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PROTECTION ACT
NATION PAGE 8
S.F. 49ERS
DRAFT WR
SPORTS PAGE 11
PIRATES FULL OF
ACTION, LAUGHS
WEEKEND PAGE 21
HOUSE OKS CYBERSECURITY BILL DESPITE VETO THREAT
CONSULTATION
(800) 308-0870
Fighting for victims
and their families
FREE
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Modern-day slavery and human trafcking
might seem like a faraway problem for those
living in the Bay Area but a local nonprot,
Freedom House, is putting a spotlight on the
problem locally.
Formed in 2010, Freedom House is the rst
shelter in Northern California for adult female
survivors of human traf-
cking.
Since opening, it has
provided services for 100
survivors of human traf-
cking, including housing
for 25 women at a shelter
in northern San Mateo
County.
The nonprots mission
is to bring hope and a new
life to survivors of human trafcking by pro-
viding a safe home and long-term aftercare.
Its about restoring the human dignity of
these women and bringing them hope and a
new life, said Jaida Im, the Freedom House
founder.
The nonprot holds its biggest fundraiser
this weekend in San Francisco that will give
its supporters an opportunity to hear survivor
stories and see the faces victimized by mod-
ern-day slavery.
Im and her staff work closely with law
enforcement and other agencies to identify
trafcking survivors and to provide them with
the care and services they need to rebuild their
lives.
Many of the victims Freedom House assists
were forced into the sex trade or to work for
no money in hazardous situations.
Before I came to Freedom House I was in
Battling modern-day slavery
San Mateo County shelter providing help for victims
HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL (LEFT),
HILLSBOROUGH POLICE DEPARTMENT (ABOVE)
Police and reghters come to the aid of a
dump truck lled with river rocks that got stuck
on a private bridge which collapsed
underneath it on the 2000 block of Ralston
Avenue in Hillsborough yesterday afternoon.
A sewer line, water pipe and Pacic Gas &
Electric pipe were all ruptured due to the
collapse, said Hillsborough police Chief Mark
OConnor.Two big-rig trucks were needed to
pull the truck off the bridge, OConnor said.
The driver was uninjured, he said.The broken
lines were capped. The call took three hours
and 14 minutes to clear.
TRUCK WEIGHS HEAVY ON BRIDGE
Jaida Im
Woods cut from
supervisor race
East Palo Alto councilman
bounces filing fee, twice
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
And then there were seven.
East Palo Alto Councilman David Woods
is no longer a candidate for the Board of
Supervisors after twice bouncing a
$1,117.46 check required to le his candi-
dacy papers for the June primary election.
Woods exit leaves seven candidates
vying for the District Four seat on the
Board of Supervisors that includes East Palo Alto, Redwood
City, Menlo Park and the unincorporated areas of North Fair
Oaks and Oak Knoll.
Woods cut a check to the Elections Ofce to receive nomi-
nation papers rather than submit all or some of the 4,684 sig-
natures that can be used in lieu of payment. By the time the
check made its way to the ofces accountant and then the
Controllers Ofce where the funds were found insufcient,
the March 9 ling deadline had passed. The ofce offered
Woods another week to give a valid payment but that second
check also bounced, said Candidate Filing Ofcer Meaghan
Hassel Shearer.
Woods did not return inquiries for comment.
David Woods
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Two real estate investors who do business in
San Mateo County have pleaded guilty to mail
fraud and rigging public foreclosure auctions
outside the Redwood City courthouse by
agreeing not to bid against each other, accord-
ing to the Department of Justice.
Lydia Fong and Matthew Worthing, both of
San Francisco, were charged yesterday in the
case, joining 20 other individuals throughout
four Bay Area counties who have pleaded
guilty or agreed to plead guilty in similar bid
rigging and public auction fraud cases.
According to federal prosecutors, Fong and
Worthing conspired with others for varied
stretches between October 2009 and January
2011. Worthing is also charged with partici-
pating in a similar San Francisco County con-
Real estate investors plead
guilty of rigging auctions
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Passage of a $100 annual parcel tax could
raise an estimated $1 million for the San
Bruno Park Elementary School District, an
option the board will continue to explore.
On Wednesday night, after a long discussion
about school closures, the Board of Trustees
also instructed staff to continue work on a pos-
sible parcel tax to be placed on the November
ballot. San Bruno, like many districts, is fac-
ing financial challenges. Uncertainty over
state funding is part of the problem. One solu-
tion many have turned to in recent years is
local funding through parcel taxes, the funds
from which can be used for a districts pro-
grams.
How much to ask for and for how long such
a measure would last needs to be determined.
San Bruno to explore parcel tax
Discussion comes after talk of possible school closures
See AUCTIONS, Page 26 See TAX, Page 24
See WOODS, Page 26
Friday April 27, 2012 Vol XII, Edition 218
FOR THE RECORD 2 Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
Publisher: Jerry Lee Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
jerry@smdailyjournal.com jon@smdailyjournal.com
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 250 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the familys choosing.To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 250 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Announcer Casey
Kasem is 80.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
2011
Powerful tornadoes raked the South and
Midwest. According to the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration, more than 120 twisters
resulted in 316 deaths across parts of
Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee,
Virginia and Georgia.
Fear not those who
argue but those who dodge.
Dale Carnegie, American writer-lecturer (1888-1955)
Actor Jack
Klugman is 90.
Rock musician Ace
Frehley is 61.
In other news ...
Birthdays
REUTERS
U.S. soldier Nicholas Dickhut from 5-20 infantry Regiment attached to 82nd Airborne points his rie at a doorway after
coming under re by the Taliban while on patrol in Zharay district in Kandahar province, southern Afghanistan.
Friday: Sunny. Highs in the lower
60s. Northwest winds 10 to 20
mph.
Friday night: Mostly clear. Lows
in the upper 40s. Northwest winds
15 to 20 mph.
Saturday: Sunny. Highs in the mid
60s. Northwest winds 10 to 15
mph increasing to around 20 mph
in the afternoon.
Saturday night: Partly cloudy in
the evening then becoming mostly cloudy. Lows around 50.
Northwest winds 15 to 20 mph.
Sunday: Sunny. Highs in the upper 60s.
Sunday night through Thursday: Mostly clear. Lows around
50. Highs in the 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No.04 Big Ben
in rst place; No.03 Hot Shot in second place;and
No. 05 California Classic in third place. The race
time was clocked at 1:44.72.
(Answers tomorrow)
SOUPY FIGHT CAVITY GLITCH
Yesterdays
Jumbles:
Answer: After getting to the emergency room, he was
hoping for some HOSPITALITY
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
CHAWT
NDRIG
BUTARP
NISETV
2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
in
d

u
s

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n

F
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:
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Answer here:
7 8 4
3 9 15 37 38 39
Mega number
April 24 Mega Millions
4 8 9 11 23
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
2 3 6 7
Daily Four
4 8 6
Daily three evening
In 1521, Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan was killed
by natives in the Philippines.
In 1777, the only land battle in Connecticut during the
Revolutionary War, the Battle of Ridgeeld, took place, result-
ing in a limited British victory.
In 1805, during the First Barbary War, an American-led force
of Marines and mercenaries captured the city of Derna, on the
shores of Tripoli.
In 1822, the 18th president of the United States, Ulysses S.
Grant, was born in Point Pleasant, Ohio.
In 1865, the steamer Sultana exploded on the Mississippi River
near Memphis, Tenn., killing more than 1,400 people, mostly
freed Union prisoners of war.
In 1932, American poet Hart Crane, 32, drowned after jump-
ing from a steamer into the Gulf of Mexico while en route to
New York.
In 1941, German forces occupied Athens during World War II.
In 1967, Expo 67 was ofcially opened in Montreal by
Canadian Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson.
In 1972, the Apollo 16 mission to the moon ended safely.
In 1973, Acting FBI Director L. Patrick Gray resigned after it
was revealed that hed destroyed les removed from the safe of
Watergate conspirator E. Howard Hunt.
In 1982, the trial of John W. Hinckley Jr., who had shot four
people, including President Ronald Reagan, began in
Washington. (The trial ended with Hinckleys acquittal by rea-
son of insanity.)
In 1992, the new Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was pro-
claimed in Belgrade by the republic of Serbia and its lone ally,
Montenegro.
Actress Anouk Aimee is 80. Actress Judy Carne is 73. Rock
musician Jim Keltner is 70. Rhythm-and-blues singer Cuba
Gooding is 68. Singer Ann Peebles is 65. Rock singer Kate
Pierson (The B-52s) is 64. Rhythm-and-blues singer Herbie
Murrell (The Stylistics) is 63. Actor Douglas Sheehan is 63. Pop
singer Sheena Easton is 53. Actor James Le Gros (groh) is 50.
Rock musician Rob Squires (Big Head Todd and the Monsters)
is 47. Singer Mica Paris is 43. Actor David Lascher is 40. Actress
Maura West is 40. Actress Sally Hawkins is 36. Rock musician
Patrick Hallahan (My Morning Jacket) is 34. Rock singer Jim
James (My Morning Jacket) is 34.
Puppy on runway delays
flights at NYC airport
NEW YORK A puppy named
Byrdie delayed several ights at New
Yorks LaGuardia Airport when she
escaped from her crate and frolicked
around a busy runway.
The Port Authority says the 30-pound
Rhodesian ridgeback scampered around
the runway for about 10 minutes on
Wednesday while authorities unsuccess-
fully tried to collar her.
The agency says they had to nd the
poochs owner aboard the Memphis-
bound Delta Air Lines Airbus to help
catch it.
The owner was brought out on to the
runway. She called out to the 14-month-
old pup and she came running to her.
Boring meets Dull in
international partnership
PORTLAND, Ore. Boring: Meet
Dull.
Thats what happened when two small
towns, one in the U.S. state of Oregon
and the other in Scotland, decided to get
together and become sister communi-
ties.
The Oregonian reports that the idea
came from a Scottish tourist, Elizabeth
Leighton, who traveled this year through
the Oregon town in Clackamas County
that was named after homesteader
William H. Boring.
The unofcial partnership means that
the towns can use their collectively
descriptive names to promote tourism.
Ofcials in the Oregon town plan to sell
T-shirts that say Boring and Dull.
Boring has a population of 8,000. Dull
has a population of 84 and possibly gets
its name from a Gaelic word meaning
meadow or snare.
Invite mix-up leads
Swede to ministers dinner
STOCKHOLM Swedens envi-
ronment minister thought she had
asked the countrys former agriculture
minister to attend a glam dinner. But
the invitation went to the wrong
Margareta Winberg an ordinary
Swede who jumped at the chance to
mingle, even participating in the group
photo.
Winberg, a 67-year old retiree from
Sundbyberg outside Stockholm, told
Swedish daily Dagens Nyheter that
although she doesnt know much about
the environment, she didnt hesitate in
taking up Lena Ek on the offer last
week.
She told the paper that she wore black
trousers and a blouse with some things
on, and that she met interesting people,
like that guy Blix, a reference to for-
mer chief U.N. weapons inspector Hans
Blix.
Eks spokesman said the minister
found the situation extremely funny.
Joshua Ledet continues
to impress on American Idol
LOS ANGELES Joshua Ledet
earned another pair of standing ovations
on American Idol.
The powerful 20-year-old gospel singer
from Westlake, La., got the Fox talent
contests judges on their feet again
Wednesday after his energetic take on
Queens Crazy Little Thing Called
Love and restrained rendition of
India.Aries Ready for Love. The nal-
ists were tasked with tackling both a
Queen classic and a song of their own
choosing.
Is it bad for me to say Joshuas part of
the show is my favorite part of the show?
beamed Jennifer Lopez.
Skylar Laine, the 18-year-old country
rocker from Brandon, Miss., who
impressed the panel with The Show
Must Go On and Jason Aldeans Tattoos
on This Town, joked that Ledet earned
his 12th standing ovation of the season.
Laine herself wasnt lacking for fans.
Steven Tyler called her country interpreta-
tion of the Queen ballad over the top.
I am a ginormous fan, said Randy
Jackson.
But Jackson and Tyler didnt love Elise
Testones bold selection of Jimi Hendrixs
Bold as Love. Tyler warned the rockin
28-year-old teacher from Charleston,
S.C., that while it warmed his heart for her
to do Hendrix, shes gotta do songs that
people know.
12 15 19 20 28 21
Mega number
April 25 Super Lotto Plus
3
Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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REDWOOD CITY
Petty theft. An iPhone was stolen from a
restaurant on Wilson Street before 8:49 p.m.
Thursday, April 19.
Vandalism. A front lobby window was shat-
tered on Broadway before 8:42 p.m.
Thursday, April 19.
Fraud. A man was arrested for trying to cash
a check on a closed account that had fraudu-
lent activity on El Camino Real before 6:43
p.m. Thursday, April 19.
Stolen vehicle. A vehicle was stolen on El
Camino Real before 3:43 p.m. Thursday,
April 19.
Burglary. A rear window was smashed and a
bag containing cash, paperwork and keys was
taken on Castle Hill Road before 9:07 a.m.
Thursday, April 19.
Burglary. A rear window was smashed and
two backpacks were taken on Pleasant Hill
Road before 7:42 a.m. Thursday, April 19.
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO
Disturbance. A woman was yelling and
swearing at people at the bus stop in front of
Kentucky Fried Chicken at Airport Boulevard
and Baden Avenue at 10:48 p.m., Thursday,
April 19.
Disturbance. An intoxicated woman was
cutting herself at the Industrial Hotel on
Cypress Avenue at 7:53 p.m., Thursday, April
19.
Police reports
Thats cold
An ice cream man was badly beaten after
he was robbed on Fifth Avenue in
Redwood City before 4:07 p.m. Thursday,
April 19.
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Students from a handful of local high
schools are hoping they designed the top robot
this year as they compete in nationals for the
21st FIRST Robotics Championship competi-
tion in St. Louis this weekend.
Four robotics teams consisting of students
from seven local high schools Palo Alto,
Gunn, Aragon, Menlo-Atherton, Woodside,
Carlmont and Sequoia are headed to the
Midwest in hopes of winning the FIRST (For
Inspiration and Recognition of Science and
Technology) Robotics competition. The stu-
dent designed-bots start going head to head
Friday morning with the championship games
held Saturday.
Earning a spot was a challenge for each
school, but first came the design work.
Students are given a different challenge each
year. Teams start designing the bot in January
and are given a six-week build period to get
things done. All teams, nationwide, must ship
the robots by the same time to ensure no one
has extra time to work. Teams must x dam-
age from an earlier competition just prior to
the start of the next tournament.
This year, students were designing robots to
compete in the Rebound Rumble. The game is
played between two alliances of three teams
each. Each alliance competes by trying to
score as many basketball-like balls in the
hoops as possible during a two-minute-and-
15-second match. Balls scored in higher
hoops earn additional points. Teams are
awarded bonus points if they are balanced on
bridges at the end of the match.
Zoe Nuyens, co-president of the M-A team,
explained they wanted the additional points.
So the smaller team spent more time on the
design. The junior joined the team her fresh-
man year after watching her brother partici-
pate. Spending extra time has given the team a
unique design which allows a robot that can
pull balls from two directions. It also left a
shorter time to build so the team didnt do as
well in its rst competition. Those challenges
did allow the team to make tweaks and be suc-
cessful in its second, which was held at San
Jose State University.
Leading up to this weekends competition,
the team has designed a few modications that
would be made in St. Louis, said Nuyens.
Doing so may put the bot over the weight limit
requiring the team to get rid of the mobility on
one side.
For students, this activity offers a hands-on
learning opportunity not offered in the class-
room. Being successful requires volunteer
assistance from teachers and community men-
tors with expertise in the eld.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 105.
Conquering the Rebound Rumble
Local high school teams compete for championship robotics title
KORE CHAN/DAILY JOURNAL
The Aragon Robotics Team attempts to ne tune their robot for greater accuracy at shooting
foam basketballs into hoops during the Silicon Valley Regional robotics tournament.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A 64-year-old house cleaner angry that he
couldnt reclaim his towed vehicle torched a
2008 Cadillac Escalade in the parking lot of
the Department of Motor Vehicles in Daly
City on Monday because he thought it
belonged to an employee, according to pros-
ecutors.
Hugo Carranza, whose vehicle had been
towed by San Francisco police last October
due to an expired registration, reportedly
paid fines at the DMV office but could not
get his car released. On April 23, he filled a
bottle with oil or gas, randomly selected what
he thought was an employees vehicle and
poured the liquid over two tires before light-
ing it on fire, said District Attorney Steve
Wagstaffe.
The Escalade was scorched but not
engulfed and the flames
also damaged a Honda in
an adjacent space,
Wagstaffe said.
A witness reported see-
ing Carranza walk away
from the scene and the
arson was reportedly
caught on tape. At the
scene, Carranza walked
up to a police lieutenant
and said Im the one who did it, Wagstaffe
said.
Carrazana yesterday pleaded not guilty to
felony counts of arson and vandalism. He
asked for a court-appointed attorney and did
not waive his right to a speedy trial. He
returns to court May 7 for a preliminary hear-
ing and remains in custody in lieu of
$100,000 bail.
DA: Man angry at
DMV torches SUV
Hugo Carranza
4
Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Two court-appointed doctors are
split in their opinion of whether a
San Bruno man was insane when he
allegedly helped murder an acquain-
tance in his parents home as they
slept before dragging the body
down the driveway.
The opposing conclusions dont
require a third evaluation and wont
stave off a murder trial for Nicholas
Jose Vargas, 25, but will play a role
in a secondary sanity phase of trial
if he is rst convicted of killing
Christopher Chastain in April 2011.
Both Vargas and co-defendant
Brandon David Thompson, 27, have
pleaded not guilty to murder and
deadly weapons charges.
Prosecutors contend on April 10,
2010 the men
killed Chastain,
23, in the home
Vargas shared
with his parents
on the 400 block
of Cypress
A v e n u e
although a
motive remains
unclear. Vargas
allegedly placed a plastic bag over
Chastains head and hit him twice
with a pipe wrench while Thompson
stabbed him twice in the abdomen
with a kitchen knife.
The defendants reportedly
dragged Chastains body down the
driveway to Vargas Honda Accord
but could not lift the man who
weighed 275 pounds. Prosecutors
say Thompson left the scene and
Vargas contacted his father inside
who followed the blood to
Chastains body and called 911.
Although a motive hasnt been
denitively established, investiga-
tors think Vargas may have thought
Chastain had harmed his sister in
some way.
Having two defendants being
tried together enter differing sanity
claims is not typical and is cer-
tainly going to be an issue, said
prosecutor Al Giannini.
Giannini said he anticipates the
defense attorneys asking to separate
their clients cases but will oppose
any move to do so.
Vargas attorney Connie OBrien
did not return a call for comment.
Both men are due back in court
May 7 to set a trial date and remain
in custody without bail.
Eleven arrests made
in Oakland pot bust
OAKLAND Oakland police
say they arrested 11 people and
seized hundreds of pot plants from a
warehouse after a nighttime raid.
According to television news
reports, police used flash-bang
grenades to enter the commercial
warehouse around 9:30 p.m.
Wednesday.
Police say the building was
equipped with high-end sophisticat-
ed video equipment, and its interior
doors bolstered with reinforced steel.
Officers say they found about
2,500 marijuana plants and 50
pounds of dried pot. They also dis-
covered several weapons, including
two assault ries and two sets of
body armor.
Investigators say they also recov-
ered $40,000 in cash.
The warehouse was serving as a
growing and distribution operation,
and police say it was not listed with
the city as a designated or authorized
medical marijuana facility.
Police did not identify those arrest-
ed.
Doctors split on accused killers sanity
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The San Mateo County Harbor
District announced yesterday its
board appointed William H.
Holsinger as its newest member to
serve the remainder of a mid-term
vacancy created by the death of
Sally Campbell.
Holsinger, of San Mateo, was
chosen Thursday from a candidate
pool of eight. Holsinger was imme-
diately sworn in and will serve
through Dec. 31, 2012, when the
term ends. Holsinger can run in
November for the seats next full
term which is up for election along
with those currently lled by Harbor
Commissioners Pietro Parravano
and Leo Padreddii. He previously
ran for the Harbor Commission
unsuccessfully in 2004.
Holsinger is a practicing attorney
who serves on several public and
private boards and commissions,
including the boards of directors of
the Burlingame Rotary Club and
Project 90, a drug and alcohol treat-
ment program serving San Mateo
and Santa Clara counties.
Campbell, a 19-year Harbor
Commission member, died earlier
this month of cardiac arrest follow-
ing knee surgery. She was 68.
Harbor commissioner named
San Mateo County Harbor District General Manager,Peter Grenell,swears
in Will Holsinger, right, as Harbor Commissioner.
Nicholas Vargas
Around the Bay
5
Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
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1 N Amphlett Blvd Ste F
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Rape suspect fit for trial
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A Redwood City transient accused of beating and trying
to sexually assault a young woman who was staying at a
motel to study for finals is mentally fit to
stand trial on several felony charges that
could send him to prison for life.
Maurice Banks, 44, has pleaded not
guilty but a judge put criminal proceed-
ings on hold while two doctors evaluated
his ability to aid in his own defense. On
Thursday, both doctors agreed Banks is
competent to aid in his own defense
against charges of assault with the intent
to sexually assault, causing great bodily
injury, assault, attempted oral copulation, first-degree bur-
glary, indecent exposure and maliciously dissuading a wit-
ness.
Banks has previously pleaded not guilty to all charges and
will now stand trial June 18, said prosecutor Ivan
Nightengale.
Officers arrested Banks Dec. 4, 2010 after responding to
reports of a woman screaming for help at the Garden Motel
at 1690 Broadway in Redwood City. The woman told police
she was using the motel as a quiet studying venue. At
approximately 4 a.m., she told police she heard prying nois-
es at the window opposite the front door and got up to run
from the room. While fumbling with the lock and chain, a
man she later identified as Banks entered the window,
grabbed her and threw her on the bed.
The suspect punched her several times in the face and
strangled her into unconsciousness. When she awoke, her
pants were pulled down to her knees and the suspect was
standing over her demanding oral sex. The woman said she
consented but ran from the room after he turned his head.
Police found Banks three to four hours later at the motel.
The woman was hospitalized for her injuries, which
included fractured eye orbital bones and sinus fractures
requiring surgery, according to prosecutors.
Banks remains in custody in lieu of $250,000 bail.
Maurice Banks
By Terence Chea
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Treasury
Secretary Timothy Geithner called on
China Thursday to move forward with
economic reforms ahead of his meeting
with leaders in Beijing.
Geithner spoke about the state of
China-U.S. relations and a host of other
economic issues during a San Francisco
event hosted by the Commonwealth
Club of California.
He and Secretary of State Hillary
Clinton are traveling to Beijing next
week for the fourth round of the U.S.-
China Strategic and Economic Dialogue.
The treasury secretary said the Obama
administration welcomes recent changes
to Chinas exchange rate system but
believes the Chinese renminbi needs to
appreciate further against the dollar.
It will provide China the independence
and exibility to respond to future
changes in growth and ination, Geithner
said. And it will help the world economy,
reducing a source of unfair competition
with Chinas trading partners.
He urged China to continue reforming
its nancial system, which is dominated
by state-owned banks that channel
resources to state enterprises at the
expense of private companies.
Geithner said it was unclear whether
Chinas economic reforms would be
affected by a political crisis triggered by
the fall of former Chongqing Mayor Bo
Xilai, a rising politician toppled over a
scandal involving his wifes alleged par-
ticipation in the murder of a British busi-
nessman.
Geithner: Chinese financial reforms key
REUTERS
Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner speaks at the Commonwealth Club at the
Mark Hopkins Hotel in San Francisco.
By Juliet Williams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO About 200 reli-
gious leaders from numerous denomina-
tions endorsed Gov. Jerry Browns pro-
posed November tax initiative Thursday,
saying they believe those who are
blessed with riches should share them
with the less fortunate.
Brown met with leaders from PICO
California in the basement of the down-
town Cathedral of the Blessed
Sacrament, the regional Catholic diocese
headquarters a block from the state
Capitol. The nonprot groups ministers
and rabbis were lobbying lawmakers for
policies they say reect their values of
social justice and caring for the needy.
Our vision of California as a land of
opportunity for all cannot be achieved if
our youth, elders, families and communi-
ties are starved of the resources they
need, said the Rev. George Cummings,
founding pastor of Imani Community
Church in Oakland.
Religious leaders endorse Browns tax plan
6
Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Man arrested for human trafficking
A Sacramento man was arrested Wednesday on human traf-
cking, pimping and pandering charges after getting into a
domestic disturbance with a woman at a hotel on Airport
Boulevard in South San Francisco the day before, according to
police.
The woman was assaulted Tuesday after being confronted by
the suspect about her loyalty as a prostitute. The victim was
struck, strangled and money was taken from her by the suspect,
according to police.
The suspect, 32-year-old Marshaun Jourdan, was arrested in
a hotel in Burlingame Wednesday, according to police.
He allegedly contacted the victim through her adult website
while she lived out of state a couple of years ago, according to
police. He bought her a plane ticket and had her live in an
apartment in the Sacramento area. He also provided her with a
cellphone and lodging under the agreement she would solicit
herself as a prostitute and give him all the money she earned,
according to police.
Jourdan is being charged with human trafcking, pimping,
pandering, robbery, making criminal threats, false imprison-
ment and domestic battery, according to police.
He was booked into San Mateo County Jail and is being held
on a $500,000 bail.
Girl assaulted in South San Francisco
A girl in her teens was assaulted by four young adults on
West Orange Avenue near a bus stop Wednesday afternoon,
according to South San Francisco police.
The four pulled up beside her in a green van and punched
and kicked her to the ground and stole her cellphone, accord-
ing to police. The suspects were three young women and one
young man, two of whom were identied as classmates of the
girl, according to police.
The two other suspects have not been identied, according to
police.
Anyone with information regarding the incident should call
police at (650) 877-8900.
Mary Ann Niebuhr
Mary Ann Niebuhr died April 6, 2012
peacefully in her sleep with her family at
her side.
Mary Ann was
born on Nov. 6, 1932
and grew up in San
Francisco. She was
the youngest of four
children by Adrian
and Anna Kloos,
who emigrated from
the Netherlands in
1920. She attended George Washington
High school in San Francisco and grad-
uated in 1950. She then attended the San
Francisco College for Women at Lone
Mountain (now part of USF) and studied
chemistry.
