a
lot of the work, but this is not so
for the MidKnight Inventors.
Thats not how we build scien-
tists, Stevens said.
And Stevens has first-hand
proof that robotics club builds
MIDKNIGHT
Continued from page 1
please see ADVISOR, page 7
MARCH 28-APRIL 3, 2012 THE WEST WINDSOR SUN 5
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The following items were taken
from reports on file with the West
Windsor Police Department:
On Saturday, March 17 at 10:25
p.m., Patrolman Silcox responded
to Windsor Pond Road near
Cardiff Court in response to the
report of a hit and run motor ve-
hicle crash. Upon arrival, Silcox
met with the victim, later identi-
fied as a 54-year-old man from
West Windsor, who said the of-
fender, later identified as a 29-
year-old Jersey City woman,
struck his mini-van with her
white Infiniti at the intersection
of Quakerbridge Road and Vil-
lage Road West.
The man related that the
woman left the scene in her In-
finiti and he followed her in his
vehicle to their current location.
Silcox says he then met with the
woman who was unable to pro-
vide a reasonable explanation for
not stopping after the accident.
While speaking with the
woman, Silcox detected a strong
odor of an alcoholic beverage em-
anating directly from her breath.
Silcox had the woman perform
several filed sobriety tests which
she did not pass.
The woman was placed under
arrest, taken to headquarters and
processed for the arrest.
The woman was issued traffic
summonses for drunken driving,
leaving the scene of an accident,
failure to report an accident, care-
less driving and reckless driving.
The woman was released on
her own recognizance, pending a
future court date.
On Saturday, March 17 at 10:53
p.m., Patrolman Van Ness
stopped a 2000 brown Lexus for
failing to use a turn signal and
speeding. Upon meeting with the
driver, later identified as a 23-
year-old West Windsor man, Van
Ness notice a strong odor of an al-
coholic beverage coming from in-
side of the vehicle.
After observing signs of intoxi-
cation, Van Ness had the man per-
form several field-sobriety tests,
which he says the driver did not
police report
please see POLICE, page 9
letters to the editor
6 THE WEST WINDSOR SUN MARCH 28-APRIL 3, 2012
20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A
Princeton, NJ 08542
609-751-0245
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Publisher
ALAN BAUER
General Manager & Editor
STEVE MILLER
Executive Vice President
ED LYNES
Vice President of Sales
JOSEPH EISELE
Advertising Director
TIM RONALDSON
Director of Digital Media
TOM ENGLE
Art Director
JULIE STIPE
West Windsor Editor
DAN McDONOUGH, JR.
Chief Executive
RUSSELL CANN
Chairman of the Board
MICHAEL LaCOUNT, Ph.D.
Vice Chairman
BARRY RUBENS
Chief Financial Officer
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 20 Nassau Street, Suite 26A,
Princeton, NJ 08542. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08550 ZIP code. If
you are not on the mailing list, six-month
subscriptions are available for $39.99. PDFs
of the publication are online, free of charge.
For information, please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@westwindsorsun.com. For advertis-
ing information, call 609-751-0245 or
email advertising@westwindsorsun.com.
The Sun welcomes suggestions and com-
ments from readers including any infor-
mation about errors that may call for a cor-
rection to be printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@westwindsorsun.com, via fax at
609-751-0245, or via the mail. Of course,
you can drop them off at our office, too. The
West Windsor Sun reserves the right to
reprint your letter in any medium includ-
ing electronically.
in our opinion
W
hen New Jersey abandoned
its plans for a standalone
February presidential pri-
mary, people thought the state might
lose political clout.
And that line of thinking made
sense: The earlier the primary, the
more impact a state might have and
the more money presidential candi-
dates might spend in the state trying
to win voters.
But the move made sense for other
reasons. The political parties werent
happy with the February date. And the
election would have cost millions of
tax dollars about $12 million to be
more precise. Holding a single pri-
mary election in June for multiple
contests was the wise move.
