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DATA CENTER Brocade Director Cookbook for Brocade DCX Backbone Family October 2011

DATA CENTER

Brocade Director Cookbook for Brocade DCX Backbone Family

October 2011

DATA CENTER Brocade Director Cookbook for Brocade DCX Backbone Family October 2011

DATA CENTER

COOKBOOK

CONTENTS

Brocade Director Cookbook for Brocade DCX Backbone Family

1

Contents

2

Chapter 1: Brocade Director Introduction

 

10

Overview of Brocade DCX 8510 - 8 Backbone

10

Overview of Brocade DCX 8510-4 Backbone

14

Overview of Brocade DCX Backbone

 

19

Port-side of Brocade DCX Backbone

21

Overview

of

Brocade

DCX-4S

Backbone

21

Port-side of Brocade DCX-4S Backbone

23

Chapter 2: Basic Configuration

 

24

Assigning IP address

 

24

Creating serial connection

 

25

Assigning IP addresses

25

Static IP address

25

IPv6

Auto configuration

27

View

IP configuration

27

Domain IDs

 

27

Viewing your Domain ID

 

27

Setting your Domain ID

28

Ports

28

Port identification by slot and port number

29

Port identification by port area ID

30

Port

identification

by

index

30

Swapping port area IDs

 

30

Enable a port

 

31

Disable a port

31

Setting

Port

Speed

32

Setting Port name

32

Blades

33

Disabling blades

 

38

Blade

Swapping

38

Blade power management

 

38

Verifying High Availability features

39

Customizing the switch name

39

Checking Switch Status

 

39

Chassis names

40

Customizing chassis names

 

40

Switch activation and deactivation

40

Disabling a switch

 

40

Enabling a switch

40

Enterprise-class platform shutdown

 

40

Powering off a Brocade enterprise-class platform

40

Setting the date and time

 

41

Synchronizing the local time with an external source

41

To enable or disable FIPS, refer to Chapter 7, Brocade Fabric OS Adminstrator’s

42

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Webtools

42

Configuring IP and netmask information

42

Blade management

43

Enabling or disabling a blade

43

Setting a slot-level IP address

44

Viewing IP addresses

44

Switch configuration

45

Enabling and disabling a switch

45

Changing the switch name

45

Changing the switch domain ID

45

Viewing and printing a switch report

45

Switch restart

46

Performing a fast boot

46

Performing a reboot

46

Configuring fabric settings

46

Assigning a name to a port

47

Enabling and disabling a port

48

Persistent enabling and disabling ports

48

Enabling and disabling NPIV ports

48

Configuring BB credits on an F_Port

48

Chapter 3: Account Management

50

Overview

50

User Roles

50

Local database user accounts

50

Creating account:

50

Displaying Account Information:

50

Deleting account:

51

Modifying account:

51

Changing password for current login account

52

Changing password for different login account

52

Local account database distribution

52

Distributing the local user database

53

Accepting distribution of user databases on the local switch

53

Rejecting distributed user databases on the local switch

53

Password policies

53

Enabling the admin lockout policy

54

Unlocking an account

54

Disabling the admin lockout policy

54

Authentication servers on the switch

54

Adding a RADIUS or LDAP server to the switch configuration

54

Enabling and disabling a RADIUS or LDAP server

54

Deleting a RADIUS or LDAP server from the configuration

55

Changing a RADIUS or LDAP server configuration

55

Changing the order in which RADIUS or LDAP servers are contacted for service

55

Displaying the current RADIUS configuration

55

Configuring local authentication as backup

55

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Chapter 4: Setting the Protocols

 

57

Secure Copy

57

Setting up SCP for configUploads and downloads

57

Secure Shell protocol

 

57

Allowed-user

 

57

Configuring SSH authentication

57

Deleting keys on the switch

59

Telnet protocol

59

Blocking Telnet

 

59

Unblocking Telnet

60

Chapter 5: Configuration file and Firmware management

61

Configuration file backup

 

61

Uploading a configuration file in interactive mode

61

Configuration file restoration

61

Installing firmware

 

62

Firmware

download

from

network

62

Firmware download from a USB device

64

Webtools

65

Creating a configuration backup file

 

65

Restoring a configuration

 

67

Uploading and downloading from USB storage

69

Performing a firmware download

 

70

Chapter 6: Licensing

 