Mary Ann met the love of her life
Vernon Niebuhr while vacationing in
Hawaii. They were married in 1959 at
St. Monicas Catholic Church in San
Francisco. Vernon and Mary Ann spent
the early years of their marriage living in
Iowa. In 1962, they moved back to the
San Francisco Bay Area, with their rst
child Paul and purchased a house in San
Mateo. She subsequently gave birth to
Julie, Shelley and David, making for a
large, busy household full of love. She
enjoyed league bowling and traveling,
which brought her to nearly every U.S.
state and to countries on ve continents.
She is survived by her husband
Vernon, her four children and eight
grandchildren.
A celebration of life will be held 11
a.m. April 28, 2012 at the Immaculate
Heart of Mary Catholic Church in
Belmont with a reception to follow.
Maurice Mo Witte
Maurice Mo Witte died peacefully
at home on April 11, 2012 at the age of
91 survived by his devoted wife of 64
years, Florian; his two children Randall
and Terrye; daughter-in-law Lakshmi
and her son Nicholas; grandaughters
Megan Elizabeth Nunes and Stacey
Lianne Parker; great-grandchildren
Bella Rosalie Nunes, Lucas Owen
Nunes and Leroy Parker.
Mo was born March 14, 1921 in San
Francisco to Joseph and Fannie Witte.
He attended George Washington High
School and after graduating served as a
Pharmacists First Mate on board the
USS Rochambeau and USS Yorktown in
the Pacific during
World War II.
Following the Navy,
Mo worked as a
salesman for
Nusbaum Levy
W h o l e s a l e
Hardware, Bacar
Corporation and
Orchard Supply
Hardware. Mo was a
longtime member of
the San Francisco
Masonic Lodge and
the San Mateo Elks
Club. He enjoyed
golf, bridge, crib-
bage, bowling and
flirting with the
ladies.
Mo was a generous and loving hus-
band, father, grandfather and great-
grandfather and will be missed by all
whose lives he touched with his quiet
manner and sold presence.
As a public service, the Daily Journal
prints obituaries of approximately 250
words or less with a photo one time on
the date of the familys choosing.
Obituaries
FEDERAL
GOVERNMENT
U.S. Rep.
Anna G. Eshoo,
D-Palo Alto, led
39 of her House
colleagues in a
letter urging
President Barack Obama to issue an
executive order that would require cor-
porations and companies that have con-
tracts with the federal government to
disclose campaign contributions.
Eshoo and other members expressed
concern about reports that a major
presidential super PAC has accepted
large contributions from government
contractors, an act long considered
impermissible under pay to play
laws.
CITY GOVERNMENT
The city of San Mateo in conjunc-
tion with the Downtown San Mateo
Association is requesting proposals
from qualified firms to coordinate a
weekly Mobile Gourmet Food
Truck event at the Downtown San
Mateo Caltrain Transit Center. The
city/DSMA will not compensate the
event planner, rather, the city will pro-
vide space at the Transit Center at no
cost and the event planner will share
with the city a portion of the gross
revenues generated by the food
trucks. It is the citys intention to
approve the event for the 2012 season
and will consider extending approval
for future years pending City
Council direction later this calendar
year. The closing date for proposals
is May 11. For more information visit
www.cityofsanmateo.org/Bids.aspx?
bidID=182.
Redwood City Mayor Alicia
Aguirre announced Monday that
Councilwoman Barbara Pierce and
Councilman Jeff Ira will serve as an
ad hoc committee to research and
report on options regarding the
Saltworks development application
which has been on le with the city
nearly three years. In November, devel-
oper DMB said it planned to revise and
resubmit a plan but has not yet done so
which has stalled the environmental
review process. Earlier this month,
Councilwoman Rosanne Foust sug-
gested seeking an advisory vote from
the public on how the city should move
forward or if it even should. The com-
mittee is expected to bring back its
ndings for discussion at the may 21
meeting.
EDUCATION
Redwood City students could see
fewer school days if funding drops,
under an agreement with teachers
approved by the Board of Trustees
Wednesday.
Allowing for funding to dictate the
number of school days and pay is a
practice the district previously adopted
in response to mid-term budget cuts.
Many districts now place possible fur-
lough days at the end of a school year in
hopes of instead holding class. The
Redwood City Elementary School
District, in cooperation with its unions,
was among the rst to use the idea.
On Wednesday, the board approved a
one-year contract with the Redwood
City Teachers Association from July 1,
2012 through June 30, 2013 that would
keep that practice going. The 187-day
school year, however, will have one fur-
lough day built in. Under the funding
formula, the current year should be cut
one day. Instead, that cut will be made
in the following year, according to the
proposed contract. Conversely, the
additional work days will be restored
should funding increase.
No raises are included in the propos-
al and class sizes will average 31 stu-
dents.
Local briefs
LOCAL/NATION 7
Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Lesbian Scout leader ousted
in Ohio; parents upset
The rst-graders in Ohio Pack
109s Tiger Scouts didnt know or
care their den mother was a lesbian
at least not until the Boy Scouts
of America threw her out over the
organizations ban on gays.
Now, parents who were aware of
Jennifer Tyrrells sexual orientation
well before she took the boys on
campouts and helped them carve
race cars for the annual Pinewood
Derby have rallied to her defense in
a case that has re-ignited the debate
over the Scouts policy.
I teach my children to judge peo-
ple on their actions, said Rob Dunn,
a father in Bridgeport, a village of
about 2,000 across the Ohio River
from Wheeling, W.Va. Whether
you agree with their lifestyle or not.
Secret Service investigating
another overseas trip
WASHINGTON Expanding
the prostitution investigation, the
Secret Service acknowledged
Thursday it is checking whether its
employees hired strippers and pros-
titutes in advance of President
Barack Obamas visit last year to El
Salvador.
The disclosure came not long after
the Homeland Security secretary
assured skeptical senators that the
recent prostitution scandal in
Colombia appeared to be an isolated
incident.
A spokesman for the Secret
Service, Edwin Donovan, said the
agency was investigating allegations
raised in news reports about unpro-
fessional behavior that have
emerged in the aftermath of the
Colombia incident.
By Alan Fram
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON House
Speaker John Boehner accused
President Barack Obama on
Thursday of conduct beneath the
dignity of the White House. The
top House Democrat said Boehner
considers the health of women a
luxury.
In a measure of the sharp elbows
both parties are throwing this elec-
tion year, note that those words
were exchanged over legislation
whose basic purpose they say they
agree on: preventing interest rates
on millions of federal student loans
from doubling to 6.8 percent this
summer.
Their chief remaining dispute is
how to pay for the $5.9 billion cost
of keeping those rates low. When it
comes to that, each side has in effect
taken a political hostage: House
Republicans would cut spending
from Obamas prized health care
overhaul law, Senate Democrats
would boost payroll taxes on own-
ers of some private corporations and
House Democrats would erase fed-
eral subsidies to oil and gas compa-
nies.
Thursdays partisan blasts were
the latest, vivid example of how
lawmakers are missing no chances
this election season to portray
themselves as seriously address-
ing voters concerns about the
economy and other issues while
accusing the other side of blatant-
ly playing political games.
The rhetoric intensified
Thursday, a day before the House
was set to vote on a GOP-written
bill that would keep current 3.4 per-
cent interest rates on subsidized
Stafford loans intact for another
year. The measure would be paid
for by carving money out of a pre-
ventive health fund established by
Obamas health care overhaul law
a measure most Democrats con-
sider a prized accomplishment
worth ghting for.
Obama spent two days this week
barnstorming through three college
campuses in North Carolina,
Colorado and Iowa, using cam-
paign-style speeches before cheer-
ing throngs of students to complain
that Republicans are dragging their
feet on blocking the interest rate
boosts.
By Thursday, Boehner, R-Ohio,
had had enough, accusing Obama of
using taxpayer money to launch
political attacks on Republicans for
a problem that GOP lawmakers
were already working to address.
Frankly, I think this is beneath
the dignity of the White House,
Boehner told reporters. He added,
For the president to make a cam-
paign issue and then to travel to
three battleground states and go to
three large college campuses on tax-
payers money to try to make this
some political issue is pathetic. And
his campaign ought to be reimburs-
ing the Treasury for the cost of this
trip.
Dems, GOP swap charges in student loan fight
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A day spa owner was cited and a
masseuse arrested in downtown San
Mateo Wednesday for prostitution
activities at Celandine Day Spa,
according to police.
Acting on complaints from local
businesses, San Mateo police inves-
tigated the spa and developed evi-
dence that showed acts of prostitu-
tion were taking place at the busi-
ness at 155 E. Fifth Ave., directly
across from Central Park.
Shuyi Cece Chen, 45, of
Hayward, was arrested and booked
into San Mateo County Jail for two
counts of prostitution. The business
owner, Michelle Yang, 41, of Daly
City, was cited for several misde-
meanor violations of the citys code
pertaining to the illegal operation of
her massage business, according to
police.
Yang denied any knowledge of
the arrest when contacted by phone
Thursday.
Deputy Chief Michael Callagy
serves on a statewide committee to
monitor and craft legislation that
ensures that lawful massage busi-
nesses are protected and that illegal
massage businesses are held
accountable for unlawful activity.
It is imperative that we safe-
guard the public by stopping human
trafcking and exploitation that can
take place in businesses that are
fronts for prostitution. The healing
profession of massage therapists
deserve the good name of their pro-
fession to be without compromise
and to that end we will act on any
massage establishment that offers
acts of prostitution, Callagy said in
a prepared statement.
Prostitution arrest at San Mateo day spa
Around the nation
REUTERS
Barack Obama speaks about the rising costs of student loans while at the
University of Iowa.
STATE/NATION 8
Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Donna Cassata
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON The House
ignored Obama administration
objections Thursday and approved
legislation aimed at helping stop
electronic attacks on critical U.S.
infrastructure and private companies.
On a bipartisan vote of 248-168,
the GOP-controlled House backed
the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and
Protection Act, which would encour-
age companies and the federal gov-
ernment to share information collect-
ed on the Internet to prevent elec-
tronic attacks from cybercriminals,
foreign governments and terrorists.
This is the last bastion of things
we need to do to protect this coun-
try, Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Mich.,
chairman of the House Intelligence
Committee, said after more than ve
hours of debate.
More than 10 years after the Sept.
11 terrorist attacks, proponents cast
the bill as an initial step to deal with
an evolving threat of the Internet age.
The information sharing would be
voluntary to avoid imposing new
regulations on businesses, an imper-
ative for Republicans.
The legislation would allow the
government to relay cyber threat
information to a company to prevent
attacks from Russia or China. In the
private sector, corporations could
alert the government and provide
data that could stop an attack intend-
ed to disrupt the countrys water sup-
ply or take down the banking system.
The Obama administration has
threatened a veto of the House bill,
preferring a Senate measure that
would give the Homeland Security
Department the primary role in over-
seeing domestic cybersecurity and
the authority to set security stan-
dards. That Senate bill remains
stalled.
House Speaker John Boehner, R-
Ohio, said the administrations
approach was misguided.
The White House believes the
government ought to control the
Internet, government ought to set
standards and government ought to
take care of everything thats needed
for cybersecurity, Boehner told
reporters at his weekly news confer-
ence. Theyre in a camp all by
themselves.
Faced with widespread privacy
concerns, Rogers and Rep. C.A.
Dutch Ruppersberger of
Maryland, the Intelligence panels
top Democrat, pulled together an
amendment that limits the govern-
ments use of threat information to
ve specic purposes: cybersecurity;
investigation and prosecution of
cybersecurity crimes; protection of
individuals from death or serious
bodily harm; protection of minors
from child pornography; and the pro-
tection of national security.
The House passed the amendment,
410-3.
House OKs cybersecurity bill despite veto threat
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO Google is
firing back at the Federal
Communications Commission on an
investigation that led to a $25,000
fine against the Internet search
leader.
In a letter sent Thursday, Google
Inc. disputed the reason for the ne.
The FCC contends Google impeded
an agency investigation into whether
the company had violated U.S. laws
by collecting personal information
transmitted over unsecured Wi-Fi
networks while photographing
neighborhoods from 2007 to 2010
for the Street View feature on its
mapping service.
Google blames the FCC for drag-
ging out an investigation that lasted
17 months. In its letter, Google said
it regularly responded to the FCCs
requests, but sometimes didnt hear
back from the agency for seven to
12 weeks.
Google firing back at FCC
after Wi-Fi investigation
By Judy Lin
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO A bill that
would allow the governor to attend
closed-door meetings with city
councils, boards of supervisors and
other local elected bodies passed
unanimously out of the state
Assembly on Thursday.
The bill would apply to an exemp-
tion in the states open meetings law
that allows local ofcials to meet
privately to discuss public threats.
It was intro-
duced at the
request of the
Los Angeles
County Board
of Supervisors,
after the board
was found to
have violated
the open meet-
ings law last
September. Thats when the board
met with Gov. Jerry Brown to dis-
cuss his plan to shift certain inmates
from state to county oversight.
The discussion was held privately
despite complaints that it should
have been public.
Last week, the county agreed to
pay $14,750 in legal fees to settle a
lawsuit led by Californians Aware,
a statewide advocacy group, and
acknowledged the meeting should
have been public.
On Thursday, lawmakers passed
AB1736 by Assemblyman Cameron
Smyth, R-Santa Clarita, on a 51-0
vote, sending it to the Senate.
Bill lets governor, local officials meet privately
The White House believes the government
ought to control the Internet, government ought to set
standards and government ought to take care of everything
thats needed for cybersecurity....Theyre in a camp all by themselves.
House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio
Jerry Brown
OPINION 9
Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
Thanks for San Bruno coverage
Editor,
Thank you for your strong editorials
about the school closures in the San Bruno
School District, we could not have kept it
open without your articles. Also thanks to
Heather Murtagh who has written fair arti-
cles on this issue, she has a bright future
ahead of her. I was impressed that she
stayed at the school board meetings all the
way to the end and was still able to meet
her deadlines. Now the work falls on all of
us as parents in the San Bruno School
District to help the school district through
fund raisers and grants, the road ahead is
not easy but what road is. I believe this will
help unify all of the schools instead of
being pitted against each other.
Thanks for your support.
Joe and Michele Lynch
San Bruno, Crestmoor Elementary
Waiting to Occupy
Editor,
Regardless of Occupys good intentions,
in Redwood City they appear to have
missed the point. It seems to me that the
goal here is to provide several thousand
new housing units in an area that desperate-
ly needs places for people to live without
commuting from Stockton. In practice,
these homes and businesses (which will
provide some much needed employment),
will draw from current Redwood City and
Peninsula residents freeing up their previ-
ous homes for additional housing, most
probably at lower prices.
I believe the governments involved in this
project should be helpers their responsi-
bilities include providing vital services,
physically moving the community forward,
improving the lifestyles of their habitants
and doing no or minimal harm in the
process. The council should be focused on
the effects of traffic, water and sewage,
flood control and other similar matters so
the market can determine if the builder is
producing quality products at attractive
prices. No one will force people to live
there.
The benefits to the city and its environs
in taxes and infrastructure are simply not
obtainable via other means. Council: Do
your homework with speed and accuracy
and let us decide if we want to live there.
Robert M. Berger
San Mateo
Telling it like it is
Editor,
Kudos to Redwood City Councilman Ian
Bain for finally telling the truth in his April
19 guest perspective Advisory vote is the
right thing to do. When it comes to the
City Councils responsibility to consider
Cargills frightening plan for the Redwood
City Bayfront, Bain made clear that the
council has the right to stop consideration
of the project. This is because the salt
ponds that Cargill owns and hopes to build
on is not zoned for housing, They have no
legal right to do anything but keep making
salt.
Many people have been pointing this fact
out for years, as Cargill has sought to
intimidate the city into reviewing and
approving their shockingly inappropriate
vision. Unfortunately, our city issued a mis-
leading statement years ago claiming the
opposite, that the city was required to ini-
tiate the approval process on Cargills plan
And Redwood City has never corrected the
record. But at least now one of the coun-
cilmembers has admitted the truth.
Judith Borcz
Redwood City
Conflict of interest
Editor,
With all due respect to Councilman Ian
Bain, his recent claim of pointing out the
ongoing conflict of interest his colleague
Rosanne Foust has on the Cargill Bay fill
plan is politics of personal destruction is
way off base.
Councilwoman Foust is on notice that she
violated state law repeatedly in 2008-10
when, as mayor, she initiated the approval
process for the Cargill project. With respect
to the massively controversial Bay fill plan,
Foust was warned by the California Fair
Political Practices Commission not to use
her official position in any way.
At the April 9 Redwood City Council
meeting, Councilwoman Foust defiantly
thumbed her nose at the FPPC, again inter-
vening directly into the debate over the
project, singing Cargills praises, even
claiming that she is recused on this issue
merely because Ive been dinged.
State conflict of interest laws are not
something to make light of; our public offi-
cials do need to obey the law. I am grateful
that there are residents with the courage to
call it like they see it, because the violation
here again is clear. Foust barely escaped
being fined in 2010, and so Ill be surprised
if she isnt fined this time in what looks
like politics of personal self-destruction.
Adrian Brandt
Redwood City
The process?
Editor,
Redwood City Councilwoman Rosanne
Fousts suggestion that the city vote this
November on Cargills Bayfill proposal
raises a lot of questions.
First, why would the City Council change
course after years of hiding behind the
claim that no true opinions can be formed
on the issue until the entire approval
process runs its course? (The City Council
has remained silent while the entire Bay
Area debates the project the biggest
development on San Francisco Bay in 50
years). Very likely, Cargill and DMB do not
like the constant stream of criticism that
has turned their project into a pariah.
Second, was not the councilmember told
that further involvement with the project
was a violation of state conflict of interest
laws? Her employer, the San Mateo County
Economic Development Association (SAM-
CEDA) is a central booster of the project,
regardless of its environmental impacts.
Third, is it legal to vote on just vague
project benefits (in the words of
Councilwoman Rosanne Foust), with all the
many serious impacts yet to be detailed?
Those who supported the council when
they demanded that everybody be patient
and attacked others as supposedly subvert-
ing the process must now be a little con-
fused. I know I am.
Cedric Crocker
Redwood City
District elections
need to be in place
Editor,
Retired San Mateo mayor Sue Lemperts
column, Who will win for supervisor? in
the April 23 edition of the Daily Journal, is
a tutorial on the San Mateo County political
game, but not much more. Endorsements,
labor unions, money and the county power
brokers are the extent of Lemperts discus-
sion. Once again, the county will elect a
supervisor based on an antiquated system
of who you know rather than what you
know.
Lempert did not mention one issue facing
the county or one position that even one
candidate holds. Grant it, positions, values
and ideas are difficult to find when reading
the content on the websites of most of the
candidates. Platitudes is what most throw
out. Keeping children safe, creating jobs
and loving San Mateo County are the easy
themes of most of the campaigns.
This vacuous approach is what county
residents get every election cycle, but its
disappointing coming from a strong woman
who has always held progressive positions
on transit, housing and fairness. The coun-
tys Democratic Party, the unions and the
gang of elected officials who hand out their
jobs to the anointed insiders have held the
county hostage and will continue to do so
until district elections are in place.
Until then, only big money, unions and
the power players will select our represen-
tatives.
Brielle Johnck
Menlo Park
Straighten up
and fly right
I
t started with an email from a reader
concerned that a local fast-food estab-
lishment was not ying the American
ag properly. I read the
email with a hmm, and
left it in my in box. The
next day I had photo
evidence of the estab-
lishments error in their
ways.
The ag, it appeared,
was hanging upside
down. That, I had
learned in elementary
school civics class, was
a no-no, unless, of
course, they were in distress.
So I called over to the establishment and
inquired. No, they were ne, but apparently
they had missed that civics class. The assis-
tant manager told me the ag had been xed
already, a grommet had broken, but when I
explained that the stars (also known as the
union) had to be at the top, she assured me
they would x it right away. No need to call
corporate.
In the meantime, the reader called me in
distress because they had also told him the
ag was xed but it was still hanging upside
down.
So I called back and asked again. The
assistant manager told me the ag had
already been xed and that everything was
OK. It was kind of a busy day for me, and I
just wanted her to x the ag, knowing that a
call to corporate would eventually x it but
would just lead to a series of unnecessary
calls. So I explained again that the stars had
to be on top. She told me they would x it.
Moments later, I got a call from the reader
telling me the ag was xed and all was
well.
But really? Did it take multiple calls from
a regular citizen and a newspaper editor to
get the establishment to y the ag right-side
up? I guess so.
It leads to another discussion about the
ag. No one is required to y the ag, but I
think if you do, or own a establishment that
wants to y one, perhaps everyone there
should be brought up to speed on the rules.
I y a ag at my house on national holi-
days and on other days when I get to it. Im
proud to live in the United States of America.
I take it down before nightfall because those
are the rules, right? Doesnt everyone know
the rules?
Apparently not.
So for everyone who needs a refresher,
here are the basics:
The ag should only be own from sunrise
to sunset, unless it is illuminated at night. It
should not be own in poor weather, except
for an all-weather ag. It should never be
displayed with the union down, except as a
sign of distress. And the ag should never be
allowed to touch anything beneath it, includ-
ing the ground, water, the oor or merchan-
dise.
There are many other rules for the ag in
certain ceremonies and events, but like I said,
those are the basics. So if you do decide to
y the ag, please do so with honor.
***
A story last week about local farmers mar-
kets neglected to mention two including
the one at the San Mateo Event Center on
Wednesdays and at the College of San Mateo
on Saturdays. Both are popular, and probably
should have been mentioned. Perhaps its
like when an actor thanks everyone at the
Academy Awards but forgets to mention his
wife.
No slight intended, just an oversight.
***
U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo,
endorsed East Palo Alto Councilman Carlos
Romero for District Four supervisor in what
is now a seven-person race after East Palo
Alto Mayor David Woods is off the ballot.
Thats a big grab for Romero.
Jon Mays is the editor in chief of the Daily
Journal. He can be reached at jon@smdai-
lyjournal.com.
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BUSINESS 10
Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 13,204.62 +0.87% 10-Yr Bond 1.959 -1.26%
Nasdaq3,050.61 +0.69% Oil (per barrel) 104.040001
S&P 500 1,399.98 +0.67% Gold 1,656.60
By Christina Rexrode
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK On a day that
brought both good and bad news about
the economy, investors chose to see the
glass as half-full.
U.S. stocks edged higher Thursday,
pushed up by a batch of bright earnings
reports and encouraging news about
home sales. In the fight for investors
attention, those upbeat signs muscled
out a disappointing report on unem-
ployment claims, mixed results on
European markets and weakness at big-
name companies like Aetna, UPS and
Dow Chemical.
The Dow Jones industrial average
rose 113.90 points to 13,204.62. The
Standard & Poors 500 climbed 9.29
points to 1,399.98. The index momen-
tarily flitted above 1,400 in the late
afternoon, its first foray past that psy-
chological barrier in three weeks. The
Nasdaq composite index rose 20.98
points to 3,050.61.
The National Association of Realtors
reported that the number of contracts to
buy homes is rising, which pushed up
the stocks of home builders like
PulteGroup and Lennar. Companies
like Lockheed Martin, the aerospace
and defense contractor, and Starwood
Hotels, which runs chains including
Westin and Sheraton, climbed after
beating analysts predictions for first-
quarter earnings. Amazon.com rose 1.6
percent during the trading day, then
reported much-higher-than-expected
earnings after the close. Its stock blast-
ed nearly 14 percent higher around 5
p.m.
Still, investors didnt need to look far
to find problems, or at least confusion,
looming on the horizon.
In the U.S., the government reported
that the number of people seeking
unemployment benefits was little
changed last week, stoking more uncer-
tainty about when and if companies will
return to pre-recession levels of hiring.
John De Clue, global investment
strategist at U.S. Banks wealth man-
agement business in Minneapolis, was
watching the yield on 10-year Italian
bonds tick up. That means the Italian
government is paying more to persuade
investors to hold its bonds, a sign that
investors are worried about Italys abil-
ity to repay its debts.
De Clue described the situation in
Europe as two steps forward and one
step back.
Market sent higher
Wall Street
Stocks that moved substantially or traded
heavily Thursday on the New York Stock
Exchange and Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
United Parcel Service Inc.,down $1.40 at $78.25
The package delivery company said its rst-
quarter prot rose 6 percent, but the results
were below Wall Streets expectations.
Aetna Inc., down $4.05 at $45.31
The health insurer said that its rst-quarter prot
fell 13 percent,and its adjusted earnings missed
Wall Street expectations.
The Dow Chemical Co., down $1.23 at $34.85
The chemical maker said that its rst-quarter
earnings fell 50 percent due to restructuring
costs related to closing some of its plants.
AstraZeneca PLC, down $2.55 at $43.36
The British drug maker announced that its chief
executive is retiring as it reported a 44 percent
drop in rst-quarter net income.
Liz Claiborne Inc., up $1.20 at $13.88
The clothing company said that its rst-quarter
loss narrowed as sales of its Kate Spade and
Lucky Brands goods strengthened.
Skechers USA Inc., up $2.04 at $16.96
The footwear maker reported a loss in its rst
quarter, but the companys results came in
ahead of Wall Street expectations.
Nasdaq
Ancestry.com Inc., up $1.27 at $25.71
The family history website said Wednesday that
it will acquire its rival, Archives.com, for about
$100 million in cash and assumed liabilities.
Equinix Inc., up $19.81 at $169.28
The Redwood City, Calif.-based data center
operator on Wednesday reported rst-quarter
earnings and revenue above Wall Streets
expectations.
Big movers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HIV drug maker Gilead Sciences
Inc.s prot dropped 32 percent in the
rst quarter on costs related to its pur-
chase of hepatitis C drug developer
Pharmasset Inc.
Foster City-based Gilead said
Thursday that its profit fell to $442 mil-
lion, or 57 cents per share, from $651.1
million, or 80 cents per share. The com-
pany bought Pharmasset in January for
$11.1 billion, and its results in the first
quarter included $193.9 million, or 25
cents per share, in costs related to the
deal. Excluding those charges and other
one-time items, Gilead said it earned 91
cents per share. Revenue rose 19 per-
cent, to $2.28 billion from $1.93 bil-
lion.