Now, it looks like the June date still
might pay dividends since the GOP
primary shows no signs of getting less
intense.
Now, our guess is that there might
not be a huge economic windfall, but,
these days, snaring a few extra dollars
doesnt hurt.
New Jerseys impact on the race
isnt as great as Californias. That
state also holds its primary on June 5.
And California has more than three
times the number of delegates up for
grabs than does New Jersey: 172 to 50.
Also, were not too sure how compet-
itive the GOP race will be in the state.
Our guess is Mitt Romney will carry
the day here and that the other can-
didates know this. How much time
and money will they spend in the Gar-
den State? Who knows? It all depends
on what happens in the coming
weeks.
Still, having the primary matter at
least a little bit is somewhat exciting.
Its kind of the icing on the cake the
cake being the other benefits the state
realized by moving the date.
We certainly wouldnt mind a few
visits from the political campaigns.
Their presence will help to boost local
economies and theres a little bit of
prestige on the line if the race stays
close.
Will N.J. primary matter?
This year, it just might, if all of the GOP candidates stay in the race
A contested primary?
When the state moved its presidential
primary to June, it made economic
sense, but some wondered about the
potential downside of making the pri-
mary irrelevant. However, this years
GOP contest could liven things up.
Kaish is budget-conscious
and fair minded
I am writing this letter to ask support
for Michele Kaish, who is running for elec-
tion to the West Windsor-Plainsboro
Board of Education.
Michele is budget-conscious, fair mind-
ed in her decisions and a person of in-
tegrity. She devotes time and energy to ed-
ucate herself about the issues prior to
making decisions. I have worked along-
side her for the past seven years on nu-
merous school committees and activities,
and Michele is one of the best people I
have worked with in terms of how much
effort she puts into her tasks and her
friendly style of leadership and manage-
ment. I have known Michele for nine
years and she puts children first, wants to
do the best and will accomplish the best
for our schools. I sincerely ask West Wind-
sor residents to elect Michele Kaish to our
board of education.
- Micki Kermani
Writer encourages all
to vote for Kaish
I met Michele Kaish the way many peo-
ple do at a PTA meeting. In the seven
years that I have known her, Michele and I
have had many discussions about the West
Windsor-Plainsboro Regional School Dis-
trict. I know Michele has spent hours,
days and weeks of her life devoted to vol-
unteering in the schools and to working to
make the school district a better place for
parents, teachers and especially students.
What I have always appreciated about
Michele is that although she and I some-
times disagree on issues involving the
schools, she is a careful and patient listen-
er and always ready to explore and
discuss the many sides involved in any sit-
uation. Michele realizes there is no one
size fits all solution to education.
Being the mother of three sons, all with
different ages, interests and learning ob-
jectives, she has immense first hand expe-
rience in all that the WWPRSD has to
offer. She also has seen which areas need
improvement. I truly believe that her ex-
periences as a parent and as a volunteer in
the schools make her the perfect
candidate to be a member of the board of
education.
Michele has proven herself to be an in-
telligent, caring and fair guardian of the
goals and objectives of our schools and
she is genuinely interested in providing
the best educational experience for all the
students in our district. I will be voting for
Michele on April 17 and I encourage all
please see LETTERS, page 8
The West Windsor school board elec-
tion will take place on Tuesday, April 17,
and as such, we wish to share our policy
on election coverage and letters to the
editor. Weve invited all candidates to
submit information about themselves
a basic background so residents can
come to know whos running.
On April 4, these profiles will appear
at www.westwindsorsun.com. The follow-
ing week, on April 11, candidates will
have an opportunity to share why
theyre running, discuss three issues
they see as the most important, explain
how theyll handle budgeting and why
they believe theyre the best suited can-
didate for the open positions. Those re-
sponses also will be online.
Finally, we will publish letters to the
editor that endorse candidates or that
are election-related up to the April 4
print edition. Letters that are received
after deadline will appear online only at
www.westwindsorsun.com. Weve done
this to ensure there wont be last-minute
attacks in print that cannot be answered
before the actual election. Election-relat-
ed letters should be sent to news@west-
windsorsun.com.