72

Licensing overview

72

ICL

licensing

72

ICL 16-link license

 

72

ICL 8-link license

72

Slot-based licensing

72

Adding a license to a slot

76

Removing a license from a slot

76

Adding a licensed feature

76

Removing a licensed feature

77

Web tools

78

Licensed feature management

 

78

Activating a license on a switch

78

Assigning slots for a license key

79

Removing a license from a switch

79

Universal time based licensing

80

Chapter 7: Virtual Fabrics

81

Overview

81

Enabling Virtual Fabric mode

 

81

Logical Switches

 

82

Creating Logical Switches

82

Assigning/Removing ports to logical switches

83

Displaying logical switch configuration

84

Changing Fabric ID of switch

85

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Setting /Removing IP address for fabric

85

Logical Fabric and ISL sharing

85

Configuring the switch to use XISL

86

Deleting a logical switch

86

Disable Virtual Fabrics

87

NPIV overview

87

Fixed addressing mode

88

10-bit addressing mode

88

Enabling/Disabling NPIV

89

Configuring NPIV

89

Viewing NPIV port configuration information

90

Web Tools

92

Selecting a logical switch from the Switch View

92

Viewing Logical ports

94

Chapter 8: Zoning

96

Overview

96

Zoning Configurations

96

Zone aliases

96

Creating an aliases

97

Adding members to alias

97

Removing members from alias

97

Deleting an aliases

98

Viewing aliases in defined configuration

98

Creating a Zone

98

Adding members to zone

99

Removing members from zone

99

Deleting a zone

99

Viewing zoning in defined configuration

99

Default zoning mode

100

Zoning database size

100

Zoning Configurations

101

Creating zoning configurations

101

Adding zones to zoning configuration

101

Removing zones from zoning configuration

101

Enable a zoning configuration

102

Disabling a zoning configuration

102

Deleting a zone configuration

103

Clearing changes to configuration

103

Viewing all zone configuration information

103

Viewing selected zone configuration

104

Viewing configuration in effective zone database

104

Clearing all zone configurations

104

Zone object maintenance

105

Copying a zone object

105

Deleting a zone object

105

Renaming a zone object

106

Zoning configuration management

107

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New switch addition

107

Web Tools

107

Zoning configurations

107

Opening the Zone Administration window

107

Setting the default zoning mode

107

Zoning management

108

Refreshing fabric information

110

Saving local zoning changes

110

Select a zoning view

110

Creating and populating zone aliases

111

Adding and removing members of a zone alias

111

Renaming zone aliases

111

Deleting zone aliases

112

Creating and populating zones

112

Adding and removing members of a zone

112

Renaming zones

113

Cloning zones

113

Deleting zones

113

Creating zone configurations

113

Adding or removing zone configuration members

114

Renaming zone configurations

114

Cloning zone configurations

114

Deleting zone configurations

115

Enabling zone configurations

115

Disabling zone configurations

115

Displaying enabled zone configurations

115

Adding a WWN to multiple aliases and zones

116

Removing a WWN from multiple aliases and zones

116

Replacing a WWN in Multiple Aliases and Zones

116

Searching for zone members

117

Clearing the Zoning Database

117

Zone configuration analysis

117

Best practices for zoning

118

Chapter 9: Routing and Trunks

119

Routing Traffic

119

Inter-Switch Links (ISLs)

119

Inter-chassis links

120

Routing policies

125

Displaying the current routing policy

125

Setting the routing policy

125

Setting up the AP route policy

125

Route selection

126

Dynamic Load Sharing

126

Setting DLS

126

Trunking overview

126

Basic trunk group configuration

127

Re-initializing ports for trunking

127

Enabling Trunking on a port

127

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Enabling Trunking on a switch