Analysts expected the company to
report a prot of 93 cents per share on
$2.2 billion in revenue, according to
FactSet.
After buying Pharmasset, Gilead has
as stable of experimental hepatitis C
treatments including GS-7977, a pill that
is as especially promising. Doctors may
be able to prescribe GS-7977 as part of a
regimen that does not include interferon,
an injection that is a staple of hepatitis C
treatment that causes difficult side
effects.
The hepatitis C virus can cause life-
threatening liver damage, and it is the
main reason for patients needing liver
transplants in the United States. Analysts
expect it to become a bigger health prob-
lem as baby boomers age.
Gilead said sales of its HIV drug
Atripla rose 19 percent to $887.6 mil-
lion. Sales of Truvada grew 13 percent to
$758.3 million and revenue from Viread
increased 14 percent to $191.7 million.
The company also reported $52.2 mil-
lion in sales of Complera and Eviplera,
which were approved in late 2011. Most
of the improvement came from greater
sales in the U.S.
Shares of Gilead Sciences fell 7 cents
to $52.65 in after-hours trading follow-
ing the report. They had risen 15 cents to
$52.72 in regular trading.
Gilead Sciences 1Q profit down
By Samantha Bomkamp
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ATLANTA UPS said Thursday that
its rst-quarter prot rose 6 percent, but
the result came in below Wall Streets
expectations as Asian exports and other
international shipments slowed.
United Parcel Service Inc., the worlds
largest package company, said net
income rose to $970 million, or $1 per
share, from $915 million, or 91 cents per
share.
Revenue rose 4.4 percent to $13.14
billion.
Analysts expected net income of
$1.02 per share and revenue of $13.3 bil-
lion, according to FactSet.
Much of UPS prot growth came
from its core U.S. business, where rev-
enue was up 6.1 percent on higher vol-
ume and prices. But that was offset by a
shift toward lighter packages and slower
shipping methods. UPS is handling more
e-commerce packages from online busi-
nesses directly to consumers, which tend
to be lighter and cheaper to ship.
UPS, based in Atlanta, also said that
online sales drove some of its speedy
shipping options, including next day air.
Ground volume rose 4 percent on
demand for lightweight, less expensive
shipments.
International revenue was up just 2.3
percent to $2.97 billion, and revenue per
package fell. Asian exports have slowed
as Chinas economy cools. And some
European countries are sliding into
recession. The international business,
which had been racking up double-digit
quarterly sales gains, has been slowing
since last summer.
UPS said part of the reason that ship-
ments from Asia to the U.S. are down is
that some businesses are locating facto-
ries in Mexico or other countries closer
to home, to keep a tighter handle on
inventory. Still, Chief Financial Ofcer
Kurt Kuehn said in an interview that vol-
umes within Asia and between countries
in Europe were surprisingly strong.
Some strength in Europe bodes well for
the company, which in March offered
$6.77 billion to buy Dutch rival TNT
Express, by far the biggest deal ever for
UPS.
Exxon Mobil 1Q
profit drops 11 percent
NEW YORK It was an especially
tough quarter for Exxon Mobil.
The company produced less oil and
natural gas. Prots dropped at its chemi-
cal plants and U.S. reneries. And its
overall net income fell 11 percent, the
rst decline in quarterly earnings since
late 2009.
The results, announced Thursday, sig-
naled a tough year ahead for Exxon and
the rest of the petroleum industry. Even
after spending billions of dollars hunting
for oil at the bottom of the ocean, in the
frigid waters of the Arctic and deep
underground in North American shale
rock, Big Oil is failing to keep up with
growing world oil and gas demand.
When you get as big as Exxon, its
hard to keep growing, said Blake
Fernandez, an analyst with Howard Weil
Inc. Theres only so many projects you
can take on at the same time.
On top of that, the cost of oil, which
rose 14 percent in the U.S. during the
quarter, kept Exxon from earning bigger
prots on the chemicals and gasoline it
sold.
Zynga reports 1Q
net loss, higher revenue
NEW YORK Online games compa-
ny Zynga reported a net loss in the rst
quarter because of stock-compensation
expenses, but adjusted earnings were
better than Wall Street expected.
Zynga Inc. said Thursday that net loss
was $85.4 million, or 12 cents per share,
in the January-March period. It had
earnings of $16.8 million a year earlier
when it was still a private company.
Zynga went public in December.
The companys adjusted earnings of 6
cents per share beat Wall Streets expec-
tations by a penny.
UPS 1Q profit up, international business slows
Business briefs
JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL
Carlmonts Corey Pang hits a return during his match against Burlingames Scott Taggart in the nal of the PAL championship singles match.
Pang beat Taggart 6-2, 6-1 to cap a 4-0 run in the tournament. He won his rst three matches by scores of 6-0, 6-0.
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Apparently, dominant is a four-letter
word.
And its spelled P-A-N-G.
Carlmonts Corey Pang is the Peninsula
Athletic League individual champion by
storming through the bracket and eventually
taking down Burlingames Scott Taggart 6-2,
6-1 in the Fridays nal.
Up until the nal, Pang won 36 straight
games, beating three different opponents 6-0,
6-0.
And come the championship match with
Taggart, there simply was no denying Pang.
It feel pretty good after a long season,
Pang said, especially after him getting me
last time. I get this one.
Pang was referring to an April 16 defeat at
the hands of a then red-hot Taggart. The
Burlingame No. 1 singles player outlasted
Pang 6-7(4), 6-2, 7-6 (1) to pick up his biggest
win of the year.
Last time, I wasnt in it mentally, Pang
said. I let my emotions get to me. And once I
started getting upset, I started losing con-
dence in my strokes and he just outplayed me
then.
Both times, Corey played really well,
Taggart said. Last match, when I beat him, it
as a close match. We went back and forth but
I pulled it out. This game, he played really
well. I came into it a little nervous rst
nals for high school tennis. He just stayed
solid. Hes a really good player, stayed in it. I
Pang pulverizes PAL field
Menlo-Athertons Giordano and Brown capture the doubles championship
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA Just for fun,
general manager Trent Baalke wrote
A.J. Jenkins name on a piece of
paper and put it in an envelope. If all
went according to plan, he would be
San Franciscos selection with the
30th pick in the NFL draft.
Turns out Jenkins was still on the
board Thursday
night and the
Illinois wide
receiver had no
idea he would be
a first-rounder.
In fact, his sister
had to get him
from the bath-
room when the
49ers called,
and he sprinted
to the phone.
Im out of words right now, said
Jenkins, whose ability to play sever-
al spots in Jim Harbaughs offense
put him high on the Niners list. I
thought it was the perfect t to be
honest. I didnt think the phone call
was going to come so soon. Im
honored and Im blessed. Its crazy.
The 49ers took another step to
boost their suddenly deep receiving
corps by adding Jenkins.
He will join a unit that already
features Randy Moss, Mario
Manningham and Michael Crabtree
on the reigning NFC West champion
49ers, who went 13-3 to end an
eight-year playoff drought before
losing in overtime of the NFC title
game to the eventual Super Bowl
champion New York Giants.
Jenkins had 90 catches last season
for 1,276 yards and eight touch-
downs.
San Francisco has all 11 defensive
starters back. This became a drasti-
cally different draft for Baalke,
whose selections the past two years
became immediate impact players
offensive linemen Anthony
Davis and Mike Iupati in 2010 and
then linebacker Aldon Smith, who
had 14 sacks last season as a rookie.
You let the board speak, best
player available. We had an oppor-
tunity to trade back and chose not
to, Baalke said. Had we decided
to trade back theres a good chance
we would have lost him.
Jenkins visited the 49ers earlier
this month and told his agent it was
his best meeting of all after also
speaking to the Baltimore Ravens,
the Jaguars he grew up rooting for in
Jacksonville, Kansas City, Detroit
and St. Louis.
Not only did he ace Harbaughs
standard sports quiz for potential
players questions such as the
name of Green Bays stadium and
who won the Heisman Trophy two
years ago, Jenkins recalled he
impressed with his route-running
ability and speed. He ran a 4.31 40-
yard dash at the NFL combine in
February.
Everything lined up, Harbaugh
said. Trent put his name in an enve-
lope and said, This is the guy were
going to pick, and it held true. Hes
a strong, tough player.
The Niners owned their lowest
pick since choosing 31st in 2004,
when former general manager Terry
Donahue traded down twice from
their original 16th spot.
On Friday, San Francisco has the
61st overall pick in the second
round and then No. 92 in the third
round.
49ers go on the offensive
By Barry Wilner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Andrew Luck
knew exactly where he was heading
and the daunting task he faces.
So did Robert Grifn III.
What the NFL draft lacked in sur-
prise and suspense with its top two
picks, it certainly delivered in chal-
lenges for the leagues newest stars.
Luck, the Stanford quarterback
and overall No.
1, heads for
I n d i a n a p o l i s
where he must
replace Peyton
Manning, who
merely won four
MVP awards
and a Super
Bowl. RGIII
answers the call
in Washington,
where he will try to soothe a devout
but highly critical fan base.
You dont really replace a guy
like that, Luck said. You cant.
You just try to do the best you can.
Obviously, he was my hero growing
up.
His selection as the top pick was
hardly a stunner. The Colts informed
Luck last week that Commissioner
Roger Goodell would announce his
name rst. Right behind him was
Grifn; no suspense attached to that
pick, either.
After being
loudly booed at
the outset,
Goodell told a
raucous crowd at
Radio City
Music Hall that
the season
begins tonight,
so lets kick if
off. Then he did, congratulating
Luck while the crowd chanted
RG3, RG3.
Luck left the stage, slapped hands
with some fans in Colts shirts and
headed to the interview room.
I realize you could go crazy try-
ing to measure yourself to Peyton
Manning every day. That would be
an insane way to live, Luck said. I
know his legendary status, really.
Huge shoes to try and ll if youre
trying to do that. ... If one day I can
be mentioned alongside Peyton as
one of the football greats, that would
be a football dream come true.
To get Grifn, Washington dealt a
second-round pick this year and its
rst-rounders in 2013 and 14 to St.
Louis to move up four spots. But
they wound up with the Baylor QB
who beat out Luck for the Heisman
Trophy.
Dressed in a light blue suit that
Luck, RGIII go
1-2 in NFL Draft
<< Pagan stuns Reds in Giants win, page 13
PAL track championships begin today, page 13
Friday, April 27, 2012
GOING OUT WITH A BANG: SAN MATEO SWIMMER CHEN SETS SCHOOL RECORD IN 100 BACK IN WIN OVER HILLSDALE >>> PAGE 12
See TENNIS, Page 14
Andrew Luck
Robert Griffin
See DRAFT, Page 14
A.J. Jenkins caught 90 passes for
over 1,200 yards and eight
touchdowns for University of Illinois
last season.
A.J. Jenkins
SPORTS 12
Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
With one more swim meet in the
pool hes own for the better part of
four years, San Mateos Ronald
Chen wanted to go out with a bang.
As it turned out, it was a bang of
historic proportions.
The Bearcats senior crushed his
own school record in the 100 back-
stroke with a time of 53.57. Chens
record-breaking performance was
the highlight of San Mateos 82.5-
76.5 win over inner-city rival
Hillsdale to close out the Peninsula
Athletic League Ocean Division
schedule.
It felt good, Chen said of his
record-breaking mark. Its always
nice to have someone race next to
you. Javier (Rosas) is really fast so
it was nice to race him. I wanted to
break my own school records in the
100 back and the 100 breast. The
100 breast fell a little short because
there wasnt much time to rest in
between. And I wanted to get CCS
200 free relay to qualify for another
one.
Chen won all four events he par-
ticipated in; all of which were
packed in the back end of the meet.
Were usually a better back-half
team compared to other teams.
Were usually losing in the front-
half of the meet and well come
back and win, Chen said.
They were very excited, very
hyped, said San Mateo co-coach
Kathy Parodi. I think that, with
also the opportunity to swim one
last time in their pool and get CCS
times, they did well. They were
mentally and physically prepared.
We couldnt have asked for a better
meet. They knew there was going to
be competition in the pool and I
think they really did their best to
close out some great wins.
The San Mateo boys won nine of
the 12 events on Friday. On the
girls side, the Bearcats slipped past
the Knights 87-83, despite losing 6
of the 11 races.
There was denitely extra hype,
Parodi said. A lot of these kids
know each other, they went to mid-
dle school and elementary school
together so theyre able to say Hi,
whats going on? and still have a
competitive edge in the pool even
though there is still familiarity with
each other. I think that helps in kind
of knowing their competition going
into the pool they know what they
can prepare for.
They both came down to the
nal event, said Hillsdale coach
Mike Amaya. Our boys did fabu-
lously. Once again, we had a couple
boys that were sick and not here
today. We match up well with them
at PALs and were looking forward
to it.
Their girls team is very strong
and we gave it a good shot. We had
two girls sick today. We think well
do better at PALs next week, he
said.
Before Chen could shine, his
teammate Jack Halet had himself a
day.
Halet posted Central Coast
Section qualifying times in the 200
individual medley (2:07.57) and the
500 freestyle (4:56.91).
After coming out of the pool in
the 500, Halet joined Chen along
with Perry Liu and Tom McCall in
winning the 200 freestyle relay.
Chen followed that with wins in
the 100 back stroke and breast
stroke, and anchored the clinching
400 freestyle relay.
Ronald had a fantastic day,
Parodi said. They knew coming in
it was going to be a tough meet, but
they knew going into the back half
of the meet that Ronald had four
events, so they knew everything
played in their favor and were going
to have a phenomenal meet and a
great ending for him as a senior.
Im denitely sad about leaving
San Mateo, said Chen, who will be
swimming for Columbia University
next year. IIve really enjoyed it for
the past four years and Im going to
miss this pool a lot.
He is a very strong and very
powerful swimmer, Amaya said of
Chen. Our boys are a little bit
younger and are gaining the experi-
ence to swim against people like
that on a regular basis. I have no
doubt that Javier (Rosas) and Erik
(Garcia) are the Ronalds of the
future.
Garcia and Rosas teamed up in
the 200 medley relay with Vicente
Chisholm and Daniel Amaya for a
winning time of 1:51.36.
Rosas picked up a win in the 200
freestyle. Chisholm took the other
Knights win in the 50 freestyle.
On the girls side, Helena Alfajora
and Lesley Chiang had solid days
for Hillsdale in their loss.
Alfajora, Chiang, Darya Shtykalo
and Alicia Ross won the 200 medley
relay in 2:05.34.
Alfajora took the 100 back stroke
as well. Chiang picked up a win in
the 200 freestyle and both had
another win in them as part of the
200 freestyle relay team. Ross also
won the 50 free.
But San Mateo was strongest top
to bottom. Julia Hansen paced the
Bearcats with a win in the 100
breast stroke. She also won the 200
IM and was part of the clinching
400 freestyle relay team that includ-
ed Samantha Low, Priscilla Law
and Diane Liu.
Chen ends regular season with a flourish
JULIO LARA/DAILY JOURNAL
SanMateos Ron Chen won four events, including the 100 breast stroke,
Thursday as the Bearcats beat Hillsdale in the nal duel meet of the
season. Chen also broke the school record in the 100 back stroke.
SPORTS 13
Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
1941 El Camino Real, San Mateo
650-574-0505 | www.heidipies.com
CCLC Franklin | CCLC Lincoln | CCLC Roosevelt
650-697-7900 | www.cclc.com
rbracci@cclc.com areinisch@cclc.com
24 Second Avenue San Mateo, CA 94401
info@peninsulafamilyservice.org
AMANDA NYGARD JERRY SCHWAB
San Mateo
KAYLA WAYNE
Redwood City
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CINCINNATI Angel Pagan made the
Giants long trip home a little easier.
Pagan hit a three-run homer in the ninth
inning Thursday, lifting the San Francisco
Giants to a 6-5 win over the Cincinnati Reds.
We were all pumped when I got back to the
bench, Pagan said. We were thinking about a
happy ight home.
The Giant avoided a three-game sweep and
snapped a seven-game losing streak at Great
American Ball Park.
It was one of those games that save your
sanity, Giants manager Bruce Bochy said.
Joaquin Arias, who was called up
Wednesday when Aubrey Huff was placed on
the disabled list with an anxiety disorder, led
off the ninth against Cincinnati closer Sean
Marshall (0-2) with a walk, and Ryan Theriot
followed with a single. After pinch-hitter Brett
Pill struck out, Pagan lofted a 1-2 pitch 386
feet into the left eld seats.
Pagan was ready for the curveball after strik-
ing out against Marshall on the pitch
Wednesday night.
I knew he was going to
throw it again, Pagan said.
I had to make an adjust-
ment. I swung at one in the
dirt last night. This one was
in the strike zone.
The curveballs been a
good pitch for me, said
Marshall, who blew his
rst save after converting
four opportunities. Ive gotten some outs with
it. The ball hung in the middle of the plate. He
didnt get a good swing on it. What hurts is the
guys played so well.
Javier Lopez (2-0) allowed two hits but no
runs in the eighth to earn the win. Santiago
Casilla struck out the side in the ninth for his
second save.
Casilla is replacing Brian Wilson, who will
miss the rest of the season with an elbow
injury.
You have to throw strikes. Thats number
one, Casilla said. Having six saves last year
helped and I pitched the ninth inning in the
Dominican. When I pitch more I feel better.
Casilla bailed out a bullpen that had a rough
series.
You cant throw the ball any better than
Casilla did, Bochy said. Our bullpen has
been struggling this series, too. We havent
played our best baseball yet.
Jay Bruce hit a two-run home run in the sixth
inning and Scott Rolen led off the seventh with
his second of the season, both in the last two
games.
Giants third baseman Pablo Sandoval went 1
for 5, extending his season-opening hitting
streak to 19 games, a franchise record. He went
into the game tied with Johnny Rucker, who hit
in the rst 18 games of the 1945 season with
the then-New York Giants.
Reds starter Homer Bailey lasted 6 1-3
innings, allowing seven hits and three runs
two earned with two walks and six strike-
outs.
Giants starter Ryan Vogelsong gave up seven
hits and four runs with two walks and ve
strikeouts in six innings.
The Reds took a 2-0 lead in the second on
Devin Mesoracos sacrice y and Baileys
RBI single. The Giants capitalized on shortstop
Zack Cozarts error to tie the score with two
runs in the fourth inning.
Bruce broke the tie with his fourth homer of
the season, a 381-foot shot to right-center eld
that just cleared the glove of the leaping Pagan.
The homer was Bruces rst since hitting two
against the Miami Marlins on April 8.
Pinch-hitter Gregor Blanco came up with a
sacrice y to cut Cincinnatis lead to 4-3 in
the seventh before Rolens 429-foot homer.
NOTES: Marshalls appearance was the
300th of his career. ... The Giants hadnt won in
Cincinnati since a 3-0 win on June 8, 2010. ...
Pagan extended his hitting streak to 11 games
(16 for 52, .308) with a seventh-inning single.
... Giants C Buster Posey went 0 for 3 with a
walk to see his hitting streak snapped at eight
games. ... San Francisco RF Nate Schierholtz
went 0 for 4 to extend his streak of consecutive
hitless at bats to 12.
Giants avoid sweep thanks to Pagans power
Giants 6, Reds 5
Angel Pagan
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The push for track and eld glory begins in
the Peninsula Athletic League as the rst of the
two-day PAL championships starts today with
the trials and three nals at Terra Nova begin-
ning at 4 p.m.
This marks the rst step toward crowning an
individual and overall PAL champions, with
the PAL nals set for May 5 at Terra Nova as
well. It also marks the beginning of the quali-
fying process for those few athletes who will
be eligible to compete in the Central Coast
Section and state championships.
And has been the case the last several sea-
son, many PAL track coaches expect the team
title to come down to the last event of the day.
Its a pretty potent eld, said Frank Hunt,
Aragons distance coach and longtime PAL
track and eld gure. Many schools have dif-
ferent strengths, but its the one (school) who
has the overall balance that is the difference in
the meet (in determining a team champion).
Before a champion is crowned, however,
they must rst qualify for the second week.
For the elite athletes, the trials are all about
qualifying for next weeks nals. But for the
vast majority of track and eld athletes, the tri-
als could represent their nal competition of
the season.
For some, it might be the last time they per-
form, said Ron DiMaggio, Westmoors long-
time coach. The goal is to give their max-
imum effort, get a [personal record]. If it gets
them into the nals, thats awesome. But being
it could be the last one, make it the best one
ever.
The trials today encompass all the running
events, except the relays and the 3,200. The
top nine runners in of all the heats combined
advance to the championship round.
In the eld events, three nals will be con-
tested on both days. Todays eld nals are:
boys long jump, pole vault and discus; and the
girls long jump, high jump and shot put. Next
week, the triple jump replaces the long jump
and the other sports ip op.
The PAL has dozens of athletes highly
ranked in CCS and, based solely off their best
times and distances of the season, there could
be a number of athletes representing the league
at the section meet assuming they qualify
for the PAL nals. Athletes cannot compete
past the league championships or beyond
if they dont make it to the championship
round.
The whole secret of this meet (the trials) is
to get to the nals, Hunt said.
Just because a runner or jumper has a strong
qualifying time or distance, it doesnt guaran-
tee them a spot in the nals. A favorite in the
hurdles clips a hurdle and falls during his qual-
ifying heat, the leagues leading shot putter
fouls on all her attempts.
Just like that, their season is over.
You can have the best time in the state, but
if you dont get out of your (league) trials, you
cant go (to the state meet), Hunt said.
Added DiMaggio: It does happen (to have
a favorite fail to qualify for the nals) because
youre dealing with kids 14, 15, 16 years
old. Some are going to run incredible and jump
incredible and t4
row incredible. Others might not do as well.
Not all the time do you get the favorite make
it.
Unlike previous years, admission will be
charged to watch both the trials and nals.
Adult tickets are $6, with senior citizens being
charged $4. High school students with a stu-
dent body card pay $2 without the identi-
cation, its $6. Children 6 to 12 are also $2 dol-
lars.
Qualifying for track finals begins today
The whole secret of this meet (the trials) is to get to the nals.
Frank Hunt, Aragon distance coach
SPORTS 14
Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Paul Larson


MILLBRAE I
recently attended a
family funeral in
Southern California.
The burial took
place at a long
established Catholic
Cemetery which
later decided to build a Mortuary facility on
their property. I knew from past experience
that this cemetery was well maintained and
had a good reputation. The immediate
family had other loved-ones buried at the
cemetery and wished to return this time too.
With the knowledge that this cemetery had a
Mortuary on the grounds they trusted it to be
convenient and decided to have this facility
handle the funeral arrangements.
Prior to the funeral I had some phone
contact with the Mortuary staff and saw
nothing out of the ordinary. But soon after I
spoke to family members who relayed
troubling details such as higher than average
costs, questionable service and other
apprehensions that raised a red-fag. I
listened carefully taking into consideration
that funerals and arrangements may be
conducted differently in Southern California
(as compared to here on the Peninsula).
Later though I discovered that these
concerns and others were all valid as I
experienced them myself during the funeral.
Coming from the background of owning
a family run and community supportive
funeral home I was embarrassed at what I
saw as a production line process with little
compassion or time to care for the families
this Mortuary is supposed to be serving.
I wondered how the Catholic Church
could allow this Mortuary to operate in such
a manner? Well, I did some research and
discovered that the Archdiocese of Los
Angeles has mortuaries located on a
number of their cemetery properties, but
does not operate them. According to the
Funeral Consumers Alliance of Southern
California the Archdiocese has an
arrangement with Stewart Enterprises
which is a New Orleans based mortuary
corporation. Stewart Enterprises runs a
website called Catholic Mortuaries.com
giving a misleading impression to many that
the Catholic Church operates these facilities.
When patronizing one of these
mortuaries on Catholic cemetery grounds
most families assume that they will be
receiving a level of comfort as they would
from their local church or parish priest.
None of this was evident during my
experience of extremely high costs
(compared to what was received) and the
dis-interested service provided by the
mortuary staff. I dont see this as a failing
of the Catholic cemetery, but of those in
charge of running this mortuary.
The point Im trying to make is to do
your homework and shop for a Funeral
establishment you are comfortable with.
Just because a Mortuary is located on
cemetery property doesnt mean they are
your only choice or that they offer fair costs
or give better quality ofservice. You have
the right to select what ever funeral home
you wish to conduct the arrangements. Talk
to various funeral directors, and ask friends
and families who they would recommend.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Advertisement
just made more errors. I give him props. He
played really well. Thats why hes the No. 1
seed.
[The goal was to be] mentally prepared to
ght. I wasnt expecting him to give it to me
so I had to battle for every point.
Pang played like a man on a mission
throughout the PAL tournament. Fridays
match against Taggart was no exception.
Pang jumped out early in the rst set, win-
ning 6-2 in relatively comfortable fashion.
In the second set, Pang simply overpowered
the very talented Taggart and made the set
look effortless at times.
I was just hoping to get by every match,
Pang said of his tournament efforts. Some of
the scores didnt reect how well some of the
other players played. But, I played the big
points well and thats the difference between
this year and last year.
I tend to play better against guys that are
better than me, Taggart said when asked if
nerves played a serious role in the match. He
rips the ball. Im nervous, but I had less pres-
sure. He just played really well. I just made a
little more errors. He just went in full
strength.
El Caminos Josiah Faustino capped an
impressive run of his own in the PAL tourna-
ment, beating out Menlo-Athertons Nick
Fratt 6-1, 6-3 to take third place.
Faustino loss to Pang in the seminal, but
before then, the Colt was without the benet
of a rst round bye. He beat Stephen Tran of
Oceana, Devon Hughes of Aragon and James
Tanjuatco of Mills to reach the seminal.
On the boys doubles side, the combination
of M-As Matt Giordano and Zeke Brown
bested Carlmonts Matt Sidell and Pete Eakin
7-5, 4-6, 6-2 to capture the PAL doubles title.
Giordano and Brown bounced back nicely
after Sidell and Eakin raced out to a comfort-
able lead in the second set and evened things
up.
But after a brief pow-wow between sets, the
Bears regrouped and their strategy of forcing
the Scots deep worked to perfection.
The Newcombs of Woodside took third
place, defeating Carlmonts usual No. 1 dou-
bles team Ben Knoot and Byron Wu 6-3, 6-1.
College baseball
The College of San Mateo baseball team
closed out their 2012 regular season in winning
fashion, defeating Gavilan 3-1.