Our election
letters policy
MARCH 28-APRIL 3, 2012 THE WEST WINDSOR SUN 7
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at news@westwindsorsun.com. Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
scientists. A pharmacologist him-
self, science is important to
Stevens, but his kids havent al-
ways shared his interest.
I tried for years and years and
years to get my two daughters in-
terested in science, Stevens said.
What finally did it was robotics
club, Stevens said.
His oldest daughter, formerly
on the team, is now an MC at
FIRST robotics competitions, in-
troducing teams and getting the
audience excited for the game,
while his younger daughter is
currently co-captain of the Mid-
Knight Inventors and has applied
to Stevens Institute of Technolo-
gy in Hoboken.
The kind of addictive enthusi-
asm that building robots for
FIRST competitions inspires is
evident in other members of the
WW-P team as well.
For Timothy Brooks, a junior
at High School North, this is his
third year on the team, and he
says since the competition began
in January, hes logged more than
400 hours at the build site.
I really like that Im allowed to
implement what Ive learned,
Brooks said.
Unlike in many school classes,
robotics club lets him put ideas
into practice.
Its very hands-on, Brooks
said.
He also said hes considering
engineering in school.
Its become a huge part of my
life, robotics, he said.
Abhishektha Boppana, from
High School South, is also a jun-
ior in his third year on the team
and as team captain, he puts in
many long hours during the
FIRST competition season, spend-
ing every weekend at the build
site.
This has been my life since
January, he said. We stay up
until 5 a.m., sometimes.
Boppana is happy to see others
grow to share his enthusiasm.
I like to see kids become this
dedicated, he said.
ADVISOR
Continued from page 4
Advisor glad to see
students dedication
Easter egg hunt set for April 1
Windsor Chapel invites mem-
bers of the community to enjoy
an Easter Egg Hunt at 3 p.m. on
Sunday, April 1, at 401 Village
Road East (across from the Dutch
Neck Elementary School), in
Princeton Junction.
Free face painting and balloon
animals will be offered in addi-
tion to the hunt for children ages
2 to 9.
A rain date is set for Saturday,
April 7, at 9 a.m.
For additional information,
call the Windsor Chapel at (609)
799-2559.
West Windsor residents to do the
same.
- Lisa Schmid
Count on a proactive,
effective leader in Kaish
I was fortunate to meet WW-P
school board candidate Michele
Kaish about five years ago when
our children were attending the
same elementary school.
Michele was the PTA president
at two different schools, and Ive
had the honor of serving and
learning under her direction and
leadership as one of her vice
presidents.
Ive also had the pleasure of sit-
ting in the stands with Michele
and her family as we rooted on
our children playing baseball at
Ward Field while discussing life,
school and other world events.
As a PTA president, Michele
consistently added value and di-
rection to the boards understand-
ing of the goals and direction of
the WW-P School District.
She provided a depth of diver-
sity and an independent view as a
focused and engaged member
within her leadership role.
In all my experiences and in-
teractions with Michele, Ive con-
tinued to be impressed with her
unique ability to craft and imple-
ment policies that encouraged ad-
ministrators and educators to im-
prove the quality of our chil-
drens educational experiences.
As in many organizations,
members always have differences
of opinions, and I found Micheles
skilled way to agree to disagree
and maintain a civility and re-
spect for all involved completely
refreshing.
It is with strong conviction that
I say Michele Kaish will be an ex-
cellent addition to the WW-P
School Board and she will effec-
tively manage to ensure that our
schools are well run.
She is a proactive and efficient
leader who operates with ex-
tremely high ethical standards
and never acts arbitrary, capri-
cious or unreasonable.
I have only the highest respect
for Micheles abilities and hope
that WW-P voters will reward her
efforts with a seat on the Board.