128

Displaying trunking information

128

F_Port trunking

128

Enabling F_Port trunking

128

Disabling F_Port trunking

129

FC-FC Routing

129

Integrated Routing

129

Setting up the FC-FC routing service

129

Verifying the setup for FC-FC routing

129

Assigning backbone fabric IDs

130

FCIP tunnel configuration

131

Creating an FCIP tunnel

131

Inter-fabric link configuration

131

Configuring an IFL for both edge and backbone connections

131

Setting router port cost for an EX_Port

134

Configuring EX_Port frame trunking

135

LSAN zone configuration

135

LSAN zones and fabric-to-fabric communications

135

Controlling device communication with the LSAN

135

Web Tools

138

Disabling or enabling ISL trunking

138

Viewing trunk group information

138

F_Port trunk groups

139

Creating and maintaining F_Port trunk groups

140

FC-FC routing management

141

Opening the FC Routing module

142

Configuring an EX_Port

143

Editing the configuration of an EX_Port

143

Viewing LSAN zones

143

Viewing LSAN Devices

143

Configuring the backbone fabric ID

144

Enabling Access Gateway mode

144

Disabling Access Gateway mode

145

Viewing the Access Gateway settings

145

Port configuration

146

Creating port groups

146

Editing or Viewing port groups

148

Deleting port groups

149

Access Gateway policy modification

150

Path Failover and Failback policies

150

Modifying Path Failover and Failback policies

150

Enabling the Automatic Port Configuration policy

150

Chapter 10: Port Indexing

152

Chapter 11: CEE and FCIP configurations

154

CEE Command Line Interface

154

Accessing the CEE CLI through the console or Telnet

154

Saving your configuration changes

154

Saving configuration changes with the write command

155

Using the do command as a shortcut

156

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CEE and LAN integration

157

CEE map attributes

157

Configuring DCBX

158

Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol

158

Configuring VLAN Membership

159

Configuring the CEE Interfaces

159

Minimum CEE configuration to allow FCoE traffic flow

160

FCIP

161

Configuration preparation

162

Configuration steps

162

Setting VE_ports to persistently disabled state

162

Configuring VEX_ports

163

Setting the GbE port operating mode (FX8-24 blade only)

163

Configuring a GbE or XGE port IP address

163

Configuring an IP route

164

Validating IP connectivity

165

Creating an FCIP tunnel

165

Creating additional FCIP circuits

165

Verifying the FCIP tunnel configuration

166

Enabling persistently disabled ports

166

Modifying an FCIP tunnel

166

Modifying an FCIP circuit

166

Deleting an IP interface

166

Deleting an IP route

166

Deleting an FCIP tunnel

167

Deleting an FCIP circuit

167

Web Tools

167

FC0E configuration tasks

167

Quality of Service (QoS) configuration

167

Adding a CEE map

168

Adding a traffic class map

170

LLDP-DCBX configuration

171

Configuring global LLDP characteristics

171

Adding an LLDP profile

173

Configuring CEE interfaces

175

Configuring a link aggregation group (LAG)

176

Configuring

VLANs

179

Configuring FCoE login groups

180

Displaying FCoE Port Information

182

Displaying LAG information

185

Displaying VLAN information

185

Displaying FCoE login groups

186

Displaying QoS information

186

Displaying LLDP-DCBX information

188

Displaying CEE interface statistics

189

Enabling and disabling a CEE interface

191

Enabling and disabling a LAG

192

Enabling and disabling LLDP

192

Enabling and disabling QoS priority-based flow control

193

Enabling and disabling FCoE ports

193

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Chapter 12: Getting technical help

194

SupportSave

194

Few Notes on FOS v7.0 Updates

196

Brocade DCX 8510-4 Backbone HardwareReference Manual

198

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CHAPTER 1: BROCADE DIRECTOR INTRODUCTION

Overview of Brocade DCX 8510 - 8 Backbone

The Brocade DCX 8510-8 is part of Brocade's industry-leading Backbone-class product line, a highly robust class of network switching platform that combines breakthrough performance, scalability, and energy efficiency with long-term investment. Brocade 8510 Backbones are the industry’s most powerful Fibre Channel switching infrastructure, providing the most reliable, scalable, high performance foundation for private cloud storage and highly virtualized environments. They are designed to increase business agility by adapting to dynamic growth and change, providing high availability access to information, and reducing infrastructure and administrative costs.

Key features of the Brocade DCX 8510-8 include:

• Up to 384 16 Gbps external ports in a single chassis, enabling high density SAN configurations with reduced

footprint.

• Support for 2, 4, 8, and 16 Gbps auto-sensing Fibre Channel ports. Trunking technology groups up to eight ports to create high performance 128 Gbps ISL trunks between switches.

• The Brocade DCX 8510-8 also supports 10 Gbps FC-type SFPs in 16 Gbps port blades only and also supports 10 SFPs in the FX8-24 and FCOE10-24 application blades. The two types of SFPs are not interchangeable.