Clay Bauer picked up his fourth win of the
year, pitching 5 2-3 innings of ve-hit baseball.
The sophomore struck out three but walked ve.
Ryan Wood pitched a perfect ninth of the save.
Cameron Gniadek had a multi-hit game for
CSM.
The Bulldogs took a 2-0 lead in the fth on
three hits and took advantage of a pair of
Gavilan errors.
Mark Hurley picked up the RBI in that frame.
Gavilan cut that lead in half in their half of the
fth.
But CSM got that run right back on a Jarrett
Costa double.
The Bulldogs nish the regular season at 27-
9 overall and 19-3 in the Coast Conference
Golden Gate division.
They are the outright champions of the divi-
sion, besting West Valley by three games.
CSM goes into the post season ranked No. 2
in Northern California by the California
Community College Baseball Coaches
Association.
Continued from page 11
TENNIS
didnt quite mesh with Redskins burgundy and
gold and wearing socks that t the teams
color scheme and proclaimed GO CATCH
YOUR DREAM Grifn had some trouble
getting the Redskins hat over his braids. He
ended up wearing it just a tad crooked while he
ashed big smiles for photos.
Go catch that dream because a lot of
times when you chase something you never get
to it, he said. So if you say, Hey, Im going
to go catch my dream, youre already telling
yourself that youre going to get it.
RG3 also sang the teams ght song during a
conference call:
Hail to the Redskins! Hail vic-tor-y!
Grifn said. Thats how I felt. It felt that
good.
Less than an hour before Goodell began the
draft, Cleveland and Minnesota pulled off a
trade in what would become a virtual swap
shop, with eight deals on opening night. The
Browns moved up just one spot, from fourth to
third, to ensure getting running back Trent
Richardson of national champion Alabama.
Minnesota received picks in the fourth, fth
and seventh rounds and still was in position to
get one of the elite prospects in this draft with
the fourth spot overall, Southern California
offensive tackle Matt Kalil.
Like Grifn, Richardson was treated to lusty
cheers from the crowd. Unlike Grifn, he had
less trouble placing the Cleveland hat over his
impressive dreads.
This team really wants me, Richardson
said. They aint going to let me slip out of
their hands at all.
Lucks good fortune put him in a similar
position to Stanford predecessors Jim Plunkett,
who won two Super Bowls for the Raiders, and
John Elway, who led Denver to two NFL titles.
He is the fourth consecutive quarterback cho-
sen rst and 12th in the last 15 years, dating
back to Manning.
Elway now runs the Broncos and recently
signed Manning as a free agent after Manning
missed all of last season following neck sur-
gery.
Indianapolis was the only team in the rst
seven picks to stay put.
After Minnesota took Kalil, Jacksonville
jumped up two spots, trading with Florida
neighbor Tampa Bay to get Oklahoma States
Justin Blackmon, the top receiver in this crop.
It just goes to show you that anything can
happen, Blackmon said, referring to the
Jaguars going after him.
St. Louis must have liked dealing down
because the Rams did it again, trading with
Dallas, which was 14th overall. The Cowboys
selected LSUs Morris Claiborne, the top cor-
nerback, adding him to free agent signing
Brandon Carr and shoring up what was a Swiss
cheese secondary.
Continued from page 11
DRAFT
By Ralph D. Russo
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HOLLYWOOD, Fla. College football is
on the verge of nally having a playoff, its
own version of the nal four.
For the rst time, all the power brokers who
run the highest level of the sport are comfort-
able with the idea of deciding a championship
the way its done from pee-wees to pros. And
the way fans have been hoping they would for
years.
Yes, weve agreed to use the P word, Pac-
12 Commissioner Larry Scott said Thursday.
They want to limit it to four teams. Thats
for sure. Now they have to gure out how to
pick the teams, where and when to play the
games and how the bowls do or do not t in.
The new postseason format would go into
effect for the 2014 season.
As for the 14-year-old Bowl Championship
Series, its on life support. Any chance that it
survives past the next two seasons? I hope
not, said Southeastern Conference
Commissioner Mike Slive, who pitched a
four-team playoff four years ago but was shot
down at this same hotel beachside hotel.
This is a seismic change for college foot-
ball, BCS Executive Director Bill Hancock
said after the 11 conference commissioners
and Notre Dames athletic director wrapped
up three days of meetings in south Florida.
That Hancock actually used the word play-
off when describing what was being consid-
ered alone signaled a shift in thinking for the
BCS. In a memo leading up to these meetings,
the term four-team event was used to
describe creating two national seminals and a
championship game.
Hancock said the commissioners will pres-
ent a small number of options for a four-
team playoff to their leagues over the next
month or so at conference meetings. He esti-
mated that between two and seven congura-
tions are being considered.
Itll be up to each conference to determine
which plan it likes best. The commissioners
will get back together in June and try to come
up with a nal version, and eventually the uni-
versity presidents will have to sign off on it.
Hancock has said theyd like a new format
ready for approval by July 4.
And he warned that if no agreement is
reached, the fallback could be sticking with an
overhauled version of the old system, which
aims for a No. 1 vs. No. 2 championship
game.
But thats a longshot.
BCS takes big step toward playoff
SPORTS 15
Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W L Pct GB
y-Boston 39 27 .591
x-New York 36 30 .545 3
x-Philadelphia 35 31 .530 4
Toronto 23 43 .348 16
New Jersey 22 44 .333 17
Southeast Division
W L Pct GB
y-Miami 46 20 .697
x-Atlanta 40 26 .606 6
x-Orlando 37 29 .561 9
Washington 20 46 .303 26
Charlotte 7 59 .106 39
Central Division
W L Pct GB
z-Chicago 50 16 .758
x-Indiana 42 24 .636 8
Milwaukee 31 35 .470 19
Detroit 25 41 .379 25
Cleveland 21 45 .318 29
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W L Pct GB
z-San Antonio 49 16 .754
x-Memphis 41 25 .621 8 1/2
x-Dallas 36 30 .545 13 1/2
Houston 34 32 .515 15 1/2
New Orleans 21 45 .318 28 1/2
Northwest Division
W L Pct GB
y-Oklahoma City 47 19 .712
x-Denver 38 28 .576 9
x-Utah 36 30 .545 11
Portland 28 38 .424 19
Minnesota 26 40 .394 21
PacicDivision
W L Pct GB
y-L.A. Lakers 41 24 .631
x-L.A. Clippers 40 26 .606 1 1/2
Phoenix 33 33 .500 8 1/2
Golden State 23 42 .354 18
Sacramento 21 44 .323 20
x-clinchedplayoff spot
y-clincheddivision
ThursdaysGames
Toronto 98, New Jersey 67
Utah 96, Portland 94
Chicago 107, Cleveland 75
Houston 84, New Orleans 77
Denver 131, Minnesota 102
Memphis 88, Orlando 76
Atlanta 106, Dallas 89
Boston 87, Milwaukee 74
New York 104, Charlotte 84
Detroit 108, Philadelphia 86
Washington 104, Miami 70
San Antonio at Golden State, Late
L.A. Lakers at Sacramento, Late
End regular season
NBA STANDINGS
East Division
W L Pct GB
Washington 14 4 .778
Atlanta 12 7 .632 2 1/2
New York 11 8 .579 3 1/2
Philadelphia 9 10 .474 5 1/2
Miami 7 11 .389 7
Central Division
W L Pct GB
St. Louis 12 7 .632
Cincinnati 9 10 .474 3
Milwaukee 9 10 .474 3
Pittsburgh 8 10 .444 3 1/2
Houston 7 12 .368 5
Chicago 6 13 .316 6
West Division
W L Pct GB
Los Angeles 13 6 .684
San Francisco 10 9 .526 3
Colorado 9 9 .500 3 1/2
Arizona 9 10 .474 4
San Diego 5 14 .263 8

ThursdaysGames
San Francisco 6, Cincinnati 5
N.Y. Mets 3, Miami 2
Washington at San Diego, late
FridaysGames
Chicago Cubs (Maholm 1-2) at Philadelphia (Halla-
day 3-1), 4:05 p.m.
Arizona (J.Saunders 1-1) at Miami (Zambrano 0-1),
4:10 p.m.
Houston (W.Rodriguez 1-2) at Cincinnati (Leake 0-
2), 4:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 1-0) at Atlanta (Hanson 2-
2), 4:35 p.m.
Milwaukee (Gallardo 1-1) at St. Louis (Westbrook
2-1), 5:15 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Schwinden 0-0) at Colorado (Pomeranz
0-1), 5:40 p.m.
Washington(Detwiler 2-0) at L.A.Dodgers(Kershaw
1-0), 7:10 p.m.
San Diego (Luebke 2-1) at San Francisco (Hacker 0-
0), 7:15 p.m.
SaturdaysGames
Milwaukee at St. Louis, 10:05 a.m.
Houston at Cincinnati, 1:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Philadelphia, 4:05 p.m.
Arizona at Miami, 4:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Atlanta, 4:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Colorado, 5:10 p.m.
San Diego at San Francisco, 6:05 p.m.
Washington at L.A. Dodgers, 6:10 p.m.
SundaysGames
Arizona at Miami, 10:10 a.m.
Houston at Cincinnati, 10:10 a.m.
Chicago Cubs at Philadelphia, 10:35 a.m.
Pittsburgh at Atlanta, 10:35 a.m.
NL STANDINGS
East Division
W L Pct GB
Baltimore 12 7 .632
Tampa Bay 12 7 .632
New York 10 8 .556 1 1/2
Toronto 10 9 .526 2
Boston 8 10 .444 3 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cleveland 9 8 .529
Chicago 10 9 .526
Detroit 10 9 .526
Kansas City 5 14 .263 5
Minnesota 5 14 .263 5
West Division
W L Pct GB
Texas 15 4 .789
Oakland 10 10 .500 5 1/2
Seattle 10 10 .500 5 1/2
Los Angeles 6 13 .316 9

ThursdaysGames
Kansas City 4, Cleveland 2
Seattle 5, Detroit 4
Tampa Bay 4, L.A. Angels 3
Baltimore 5,Toronto 2
Boston 10, Chicago White Sox 3
FridaysGames
Detroit (Verlander 2-1) at N.Y.Yankees (Nova 3-0),
4:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels (Weaver 3-0) at Cleveland (Masterson
0-2), 4:05 p.m.
Oakland (McCarthy 0-3) at Baltimore (Arrieta 1-1),
4:05 p.m.
Seattle (Beavan 1-2) at Toronto (R.Romero 3-0),
4:07 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Shields 3-0) at Texas (M.Harrison 3-0),
5:05 p.m.
Boston (Bard 1-2) at Chicago White Sox (Danks 2-
2), 5:10 p.m.
Kansas City (Teaford 0-1) at Minnesota (Pavano 1-
2), 5:10 p.m.
SaturdaysGames
L.A. Angels at Cleveland, 10:05 a.m.
Kansas City at Minnesota, 10:10 a.m.
Detroit at N.Y.Yankees, 1:05 p.m.
Seattle at Toronto, 1:07 p.m.
Oakland at Baltimore, 1:05 p.m.
Boston at Chicago White Sox, 1:10 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Texas, 5:05 p.m.
SundaysGames
Detroit at N.Y.Yankees, 10:05 a.m.
L.A. Angels at Cleveland, 10:05 a.m.
Seattle at Toronto, 10:07 a.m.
Oakland at Baltimore, 10:35 a.m.
AL STANDINGS
BOYS SWIMMING
San Mateo 82.5, Hillsdale 76.5
200 Medley relay Hillsdale (Garcia, Rosas,
Chisolm, Amaya) 1:51.36; 200 free Rosas
(H) 1:55.81; 200 IM Halet (SM) 2:07.57
(CCS qualifying time); 50 free Chisolm
(H) 24.56; 100 fly Babbs (SM) 1:04.60; 100
free McCall (SM) 56.18; 500 free Halet
(SM) 4:56.91 (CCS qualifying time); 200 free
relay San Mateo (McCall, Halet, Liu, Chen)
1:35.73; 100 back Chen (SM) 53.57 (new
school record); 100 breast Chen (SM)
59.90; 400 free relay San Mateo (Halet,
McCall, Barhoumi, Chen) 3:39.10.
GIRLS SWIMMING
San Mateo 87, Hillsdale 83
200 medley relay Hillsdale (Alfajora, Chi-
ang, Shytkalo, Ross) 2:05.34; 200 free
Chiang (H) 2:13.14; 200 IM Hansen (SM)
2:22.69; 50 free Ross (H) 28.05; 100 fly
Low (SM) 1:10.12, 100 free Chiang (H)
59.43; 500 free Cerda (SM) 6:47.67; 200
free relay Hillsdale (Ross, Alfajora,
Chaing, Palisoc) 1:509.72; 100 back Al-
fajora (H) 1:08.49; 100 breast Hansen
(SM) 1:13.38; 400 free relay San Mateo
(D. Liu, Low, Law, Hansen).
WEDNESDAY
BASEBALL
Burlingame 5, Terra Nova 4
Burlingame 000 003 2 5 9 0
Terra Nova 000 400 0 4 5 1
WP Goodman (5-0). LP Sehgal (6-1).
3B Casperson ( TN). 2B Goodman 3
(B); Manessis ( TN). Multiple hits Good-
man 3, Arobio 2 (B); Manessis 2 ( TN).
Multiple RBI Casperson 3 ( TN). Records
Burlingame 7-2 PAL Bay, 14-5 overall;
Terra Nova 6-3, 15-6.
Carlmont 6, El Camino 5
El Camino 110 200 1 5 6 0
Carlmont 150 000 x 6 9 2
WP Bongi (1-1, 2-4). S Collins. LP
Mack. Multiple hits Moncada 2 (EC);
Haake 2, Barret 2 (C). Multiple RBI Bo-
lentini 2 (EC); Barret 2 (C). Records
Carlmont 4-5 PAL Bay, 111-9 overall.
Menlo School 7, Pinewood 0
Menlo 500 002 0 7 10 3
Pinewood 000 000 0 0 6 0
WP Batchelder (7-4). LP Bell. HR
Batchelder (MS). 2B Stratford (MS); Jones
(P). Multiple hits Batchelder 3, King 2,
Crowder 2 (MS); Fraioli, Jones (P). Multiple
RBI Batchelder 3 (MS). Records Menlo
School 5-0 WBAL, 14-7 overall; Pinewood 2-
3, 9-5.
Kings Academy 2, Sacred Heart Prep 1
SHP 000 100 0 1 4 2
KA 000 020 x 2 4 1
WP Chae. LP Larson. HR Caldwell
(KA). 3B Gomez (KA). 2B Martella
(SHP). Multiple hits none. Multiple RBI
Caldwell 2 (KA). Records Sacred
Heart prep 3-2 WBAL, 12-9-1 overall
LOCAL SCOREBORD
Thursday
First Round
1. Indianapolis, AndrewLuck, qb, Stanford.
2.Washington (from St. Louis), Robert Grifn III, qb,
Baylor.
3. Cleveland (from Minnesota), Trent Richardson,
rb, Alabama.
4.Minnesota (from Cleveland),Matt Kalil,ot,South-
ern Cal.
5. Jacksonville (from Tampa Bay), Justin Blackmon,
wr, Oklahoma State.
6.Dallas (from Washington through St.Louis),Mor-
ris Claiborne, db, LSU.
7. Tampa Bay (from Jacksonville), Mark Barron, db,
Alabama.
8. Miami, Ryan Tannehill, qb,Texas A&M.
9. Carolina, Luke Kuechly, lb, Boston College.
10. Buffalo, Stephon Gilmore, db, South Carolina.
11. Kansas City, Dontari Poe, nt, Memphis.
12.Philadelphia (from Seattle),Fletcher Cox,dt,Mis-
sissippi State.
13. Arizona, Michael Floyd, wr, Notre Dame.
14.St.Louis (from Dallas),Michael Brockers,dt,LSU.
15.Seattle (from Philadelphia),Bruce Irvin,de,West
Virginia.
16. N.Y. Jets, Quinton Coples, de, North Carolina.
17.Cincinnati (fromOakland),DreKirkpatrick,db,Al-
abama.
18. San Diego, Melvin Ingram, lb, South Carolina.
19. Chicago, Shea McClellin, de, Boise State.
20.Tennessee, Kendall Wright, wr, Baylor.
21.New England (from Cincinnati),Chandler Jones,
de, Syracuse.
22.Cleveland (from Atlanta),Brandon Weeden,qb,
Oklahoma State.
23. Detroit, Riley Reiff, ot, Iowa.
24. Pittsburgh, DavidDeCastro, g, Stanford.
25.New England,(from Denver),Donta Hightower,
lb, Alabama.
26. Houston,Whitney Mercilus, lb, Illinois.
27.Cincinnati (fromNewOrleansthroughNewEng-
land), Kevin Zeitler, g,Wisconsin.
28. Green Bay, Nick Perry, lb, Southern Cal.
29.Minnesota (from Baltimore),Harrison Smith,db,
Notre Dame.
30. SanFrancisco, A.J. Jenkins, wr, Illinois.
31.TampaBay(fromNewEnglandthroughDenver),
Doug Martin, rb, Boise State.
32. N.Y. Giants, David Wilson, rb,Virginia Tech.
Major LeagueBaseball
MLBSuspendedClevelandLHPHaroldGuerrero
(Mahoning-NYP) and Chicago White Sox RHP
AndreRienzo(Winston-Salem-Car) 50gameseach
for testing positive for performance-enhancing
substances in violation of the minor league drug
prevention and treatment program.
AmericanLeague
DETROITTIGERSReleased3BBrandonInge.Re-
called RHP Brayan Villarreal from Toledo (IL).
Selected the contractsof RHP Luke Putkonen and
1B Brad Eldred from Toledo. Optioned RHP Thad
Weber to Toledo.
National League
SANDIEGOPADRESPlacedRHPMicahOwings
on the 15-day DL.
NFL DRAFT
TRANSACTIONS
16
Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
By Hank Kurz Jr.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
RICHMOND, Va. Travis Pastrana insists
hes not in this on a lark.
The X Games and motocross star is set to
make his Nationwide Series debut Friday night
at Richmond International Raceway.
Pastrana was supposed to make his debut last
summer at Indianapolis, but he broke his right
ankle two days before.
Its been since that race ... Ive been thinking
about getting in here and starting the Nationwide
and seeing whats going on, he said Friday at
RIR, where he was going to run in a K&N Series
race Thursday night. It has been a long road of,
Hey, how you going to do? When you going to
race? ... Were going to go out here and I nal-
ly get a chance to have some
fun tomorrow.
Im really pumped.
Pastrana, the winner of 11
X Games gold medals, has
no illusions of instant suc-
cess in NASCAR, admitting
one of his biggest fears is
making a green-ag pit
stop, which would be the
rst of his career.
Accordingly, hes starting with modest goals.
A goal for me for this rst race, a goal that
would be very, very difcult to reach, would be
to stay on the lead lap, and thats where were
coming in, thats where were starting, Pastrana
said. Even if we dont, thats the goal for the
next weekend.
Ive got to make every lap of these races. Ive
got to get as much experience as I can.
Pastranas schedule includes seven races, with
his next stop in two weeks at Darlington.
Wherever he turns up, other drivers are
inclined to be welcoming.
Hes going to be a welcome sight to the
Nationwide Series, Denny Hamlin said. I
think hes kind of a breath of fresh air type guy.
Hes outgoing. Hes obviously not afraid to take
chances and I know personally through talking
with him that hes been waiting to run for a long
time and just hes been ghting to get his leg
good enough to where he could do it.
Jimmie Johnson said it might take Pastrana
time to adapt to racing on four wheels, but that
he already brings something to the sport.
Hes an amazing guy with a huge fan base,
and its going to be good for NASCAR,
Johnson said.
And good for Pastrana, especially if he can
show that he belongs.
As a racer, Ive always felt like a racer,
Pastrana said. I know Ive gone to Nitro
Circus and done X-Games and everything,
which is a show and you have to be able to have
fun with it, but I gured you know what, Im
going to go out, Im going to try my hardest and
theres going to be a lot of people that under-
stand what youre doing and theres going to be
a lot of people who dont, he said.
It looks like fun and games on the outside,
but everyone that has ever been to the top of any
sport knows how much work it takes to get there,
and Im willing to put in that work, and its not
going to be overnight.
X Games star ready for NASCAR Nationwide debut
Travis Pastrana
Suspending Pro Bowl an option
NEW YORK Have NFL fans seen the last
of the Pro Bowl?
The game could be suspended next year, two
people familiar with discussions said Thursday.
Commissioner Roger Goodell, among others,
expressed concerns about the quality of play after
Januarys game, and the league has been holding
talks with the players union about the future of
the all-star game. The people spoke on condition
of anonymity because the talks were not being
publicized.
Responding to an ESPN report that Goodell is
strongly considering suspending the game in
2013, NFL spokesman Greg Aiello said: No
determination has been made yet.
Goodell said before the Super Bowl in
February he was unhappy with what he saw in the
AFCs 59-41 win in the Pro Bowl at Honolulu
a game that often resembled touch football. Many
players chosen for the game bow out, and if the
Pro Bowl is held before the Super Bowl, as it was
during the past three years, players from the con-
ference champions dont participate.
The game still draws solid TV ratings, but isnt
considered a money maker. Although viewership
dropped 8.1 percent in January, the Pro Bowl still
was the highest-rated sports program of the week-
end.
Sports brief
NATION/WORLD 17
Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON More than 3 million
health insurance policyholders and thousands
of employers will share $1.3 billion in rebates
this year, thanks to President Barack Obamas
health care law, a nonpartisan research group
said Thursday.
The rebates should average $127 for the
people who get them, and Democrats are hop-
ing theyll send an election-year message that
Obamas much-criticized health care overhaul
is starting to pay dividends for consumers.
Critics of the law call that wishful thinking.
The law requires insurance companies to
spend at least 80 percent of the premiums they
collect on medical care and quality improve-
ment or return the difference to consumers
and employers. Although many large employ-
er plans already meet that standard, its the
rst time the government has imposed such a
requirement on the entire health insurance
industry.
This is one of the most tangible benets of
the health reform law that consumers will
have seen to date, said Larry Levitt, an expert
on private insurance with the Kaiser Family
Foundation, which analyzed industry lings
with state health insurance commissioners to
produce its report. Kaiser is a nonpartisan
information clearinghouse on the nations
health care system.
Still, health insurance is expensive, and
$127 may not even pay a months worth of
premiums for single coverage.
And the insurance industry says consumers
should take little comfort from the rebates
because premiums are likely to go up overall
as a result of new benets and other require-
ments of the law.
The net of all the requirements will be an
increase in costs for consumers, said Robert
Zirkelbach, spokesman for Americas Health
Insurance Plans, the main industry trade
group.
Given that health care costs are inherently
unpredictable, its not surprising that some
plans will be paying rebates to policyholders
in certain markets, Zirkelbach added.
But the Kaiser report said the rebate
requirement may be acting as a brake on the
industry, discouraging insurers from seeking
big premium increases to avoid having to
issue refunds later and face possible criticism.
The new law has provided an incentive for
insurers to seek lower premium increases than
they would have otherwise, the report said.
This sentinel effect on premiums has likely
produced more savings for consumers and
employers than the rebates themselves.
The study found the largest rebates will go
to consumers and employers in Texas ($186
million) and Florida ($149 million), where
Govs. Rick Perry and Rick Scott have been
among the staunchest opponents of the feder-
al law. Both states applied for waivers from
the 80 percent requirement and were turned
down. Hawaii is the only state in which insur-
ers are not expected to issue a rebate.
Heres how the rebates break down nation-
ally:
More than 3 million individual policyhold-
ers will reap rebates of $426 million, averag-
ing $127 apiece. These are consumers who
are not covered through an employer and buy
their policy directly. Consumers in Texas,
Oklahoma, South Carolina and Arizona are
most likely to be eligible.
Insurance companies must notify policy-
holders, and the rebates are due by Aug. 1.
Some companies have already begun to pay.
In the small-employer market, plans cover-
ing nearly 5 million people will receive
rebates totaling $377 million.
Employers do not have to pass their rebates
on to workers, and can also take them as a dis-
count on next years premiums.
Report: Rebates from health care law will top $1B
By Hamza Hemdawi
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO Egypts presidential race is
boiling down to a contest between Hosni
Mubaraks former foreign minister and
two Islamists with strong bases of support
after the election commission on Thursday
released the nal list of 13 candidates.
None of the front-runners represents the
largely liberal and secular youth who
drove the uprising that toppled Mubaraks
autocratic regime 14 months ago, dim-
ming their hopes that the winner will bring
dramatic democratic change in the coun-
try.
Instead, what has emerged as the key
question in next months vote to choose
the rst president after nearly 30 years of
rule by Mubarak is whether the country of
85 million takes a turn toward religious
rule or remains a mainly secular state.
Divisions among supporters of each
camp have left the race highly unpre-
dictable. Islamists showed their electoral
power in parliamentary elections late last
year in which the Muslim Brotherhood
and members of the ultraconservative
Sala movement won around 70 percent
of the legislatures seats. But in the presi-
dential race, their backers are split
between the Brotherhoods candidate,
Mohammed Morsi, and a more moderate
Islamist, Abdel-Moneim Abolfotoh.
Former Foreign Minister Amr Moussa
has emerged as the strongest secular alter-
native. Moussa has distanced himself from
the old regime and gained acceptance from
some liberal and secular factions, but he
remains mistrusted by some who see him
as too close to his former boss, Mubarak.
Abolfotoh, who broke from the Muslim
Brotherhood last year, appeals not only to
Islamists but also some liberals who nd
Moussa unpalatable.
Also hanging over the race is the mili-
tary, which has ruled since Mubaraks fall
on Feb. 11, 2011. It has promised to hand
over power to the elections winner but
many believe it is trying to carve out a per-
manent role for itself in politics.
The liberal youth groups credited with
Mubaraks stunning ouster are divided and
weakened, victimized by a systematic
campaign to discredit them by the gener-
als, the Islamists and a powerful state and
private propaganda machine that has sided
with the military against everyone else.
Egypt presidential race boils
down to three candidates
No charges dismissed for
soldier in Wikileaks case
FORT MEADE, Md. A military
judge refused on Thursday to dismiss the
most serious charge against an Army pri-
vate accused in the biggest leak of gov-
ernment secrets in U.S. history.