- Patti Kuczmarski
WEDNESDAY
March 28
FOR CHILDREN
Toddler Story Time & Craft: Ages 2
to 4. 10:30 to 11 a.m. at West Windsor
Branch Library. Stories and music
followed by a craft. Siblings wel-
come. No registration required.
Bollywood Babies: Age 18 to 36
months. 11:30 to noon at West Wind-
sor Branch Library. Experience the
fun of Bollywood dance. Instructor
Sunita Raj has over 12 years profes-
sional dance experience and a
degree in early childhood education.
Children learn simple Bollywood
dance moves. No registration
requires.
THURSDAY
March 29
FOR CHILDREN
DIY Art: Ages 6 to 11. 4:15 to 5 p.m.
at West Windsor Branch Library.
Come get creative. Various materi-
als provided in this art program to
help participants engage in creative
thinking. Support, advice and
encouragement provided. No regis-
tration required.
Picture Books & Craft: Ages 3 to 5.
10:30 to 11 a.m. at West Windsor
Branch Library. Stories followed by
a craft. No registration required.
American Sign Language: Ages 6
and up. 4:15 to 5 p.m. at West Wind-
sor Branch Library. Children ages 6
and up invited to an introductory
class in American Sign Language.
Learn to sign colors and make sim-
ple sentence. Online registration
required. Sponsored by Friends of
the West Windsor Library.
Spring Playfest Auditions: Ages 8
to 13. 7 to 9 p.m. at West Windsor
Branch Library. Audition for four
short plays Dollhouse Blues, My
Secret Admirer, Cookie Crazy
and The Book of Spells all to be
performed on May 18 through 20.
Audition is reading from the script;
pick one up at the reference desk or
by emailing mkerr@mcl.org.
Rehearsals begin in early April.
FRIDAY
March 30
FOR CHILDREN
Sing & Play for all ages: 10:30 to 11
a.m. at West Windsor Branch
Library. A sing-along program with
guitar and CD music. Action songs
and finger plays encourage audi-
ence participation. No registration
required.
SATURDAY
March 31
FOR ALL
Easter Egg Hunt: 10 a.m. at West
Windsor Community Park by the pic-
nic pavilion. Arrive by 9:45 a.m. This
free event, sponsored by West Wind-
sor Lions Club, is open to children
ages pre-kindergarten to third
grade. Participants must bring own
basket or bag. Rain date is April 7.
Wellness Fair: 1 to 4 p.m. at West
Windsor Senior Center. Free blood
pressure screenings, BMI and body
fat analysis, raffle prizes, give-
aways, health and wellness informa-
tion. Walk with a Doc begins at
12:45 p.m. at Maurice Hawk School.
Tai Chi with the Mayor is at 3 p.m.
For more information visit
www.westwindsornj.org or call
(609) 936-8400.
Bharat Natyam Workshop: Ages 6
and older. 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at West
Windsor Branch Library. Indian clas-
sical dance workshop. Kinnari
Hundiwala will instruct. She has 20
years experience. Class is meant for
beginners and held weekly; regular
attendance recommended. Regis-
tration required.
FOR CHILDREN
Hindi Class & Craft: Ages 5 and
older. 12 to 12:30 p.m. at West Wind-
sor Branch Library. No knowledge of
Hindi necessary, but regular atten-
dance encouraged. Ms. Gita teaches
an integrated and structured
approach covering practical day-to-
day conversation, grammar, speak-
ing, listening, reading and writing.
Stories and craft are included.
Tamil Language Class: Ages 5 and
older. 3 to 4 p.m. at West Windsor
Branch Library. Learn basics of
Tamil language. Bring a notebook
and pencil. No registration required.
Problem Solvers: Grades two
through five. 10:30 a.m. to noon at
West Windsor Branch Library. Come
together with children of the same
age to have fun solving logic puz-
zles. No registration required.
SUNDAY
April 1
FOR ALL
PST Easter Egg-Stravaganza: 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. at Mercer County
Park. Egg hunts for ages 2 and older.