GbE

• The 10 Gbps ports can be configured manually on only the first eight ports of the 16 Gbps port blades.

• Support for all of the application, port blade, and control processor (CP) blades supported in the Brocade 8510-4

(with

the exception of the Core Switch Blade), thereby providing flexible system configurations and fewer types of new blades.

• Up to five chassis can be connected with the use of 4x16 Gbps quad SFP (QSFP) inter-chassis links (ICLs).

• Support for high-performance port blades running at 2, 4, 8, 10, or 16 Gbps, enabling flexible system configuration.

• Redundant and hot-swappable control processor and core switch blades, power supplies, blower assemblies, and WWN cards that enable a high availability platform and enable nondisruptive software upgrades for mission- critical SAN applications.

• Universal ports that self-configure as E_Ports, F_Ports, EX_Ports and M_Ports (mirror ports). 10 Gbps ports are only.

• Diagnostic port (D_Port) functionality.

E_Ports

• In-flight data cryptographic (encryption/decryption) and data compression capabilities through the 16 Gbps port blades.

• Fibre Channel over IP (FCIP) functionality through the FX8-24 blade.

The Brocade DCX 8510-8 features a modular and scalable mechanical construction that allows a wide range of flexibility in installation, fabric design, and maintenance. The chassis can be mounted with the cables facing the front of the equipment rack or to the rear, and consists of the following:

• Up to eight hot-swappable port blade assemblies that can be configured in a single chassis, delivering up to 384 16 Gbps Fibre Channel ports.

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• Two slots for control processor blades (CP8):

- A single active CP8 blade can control all 384 ports in the chassis.

- The standby CP8 blade assumes control of the Brocade DCX 8510-8 if the active CP fails.

• Two slots for core switch blades (CR16-8):

- CR16-8 blade interconnects all port blades.

- Inter-chassis link (ICL) connectors to connect to as many as four neighboring chassis.

- Both CR16-8 blades are active.

• Modular, hot-swappable port blades:

- 64-port, 8-Gbps blades (FC8-64)

- 32-port, 16-Gbps blades (FC16-32)

- 48-port, 16-Gbps blades (FC16-48)

• Modular, hot-swappable application blades:

- FX8-24: 24-port (12 FC, 10 GbE, 2 10GbE) FCIP extension blade enabling long distance communication existing IP infrastructure.

over

• Modular, hot-swappable encryption blades:

- FS8-18: 16-port, up to 4 blades per chassis, supporting in-flight data cryptographic (encryption/decryption) data-compression capabilities

and

Modular, hot-swappable field-replaceable units (FRUs):

- Three blower assemblies.

- Up to four power supplies (100-240 VAC auto-sensing). o 110 VAC (nominal): Four power supplies are required for high availability.

At

o

220 VAC (nominal) is recommended for efficiency. Two or four power supplies are provided

depending on

the quantity ordered.

o

Redundant AC primary power connections ensure high availability. Each power supply has its own connector, so the number of primary power connections is four for optimum efficiency and redundancy.

NOTE

- Two WWN cards.

- Blades use small form-factor pluggable (SFP+, and mSFP) optical transceivers. SFP+ and mSFP support speeds of 2, 4, 8, 10, or 16 Gbps.

transceivers

The 8-Gbps SFP+s and mSFPs auto-negotiate at 2, 4, and 8 Gbps. The 16-Gbps SFP+s auto-negotiate at 4, 8, and 16 Gbps. The 10 Gbps speeds must be manually set and require special 10 Gbps SFP+ transceivers.

- QSFP-based inter-chassis link (ICL) cabling running at 64 Gbps (four 16 Gbps clustered in a single quad connector and cable).

• Blades that are serviced from the port side of the Brocade DCX 8510-8. Blowers, power supplies, and power are serviced from the nonport side.

• World Wide Name (WWN) cards on the nonport side, to maintain chassis-specific information such as WWNs, IP addresses, and summary status information of each port blade and power supply through LEDs.

• Redesigned cable management comb and chassis door.

• Constant intake and FRU temperature monitoring.

cables that

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Port side of the Brocade DCX 8510-8

NOTE Airflow in the Brocade DCX 8510-8 is from the nonport (noncable) side to the port (cable) side and out the exhaust vent.