Col. Denise Lind rejected a defense
motion to throw out the charge of aiding
the enemy during a pretrial hearing for
Pfc. Bradley Manning. The charge carries
a maximum penalty of life in prison. It was
one of several motions seeking to dismiss
some or all of the charges, but Lind left all
22 counts against Manning in place.
In seeking dismissal of the most seri-
ous offense, defense attorney David
Coombs had argued that the charge didnt
properly allege that Manning intended to
help al-Qaida when he allegedly sent
hundreds of thousands of classied Iraq
and Afghanistan war reports and State
Department diplomatic cables to the anti-
secrecy website WikiLeaks.
Manning stated in an online chat with a
condant-turned-informant that he leaked
the information because, I want people
to see the truth.
Prosecutors had argued that Manning
knew the enemy would see the material
when it appeared on WikiLeaks, regard-
less of his intentions.
Around the nation
Given that health care costs are inherently
unpredictable, its not surprising that some plans will
be paying rebates to policyholders in certain markets.
Robert Zirkelbach, spokesman for Americas Health Insurance Plans
18
Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
AUTO
Lexus GS gets F Sport treatment
By Ann M. Job
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The re-engineered-for-2013 Lexus GS 350
shows that a Lexus sedan can have an overtly
sporty ride, a snarly-looking front end and a
noticeable exhaust note, all while hewing to
the brands high t-and-nish reputation.
Packaged in optional F Sport dress, this
fourth-generation GS 350 vies to be the clos-
est GS to the BMWs 5-Series sedan, with its
well-known performance air and image.
But given that for every GS that Lexus sold
in the United States last year BMW sold 14 of
its 5-Series cars, the new GS 350 has a ways
to go to convince shoppers of its sporty per-
sonality.
Maybe this is why Lexus offers a lot for the
money on its new, rear-wheel drive, mid-size
GS.
Starting manufacturers suggested retail
price, including destination charge, is $47,775
for a base model with 306-horsepower V-6
and automatic transmission.
This compares with the $48,345 starting
retail price for a 2012 BMW 528i that has a
240-horsepower, twin-turbo, four cylinder and
automatic transmission.
Standard equipment on the base, 2013 GS
350 includes leather-trimmed seats, keyless
entry, push-button start, moonroof, 12-speak-
er audio system, rearview camera, 10-way,
power-adjustable front seats and 10 air bags.
The base 2012 BMW 528i comes with
leatherette upholstery, moonroof, a front-pas-
senger seat with four-way power adjustments,
10-speaker audio, six air bags and no rearview
camera, among other things.
2013 Lexus GS 350 F Sport
BASE PRICE: $46,900 for base; $49,450 for
AWD model.
PRICE AS TESTED: $63,704.
TYPE: Front-engine, rear-wheel-drive, ve-
passenger, mid-size luxury sedan.
ENGINE: 3.5-liter, double overhead cam,
direct-injection V-6 with VVT-i.
MILEAGE:19 mpg (city),26 mpg (highway).
TOP SPEED: 142 mph.
LENGTH: 190.7 inches.
WHEELBASE: 112.2 inches.
CURB WEIGHT: 3,795 pounds.
BUILT AT: Japan.
OPTIONS: F Sport and cold weather
packages combined with other options
(includes blind spot monitor, lane assist,
navigation system, heated steering wheel,
19-inch, alloy wheels with Dark Graphite
nish, power rear sunshade, heated and
ventilated front seats, F Sport-tuned
Adaptive Variable Suspension,F Sport body
styling, pre-collision system) $13,210; trunk
mat $105; cargo net $64.
DESTINATION CHARGE: $875.
Behind the wheel
See LEXUS, Page 20
AUTO 19
Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Collision Repair, Renishing, Restorations, Metalwork,
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650-280-3119
Mention this ad for 10% off Bodywork Labor
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AUTOBODY & PAINT
By Didi Tang
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIJING Han Zhongping, a 38-year-old
coal mine owner who has four luxury cars and
is in the market for another, looked at BMWs
latest sedans at this weeks Beijing auto show
and said what he wants is simple.
The most expensive is the best, said Han,
from the northwestern town of Yulin in
Chinas coal elds. His stable of cars already
includes models from BMW and Mercedes-
Benz, all bought for cash.
We Chinese like the show of grandeur, he
said. Finally weve got some money, and we
want to show it off.
Luxury automakers from Mercedes-Benz to
Cadillac to Japans Inniti see Chinas newly
rich buyers like Han as a big part of their
future. They are designing models for Chinese
tastes and shifting some production to this
country as its rapid growth mints tens of thou-
sands of new millionaires.
Luxury sales are buoyant despite a slump in
Chinas car market. They surged 21 percent in
the rst quarter over a year ago, according to
JD Power & Associates, while the overall
market grew just 2 percent. Analysts foresee
strong growth for years to come, with luxury
sales rising from 1 million vehicles last year
to as much as 3 million by 2025.
People really want to show off their social
status, said Lin Huaibin, chief China auto
forecaster for IHS Automotive.
Automakers are launching models with big-
ger rear seats for Chinese buyers who ride in
back and have drivers or want to pamper
their passengers. Audis A6L has rear-seat
teacup warmers and massage units. Rear pas-
sengers in BMW AGs 3-series can push a
button to move the front passenger seat for
still more legroom.
Manufacturers are shifting production to
China to avoid high import duties or ramping
up output at existing operations.
General Motors Co.s Cadillac and Nissan
Motor Co.s Inniti announced plans this
week for their rst China factories, joining
German rivals that have made cars here for
much of the past decade. BMW is adding a
second factory and a design studio.
Demand has been fueled by rapid econom-
ic growth that rebounded quickly from the
2008 global crisis. Chinas economy grew by
8.1 percent in the rst quarter its slowest in
three years but far ahead of the United States,
Europe and Japan.
People are getting wealthier, said Jacob
George, managing director of J.D. Power Asia
Pacic. And theres more of a tendency to
buy luxury in China.
Audi, Chinas best-selling premium brand,
said sales rose 37 percent last year to 313,000
cars. Daimler AGs Mercedes-Benz Cars said
rst quarter sales of its S-class in China
soared 74 percent.
A high-status car also can be a business tool
in brand-conscious China.
Zhang Yongxiang, a Beijing entrepreneur
who operates a laundry service, wants to trade
up from a Volkswagen Passat, a step that is
getting easier for Chinese buyers as manufac-
turers roll out lower-priced models that com-
pete with mass-market sedans.
It will help my business, said Zhang, 42,
who was looking at a Mercedez C-class
model at the auto show.
Your clients wont say anything to you, but
they look at your car and judge, Zhang said.
Some companies wont give you a chance if
you dont have a respectable car.
Li Yansong, a 34-year-old who works in
advertising, wants a car that can impress. One
possibility is an Audi, which has a close asso-
ciation with the government after having been
widely used by Chinese ofcials since the
1990s.
Because the public think it is a government
car, it helps, said Li.
Auto China 2012 was a showcase for com-
panies from global brands to Italian producers
of handbuilt sports cars that want a piece of
Chinas luxury market.
Mercedes-Benzs Smart unit is marketing a
Dragon Edition of its two-seat runabout
made in a limited set of 700 vehicles with red
and gold decorations and the Chinese charac-
ter for dragon on the side. In the mini-luxu-
ry end of the market, Italys Fiat SpA showed
a version of its 500 compact styled by fashion
house Gucci.
Chinas Geely Holding Group displayed its
Englon SC7-RS concept car, which has the
high prole and rounded edges of a Bentley or
Luxury automakers rush to capture Chinese demand
REUTERS
A model stands next to a Chevrolet CODE 130R at Auto China 2012 in Beijing, China.
See CHINA, Page 20
AUTO 20
Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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A 2013 Lexus GS 350 with V-6 and all-wheel
drive has a starting retail price of $50,325, while
the starting retail price for a 2012 BMW 528i
xDrive with four-cylinder engine and all-wheel
drive is $50,645.
Another mid-size, luxury competitor is the
2012 Inniti M37, which has a starting MSRP,
including destination charge, of $48,595.
Standard items on the M37 include a 330-horse-
power V-6, automatic transmission, leather inte-
rior, moonroof, six-speaker audio system, 10-
way, power-adjustable front seats, rearview
monitor, keyless entry, push-button start and six
air bags.
One of two main mid-size sedans at Lexus,
the GS aims to challenge other rear-drive per-
formance sedans.
New styling is the rst visible clue to the
changes that were made. The front spindle
shape of the grille, as Lexus calls it, reminded
me of a woman in a cinched corset and didnt
convey an upscale image. The backs light-emit-
ting diode taillamps reminded me of a BMW.
The interior, however, impressed with com-
fortable seats, nicely laid out controls and a siz-
able, 12.3-inch (measured diagonally) display
screen in the middle of the dashboard that pro-
vides clear, easy-to-read information.
Fit and nish on the test GS 350 was impec-
cable, with seat material stitching and every gap
between interior trim parts as well as steel sheet
metal outside perfectly aligned.
Since the tester had the optional F Sport pack-
age, it came with 19-inch wheels that were a
dark color, not shiny silver, tted with low-pro-
le tires. This made the GS 350 look sinister and
denitely more youthful and sporty. But watch
these fancy wheels. They are easy to scrape
against concrete curbs during parallel parking
maneuvers, and the small amount of tire side-
wall, plus an F Sport suspension, means road
bumps can come through harshly to passengers.
The overall GS size is about the same as last
years model, stretching nearly 16 feet long,
from bumper to bumper. This is just a couple
inches shorter than a 5-Series sedan.
But the underlying GS platform is new, with a
slightly wider track and an inch more in height
compared with the old GS.
This provides a bit more interior room, espe-
cially in the back seat of the GS where head-
room now measures 37.8 inches, which is about
on par with the back seat of the M37. Legroom
in the GS 350 back seat totals 36.3 inches, or
about the same as the M37. Still, theres a hump
in the GS rear oor that a middle passenger has
to contend with, and three adults sit closely in
back. Trunk space of 14.3 cubic feet is accom-
modating.
Passengers familiar with more rened rides in
Lexus cars were surprised to hear the strong,
throaty engine sounds from the test GS 350 F
Sport. They also didnt know what to make of
the ride that readily conveyed road vibrations,
even when the suspension setting was in normal
mode.
The 3.5-liter, double overhead cam, direct
gasoline injection V-6 is mildly tweaked from
last year for peak torque of 277 foot-pounds at
4,800 rpm.
Power came smoothly and quickly through a
six-speed automatic transmission, and zero-to-
60-miles-per-hour time is a sporty 5.7 seconds,
according to Lexus.
Continued from page 18
LEXUS
Rolls-Royce. Geely says it might be sold in
two to three years.
Rolls-Royce, owned by BMW, premiered
an extended wheelbase version of its own
Phantom II for Chinese buyers.
They want to travel highly relaxed, said
Rolls-Royces chief executive, Torsten
Mueller-Oetvoes. There is no better way to
travel than in a Rolls-Royce.
Rolls-Royce also has introduced a Year of
the Dragon collection to commemorate the
current year in the Chinese zodiac with drag-
on-themed styling.
Even buyers who drive their own cars want
more lavish rear seats to pamper parents or
business clients.
We have mirrors for the rear seat only in
China. We have individual reading lights
only in China, said Christian Schulte, prod-
uct manager for BMWs 5-series, which sells
for 428,600-797,600 yuan ($68,000-
$126,600), depending on options.
Besides rear-seat massage units, Audis
A6L L for long wheelbase has an air
ltration system, a 220-voltage outlet for a
laptop computer and a USB socket. The A6L
starts at 383,000 yuan ($60,800) and go up to
742,600 yuan ($118,000).
Cadillac plans to design a global model, the
XTS sedan, based on Chinese needs, said
Joseph Liu, executive vice president of
Shanghai GM Corp, a joint venture between
GM and state-owned Shanghai Automotive
Industry Corp.
Continued from page 19
CHINA
By John Defore
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK Aardman Animations
distinctively charming brand of
Claymation returns to the big screen at
last in The Pirates! Band of Mists, a
delightful romp whose varied pleasures
should please kids all along the age spec-
trum. An easy sell at the box ofce, it is
sequel-ready thanks to a series of books
by Gideon Defoe.
The title doesnt hint at the lms plot,
which incorporates real-life (if drolly
reimagined) historical figures Charles
Darwin and Queen Victoria, but it gets at
the heroes lovable-loser appeal:
Although their leader, the generically
named Pirate Captain voiced by Hugh
Grant), sees himself as a rogue to be
reckoned with, he and his crew are a op
in the departments of menace and booty-
snatching.
Theyre better at securing smoked
meats for Ham Night than locating vic-
tims worth robbing, but when a Pirate of
the Year event arrives (Salma Hayek and
Jeremy Piven entertain as two of the vil-
lainous competitors), they start boarding
every boat they spy in hopes of impress-
ing the judge. When they attack Darwins
Beagle, the calmly terried nerd reveals
that they already possess a priceless
treasure: Polly, their beloved parrot, is
actually a rare dodo. Captains misguided
attempt to exploit the bird for gold leads
to London, where Victorias anti-pirate
campaign means the shipmates must don
absurd disguises while fending off
attempts to birdnap Polly.
Although Defoes witty screenplay
overows with gags for viewers who
know a bit of history ever wanted to
see snobby Jane Austen throw a beer
stein at poor Joseph Merrick, aka the
Elephant Man? plot points quickly
translate to action, with chase scenes
involving bubble-filled bathtubs and
pedal-driven airships. (The lmmakers
may be saving elaborate swordplay for
later installments, though pirate slang is
hardly in short supply.)
While this tales cast lacks singular
characters like the absent-minded inven-
tor Wallace and his wise and taciturn dog,
Gromit, it does offer a terric wordless
animal: Darwins trained manpanzee
butler, who dryly comments on the action
via dialogue on index cards.
Pirates has action, laughs
See PIRATES, Page 24
WEEKEND jOURNAL
22
Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Cristina Silva
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LAS VEGAS Peter Jacksons The
Hobbit is preparing to leave the shire.
The director of the Oscar-winning Lord of
the Rings trilogy previewed 10 minutes of
assorted footage Tuesday from his upcoming
prequel.
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, was
lmed in New Zealand using more frames per
second than the Hollywood standard. Jackson
said in a video introduction that using 48
frames per second produces a smoother image.
The movie could usher in a new era of lm-
making and require lm houses across the
globe to embrace digital technology.
Jackson said the human eye no longer sees
individual pictures under the faster speed, but
a steady stream of clear images.
The movement feels more real, Jackson
said while introducing his film at the
CinemaCon convention for theater owners on
the Las Vegas Strip. Its much more gentle on
the eyes.
Indeed, the footage was vivid, with grass
blades, facial lines and soaring mountains
appearing luminous and pronounced. The
actors looked almost touchable, as if they
were performing live on stage.
Its unclear what the nal product will look
like when its released in December. Jackson
said he was still editing the movie and the
shared footage included green screens that
will eventually be used to add in scenery,
action or special effects.
Other digital pioneers are making the same
push for higher lm speeds. Avatar creator
James Cameron has promised to shoot the
sequel to his science-ction blockbuster at 48
or 60 frames a second.
Jackson warned the new approach would
take time to adjust to. Some bloggers agreed,
quickly branding the footage released
Tuesday as a failure in digital technology. The
critics claimed the unnished scenes looked
like a low-budget TV show.
British actor Martin Freeman stars as Bilbo
Baggins, the hobbit who acquires the evil ring
that sets the action of The Lord of the Rings
in motion.
The footage showed Baggins lost in
Gollums cave. Andy Serkis portrayal of the
strange creature known for his precious
obsession and speaking in the third person is
just as disturbing as it was in the trilogy, with
Baggins forced to appeal to Gollums love of
games to survive.
Ian McKellen, reprising the role of the wiz-
ard Gandalf, persuades Baggins to leave the
shire and join him on his journey. The footage
of the hobbits hometown is stunning, with
each color having almost a neon glow.
There were other brief snippets of story.
Orlando Bloom, as the elf Legolas, was
shown with his characters owing, blonde
hair. McKellen toured an ancient tomb that he
surmised once housed someone evil. Trolls
engaged in battle.
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey is
the rst chapter in Jacksons two-part adapta-
tion of J.R.R. Tolkiens fantasy classic.
The two lms were shot simultaneously in
3-D, with the second one, The Hobbit: There
and Back Again, due in theaters in December
2013.
The nal installment of the Lord of the
Rings trilogy swept the Academy Awards
with 11 trophies, including best picture and
director, in 2003.
First Look: Peter Jackson unveils Hobbit scenes
The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, was lmed in New Zealand using more frames per
second than the Hollywood standard. Jackson said in a video introduction that using 48
frames per second produces a smoother image.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 23
Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT
SILICON VALLEY OPEN STUDIOS
2012. Now in its 26th year, the Silicon Valley
Open Studios is your chance to visit artists in
their studios from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on
Saturdays and Sundays the rst three week-
ends in May. Throughout this free event, you
can view and enjoy a vast variety of visual
expression, including painting, photography,
sculpture, jewelry, calligraphy, ceramics,
fiber arts, pottery, mosaics, metal work,
glass, drawing, printmaking, watercolor and
woodworking. Weekend one, May 5-6: East
Palo Alto, Ladera, Los Altos, Los Altos Hills,
Loyola, Mountain View, Palo Alto, Santa
Clara, Stanford and Sunnyvale. Weekend
two, May 12-13: Campbell, Cupertino,
Gilroy, Los Gatos, Milpitas, Monte Sereno,
Morgan Hill, San Jose and Saratoga.
Weekend three, May 19-20: Atherton,
Belmont, Hillsborough, Menlo Park, Portola
Valley, Redwood City, San Carlos, San
Mateo and Woodside. Organized by Silicon
Valley Open Studios. Twin Pines Art Center.
10 Twin Pines Lane. Belmont. For informa-
tion email info@svos.org or visit
www.svos.org.
***
REMEMBER WHEN: ANTIQUE AIR-
PLANES AND CARS. Remember when
ying was thought romantic? When driving a
car took skill and precision? When it was the
journey and not the destination that was the
best part of the trip? On May 12 from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m., Hiller Aviation Museum brings
you back to that time as beautiful antique air-
planes are displayed alongside gorgeous
antique cars. Hiller Aviation Museum is
located at 601 Skyway Road, San Carlos. For
information about hours of operation and
admission prices call 654-0200 or visit
www.hiller.org.
***
SANTA CRUZ MOUNTAINS SCULP-
TURE TOURS. The Djerassi Resident
Artists Program in the Santa Cruz Mountains
begins taking reservations June 6 for free
Two-Mile Tours (July 1, Aug. 12, Sept. 2,
Sept. 16, Oct. 7 and Oct. 21). All tours start
at 10 a.m., are about 2 1/2 hours in length
and take visitors to see approximately 20
sculptures. The tours are quite strenuous as
the routes include both steep uphill and
downhill hiking, totaling approximately 300
feet changes in elevation. Registered guests
will receive additional instructions and a
map to the property in advance of their tour.
The Djerassi Program, which makes its pri-
vate program facility in Woodside available
to the public on a limited basis from March
through October, preserves its 580-acre site
in perpetuity through a conservation ease-
ment with the Peninsula Open Space Trust.
The pristine beauty of the natural landscape
and the panoramic views of the Pacific
Ocean are a spectacular backdrop to the on-
site art. For tour reservations or information,
call (650) 747-1250. The general public may
reserve two places per call. Tour dates and
information are also posted at www.djeras-
si.org.
***
CHILDREN OF THE PLUMED SER-
PENT. The Los Angeles County Museum of
Art presents Children of the Plumed Serpent:
The Legacy of Quetzalcoatl in Ancient
Mexico, the rst large-scale exploration of
the ancient kingdoms of southern Mexico
and their patron deity, Quetzalcoatl, the
human incarnation of the Plumed Serpent.
This exhibition follows the historical trajec-
tory of Quetzalcoatls life and explores his
role as founder and benefactor of the Nahua-
, Mixtec-, and Zapotec-dominated kingdoms
of southern Mexico, which were the domi-
nant cultural, political and economic forces
throughout southern Mexico for three hun-
dred years until the Aztec Empire emerged as
a rival. The arrival of Hernn Corts and his
army in 1519 ended further Aztec conquest
and under the Spanish regime the southern
kingdoms emerged as an integral part of the
new economy. Today, descendants of the
Children of the Plumed Serpent continue to
thrive in southern Mexico.
More than 200 objectsincluding painted
codices, turquoise mosaics, gold and textiles
from Mexico, Europe and the United States,
trace the development of an extensive trade
network that resulted in a period of cultural
innovation that spread across ancient
Mexico, the American Southwest and
Central America during the Postclassic (A.D.
900-1521) and early colonial periods.
Victoria Lyall, LACMA associate curator
of Latin American art, said: This exhibition
foregrounds an era of cultural innovation in
Mesoamerica when trade networks, closely
linked to the deity Quetzalcoatl, facilitated
the exchange of both goods and ideas across
vast distances. Southern Mexican kingdoms
recognized Quetzalcoatl as their founder and
patron, and these communities became, and
continue to be, the Children of the Plumed
Serpent.
The Los Angeles County Museum of Art is
located at 5905 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles.
For more information call (323) 857-6000 or
visit LACMA.org. Children of the Plumed
Serpent: The Legacy of Quetzalcoatl in
Ancient Mexico runs through July 1.
Susan Cohn can be reached at susan@smdai-
lyjournal.com or www.twitter.com/susanci-
tyscene.
MUSEUM GOTTA SEE UM
COURTESY OF MICHAEL AZGOUR
Silicon Valley Open Studios 2012 takes place throughout San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties
on the rst three weekends in May. Artist Michael Azgours oil painting A Prosperous
Engagement is among the works that may be seen. Azgour welcomes visitors on the third
weekend, May 19 and 20, at 3 37th Ave., Suite No. 16, San Mateo.
WEEKEND JOURNAL
24
Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Victorian England is rendered in sets
whose scope and detail are enhanced by
CG, but computer effects are only
noticeable where they nicely comple-
ment the animators models in sea
scenes, for instance, where realistic
crashing waves enhance the thrill factor.
Other technical touches, like lens curva-
ture in shots through a pirates spyglass,
are more subtle but will delight viewers
who appreciate craftsmanship.
The Pirates! Band of Mists, a Sony
Pictures Animation release, is rated PG
for mild action, rude humor and some
language. Running time: 88 minutes.
Continued from page 21
PIRATES
The direction came after a long meeting
about the possible closure of two ele-
mentary schools a move the board
opted not to do. Trustee Kevin Martinez,
however, noted the action doesnt solve
the budget problems. He had advocated
to reevaluate the budget after November
when the district and state had a chance
to oat tax measures to fund education.
Deciding the details of a possible tax
could cause some disagreement on the
board. Martinez, for example, requested
the district work with a polling rm to
gather community input before putting
together the ballot measure. Board
President Skip Henderson, on the other
hand, was against spending money on
consultants. Hendersons comment came
after a lengthy public comment session
that included criticism of the board for
using consultants, not taking their rec-
ommendations, then complaining of
budget woes.
The topic will come back before the
board at a future meeting.
Heather Murtagh can be reached by email:
heather@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105.
Continued from page 1
TAX
Battleship leads attack
of game-based movies
By Ryan Nakashima
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES Battleship steamed into movie the-
aters overseas last week, giving international audiences the
rst chance to decide whether a board game-based movie is
sea-worthy.
The Hasbro Inc. search-and-destroy game was once a way
for kids to while away summer afternoons. But as it debuts in
Europe on Wednesday, Battleship the movie has become a
potential franchise, sporting Michael Bay-inspired special
effects, aliens invading Earth, a bikini-model actress, superstar
Rihanna and, of course, lots of guns.
Whether the movie symbolizes Hollywoods lack of new
ideas or its brilliance in adapting old ones, Comcast Corp.s
Universal Pictures is betting big that its the latter. With a
reported production budget of $200 million, observers say it
will need to reap at least $500 million at box ofces worldwide
to pay off.
Hollywoods love of the sequel, the prequel, the reboot and
the adapted novel all originate from the same premise:
Moviegoers are more likely to buy a ticket if they are already
familiar with the story.
But not since Clue bombed in 1985 has Tinseltown gam-
bled on adapting a popular board game with no apparent sto-
ryline.
The idea of turning board games into movies has gained new
traction in part because of the huge success of Transformers,
and to a lesser extent G.I. Joe, which are both based on toys
from toymaker Hasbro Inc. The three Transformers movies
have grossed more than $2.6 billion worldwide, helping lift
Transformers toys to become Hasbros top-selling brand last
year, exceeding 11 percent of its $4.3 billion in annual revenue.
For Hasbro, the movie is a way to get a globally marketed
boost for its games business, which Sterne Agee analyst
Margaret Whiteld called stagnant and lacking innovation.
Turning that stagnation around is a goal of Brian Goldner,
Hasbros CEO since 2008. He told investors in February
were going to reignite our games business.
If it succeeds, Battleship will be the advance guard of a
whole eet of planned adaptations of Hasbro games including
Ouija, also being developed by Universal for release in 2013,
as well as Risk and Candy Land, which are both in the
works at Sony Corp. Stretch Armstrong, a movie based on
the glutinous-armed toy from Hasbro, is set for 2014 release by
Relativity Media.
On paper, Battleship scores high on the checklist for
blockbuster success: a hero in a life-or-death struggle against
incomparable odds, a steamy love interest, a star-studded cast
that includes Liam Neeson, and a whole lot of destruction and
mayhem.
Marketing of the lm borrows heavily on its successful pred-
ecessor, and trailers proclaim that the movie is From Hasbro
the company that brought you Transformers. Churning metal
weaponry and explosions are unmistakably reminiscent of the
special effects used in Transformers, which was directed by
Michael Bay.
It reeks of Transformers, which is all a good thing, says
Gene Del Vecchio, an entertainment research consultant and
author of Creating Blockbusters: How to Generate and
Market Hit Entertainment for TV, Movies, Video Games and
Books.
By Lou Kesten
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The goals in video games are usually
well-dened: Kill the bad guys. Rescue
the princess. Knock the pigs off their
pedestals.