Redeem eggs for prizes. Photos
with the Easter bunny. Food, crafts,
games and inflatable rides. Womans
carat hunt to search for eggs
worth prizes like a Coach bag or
$100 bill. For more information visit
www.wpst.com.
MONDAY
April 2
FOR ALL
Socrates Caf: 7 to 9 p.m. at West
Windsor Branch Library. Partici-
pants pose questions, listen to oth-
ers, raise challenges and consider
alternative answers. Background in
philosophy not required. No
advance preparation necessary.
FOR CHILDREN
Bricks 4 Kidz: Free demonstration
for grades kindergarten through
second. Adults encouraged to par-
ticipate. 4:15 to 5 p.m. at West Wind-
sor Branch Library. Hands-on class
where students build machines,
buildings, vehicles and other struc-
tures out of Lego bricks, using mod-
el plans designed by Bricks 4 Kidz.
Online registration required.
TUESDAY
April 3
FOR ALL
University Medical Center of
Princeton at Plainsboro: 8 p.m. at
West Windsor Branch Library. Learn
about the medical center and other
health-related facilities moving in
the near future to a 171-acre site on
Route One. Presented by Pam
Hersh, vice president of government
and community affairs, Princeton
Health Care Foundation.
West Windsor Township Human
Relations Council meeting: 8 p.m.
at West Windsor Municipal Building.
For more information visit
www.westwindsornj.org.
calendar PAGE 8 MARCH 28-APRIL 3, 2012
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or Meetings, information must be received, in writing, two weeks
prior to the date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The West Windsor Sun, 20
Nassau Street, Suite 26A, Princeton, N.J. 08542. Or by email:
news@westwindsorsun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing
through our website (www.westwindsorsun.com).
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LETTERS
Continued from page 6
Visit us online at www.westwindsorsun.com
ally wins a spot on the program
and becomes a hit, but Tracy is
bothered by the shows segrega-
tion, with black dancers appear-
ing on the show only on Negro
Day, and she is determined to in-
tegrate the show.
As well as its 40 cast members,
who are directed by Jeremy
Robinson and choreographed by
Jody Person, the production also
showcases the hard work of tech-
nical theater and music technolo-
gy students, who are in charge of
lighting the show and designing
the sound.
Overseeing them is Bob Terra-
no, assistant professor of commu-
nications at MCCC.
In 2005, seeing a need in the
area, Terrano developed an enter-
tainment technology major at
Mercer which has been very
popular with 78 students cur-
rently actively enrolled.
Lighting and sound are some-
times overlooked components of
a show, but Terrano stresses
theyre indispensible.
Sound technicians design how
it sounds to the audience, Terra-
no said, and added, The lighting
design is pretty much designing
the look of the show.
The cast also includes Brian
Bara as Tracy Turnblads mother,
Edna. A theater veteran from the
board of the James Tolin Memo-
rial Fund (which is helping with
the production), Bara said that a
stipulation of doing the show was
if he agreed to play Edna.
All his life, Bara said, he has
been doing theater here and
there, professionally and non-pro-
fessionally.
As an experienced actor, Bara
said he had no problem playing
Edna.
Its just playing another char-
acter, who happens to be a
woman, he said.
However, Bara does admit that
dancing in red patent leather
high heels is an added challenge.
That makes it really difficult,
he said.
Ben Menahem is another male
lead, but his role doesnt involve
wearing heels.
Menahem plays Link Larkin,
Tracys romantic interest.
Im playing Link as a very
wholesome guy, Menahem said.
Although Link doesnt immedi-
ately see the need for the shows
integration, he comes around
when he starts to care for Tracy.
He needs a push in the right
direction, Menahem said.
An athlete in high school,
Menahem said he tore his ACL in
junior year and chose to audition
for the school musical. He got the
lead, and since then, he said, has
done around 10 or 15 shows, most-
ly in local community theaters.
One of the best parts of the-
ater, Menahem said, is the people.