Figure 1 displays a sample configuration of the port side of the Brocade DCX 8510-8.

vent. Figure 1 displays a sample configuration of the port side of the Brocade DCX 8510-8.

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Nonport side of the Brocade DCX 8510-8

The following figure shows a sample configuration of the nonport side view of the Brocade DCX 8510-8.

figure shows a sample configuration of the nonport side view of the Brocade DCX 8510-8. Brocade

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Overview of Brocade DCX 8510-4 Backbone

The Brocade DCX 8510-4 is part of Brocade's industry-leading Backbone-class product line, a highly robust class of network switching platform that combines breakthrough performance, scalability, and energy efficiency with long-term investment. Brocade 8510 Backbones are the industry’s most powerful Fibre Channel switching infrastructure, providing the most reliable, scalable, high performance foundation for private cloud storage and highly virtualized environments. They are designed to increase business agility by adapting to dynamic growth and change, providing high availability access to information, and reducing infrastructure and administrative costs.

Key features of the Brocade DCX 8510-4 include:

• Up to 192 16 Gbps external ports in a single chassis, enabling high density SAN configurations with reduced

footprint.

• Support for 2, 4, 8, and 16 Gbps auto-sensing Fibre Channel ports. Trunking technology groups up to eight ports to create high performance 128-Gbps ISL trunks between switches.

• The Brocade DCX 8510-4 also supports 10 Gbps FC-type SFPs in 16 Gbps port blades only and also supports 10 GbE SFPs in the FX8-24 application blade. The two types of SFPs are not interchangeable.

• The 10 Gbps ports can be configured manually on only the first eight ports of the 16 Gbps port blades.

• Support for many of the application, port blade, and control processor (CP) blades supported in the Brocade 8510-8(with the exception of the Core Switch Blade), thereby providing flexible system configurations and fewer types of new blades.

• Up to six chassis can be connected with the use of 4x16 Gbps quad SFP (QSFP) inter-chassis links (ICLs)

• Support for high-performance port blades running at 2, 4, 8, 10, or 16 Gbps, enabling flexible system configuration.

• Redundant and hot-swappable control processor and core switch blades, power supplies, blower assemblies, and WWN cards that enable a high availability platform and enable nondisruptive software upgrades for mission-critical SAN applications.

• Universal ports that self-configure as E_Ports, F_Ports, EX_Ports and M_Ports (mirror ports). 10 Gbps ports are E_Ports only.

• Diagnostic port (D_Port) functionality.

• In-flight data cryptographic (encryption/decryption) and data compression capabilities through the 16 Gbps port blades.

• Fibre Channel over IP (FCIP) functionality through the FX8-24 blade. The Brocade DCX 8510-4 features a modular and scalable mechanical construction that allows a range of flexibility in installation, fabric design, and maintenance. The chassis can be wide mounted with the cables facing the front of the equipment rack or to the rear, and consists of the following:

• Up to four hot-swappable port blade assemblies that can be configured in a single chassis, delivering up to 192 16 Fibre Channel ports.

• Two slots for control processor blades (CP8):

Gbps

- A single active CP8 blade can control all 192 ports in the chassis.

- The standby CP8 blade assumes control of the Brocade DCX 8510-4 if the active CP fails.

• Two slots for core switch blades (CR16-4):

- CR16-4 blade interconnects all port blades.

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- Inter-chassis link (ICL) connectors to connect to as many as four neighboring chassis.

- Both CR16-4 blades are active.

• Modular, hot-swappable port blades:

- 64-port, 8-Gbps blades (FC8-64)

- 32-port, 16-Gbps blades (FC16-32)

- 48-port, 16-Gbps blades (FC16-48)

• Modular, hot-swappable application blades:

- FX8-24: 24-port (12 FC, 10 GbE, 2 10GbE) FCIP extension blade enabling long distance communication existing IP infrastructure.

• Modular, hot-swappable encryption blades:

over

- FS8-18: 16-port, up to 4 blades per chassis, supporting in-flight data cryptographic (encryption/decryption) and data-compression capabilities.

• Modular, hot-swappable field-replaceable units (FRUs):

- Two blower assemblies.

- Two power supplies (100-240 VAC auto-sensing).

o

At 110 VAC (nominal): A minimum of two power supplies is required, regardless of the number of port or application blades. This configuration does not support high availability.

o

220 VAC (nominal) is recommended for efficiency. A second power supply is required to support high availability.

o

Redundant AC primary power connections ensure high availability. Each power supply has its own connector, so the number of primary power connections is two for optimum efficiency and redundancy.