But theres a whole underground
movement of independent designers
making games with less well-dened
goals. They may look familiar on the
surface especially to fans of running-
and-jumping platform games like
Super Mario Bros. but the old-
school mechanics are a way to draw
players into deeper mysteries.
The three indie games described
here are positively laid-back when com-
pared with the slam-bang action of a typ-
ical AAA release. But they may stick
with you longer, and you can get all
three for less than the price of one Call
of Duty game.
Fez (Polytron, for the Xbox 360,
$10) looks, at rst glance, like a throw-
back to the 8-bit glory days of the origi-
nal Nintendo Entertainment System. You
control a blobby collection of pixels
named Gomez bouncing around a two-
dimensional town. But you soon discov-
er theres a third dimension involved
and you have to constantly shift perspec-
tive to negotiate Gomezs ever-expand-
ing universe.
It isnt an original idea: The 2D-to-3D
gimmick has driven games like Paper
Mario, Echochrome and Crush.
And once you get used to looking at the
landscape from different angles, its fair-
ly easy to nd the dozens of golden
cubes scattered about.
So lead designer Phil Fish takes it one
step further. To really complete Fez,
you need to tackle a few dozen puzzles
that are stubbornly vague. What do the
hieroglyphs on the walls mean? What
are these constellations trying to tell me?
Why wont that owl stop staring at me?
Some of the brainteasers deliver that
a-ha! moment when you solve them. A
few initially struck me as impossibly
obtuse thats before a friend would
point out a solution that was staring me
in the face the whole time. But theres no
shame in asking friends for help with
Fez. Sometimes, all you need is a dif-
ferent perspective. Three and a half stars
out of four.
Journey (That Game Company, for
the PlayStation 3, $14.99) is puzzling
from start to nish. Your character, a
nameless, voiceless nomad, is stranded
in a desert. After a few minutes you see,
in the distance, a mountaintop from
which a spear of light shines. As you
head toward the light, the shifting sands
give way to massive ruins, an underwa-
ter cavern and an arctic wasteland, pre-
sented in spare yet vivid graphics.
The controls are simple enough for
even a complete newcomer to video
games. You can walk, you can jump, and
you can chirp out a little musical note.
Those chirps are the only means to com-
municate with the other pilgrims you
meet who are avatars of the other
humans out there playing Journey at
the same time. You dont need to team
up, but its oddly comforting to have a
companion during such a desolate trek.
Journey only takes two or three
hours to nish, and its never so chal-
lenging that youll get stuck. But its
beautiful images, gorgeous music and
ambiguous ending will haunt you. Three
and a half stars.
Closure (Eyebrow Interactive, for
the PS3, $14.99) is a 2-D, black-and-
white platform game with a devious
twist: You can only step on areas that are
illuminated. If you walk into an unlit
space, you disappear into the abyss.
Thus, the key to each level is to light
up a safe route to the exit. Sometimes
you have to rotate stationary lamps;
other times, you have glowing bulbs you
can carry or insert into moving plat-
forms. And in some cases you have to
gure out how to use the darkness to
your advantage.
The guinea pigs here are three people
trapped in a rundown factory, a creepy
forest and an abandoned carnival, and if
you get stuck in one level you can switch
to a different character. With dozens of
puzzles, theres enough here to chal-
lenge even the craftiest gamer. But even
players who dont make it all the way
through Closure will relish its night-
marish images and eerie soundtrack.
Three stars.
Fez,Journey,Closurebuild mystery
At rst glance, Fez looks like a throwback to the 8-bit glory days
of the original Nintendo Entertainment System. But you soon
discover theres a third dimension involved and you have to
constantly shift perspective to negotiate Gomezs ever-expanding
universe.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 25
Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Davis Pitt
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DES MOINES, Iowa The announcement
that mad cow disease was found in a
California cow drew a rapid response this
week from the beleaguered American beef
industry, which has been enduring one crisis
after another for more than a year.
First, a severe drought in the Southwest cut
cattle herd numbers to their lowest level in
more than 60 years. Then an intense contro-
versy erupted over a common type of ller
known as pink slime, hurting ground beef
sales. The industry was just regaining its foot-
ing when the word of the mad cow discovery
came Tuesday.
They say things happen in threes, so hope-
fully this is the last one, said Buck Wehrbein,
who manages a feeding operation in Mead,
Neb.
The infected dairy cow, only the fourth ever
discovered in the United States, was found as
part of an Agriculture Department program
that tests about 40,000 cows a year for the
fatal brain disease. The animal apparently
acquired the infection from a random muta-
tion, not from eating infected cattle feed.
It was the first new case of mad cow dis-
ease in the U.S. since 2006 and came just as
beef exports finally were recovering from the
discovery of the disease in a cow imported
from Canada in 2003. With billions of dol-
lars at risk, the USDA and other government
officials responded quickly, explaining con-
sumers never were at risk because none of
the animals meat was bound for the food
supply.
It looks like that system is working, and
for those of us in the business, thats a relief,
Wehrbein said.
Mad cow disease, or bovine spongiform
encephalopathy (BSE), is fatal to cows and
can cause a fatal human brain disease in peo-
ple who eat tainted beef. The World Health
Organization has said tests show humans can-
not be infected by drinking milk from infect-
ed animals.
The swift response also reected a desire to
avoid a repeat of the pink slime scare, which
erupted when consumers learned some
ground meat contained scraps of beef treated
with ammonium hydroxide.
Some people and institutions responded by
rejecting the product known as lean, nely
textured beef. And by the time the industry
responded, demand had fallen dramatically
and production plants had closed.
In retrospect, they didnt take that serious-
ly and I think they underestimated the impact
the media could have on consumer behavior,
said Heather Jones, an industry analyst with
BB&T Capital Markets. I think they wanted
to be all over this to quell any concerns
domestically, and also you dont want to lose
any of your export markets.
After the 2003 discovery, beef exports
plunged from $3.6 billion that year to $809
million in 2004. On Tuesday, meat industry
groups, food companies and the American
Veterinary Medical Association quickly
issued statements and updated their websites,
seeking to reassure the public that the nations
meat supply is safe.
Consumers should be reminded that the
BSE agent is not contained in beef muscle
such as cuts like steaks, roasts and hamburg-
er, Tyson Foods, the second-largest beef pro-
ducer in the U.S., said in a statement.
The industrys challenges come as beef
exports are soaring, hitting a record $5.4 bil-
lion last year. The trend is continuing this
year, with export value up about 10 to 12 per-
cent, said Joe Schuele, a spokesman for the
U.S. Meat Export Federation, a trade group.
Leading beef importers, including Canada,
Mexico and Japan, responded quickly that the
new mad cow case would have no effect on
their imports. But the strongest reaction
among trade partners came from those already
skeptical about U.S. beef.
Indonesia, which previously said it wanted
to reduce dependency on beef imports and
ultimately become self-sufficient, on
Thursday became the rst country to suspend
U.S. beef imports. Indonesias Vice
Agriculture Minister Rusman Heriawan said
the country would lift the ban as soon as the
U.S. can assure us its dairy cows are free of
mad cow disease.
Indonesia last year imported 20,000 tons of
American beef, a tiny fraction of U.S. beef
shipments
U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk said
during a stopover in Singapore that the U.S.
absolutely respects the right of any country
to protect the health of its citizens, but said
there was no evidence any contaminated
product entered the food chain.
There is no reason for any consumer to be
concerned about the consumption of U.S.
beef, he said. Thus, we would expect that
Indonesia would quickly reopen its market for
U.S. beef products.
Quick response averts mad cow scare
REUTERS
An employee cooks local beef at a restaurant in Seoul. Two major South Korean retailers halted sales of U.S. beef after an outbreak of mad
cow disease as the countrys agriculture ministry looked set to move towards banning quarantine inspections,a move that would effectively
end imports. Lotte Mart, a unit of Lotte Shopping Co., said it had suspended sales due to what it said was customer concerns, as did Home
Plus, a unit of Britain's Tesco PLC.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 26
Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FRIDAY, APRIL 27
Camping Under the Stars. Harbor
Village Event Center, 270 Capistrano
Road, Half Moon Bay. During the
Annual Dream Machines Event
Weekend, families will be able to use
trailers and tents to camp under the
stars. There will also be childrens
activities all day with movies playing
inside the Shops at Harbor Village
starting at 6:30 p.m. $12 for one night,
$10 per night for two nights and $8
per night for three nights if families
will use one tent and will bring one
car. For more information and to
reserve a space call (888) 606-4862.
Guerrilla Marketing Seminar and
Small Business Fair. 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.,
Elks Lodge, 229 W. 20th Ave., San
Mateo. Learn ways to expand your
business using Guerrilla Marketing
techniques. Michael Neuendorff from
The Growth Coach will talk about who
to market to, how to market
consistently and avoid major
roadblocks. Registration from 8 a.m.
to 9 a.m., seminar from 9 a.m. to noon,
networking from noon to 1 p.m. Bring
a stack of business cards.
Refreshments will be served. Enter for
a chance to win a free ad schedule in
the Daily Journal. Pre-registration is
encouraged. Visit
www.smdailyjournal.com and click
link to pre-register. Free. For more
information call 344-5200.
Aegis Living presents: Puttin On
The Ritz. Noon to 2 p.m. 2280 Gellert
Blvd., South San Francisco. Aegis Living
welcomes the public to an Open
House and to a buffet lunch with the
sounds of Dixie Land Jazz. Free. For
more information call 952-6100.
Wine Tasting & Lecture: Wines with
aCause: Senders Wines & Cantora. 4
p.m. to 6 p.m. 150 San Mateo Road,
Half Moon Bay. Join Darlene de la
Cerna for a wine tasting of Cabernet
Sauvignon and Pinot Noir from Napa
and Sonoma. Learn how they are
grown and hear from the winemakers.
Some revenue will be donated to
childrens charities. Attendees must be
21 and up. Reservations required. For
more information contact
patti@bondmarcom.com.
Second Annual RedwoodCityTeens
in Action Showcase. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Redwood City Courthouse Square.
Includes over 20 information tables
and displays by local youth leadership
groups, break dance and hip hop
demonstrations, musical
performances, live DJs and spoken
word. Free. For more information call
423-2217.
Piped Piper Players Once Upon a
Mattress. 7 p.m. Bayside Performing
Arts Center, 2025 Kehoe Ave., San
Mateo. $16 for adults, $12 for seniors
and children under 17. Group
discounts available. For more
information and for tickets visit
piedpiperplayers.org.
Honk. 7:30 p.m. Caada College Main
Stage Theater, 4200 Farm Hill Blvd.,
Redwood City. This musical is based
on Hans Christian Andersens The Ugly
Duckling. $14 for students and seniors.
$19 for adults. $1 service charge per
ticket. For more information and
tickets visit bayareaetc.org.
San Carlos Chickens Ball. 8 p.m.
Multi-Use Room, Central Middle
School, 826 Chestnut St., San Carlos.
Six skits will vie for pokes of gold as
they perform mini-melodrames or
song-and-dance variety numbers in
Belles of the Barbary Coast. $35 for
balcony, $25 for center floor, $20 for
side floor. For more information call
207-6301 or visit chickensball.org.
Angelicas Bell Theatre & Bistro
presents The Rat Pack Live. 8:30 p.m.
863 Main St., Redwood City. Sing along
and savor the comedy, music and
horseplay of the famous foursome.
Watch the legendary Las Vegas
performances at the Sands Hotel
come alive. With Joey Bishop (Jeff
Applebaum), Dean Martin (Matt
Helm), Sammy Davis Jr. (Howard
Henderson) and Frank Sinatra (Danny
Grewen). Online tickets $20. Tickets at
the door $25. Table reservations
required. For more information or to
get tickets call 365-3226.
Led Zeppelin Live Starring
Heartbreaker. 9 p.m. Club Fox, 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. $18. For
more information call 369-7770 or visit
http://tickets.foxrwc.com.
SATURDAY, APRIL 28
Camping Under the Stars. Harbor
Village Event Center, 270 Capistrano
Road, Half Moon Bay. During the
Annual Dream Machines Event
Weekend, families will be able to use
trailers and tents to camp under the
stars. There will also be childrens
activities all day with movies playing
inside the Shops at Harbor Village
starting at 6:30 p.m. $12 for one night,
$10 per night for two nights and $8
per night for three nights if families
will use one tent and will bring one
car. For more information and to
reserve a space call (888) 606-4862.
Compassion Weekend 2012. Various
times, Various locations.You can make
a difference in the Bay Area this year.
Join thousands of volunteers from San
Jose to San Francisco to participate in
one of 28 different projects that serve
others in our local communities.
Opportunities include: construction,
landscaping, medical, education,
relationship-building and family-
friendly events. Free. For more
information visit
www.compassionweekend.org.
Auditions for Fall 2012 Season of
Peninsula Girls Chorus. By
appointment. No previous choral
experience necessary. For ages 6 to 18.
Audition is free. For more information
and to make an appointment visit
peninsulagirlschorus.org or call 347-
6351.
Community Breakfast. 8:30 a.m. to
11a.m. The American Legion San
Bruno Post No. 409, 757 San Mateo
Ave., San Bruno. Breakfast includes
scrambled eggs, ham or sausage,
pancakes and French toast. $7 for
breakfast per person. $5 for children
under 10. For more information visit
legion.org.
Wake Up Walk and Healthy Kids
Day. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Peninsula Family
YMCA, 1877 S. Grant St., San Mateo.
Bring family and friends to enjoy a fun
stroll through the community. Brings
families and communities together to
celebrate healthy living with a day of
interactive games, family activities,
giveaways and more. Get information
about summer camp, swim lessons
and other Y programs. Free. For more
information email ypena@ymcasf.org.
Neighborhood Cleanup, Bee Seen
Keeping it Clean. 9 a.m. to noon. 2600
Middlefield Road, Redwood City.
Morning treats and lunch will be
provided. Volunteers under 18 years
of age must have their parents sign
the waiver form. This event earns
community service hours. Free. For
more information or to sign up call
(888) 442--2666 or email
infor@recycleworks.org.
First annual San Mateo County
School and Afterschool Program
Garden Recognition Ceremony. 10
a.m. to noon. Taft Community School,
903 10th Ave., Redwood City. San
Mateo County will award many new
and innovative school garden
programs to a number of nearly 40
local programs that have applied. For
more information call (510) 495-4962.
All Green Electronics Recycling
Event. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 2415
University Ave., Palo Alto.Technologys
blistering pace is leaving a hazardous
by product at its wake: E-waste. The
friends of East Palo Alto Library will be
teaming up with All Green Electronics
Recycling in a fundraising drive to host
an E-waste recycling collection. Free.
For more information visit
www.allgreenrecycling.com or call
321-7712.
Pacific Coast Dream Machines
Show. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Half Moon Bay
Airport, 9850 N. Cabrillo Highway, Half
Moon Bay. The show will feature a
showcase of motorized mechanical
marvels including sports cars, aircrafts
and more. There will also be activities
for children, food and live music. Pets
are not allowed at this event. $20 for
adults, $10 for ages 11 to 17 and those
over 65, free for kids 10 and under. $30
and $15 for a two-day pass. For more
information call 726-2328 or visit
miramarevents.com.
Friends of the Library Book Sale. 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Buy a
great bargain book and stay for the
jazz concert at 3 p.m. For more
information email conrad@smcl.org.
PANDAS Parent Symposium. 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Embassy Suites Waterfront,
SFO, Burlingame. Health care
professionals and parents from
around the world will gather to learn
about the rare autoimmune disease,
PANDAS. For more information
contact amy Smith at
amyjoysmith@nutriessentials.com.
Companion Animal Storyline and
Cat/Kitten Adoption Fair. 11 a.m. to
2 p.m. Foster City Library, 1000 E.
Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City. Hosted by
Foster City Library and Homeless Cat
Network. Books, DVDs and literature
on cat care available for checkout with
free library card. Foster care and rescue
volunteers available for feline behavior
advice and rescue training. Free. For
more information call 574-4842.
SFSU Handbell Choir. Noon. Mall
Atrium, The Shops at Harbor Village,
270 Capistrano Road, Half Moon Bay.
Free. For more information visit
sfsu.edu.
Art and botany discussion and
demonstration with Lois White. 1
p.m. to 4 p.m. San Mateo County
History Museum, 2200 Broadway, San
Mateo. Participants will be pressing
flowers and foliage found on the
Crystal Springs Watershed, identifying
the plants by their Latin names and
then creating greeting cards and other
forms of botanical art to take home
with them. $10. For more information
call 299-0104 ext. 231.
Piped Piper Players Once Upon a
Mattress. 2 p.m. Bayside Performing
Arts Center, 2025 Kehoe Ave., San
Mateo. $16 for adults, $12 for seniors
and children under 17. Group
discounts available. For more
information and for tickets visit
piedpiperplayers.org.
Honk. 2 p.m. Caada College Main
Stage Theater, 4200 Farm Hill Blvd.,
Redwood City. This musical is based
on Hans Christian Andersens The Ugly
Duckling. $14 for students and seniors.
$19 for adults. $1 service charge per
ticket. For more information and
tickets visit bayareaetc.org.
Day of the Child/Day of the Book. 2
p.m. to 3:30 p.m. San Mateo Public
Library, Childrens Area, Oak Room, 55
W. Third Ave., San Mateo. Event will
include bilingual storytelling, crafts,
other fun activities, free books and
light refreshments. Languages include
Spanish, Chinese, Japanese, Farsi and
English. Free. For more information call
522-7838.
ThePaul VornHagen JazzDuo. 3 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Paul VornHagen is an
accomplished jazz saxophonist, utist
and vocalist. Free. For more
information visit smcl.org.
Salsa Workshop. 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Boogie Woogie Ballroom, 551 Foster
City Blvd., Foster City. Yiva will be
teaching two Salsa Workshops. 4 p.m.-
5 p.m. is Beginners Workshop followed
by a 30-minute practice session. 5:30
p.m. to 6:30 p.m. is Intermediate-
Advance Workshop followed by a 30
minute practice session. Take one
workshop for $20, Take both
workshops for $30. (Get two free
dance party passes (per person, per
workshop) when you register and pay
at least 24 hours in advance. For more
information email
cheryl@boogiewoogieballroom.com.
Serra Mothers Day Boutique. 5 p.m.
to 8 p.m. Serra High School cafeteria,
451 W. 20th Ave., San Mateo.There will
be a variety of local vendors selling
jewelry, purses, topiaries, crosses,
collectibles and more options for
Mothers Day gifts. Admission to the
boutique is free. For more information
call 573-9935.
The Poetic Image, A collaboration
of Words and Images Reception.
The Main Gallery, 1018 Main St.,
Redwood City. 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Exhibit
continues through May 29. Closing
reception with poetry readings on
May 26 from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. with
poetry readings. For more information
email Belinda Chlouber at
belindachlouber@gmail.com.
Monarch Electric Jazz Band. 7 p.m.
to 9 p.m. Unitarian Universalists of San
Mateo, 300 E. Santa Inez Ave., San
Mateo. Monarch Electric Jazz Band is
an improvisatory Jazzrock group
aimed at providing sophisticated
musical energy to venues around the
Bay Area. $10 general admission. $5
for kids under 12. For more
information email
jazzmonarch@gmail.com.
International Latin Cha Cha
Dance Class. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Boogie
Woogie Ballroom, 551 Foster City Blvd.,
Foster City. Drop-in cost is $16. For
more information email
cheryl@boogiewoogieballroom.com.
Dutch Uncle with The Rockaways
and Alien Cowboys. 7:30 p.m. Club
Fox, 2209 Broadway, Redwood City. $8.
For more information call 369-7770 or
visit http://tickets.foxrwc.com.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
a very dark place. I had nothing. No direction
and no hope. The people at Freedom House
cared about me and became my friends. They
helped me to build my self-esteem and have
hope for my future, said a human-trafcking
survivor who will also be a guest speaker at
Saturdays fundraiser. Other survivors will
also speak at Freedom Houses Third Annual
Gala.
Freedom House staff help meet the basic
needs of survivors by providing them food,
clothing and housing while connecting them
to resources including social service, medical,
legal, psychological, emotional and spiritual.
The fundraiser, with about 500 already
signed up to attend, is an opportunity to stand
in solidarity against modern-day slavery, Im
said.
Many of the victims are often embarrassed
or blame themselves for being victimized, she
said.
When I was forced to become a prostitute,
I saw the ugly my family warned me of, and I
believed that the world no longer possessed
good, shared another Freedom House victim.
This home that the staff has worked so hard
to create is a place for women like me to feel
safe and see what beauty God has to give.
Im herself suffered terrible depression and
was near suicide a few years ago as she suf-
fered with severe migraine headaches for
many years. A pharmacist for 20 years, she
ended up leaving the profession as she was in
pain every day and also heavily medicated.
I hit rock bottom. I was anxious and
depressed. I was ready to give up, said Im,
married with one child.
But in 2008, Im put her care into the hands
of a renowned Christian faith healer from
Korea who prayed over her.
She had tried everything else so thought it
could not hurt.
Actually, it helped.
I asked God to please heal me, she said.
After her faith healing, Im had a miraculous
recovery after about four days of what she
described as physical and emotional purging.
I woke up one morning and my mind was
crystal clear, she said.
Deciding to put her career as a pharmacist
behind her, Im was looking for her next mis-
sion in life when she attended a human traf-
cking conference in San Francisco in 2009
and was inspired to help other women who
were suffering even more than she was.
I felt like I was given a second chance in
life and found my new lifes mission, she told
the Daily Journal. For me, its about letting
these women know to never give up.
The nonprot is faith based but does not
force religion on its clients, she said.
It relies completely on donations to serve
victims.
Ims hope is to raise awareness about the
victims and the trauma they endure as they are
trafcked for sex or labor.
Freedom House is also a supporter of the
CASE Act, the Californians Against Sexual
Exploitation Act, a ballot initiative that would
increase the penalties for human trafcking
and increase protections for victims that is
supported by U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San
Mateo.
Victims need all the help they can get, Im
said.
State Sen. Leland Yee, D-San Francisco/San
Mateo, will speak at Saturdays fundraiser in
San Francisco.
Two years ago, the fundraiser attracted
about 140 attendees but this year it is sold out,
with more than 500 tickets sold.
For more information on Freedom House or
to donate to help human-trafcking victims
visit www.freedomhousesfbay.org.
Bill Silverfarb can be reached by email: silver-
farb@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-
5200 ext. 106.
Continued from page 1
SHELTER
spiracy in September 2010.
During the scheme, those involved agree
not to bid against each other for foreclosed
properties auctioned off outside the county
courthouse. Instead, they kept the winning
price low which, in turn, federal prosecutors
say, damaged the real estate market and
defrauded those expecting a level playing
field.
The collusion taking place at these auc-
tions eliminated competition from the mar-
ketplace and allowed the conspirators to
profit from the financial distress of others,
said Sharis A. Pozen, acting assistant attor-
ney general Sharis A. Pozen in charge of the
DOJ Antitrust Division, in a written state-
ment.
When property is auctioned, the proceeds
pay off the mortgage and debt with any
remaining money going to the homeowner.
Squelching competitive bids limits how
much money is available for both.
Fong and Worthing used the postal service
to send title documents to others in the con-
spiracy, make and receive payoffs and divert
money, leading to the mail fraud charges.
For their roles, the investors face up to a
decade in federal prison and $1 million fine
for violating the antitrust law known as the
Sherman Act and up to 30 years and a simi-
lar fine for each count of conspiring to com-
mit mail fraud.
The DOJs antitrust division has an ongo-
ing investigation into bid rigging and fraud at
public real estate foreclosure auctions in the
Bay Area. Including Fong and Worthing, a
total of 22 people have settled cases in San
Mateo, San Francisco, Contra Costa and
Alameda counties.
Anyone with information about bid rigging
or fraud related to public real estate foreclo-
sure auctions should contact the Antitrust
Divisions San Francisco Office at (415) 436-
6660 or visit
www.justice.gov/atr/contact/newcase.htm or
call the FBI tip line at (415) 553-7400.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650)
344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
AUCTIONS
Woods was first elected to the East Palo
Alto City Council in November 2002 and his
current term expires in 2014. He announced
a bid for county supervisor last fall, stating
on his campaign Facebook page he was run-
ning to most effectively champion the
needs of our most underserved community
members and to work for our countys eco-
nomic growth and revitalization.
Woods got an early boost with an informal
backing by current Supervisor Rose Jacobs
Gibson who told the Daily Journal in
February he seemed best suited for the job,
citing his time on the East Palo Alto City
Council and Planning Commission, his time
in the U.S. Marine Corps and local govern-
ment experience as a Realtor. Jacobs Gibson
is being termed out.
As of the last campaign contribution dis-
closure forms due in March, Woods had
raised $505 and spent $1,459.84, mainly on
professional services. However, Woods later
said he raised $8,500 more than what was
reported to the Elections Office.
With Woods off the ballot, county voters
are now left to choose for the seat between
Menlo Park Councilman Andy Cohen and
Mayor Kirsten Keith; County Board of
Education Trustee Memo Morantes; Shelly
Masur, trustee on the Redwood City
Elementary School District Board, East Palo
Alto Councilman Carlos Romero; Ernie
Schmidt, Redwood City Planning
Commission vice chair; and Warren Slocum,
retired former chief elections officer and
assessor-county clerk-recorder.
If no one candidate receives more than 50
percent of the votes in June 5 primary, the
two top vote-getters will square off in
November. Although a supervisor represents
his or her district, they are chosen by voters
countywide.
Michelle Durand can be reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone:
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
WOODS
FRIDAY, APRIL 27, 2012
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Dont wait for others to
put a fun activity together, be the one who initiates
good times. If you do, this can be an extremely enjoy-
able day.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Those who love you
are likely to do all they can to help satisfy both your
material and emotional interests as unobtrusively as
possible. Show your appreciation.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) -- Its one of those rare
days where some of your more expansive hopes
have better- than-average chances of being gratifed.