The friends you make doing
shows and being in theater,
Menahem said, its unparal-
leled. Theater, he said, is the
only place where people of com-
pletely diverse backgrounds and
beliefs and interests all come to-
gether to work on something.
Its really neat some of the
people you meet, Menahem
said.
Terrence Thomas, who plays
Negro Day dancer Seaweed J.
Stubbs, has a similar athletic
twist in the story of how he ended
up in theater.
He played basketball in high
school, Thomas said, but decided
to try out theater. The play went
over well.
I blew everyone out the
water, said Thomas. But his bas-
ketball coach found out and was-
nt happy. He told Thomas to
make a decision: basketball or
theater.
In the end, Thomas chose to
focus on basketball, but he has
never forgotten his interest in
theater.
I love the whole concept,
Thomas said. You set aside your
own personal traits and create a
totally different person.
Getting his early experience in
musicals is something of a strate-
gy for Thomas. Musicals are one
of the hardest things to tackle,
he said.
Having to dance and sing, as
well as act, makes musicals a
greater challenge, he said, than a
play.
This way, said Thomas, if I
do encounter a straight play, itll
be a walk in the park.
Unlike most of the cast, Kris-
ten Kane, who plays Tracy Turn-
blad, is not a student at MCCC.
Kane is a senior at West Wind-
sor-Plainsboro High School
North, who heard about open au-
ditions for the role, tried out for
the part and was elated to be
picked.
I do my high school musi-
cals, she said, but added that she
had never had a big role. The role
of Tracy, however, fits her like a
glove.
So many people have told me,
Youre just like that girl from
Hairspray, Kane said. Even so,
Kane insisted she and her charac-
ter are not very much alike.
Were so different, Kane said.
Tracy, she said, is bubbly,
speaks her mind, and is always
confident in herself.
Im very insecure, Kane ad-
mitted. It gives me so much
more confidence when Im saying
her lines.
Kanes forte is singing, and she
has been a member of the Prince-
ton Girl Choir since third-grade.
She loves acting, too, though, and
said a big accomplishment for her
was playing Ernestine in her
eighth-grade play, Cheaper by
the Dozen.
At first an extra in the play,
Kane got her chance to shine
when her friend Kelly became
sick four days before the show
opened. Kane learned all of
Kellys lines in three days.
In addition to singing and act-
ing, Kane has been gradually
adding dancing as well. Dancing
is obviously a big part of the role
of Tracy Turnblad, and though
Kane has little training, she loves
dancing, and said she hopes to be-
come even better in college,
where she plans to major in the-
ater.
I just want to be a triple
threat, Kane said.
Hairspray will play Friday,
April 13 at 8 p.m., Saturday April
14 and 21 at 2 and 8 p.m., and Sun-
day, April 15 and 22 at 2 p.m. at
MCCCs Kelsey Theater.
MARCH 28-APRIL 3, 2012 THE WEST WINDSOR SUN 9
HAIRSPRAY
Continued from page 1
Hairspray hits the stage from April 13 to 15
police report
pass. The man was placed under
arrest, taken to headquarters and
processed for the arrest. He was
issued traffic summonses for fail-
ure to signal a turn, speeding and
drunken and reckless driving.
He was released on his own re-
cognizance, pending a future
court date.
On Saturday, March 17 at 3:18
a.m., at Fisher Place on U.S. Route
1, Patrolman Van Ness stopped a
2008 gray Mazda for speeding.
Upon meeting with the driver,
Van Ness says he was provided a
fake name and date of birth by
the driver.
After an investigation revealed
the mans true identity and date
of birth, he was placed under ar-
rest for hindering his own appre-
hension and numerous outstand-
ing warrants from other jurisdic-
tions.
The man was taken to headquar-
ters and processed for the arrest.
He was also issued traffic sum-
monses for speeding, driving
while suspended and operating
an unregistered vehicle.
The man was released after
posting bail on the West Windsor
charge and the other outstanding
warrants, according to reports.
POLICE
Continued from page 5
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