Be optimistic about the outcome of events.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Dont sit around waiting
for something good to happen. If you get on things
immediately and strike while the iron is hot, you can
realize some gangbusters opportunities.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Forget about all the petty
things going on in your life and focus your energies
and efforts on endeavors that are near and dear to
you. When you do, life can be pretty darn great.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Collective endeavors
look extremely promising at this point in time. Check
to see if there is room for you in a coalition that is
engaged in something interesting.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- One of your better
assets is your knack for encouraging people to get
together to work on a common goal. Instinctively you
will know who should be part of this effort.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- If youve been
considering making a major change that you believe
would better your working conditions, nows the day
to implement it. Delay will only dull your fervor.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Trust your instincts,
common sense and good judgment. Snap decisions
could actually turn out to be better than those over
which you ponder for some time.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Timing can be
extremely important in situations where you are try-
ing to put together some kind of deal. Dont present
your case without having all your ducks in a row, and
dont delay the arrangement of said quackers, either.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -- You might not have any
fresh ideas yourself, but there will be no one better
than you for improving upon the innovations of others.
Youll know how to polish up what they envision.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- This could be one of
your better days, with everything going well. The
happiest surprise, however, will be running into
excellent bargains for everything you need.
COPYRIGHT 2012 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
COMICS/GAMES
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Tundra & Over the hedge Comics Classifeds
kids Across/Parents Down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


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10 -- Wiedersehen
11 Apiece
13 Poi base
14 JAMA readers
15 Hudson Bay tribe
16 Vegas numbers
17 Fort
19 Heavy hydrogen
discoverer
20 Drowse off
21 Kind of printer
23 Knitters supply
26 Palette adjunct
28 You dont say!
29 NASA destination
30 Arrive at
34 Olafs toast
36 Lao Tzus way
38 Compete
39 French Legion headgear
41 Jalopy
42 Dagwoods pooch
44 Novelist -- Levin
46 Worm or minnow
47 Wool fats
52 Austen novel
53 Leave out
54 Feel crummy
55 Sock tips
56 Prefx for second
57 Lions prey
58 Come to a halt
59 -- Majesty
60 Paddle cousin
DOwN
1 Crazes
2 Round dwelling
3 In that case (2 wds.)
4 Large-eyed lizard
5 Brass band events
6 More than passed
7 Tight-knit team
8 Decree
9 Bunch of fowers
12 Loaf ends
13 Muss up
18 Anderson Cooper channel
22 Prefx for dynamic
23 Fabric meas.
24 Razor-billed bird
25 Sweater letter
27 -- spumante
29 Dots in the Seine
31 Wide st.
32 Hush-hush org.
33 Like cool cats
35 Japanese dogs
37 Silly
40 Bridge tower
41 Mr. Linden
42 -- Runyon
43 Zeroed in on
45 Generator part
46 -- noire
48 Bombay nanny
49 Desdemonas enemy
50 1492 vessel
51 Run words together
DILBERT CROSSwORD PUZZLE
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Friday April 27, 2012 27
THE DAILY JOURNAL
28
Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY DRIVERS
VARIOUS ROUTES
SAN MATEO COUNTY
PENINSULA
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide deliv-
ery of the Daily Journal six days per week, Mon-
day thru Saturday, early morning. Experience
with newspaper delivery required. Must have
valid license and appropriate insurance coverage
to provide this service in order to be eligible.
Papers are available for pickup in San Mateo at
3:00 a.m. or San Francisco earlier.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday only, 10am
to 4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journals readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
106 Tutoring
TUTORING
Spanish,
French,
Italian
Certificated Local
Teacher
All Ages!
(650)573-9718
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
Were a top, full-service
provider of home care, in
need of your experienced,
committed care for seniors.
Prefer CNAs/HHAs with car,
clean driving record, and
great references.
Good pay and benefits
Call for Greg at
(650) 556-9906
www.homesweethomecare.com
HAIR STATIONS for rent.
(650)344-4919, Hair Contour
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES
Experienced, bilingual
sales person wanted.
Must have excellent
customer service
skills. Work on the
Peninsula.
Call (650)533-4424
Ask for Oleg
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
ORIGINAL NICKS PIZZERIA & PUB -
Help wanted, P/T Cook needed with ex-
perience. 1214 S. El Camino, San ma-
teo. Call after 10 a.m., (650)574-1530
PART-TIME SALES /
PHOTOGRAPHY
Our365 has an opening for a strong
sales & customer service oriented
person to take babies first official
photos at hospitals throughout the
Bay Area. Apply online at:
www.Our365.com/opportunities
EOE.
PROCESS SERVER (deliver legal
papers) car and insurance, reliable,
swing shift PT immediate opening
(650)697-9431
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Fax resume (650)344-5290
email info@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 512977
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Kanthasamy Abarna
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Kanthasamy Abarna filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Kanthasamy Abarna
Proposed name: Ganeshan Abarna
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on May 9, 2012
at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2E, at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 04/04/2012
/s/ Beth Freeman/
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 04/04/2012
(Published 04/06/12, 04/13/12, 04/20/12,
04/27/12)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249823
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Business Research and Ab-
stract Services, 1017 El Camino Real,
#287, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: William Paterson and Jennifer Col-
by, same address. The business is con-
ducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ William C. Paterson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/05/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/13/12, 04/20/12, 04/27/12, 05/04/12).
29 Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee Sale
Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name Change,
Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249940
The following person is doing business
as: Beauty Salon, 136 B St., SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Yolanda Castaneda,
220 Cypress Ave., #134, South San
Francisco, CA 94080. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Yolanda Castaneda /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/13/12, 04/20/12, 04/27/12, 05/04/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249946
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Airport Auto Tech, 899 Airport
Blvd., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Mar Cho Khin, 159 Shipley
Ave, Daly City, CA 94015, and Lily Chow
Ho, 14912 Riverdale St., San Leandro,
CA 94578. The business is conducted by
a General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Mar Cho Khin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/13/12, 04/20/12, 04/27/12, 05/04/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249998
The following person is doing business
as: 1.TDA, 2.TDA Investment Group,
2025 Pioneer Court, San Mateo, CA
94403 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: TDA, Inc., CA. The business
is conducted by a Corporation. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 05/14/2007.
/s/ Kathryn Mareschi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/16/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/20/12, 04/27/12, 05/04/12, 05/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250028
The following person is doing business
as: Atari Limousine Service, 3901
Geddes Ct., South San Francisco, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Rana Adeb Abdelhalim, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/ Rana Adeb Abdelhalim /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/18/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/20/12, 04/27/12, 05/04/12, 05/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249755
The following person is doing business
as: Front Page Advertising, 803 N. Hum-
boldt St. #208, SAN MATEO, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Bret Hildebrand, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
04/01/2012.
/s/ Bret Hildebrand /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/03/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/20/12, 04/27/12, 05/04/12, 05/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250017
The following person is doing business
as: 1) La Salsa, 2) La Salsa Fresh Mexi-
can Grill, 1230 El Camino Real, Ste Q,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: SBI Enter-
prise, LLC, CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Liability Company. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on
/s/ Bimal Siyan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/17/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/20/12, 04/27/12, 05/04/12, 05/11/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249700
The following person is doing business
as: Bay Area Metals, 154 S. Spruce
Ave., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Sahag Makdessian, 848 Up-
ton Way, San Jose, CA 95136. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Sahag Makdessian /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/29/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/27/12, 05/04/12, 05/11/12, 05/18/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #250086
The following person is doing business
as: Aurora Daycare, 1858 Royal Ave,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Aurora
Daycare, CA. The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Aurora Sanchez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/23/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/27/12, 05/04/12, 05/11/12, 05/18/12).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249757
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Corvus 2) Corvus Janitorial Sys-
tems, 31 Airport Blvd., Suite H, SOUTH
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Cor-
vus of California, LLC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Limited Liability Com-
pany. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
06/02/2009.
/s/ John Gribbin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/03/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/27/12, 05/04/12, 05/11/12, 05/18/12).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #249945
The following person is doing business
as: Go Faster Racing, 71 Northam Ave.,
SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Derek
LaFauci, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A .
/s/ Derek LaFauci/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/12/2012. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/27/12, 05/04/12, 05/11/12, 05/18/12).
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CIV501072
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): Patricia Crespo
YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF:
(Lo esta demandando el demandante):
Lisa Marie Stockton
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
courts lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
Superior Court of California, County of
San Mateo, Southern Branch
400 County Center
Redwood City, CA 94063
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiffs attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Charles J. Smith, Esq.
Hartnett, Smith & Paetkau
777 Marshall Street
Redwood City, CA 94063
(650)568-2820
Date: (Fecha) December 1, 2010
John C. Fitton, Clerk, by (Secretano, per)
G.Lacey, Deputy (Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
April 27, 2012, May 4, 11, 18, 2012.
210 Lost & Found
FOUND AT Chase Bank parking lot in
Burlingame 3 volume books "temple" and
others 650 344-6565
LOST - 2 silver rings and silver watch,
May 7th in Burlingame between Park Rd.
& Walgreens, Sentimental value. Call
Gen @ (650)344-8790
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
LOST: Center cap from wheel of Cadil-
lac. Around Christmas time. Chrome with
multi-colored Cadillac emblem in center.
Small hole near edge for locking device.
Belmont or San Carlos area.
Joel 650-592-1111.
294 Baby Stuff
B.O.B. DUALLIE STROLLER, for two.
Excellent condition. Blue. $300.
Call 650-303-8727.
REDMON WICKER baby bassinet $25
OBO Crib Mattress $10 650 678-4398
295 Art
6 FRAMED colored modern art pictures
36" by 26" $90 for all or $15 each
(650)345-5502
296 Appliances
CHOPPERS (4) with instructions $7/all.
SOLD!
JACK LA LANNE JUICER NEVER
USED $20 (650)458-8280
LARGE REFRIGERATOR works good
$70 or B/O (650) 589-1871
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SMALL SLOW cooker. Used once, $12
(650)368-3037
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER Eureka canister
like new $59, (650)494-1687
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK - Roof mounted, holds 4
bikes, $65., (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
1936 BERLIN OLYMPIC PIN, $99.,
(650)365-1797
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
2 MADAME ALEXANDER Dolls. $50
each or best offer.(650)589-8348
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEANIE BABIES in cases with TY tags
attached, good condition. $10 each or 12
for $100. (650) 588-1189
COKE-COLA 4-LUNCHEON SETS -
Frosted glass, $160. for all, (650)570-
7820
COLLECTIBLE CHRISTMAS TREE
STAND with 8 colored lights at base / al-
so have extra lights, $50., (650)593-8880
COLLECTIBLE FUFAYAWA / Arita Jap-
anese pattern dinnerware set for 8 great
price $100, SOLD!
COLLECTIBLES: RUSSELL Baze Bob-
bleheads Bay Meadows, $10 EA. brand
new in original box. (415)612-0156
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
DECORATIVE COLLECTOR BOTTLES
- Empty, Jim Beam, $8. each, (650)364-
7777
DEP GLASS - Black cloverleaf 36
pieces, will split. Prices vary. Large ash-
tray @ $125., (650)570-7820
298 Collectibles
GAYLORD PERRY 8x10 signed photo
$10 (650)692-3260
JACK TASHNER signed ball $25. Ri-
chard (650)834-4926
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK MCGUIRE hats, cards, beanie
babies, all for $98., (650)520-8558
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, 1 1/2 x 3 1/2,
all $40., (650)518-0813
PRECIOUS MOMENTS vinyl dolls - 16,
3 sets of 2, $35. each set, (650)518-0813
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
BILINGUAL POWER lap top
6 actividaes $18 650 349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18 high, $70
(650)387-4002
CHINA CABINET - Vintage, 6 foot,
solid mahogany. $300/obo.
(650)867-0379
VINTAGE FISHING LURES - (10) at be-
tween $45. & $100. each, CreekChub,
Helin Tackle, Arbogast, some in original
boxes, (650)257-7481
303 Electronics
19" TOSHIBA LCD color TV $99 SOLD!
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
32 TOSHIBA Flat screen TV like new,
bought 9/9/11 with box. $300 Firm.
(415)264-6605
46 MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
SAMSUNG 3G PHONE - Boost mobile
telephone, touch screen, paid $200.,
$100.obo, (415)680-7487
TOSHIBA 42 LCD flat screen TV HD in
very good condition, $300., Call at
(650)533-9561
304 Furniture
2 DINETTE Chairs both for $29
(650)692-3260
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
ADJUSTABLE BED. Full size, pillow top
w/ remote + massage. $2800 new. Must
sell $500 OBO (in Daly City). SOLD!
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BEAUTIFUL ORIENTAL Table. 32" by
32" 12" legs, Rosewood, Lightweight,
$75 SOLD!
BREAKFAST NOOK DINETTE TABLE-
solid oak, 53X66, $19., (650)583-8069
CAST AND metal headboard and foot-
board. white with brass bars, Queen size
$95 650-588-7005
CHANDELIER WITH 5 lights/ candela-
bre base with glass shades $20.
(650)504-3621
COFFEE TABLE - 30 x 58, light oak,
heavy, 1980s, $40., (650)348-5169
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DINING SET glass table with rod iron & 4
blue chairs $100/all. 650-520-7921,
650-245-3661
DISPLAY CASE wood & glass 31 x 19
inches $30. (650)873-4030
304 Furniture
DRAFTING TABLE 30 x 42' with side
tray. excellent cond $75. (650)949-2134
DRESSER - darkwood six drawer dress-
er with mirror and matching nightstand,
$30., SOLD!
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
DUNCAN PHYFE Mahogany china
cabinet with bow glass. $250, O/B.
Mahogany Duncan Phyfe dining room
table $150, O/B. Round mahogany side
table $150, O/B. (650)271-3618
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26L x 21W x
21H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOAM INCLINER for twin bed $40
650-692-1942
FOLDING LEG TABLE - 6 x 2.5, $25.,
(415)346-6038
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8 x 30, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MADE IN ITALY, 7pc. Dining Set. Inlaid
with burlwood with 2 extensions. Must
sell, $700 obo, (415)334-1980
MATTRESS TOPPER chrome full size
$15., SOLD!
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36 Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECLINER CHAIR very comfortable vi-
nyl medium brown $70, (650)368-3037
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
VANITY ETHAN Allen maple w/drawer
and liftup mirror like new $95
(650)349-2195
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $50 each or both for $80. nice
set. (650)583-8069
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five avaial-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
CEILING FAN multi speed, brown and
bronze $45. (650)592-2648
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
LAMPS - 2 southwestern style lamps
with engraved deer. $85 both, obo,
(650)343-4461
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
306 Housewares
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
SUSHI SET - Blue & white includes 4 of
each: chopsticks, plates, chopstick hold-
ers, still in box, $9., (650)755-8238
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $80. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10,
4 long x 20 wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CLICKER TORQUE Wrench, 20 - 150
pounds, new with lifetime warranty and
case, $39, 650-595-3933
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
DAYTON 15 HP motor - runs fine, $80.,
(650)592-3887
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
3,450 RPM $50 (650)347-5373
HAND DRILL $6. SOLD!
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
MEDIUM DUTY Hand Truck $50
650 593-7553
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
309 Office Equipment
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
OFFICE LAMP new $7. (650)345-1111
310 Misc. For Sale
10 PLANTS (assorted) for $3.00 each,
(650)349-6059
100 SPORT Books 70's thru 90's A's,
Giants, & 49ers $100 for all
650 207-2712
100 SPORT Photo's A's, Giants, & 49ers
$100 for all 650 207-2712
12 DAYS of Christmas vintage drinking
Glasses 1970 Color prints Prefect
condition original box $25 (650)873-8167
2 TODDLER car seats, hardly used.
Both for $75.00. (650)375-1246
21 PIECE Punch bowl glass set $55.,
(650)341-8342
21-PIECE HAIR cut kit, home pro, Wahl,
never used, $25. (650)871-7200
29 BOOKS - Variety of authors, $25.,
(650)589-2893
3 CRAFT BOOKS - hardcover, over 500
projects, $40., (650)589-2893
30 ADULT Magazines, 18 Adult VHS
movies & $ Dvds $40., also 50 Computer
Game Magazines $40., (650)574-3141
30 DISNEY Books $1.00 each
SOLD!
4 IN 1 stero unit. CD player broken. $20
650-834-4926
5 CUP electric coffee marker $8.00
SOLD!
5 PHOTOGRAPHIC CIVIL WAR
BOOKS plus 4 volumes of Abraham Lin-
coln books, $90., (650)345-5502
6 BASKETS with handles, all various
colors and good sizes, great for many
uses, all in good condition. $15 all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42 X 18 X 6, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
30
Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 The __ Kings
Play Songs of
Love: Hijuelos
novel
6 But wait, theres
more!
10 Surrounded by
14 Animated
mermaid
15 Mascara target
16 Better half, so to
speak
17 Did a fall chore
18 Kids comeback
19 Luau strings
20 See 38-Across
23 Pathetic
24 Where to ang
ones at
25 Insightful
26 See 38-Across
32 The Matrix hero
33 Bit of shuteye
34 Hi-tech brains?
35 Test ones metal
38 Clue for four
puzzle answers
39 Family insignia
41 Like some coll.
courses
42 Big initials in
Detroit
43 Low digit?
44 See 38-Across
50 SFO
guesstimates
51 One is often seen
near a dessert
array
52 RAV4 or
TrailBlazer, briefly
54 See 38-Across
58 Turbaned
Punjabi
59 Feels lousy
60 Professeurs
charge
61 Colored part of
the eye
62 Pool path
63 American Idol
success Clay
64 Club
membership,
maybe
65 Logicians E,
perhaps
66 Numerical
extreme
DOWN
1 Some are mini
2 Mount sacred to
Armenians
3 Title Gilbert and
Sullivan ruler
4 __ Wellington
5 Stick-in-the-mud
6 Connects with a
memory
7 Desktop item
8 Outdated globe
letters
9 Badly rattled
10 Talisman
11 Reprimand to
quarreling
siblings
12 Brangelina, for
one
13 __ Arc,
Arkansas
21 Texters If you
ask me ...
22 TVs Arthur
27 A, in Oaxaca
28 Bowled over
29 Souvenir from
Scotland
30 Black __: spy
doings
31 Zealous type
35 Walk me!
36 Inspiring msg.
37 Close game
38 Mason __
39 Polenta base
40 Crank (up)
42 High-end
43 She played Lois
on Lois & Clark
45 Violinist Perlman
46 Spinning toon
47 Group within a
group
48 Ive got it!
49 Log cabin
warmers
53 Olympics
segment
54 Baloney
55 One writing a lot
of fiction?
56 Prismatic bone
57 Ballet class bend
58 Hows it hangin,
bro?
By Patti Varol
(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
04/27/12
04/27/12
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
310 Misc. For Sale
9 CARRY-ON bags (assorted) - extra
large, good condition, $10. each obo,
(650)349-6059
AMERICAN HERITAGE books 107 Vol-
umes Dec.'54-March '81 $99/all
(650)345-5502
ANGEL WITH lights 12 inches High $12.
SOLD!
ART BOOKS hard Cover, full color (10)
Norman Rockwell and others $10 each
650-364-7777
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
BARBARA TAYLOR BRADFORD hard-
back books. 4 at $3.00 each or all for
$10., Call (650)341-1861
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BBQ GILL with Cover 31/2' wide by 3'
tall hardly used $49. SOLD
BBQ SMOKER BBQ Grill, LP Coleman,
Alaskan Cookin Machine, cost $140 sell
$75. 650-344-8549
BBQ SMOKER, w/propane tank, wheels,
shelf, sears model $86 650-344-8549
BEADS - Glass beads for jewelry mak-
ing, $75. all, (650)676-0732
BEAUTIFUL LAMPSHADE - cone shap-
ed, neutral color beige, 11.5 long X 17
wide, matches any decor, never used,
excellent condition, Burl, $18.,
(650)347-5104
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK - Fighting Aircraft of WWII,
Janes, 1000 illustrations, $65.,
(650)593-8880
BOOK NATIONAL Geographic Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
310 Misc. For Sale
CAMPING EQT - Eureka Domain 3
dome tent, med sleeping bag, SOLD!
CANDLE HOLDER with angel design,
tall, gold, includes candle. Purchased for
$100, now $30. (650)345-1111
CEILING FAN - Multi speed, bronze &
brown, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)592-2648
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good con-
dition $50., (650)878-9542
FOOD SLICER. Oxo Mandolin. Little
used. $15. (650)630-2329
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HANGING PLANTER. 2-black plastic-
coated steel, 20" wide, 10" deep. With
chains, hooks. Both for $35
(650)630-2329
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
JAMES PATTERSON BOOKS - 3 hard-
back @$3. each, 5 paperbacks @$1.
each, (650)341-1861
JANET EVANOVICH (4) hardback
books $3/each (8) paperback books
$1/each 650-341-1861
JEWELRY DISPLAY CASE - Hand-
made, portable, wood & see through lid
to open, 45L, 20W, 3H, $65.,
(650)592-2648
LARGE PRINT. Hard Cover. Mystery
Books. Current Author. (20) $1 each
650-364-7777
LIMITED QUANTITY VHS porno tapes,
$8. each, (650)871-7200
MAGNIFYING MIRROR. Swivel, wall
mount, 5Xx1X. Satin nickel finish. New,
in box. $20. (650)630-2329
MANUAL WHEECHAIRS (2) $75 each.
650-343-1826
310 Misc. For Sale
MEN'S ASHTON and Hayes leather
briefcase new. Burgundy color. $65 obo,
SOLD!
MIRROR, ETHAN ALLEN - 57-in. high x
21-in. wide, maple frame and floor base,
like new, $95., (650)349-2195
NATURAL GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM
- Alkaline, PH Balance water, with anti-
oxident properties, good for home or of-
fice, brand new, $100., (650)619-9203.
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OLD 5 gal. glass water cooler bottle $50
(650)593-7553
PICTORIAL WORLD History Books
$80/all (650)345-5502
PR. MATCHED PEWTER GOBLETS by
Wilton. Numbered. 7-1/2-in ht.
Excellent bridal gifts or mantel vases.
No polishing. $10/ea.or $18/pr.
SOLD!
SESAME STREET toilet seat excellent
condition $12 650 349-6059
SF GREETING Cards (300 w/envelopes)
factory sealed $20. (650)207-2712
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48 x 69
$70 (650)692-3260
SLIDING GLASS doggy door fits medi-
um to large dog $85 (650)343-4461
SONY PROJECTION TV Good condtion,
w/ Remote, Black $100 (650)345-1111
SPEAKER STANDS - Approx. 30" tall.
Black. $50 for the pair, (650)594-1494
STUART WOODS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each. (650)341-1861
TIRE CHAINS - brand new, in box, never
used, multiple tire sizes, $25., (650)594-
1494
TIRE CHAINS - used once includes rub-
ber tighteners plus carrying case. call for
corresponding tire size, $20.,
(650)345-5446
TOTE FULL of English novels - Cathrine
Cookson, $100., (650)493-8467
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
310 Misc. For Sale
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE TV /RADIO TUBES - 100 of
them for $100. total, (415)672-9206
WALGREENS BRAND Water Pitcher
Royal Blue Top 2 Quart New in Box $10
Ea use all brand Filters 650-873-8167
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT fixture - 2 lamp with frost-
ed fluted shades, gold metal, great for
bathroom vanity, never used, excellent
condition, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
WELLS FARGO Brass belt buckle, $40
(650)692-3260
WORLD BOOK ENCYCLOPEDIA - ex-
cellent condition, 22 volumes, $45.,
(415)346-6038
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
3 ACCORDIONS $110/ea. 1 Small
Accordion $82. (650)376-3762.
ELECTRIC STARCASTER Guitar
black&white with small amplifier $75.
650-358-0421
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
MAGNUS TABLE top Organ:: 2-1/2 oc-
taves. Play by number, chords by letters
Excellent condition, 5 starter books. All
$30. SOLD!
PIANO DARK MAHOGANY, spinet $400
(415)334-1980
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
312 Pets & Animals
FREE HORSE - Gentle 11 year old
standardbred gelding needs quality re-
tirement home. This horse won 62
races. Serious only call SOLD!
HAMSTER HABITAT SYSTEM - cage,
tunnels, 30 pieces approx., $25.,
(650)594-1494
SMALL DOG wire cage; pink, two doors
with divider $50.00 (650) 743-9534.
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
316 Clothes
A BAG of Summer ties $30
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BOOTS - purple leather, size 8, ankle
length, $50.obo, (650)592-9141
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
HAT: LADIES wide brim, Leghorn
straw, pouf/bow, pink/red velvet vintage
roses. From Hats On Post, SF-- orig.
$75. Yours for $25. OBO.
650-341-3288.
HAT: MENS black Stetson wool felt fe-
dora; white satin Stetson lining. Look
like Sinatra! Size 7-3/8-- long oval. $25.
SOLD!
HAT: LADIES black wool felt Breton
with 1 grosgrain ribbon above broad
brim. Sophisticated--fin the Easter Pa-
rade! $18., (650)341-3288
LADIES 3 PC. SEERSUCKER, (shorts,
slacks, jacket (short sleeves), blue/white
stripe. Sz 12, Excellent condition. $12.
all, SOLD!
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DOWN jacket light yellow with
dark brown lining $35. SOLD!
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES ROYAL blue rain coat with zip-
pered flannel plaid liner size 12 RWC
$15. SOLD!
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
LEVIS MENS jeans - Size 42/30, well
faded, excellent condition, $10.,
(650)595-3933
MEN'S SUIT almost new $25.
650-573-6981
MENS DESIGNER ties in spring colors,
bag of 20 ties $50 (650)245-3661
MENS DRESS SHOES - bostonian cas-
ual dress tie up, black upper leather, size
8.5, classic design, great condition,
$60.,Burl., (650)347-5104
MENS PANTS & SHORTS - Large box,
jeans, cargos, casual dress slacks,
34/32, 36/32, Burl, $85.all,
(650)347-5104
MENS SEARSUCKER suit size 42 reg.
$30 650 245-3661
MENS SHIRTS - Brand names, Polos,
casual long sleeve dress, golf polo,
tshirts, sizes M/L, great condition, Burl,
$83., (650)347-5104
NANCY'S TAILORING
& BOUTIQUE
Custom Made & Alterations
889 Laurel Street
San Carlos, CA 94070
650-622-9439
316 Clothes
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NINE WEST. 3 black handbags. Very
good condition. All for $10. (650)630-
2329
PICTURE HAT: Leghorn straw, pouf
bow, vintage red/pink velvet roses. Fem-
inine Easter Bonnet! From: Hats On
Post, SF @ $75. Steal at $20.,
(650)341-3288
REVERSIBLE, SOUVENIR JACKET
San Francisco: All-weather, zip-front,
hood. Weatherproof 2-tone tan.; Inner:
navy fleece, logos SF & GG bridge.
$15.00 (650)341-3288
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
VINTAGE CLOTHING 1930 Ermine fur
coat Black full length $35 650 755-9833
VINTAGE LIGHT beige mink coat $99
(415)334-1980
WOMEN'S BLACK Motorcycle Jacket
Size M Stella/Alpine Star $80. obo
(415)375-1617
317 Building Materials
WHITE STORM/SCREEN door. Size is
35 1/4" x 79 1/4". Asking $75.00. Call
(650)341-1861
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $40., (650)368-3037
13 ASSORTED GOLF CLUBS- Good
Quality $3.50 each. Call (650) 349-6059.
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all 650-345-7132 Leave message.
BOYS BOXING gloves $8. 341-8342
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)341-3288
COLEMAN "GLO-MASTER" 1- burner
camp stove for boaters or camping. Mint
condition. $35.00 (650)341-3288
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18 di-
meter, Halex brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GOLF BALLS (148) $30 (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS - 600+, $100. per dozen,
(650)766-4858
GOLF BALLS in new carton Dunlop,
Wilson, & Top Flight $9.00 650 341-8342
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
TREADMILL - PROFORM Crosswalk
Sport. 300 pounds capacity with incline,
hardly used. $450., (650)637-8244
TWO YOGA Videos. Never used, one
with Patrisha Walden, one by Rebok with
booklet. Both $6 (650)755-8238
WATER SKI'S - Gold cup by AMFA Voit
$40., (650)574-4586
YOUTH GOLF Bag great condition with
six clubs putter, drivers and accessories
$65. 650-358-0421
322 Garage Sales
ESTATE SALE
Saturday
and
Sunday
7AM-4PM
439 Santa Clara Ave.
Redwood City
Everything Must Go
Antique Tables, Oriental
Rugs, washer and dryer,
refrigerator, and more
GARAGE SALE
SAN CARLOS
10 El Sereno Dr.
(x-st.Elm & St.Francis)
Fri. & Sat.
April 27 & 28
9 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Furniture, antiques,
household items, fabric, quilt
cabinets, completed quilts,
Gammill Long Arm quilting
machine. Much More!!!
31 Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 82,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
BAMBOO poles 6 to 8 Ft, 30. SOLD!
FLOWER POTS many sizes (50 pieces)
SOLD!
GALVANIZED planter with boxed liners
94 x 10 x 9. SOLD!
POTTED PLANTS (7) $5/each
650-207-0897
TABLE - for plant, $25., perfect condi-
tion, (650)345-1111
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CANON 35MM CAMERA - Various B/W
developing items and film, $75. for all,
(415)680-7487
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
345 Medical Equipment
FOUR WHEEL walker with handbrakes,
fold down seat and basket, $50.
(650)867-6042
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 82,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom $1450. 2 bedroom $1795.,
New carpets, new granite counters, dish-
washer, balcony, covered carports, stor-
age, pool, no pets. (650) 591-4046
SAN CARLOS HILLS, 2 Bedroom,
1 bath. $1,350, Deck carport, clean.
No pets, no smoking, (650)343-3427
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
AUTO REVIEW
The San Mateo Daily Journals
weekly Automotive Section.
Every Friday
Look for it in todays paper to find
information on new cars,
used cars, services, and anything
else having to do
with vehicles.
BMW 530 95 WAGON - Moon Roof,
automatic, Gray/Black, 165K miles,
$3,850 (650)349-0713
CHEVY HHR 08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
CADILLAC 93 Sedan $ 4,000 or Trade
Good Condition (650)481-5296
620 Automobiles
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
AUTO AUCTION
The following repossessed vehi-
cles are being sold by Patelco Credit
Union on May 1st, 2012 starting at
8am ---1999 Acura 3.5 RL #010003,
2005 Ford F150 #B71448, 2004 Mer-
cedes Benz CLK 320 Cvt#024887.
Sealed bids will be taken starting at
8am on 05/01/2012. Sale held at Forr-
est Faulknor & Sons Auction Compa-
ny, 175 Sylvester Road, South San
Francisco. For more information
please visit our web site at
www.ffsons.com.
AUTO AUCTION
The following repossessed vehi-
cles are being sold by Meriwest Credit
Union - 2008 Nissan Sentra #734439.
The following repossessed vehicles
are being sold by First United Serv-
ices Credit Union --- 2006 Mercedes
Benz #003968, 2003 Toyota Sequoia
#154707. Plus over 100 late model
Sport Utilities, Pick Ups, Mini Vans,
and luxury cars ---INDOORS---Charity
donations sold. Sealed bids will be
taken from 8am-8pm on 04/30/2012
and 8am-5pm on 05/01/2012. Sale
held at Forrest Faulknor & Sons Auc-
tion Company, 175 Sylvester Road,
South San Francisco. For more infor-
mation please visit our web site at
www.ffsons.com.
FORD 08 Fusion - 34K miles, runs
great, $14,000 obo, Call Alex
(650)291-7451
HONDA 10 ACCORD LX - 4 door se-
dan, low miles, $19K, (650)573-6981
MERCEDES 06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
SUTTON AUTO SALES
Cash for Cars
Call 650-595-DEAL (3325)
Or Stop By Our Lot
1659 El Camino Real
San Carlos
625 Classic Cars
1979 CLASSIC Olds Cutlass Supreme.
81K orginal miles, new paint, excellent
condition. $6500 OBO (650)868-0436
RWC.
DATSUN 72 - 240Z with Chevy 350, au-
tomatic, custom, $4900 or trade.
(415) 412-7030
NISSAN 87 Centura - Two door, man-
ual, stick shift, 150K miles. Clean title,
good body, $1,250., (415)505-3908
PLYMOUTH 72 CUDA - Runs and
drives good, needs body, interior and
paint, $8,000 /obo, serious inquiries only.
(650)873-8623
SUBARU LOVERS - 88 XT original, 81K
miles, automatic, garaged, $2,700.,
(650)593-3610
635 Vans
NISSAN 01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW 03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON 83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 ccs,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
VARIOUS MOTORCYCLE parts USED
call for what you want or need $99
(650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
PLEASURE BOAT, 15ft., 50 horsepow-
er Mercury, $1,300.obo (650)368-2170
PROSPORT 97 - 17 ft. CC 80 Yamaha
Pacific, loaded, like new, $9,500 or trade,
(650)583-7946.
650 RVs
RV. 73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiberglass
Bubble Top $2,000. Will finance, small
downpayment. Call for appointments.
(650)364-1374
670 Auto Service
HILLSDALE CAR CARE
WE FIX CARS
Quailty Work-Value Price
Ready to help
call (650) 345-0101
254 E. Hillsdale Blvd.
San Mateo
Corner of Saratoga Ave.
670 Auto Service
MB GARAGE, INC.
Repair Restore Sales
Mercedes-Benz Specialists
2165 Palm Ave.
San Mateo
(650)349-2744
MERCEDES BENZ REPAIR
Diagnosis, Repair, Maintenance.
All MBZ Models
Elliott Dan Mercedes Master Certi-
fied technician
555 O'Neil Avenue, Belmont
650-593-1300
QUALITY COACHWORKS
Autobody & Paint
Expert Body
and
Paint Personalized Service
411 Woodside Road,
Redwood City
650-280-3119
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
2 SNOW/CABLE chains good condition
fits 13-15 inch rims $10/both San Bruno
650-588-1946
67-68 CAMERO parts, $85., (650)592-
3887
94-96 CAPRICE Impala Parts, headlight
lenses, electric fan, radiator, tyres and
wheels. $50., (650)574-3141
ACCELL OR Mallory Dual Point Distribu-
tor for Pontiac $30 each, (650)574-3141
CAMPER/TRAILER/TRUCK OUTSIDE
backup mirror 8 diameter fixture. $30.
650-588-1946
CARGO COVER, (black) for Acura MDX
$75. 415-516-7060
CHEVY SMALL Block Chrome Dressup
Kit. 1 timing chain cover, 1 large air
cleaner and a set of valve covers. $30.,
(650)574-3141
HEAVY DUTY jack stand for camper or
SUV $15. (650)949-2134
HONDA CIVIC FRONT SEAT Gray Col-
or. Excellent Condition $90. San Bruno.
415-999-4947
670 Auto Parts
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
31 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Dont lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journals
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 82,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call
(650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Bath
Grout Cleaning
April Special
Save $$
$150. Single bathroom up to 150 sq ft
color tile repair and match
marble and granite restoration
complete bathroom remodels
KAM Bath Restore - 650-652-9664
Lic 839815
Building/Remodeling
DRAFTING SERVICES
for
Remodels, Additions,
and
New Construction
(650)343-4340
Contractors
RISECON
NORTH AMERICA
General Contractors / Building
& Design
New construction, Kitchen-Bath Re-
models, Metal Fabrication, Painting
Call for free design consultation
(650) 274-4484 www.risecon.com
L#926933
Cleaning
* BLANCAS CLEANING
SERVICES
$25 OFF First Cleaning
Commercial - Residential
(we also clean windows)
Good References 10 Years Exp.
FREE Estimates
(650) 867-9969
Cleaning
MENAS
Cleaning Services
(650)704-2496
Great Service at a Reasonable Price
16+ Years in Business
Move in/out
Steam Carpet
Windows & Screens
Pressure Washing
www.menascleaning.com
LICENSED & INSURED
Professional | Reliable | Trustworthy
Cleaning
HANDY
MANDY
Carpet Upholstery
Rugs Dryer + Vents
Tile + Grout Cleaning
Excellentt Workmanship
Good Refferences
Free Estimates
(650)245-7631
Direct
30 Years in Business
Concrete
Construction
BELMONT
CONSTRUCTION
Residential & Commercial
Carpentry & Plumbing
Remodeling &
New Construction
Kitchen, Bath,
Structural Repairs
Additions, Decks,
Stairs, Railings
Lic#836489, Ins. & Bonded
All work guaranteed
Call now for a free estimate
650-766-1244
Kevin@belmontconstructionca.com
Construction Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed Insured Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
30 INCH white screen door, new $20
leave message 650-341-5364
32
Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben at (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
ANGEL TRUMPET VINE - wine colored
blooms, $40., SSF, Bill (650)871-7200
GARDEN PLANTS - Calla lilies, princess
plant, ferns, inexpensive, ranging $4-15.,
much more, (415)346-6038
Flooring
DHA
WOODFLOORING
Wood Flooring
Installation & Refinishing
Lic.# 958104
(650)346-2707
Gutters
ESTATE SHEET METAL
Lic.# 727803
Rain Gutters,
Service & Repairs
General Sheet Metal,
Heating,
Custom Copper Work
Free Estimates
(650)875-6610
Handy Help
FIX-IT-LIST
$399
10 items~labor
Roof Leak $299
(650) 868-8492
Handy Help
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Carpentry Plumbing
Kitchens Bathrooms
Dry Rot Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Water Damage,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
RDS HOME REPAIRS
Quality, Dependable
Handyman Service
General Home Repairs
Improvements
Routine Maintenance
(650)573-9734
www.rdshomerepairs.com
SENIOR HANDYMAN
Specializing in Any Size Projects
Painting Electrical
Carpentry Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
Refinish
High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
AM/PM HAULING
Haul Any Kind of Junk
Residential & Commercial
Free Estimates!
We recycle almost everything!
Go Green!
Call Joe
(650)722-3925
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
Interior Design
REBARTS
INTERIORS
Hunter Douglas Gallery
Free Measuring & Install.
247 California Dr., Burl.
(650)348-1268
990 Industrial Blvd., #106
SC (800)570-7885
www.rebarts.com
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsulas Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
CRAIGS PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work
Reasonable Rates
Free Estimates
(650)553-9653
Lic# 857741
DECOR PAINTING
Meticulous Worker,
Decorative eye
Wall covering,
Interior & Exterior.
(650)574-4107
Lic# 762988
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Plaster/Stucco
JK PLASTERING
Interior Exterior
Free Estimates
Lic.# 966463
(650)799-6062
Plumbing
$69 TO CLEAN
ANY CLOGGED DRAIN!
Sewer trenchless
Pipe replacement
Replace sewer line without
ruining your yard
(650) 898-4444
Lic#933572
Remodeling
PATRICK
BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS WALL REMOVAL
BATHS KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
650 868 - 8492
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
Marble, Stone & porcelain
Kitchens, bathrooms, floors,
fireplaces, entryways, decks, tile
repair, grout repair
Free Estimates Lic.# 955492
Mario Cubias
(650)784-3079
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tors State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Accounting
FIRST PENINSULA
ACCOUNTING
Benjamin Lewis Lesser
Certified Public Accountant
Tax & Accounting Services
Businesses & Individual
(650)689-5547
benlesser@peninsulacpa.com
Attorneys
* BANKRUPTCY *
Huge credit card debt?
Job loss? Foreclosure?
Medical bills?
YOU HAVE OPTIONS
Call for a free consultation
(650)363-2600
This law firm is a debt relief agency
Beauty
Let the beautiful
you be reborn at
PerfectMe by Laser
A fantastic body contouring
spa featuring treatments
with Zerona

,
VelaShape IIand
VASER

Shape.
Sessions range from $100-
$150 with our exclusive
membership!
To find out more and
make an appointment call
(650)375-8884
BURLINGAME
perfectmebylaser.com
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin &
Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
33 Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Divorce
DIVORCE CENTERS
OF CALIFORNIA
Low Cost
non-attorney service
UNCONTESTED
DIVORCE
650.347.2500
520 So. El Camino Real #650
San Mateo, CA 94402
www.divorcecenters.com
Se habla Espaol
I am not an attorney.
I can only provide self help services
at your specic directions
Food
AYA SUSHI
The Best Sushi
& Ramen in Town
1070 Holly Street
San Carlos
(650)654-1212
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
FIND OUT!
What everybody is
talking about!
South Harbor
Restaurant & Bar
425 Marina Blvd., SSF
(650)589-1641
GOT BEER?
We Do!
Holiday Banquet
Headquarters
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
Grand Opening
RED CRAWFISH
CRAVING CAJUN?
401 E. 3rd Ave. @ S. Railroad
San Mateo 94401
redcrawfishsf.com
(650) 347-7888
GULLIVERS
RESTAURANT
Early Bird Special
Prime Rib Complete Dinner
Mon-Thu
1699 Old Bayshore Blvd. Burlingame
(650)692-6060
JACKS
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
NEALS COFFEE
SHOP
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
Senior Meals, Kids Menu
www.nealscoffeeshop.com
1845 El Camino Real
Burlingame
(650)692-4281
SUNDAY CHAMPAGNE
BRUNCH
Crowne Plaza
1221 Chess Dr., Hwy. 92 at
Foster City Blvd. Exit
Foster City
(650)570-5700
SUNSHINE CAFE
Breakfast Lunch Dinner
1750 El Camino Real
San Mateo
(Borel Square)
(650)357-8383
THE AMERICAN BULL
BAR & GRILL
19 large screen HD TVs
Full Bar & Restaurant
www.theamericanbull.com
1819 El Camino, in
Burlingame Plaza
(650)652-4908
Food
THE MELTING POT
Dinner for 2 - $98.
4 Course Fondue Feast &
Bottle of Wine
1 Transit Way San Mateo
(650)342-6358
www.melting pot.com
Fitness
DOJO USA
World Training Center
Martial Arts & Tae Bo Training
www.dojousa.net
731 Kains Ave, San Bruno
(650)589-9148
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN
OR NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
REVIV
MEDICAL SPA
www.revivmedspa.com
31 S. El Camino Real
Millbrae
(650)697-3339
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Health & Medical
STRESSED OUT?
IN PAIN?
I CAN HELP YOU
Sessions start from $20
Call 650-235-6761
Will Chen ACUPUNCTURE
12220 6th Ave, Belmont
www. willchenacupuncture.com
TOENAIL FUNGUS?
FREE Consultation for
Laser Treatment
(650)347-0761
Dr. Richard Woo, DPM
400 S. El Camino Real
San Mateo
Insurance
AARP AUTO
INSURANCE
Great insurance
Great price
Special rates for
drivers over 50
650-593-7601
ISU LOVERING
INSURANCE SERVICES
1121 Laurel St.,
San Carlos
BARRETT
INSURANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
HEALTH INSURANCE
Paying too much for COBRA?
No coverage?
.... Not good!
I can help.
John Bowman
(650)525-9180
CA Lic #0E08395
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
MAYERS
JEWELERS
We Buy Gold!
Bring your old gold in
and redesign to
something new or cash it in!
Watch Battery
Replacement $9.00
Most Watches.
Must present ad.
Jewelry & Watch Repair
2323 Broadway
Redwood City
(650)364-4030
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues,Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
A+ DAY SPA MASSAGE
GRAND OPENING SPECIAL
Mention this ad for $10 off one hour
One hour $60, Half hour $40
Open every day, 9:30am to 9:30pm
(650)299-9332
615 Woodside Rd #5
Redwood City
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
GRAND OPENING
ASIAN MASSAGE
$50 for 1 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING!
CRYSTAL WAVE SPA
Body & Foot Massage
Facial Treatment
1205 Capuchino Ave.
Burlingame
(650)558-1199
HAPPY FEET
Massage
2608 S. El Camino Real
& 25th Ave., San Mateo
(650)638-9399
$30.00/Hr Foot Massage
$50.00/Hr Full Body Massage
HEALING MASSAGE
GRAND OPENING
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
SUNFLOWER
MASSAGE
Grand Opening!
$10. Off 1-Hour Session!
1482 Laurel St.
San Carlos
(Behind Trader Joes)
Open 7 Days/Week, 10am-10pm
(650)508-8758
TRANQUIL
MASSAGE
951 Old County Road
Suite 1
Belmont
650-654-2829
Massage Therapy
YOU HAVE IT-
WELL BUY IT
We buy and pawn:
Gold Jewelry
Art Watches
Musical Instrument
Paintings Diamonds
Silverware Electronics
Antique Furniture
Computers TVs Cars
Open 7 days
Buy *Sell*Loan
590 Veterans Blvd.
Redwood City
(650)368-6855
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Pet Services
BOOMERANG
PET EXPRESS
All natural, byproduct free
pet foods!
Home Delivery
www.boomerangpetexpress.com
(650)989-8983
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes Multi-family
Mixed-Use Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
Do you need help
finding the right senior
community for your parent?
I offer personalized guidance to
help make the right choices.
Laurie Lindquist 650-787-8292
Your Senior Housing Resource
A free service to families
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT &
ASSISTED LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
34 Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FOOD
Reservations Recommended - 650.342.6358 - Downtown San Mateo
#1 Transit Way - Next to CalTrain Station - www.meltingpot.com
4 Course Fondue Feast & Wine
Come in Monday - Friday to The San Mateo Melting Pot for a 4
course fondue feast with a bottle of house wine/bubbly for only
$98. Enjoy a melted cheese fondue, salad, entree with succulent
meats and veggies ending with a decadent chocolate fondue with
fruit and pastries. Regular price is $126. Please mention
The Daily Journal when booking your reservation.
By Michele Kayl
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ellen DeGeneres may be an out-
spoken vegan today, but a life with-
out meat or dairy wasnt always
easy for her to, er... digest.
Raised in New Orleans and
Texas, the talk show host says she
always had a healthy appetite for
sausage-laden red beans and rice, as
well as for thick, juicy steaks. She
rst tried to quit meat 15 years ago,
she said in a telephone interview,
but lasted only six months.
Ive always called myself an ani-
mal lover. And yet I ate them, she
said. Until four years ago I would
be driving past these cows on pas-
tures, and think What a lovely life
that is, and Id go and order a steak.
It takes a click, just one light bulb,
and youre like I cant do that any-
more.
The click that lit that bulb for
DeGeneres came by way of chicken
four years ago. Someone men-
tioned If you knew what chicken
looked like or you knew how chick-
en was made, youd never eat it
again, said the Emmy award-win-
ning comedian. Something
snapped.
Since then, DeGeneres and her
wife, actress Portia de Rossi, have
purged their diet of all animal prod-
ucts, including milk and eggs. It
wasnt easy this time around, either.
Its like anybody whos trying to
make a change, especially a habit
like eating food every day, she
said. Its hard to make a change.
But this time, she says, she
forced herself to watch grue-
some video footage and under-
cover documentaries shot by
opponents of the meat industry,
and to read books on the sub-
ject. The images that stuck in
her head from the films and the
books helped her stick to her
choice. But so did something
much simpler good food.
It helps that she and De Rossi
have a personal chef.
Roberto Martin, author of the
new book Vegan Cooking for
Carnivores (Grand Central Life
and Style, 2012) which includes
many of the recipes he created for
the couple made the transition
easier by serving them dishes such
as sliders made with veggie patties
and smoked tempeh, Greek salad
with tofeta (vegan feta cheese
made of tofu), ceviche made from
hearts of palm, and beluga lentil
caviar complete with buckwheat
blinis. He even recreated
DeGeneres beloved red beans and
rice.
They were over the moon
happy, said Martin, who follows a
largely plant-based diet, but is not a
strict vegan. It was vegan food that
was completely different from what
they had before. They were living
on quinoa and kale salad.
Even for Ellen, vegan road not always easy
REUTERS
Ellen DeGeneres speaks at the GLAAD Media Awards in Los Angeles.
35 Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WORLD
For more information call 650.344.5200
*While supplies last. Some restrictions apply. Events subject to change
Senior Showcase
Information Fair
Friday, May 18 at 9:00am to 1:00pm
Burlingame Recreation Center
850 Burlingame Avenue, Burlingame
Free Admission, Everyone Welcome
Free Services include*
Refreshments
Blood Pressure Check
Kidney Screening
Ask the Pharmacist
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By Mike Corder
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LEIDSCHENDAM, Netherlands
Former Liberian President
Charles Taylor became the rst head
of state since World War II to be
convicted by an international war
crimes court, a historic verdict that
sends a message that tyrants world-
wide will be tracked down and
brought to justice.
The warlord-turned-president was
found guilty on Thursday of 11
counts of war crimes and crimes
against humanity for arming Sierra
Leone rebels in exchange for blood
diamonds mined by slave laborers
and smuggled across the border.
Judges at the Special Court for
Sierra Leone said Taylor played a
crucial role in allowing the rebels to
continue a bloody rampage during
that West African nations 11-year
civil war, which ended in 2002 with
more than 50,000 dead. Ten years
after the war ended, Sierra Leone is
still struggling to rebuild.
The rebels gained international
notoriety for hacking off the limbs
of their victims and carving their
groups initials into opponents and
even children they kidnapped,
drugged and turned into killers. The
rebels developed gruesome terms
for the mutilations that became their
chilling trademark: They would
offer their victims the choice of
long sleeves or short sleeves
having their hands hacked off or
their arms sliced off above the
elbow.
The 64-year-old Taylor will be
sentenced next month after a sepa-
rate hearing.
The court has no death penalty
and no life sentence. Judges have
given eight other rebels as much as
52 years in prison.
The verdict was hailed by prose-
cutors, victims and rights activists
as a watershed moment in efforts to
end impunity for leaders responsible
for atrocities.
The ruling permanently locks in
and solidies the idea that heads of
state are now accountable for what
they do to their own people, said
David Crane, the former prosecutor
who indicted Taylor in 2003 and is
now a professor of international law
at Syracuse University. This is a
bell that has been rung and clearly
rings throughout the world. If you
are a head of state and you are
killing your own people, you could
be next.
U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-
moon hailed the judgment as a sig-
nicant milestone for international
criminal justice that sends a
strong signal to all leaders that they
are and will be held accountable for
their actions, said U.N. deputy
spokesman Eduardo del Buey.
U.S. State Department spokes-
woman Victoria Nuland said
Taylors prosecution delivers a
strong message to all perpetrators of
atrocities, including those in the
highest positions of power, that they
will be held accountable.
A warning to tyrants
Court: Charles Taylor responsible for Sierra Leone crimes By Munir Ahmed
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ISLAMABAD Pakistani
authorities deported Osama bin
Ladens three widows and his chil-
dren to Saudi Arabia early Friday,
less than a week before the rst
anniversary of the unilateral
American raid that killed the al-
Qaida leader in his hideout in a mil-
itary town.
The departure of the family closed
another chapter in an affair that
cemented Pakistans reputation as a
hub of Islamist extremism and cast
doubt on its trustworthiness as a
Western ally.
Once outside Pakistan, the wives
may be willing to share any infor-
mation they have about how bin
Laden managed to evade capture in
the country for nearly a decade fol-
lowing the Sept. 11, 2001 terror
attacks in the United States.
The U.S. commandos took bin
Ladens body, which they later
buried at sea, but left his family
behind. His wives and children were
detained by Pakistani authorities
immediately after the pre-dawn raid
on May 2, 2011.
Two of the widows are from Saudi
Arabia, and the third is from Yemen.
They were interrogated by
Pakistani intelligence agents and
eventually charged last month with
illegally entering and living in the
country. The three wives and two
adult daughters were convicted and
sentenced to 45 days in prison.
Their prison term, which was spent
at a well-guarded house in
Islamabad, ended earlier this month.
Pakistan deporting the bin
Laden familyto Saudi Arabia
By Zeina Karam
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT U.N. observers on
Thursday inspected the site of an
explosion that attened a block of
houses in the central Syrian city of
Hama and killed at least 16 people,
while the government and the opposi-
tion traded blame over the cause of the
blast.
Syrian state-run media said rebel
bomb-makers accidentally set off the
explosives. Anti-regime activists said
intense shelling by government forces
caused the extensive damage. It was
impossible to independently verify the
conicting accounts because President
Bashar Assads regime, facing a 13-
month-old uprising, has restricted
access for journalists and other outside
witnesses.
The spokesman for U.N. special
envoy Ko Annan, Ahmad Fawzi,
said observers visited the site but he
had no immediate word on what they
saw.
Two U.N. observers are stationed in
Hama, part of an advance team of 15
monitors who are visiting hot spots to
try to salvage a cease-re that is part of
a peace plan aimed at ending the vio-
lence and bringing the two sides to the
negotiating table.
Syrian regime and rebels
trade blame for deadly blast
REUTERS
Former Liberian President Charles Taylor looks down as he waits for the start
of a hearing to receive a verdict in the court room of the Special Court for
Sierra Leone in Leidschendam, near The Hague, Netherlands.
36 Friday April 27, 2012 THEDAILYJOURNAL