- Two WWN cards.

- Blades use small form-factor pluggable (SFP+, and mSFP) optical transceivers. SFP+ and mSFP support speeds of 2, 4, 8, 10, or 16 Gbps.

NOTE

transceivers

The 8-Gbps SFP+s and mSFPs auto-negotiate at 2, 4, and 8 Gbps. The 16-Gbps SFP+s auto-negotiate at 4, 8, and 16 Gbps. The 10 Gbps speeds must be manually set and require special 10 Gbps SFP+ transceivers.

- QSFP-based inter-chassis link (ICL) cabling running at 64 Gbps (four 16 Gbps clustered in a single quad connector and cable).

• Blades that are serviced from the port side of the Brocade DCX 8510-4. Blowers, power supplies, and cables that are serviced from the nonport side.

power

• World Wide Name (WWN) cards on the nonport side, with WWN status LEDs located under the bezel.

• Two vertical cable management finger assemblies and a redesigned chassis door for improved cable management.

• Constant intake and FRU temperature monitoring.

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Port side of the Brocade DCX 8510-4

NOTE

Airflow in the Brocade DCX 8510-4 is from the nonport side to the left side and port side of the chassis (viewed from the port side) and out the exhaust vents. If you use the Port Side Exhaust Kit the air vents are all on the port side of the chassis (see Figure 4). Figure 3 displays a sample configuration of the port side of the Brocade DCX 8510-4.

configuration of the port side of the Brocade DCX 8510-4. Figure 3: Port side of the

Figure 3: Port side of the Brocade DCX 8510-4 (sample configuration)

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Figure 4: Port side of the Brocade DCX 8510-4 with the port side exhaust kit installed (sample configuration)

Nonport side of the Brocade DCX 8510-4

For Blade filler panel removal and replacement please see Brocade DCX 8510-4 Backbone Hardware Reference Manual. Figure 5 displays a sample configuration of the nonport side view of the Brocade DCX 8510-4.

of the nonport side view of the Brocade DCX 8510-4. FIGURE 5: Nonport side of the

FIGURE 5: Nonport side of the Brocade DCX 8510-4 (sample configuration)

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Brocade DCX 8510-8 blades

Table 1 summarizes the port, application, control processor, and core switch blades that are available for the Brocade DCX

8510-8.

switch blades that are available for the Brocade DCX 8510-8. TABLE 1 Blades available for the
switch blades that are available for the Brocade DCX 8510-8. TABLE 1 Blades available for the

TABLE 1 Blades available for the Brocade DCX 8510-8

Apart from the CP and CR blades, all other blades will work with the 8510-4 as well.

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Overview of Brocade DCX Backbone

The Brocade ® DCX ® Backbone represents the next generation of advanced Fibre Channel enterprise-class platforms

used to intelligently interconnect storage devices, hosts, and servers in a Storage Area Network (SAN). The Brocade

DCX is the highest-performance and highest-scalability enterprise-class platform offered by Brocade. It satisfies the

most demanding Reliability, Availability, and Serviceability (RAS), performance, and scalability requirements, while delivering investment protection, interoperability, and fabric-based intelligence advantages found only in the Brocade product family.

Key features of the Brocade DCX include:

Up to 512 external ports in a single chassis, enabling high density SAN configurations with reduced footprint.

Support for 1-, 2-, 4-, and 8-Gbps auto-sensing Fibre Channel (FC) ports. Trunking technology groups up to eight ports to create high performance 64-Gbps ISL trunks between switches. (10-Gbps ports (FC10-6) are 10 Gbps only.)

Up to 1024 ports in the same rack can connect with the use of inter-chassis links (ICLs). Up 1536 ports can be connected via ICLs in adjacent racks.

Support for high-performance port blades running at 1, 2, 4, 8, or 10 Gbps, enabling flexible system configuration.

Redundant and hot-swappable CP8 and CR8 blades, power supplies, blower assemblies, and WWN cards that enable a high availability platform and enable nondisruptive software upgrades for mission-critical SAN applications.

Universal ports that self-configure as E_Ports, F_Ports, FL_Ports, Ex_Ports and M_Ports (mirror ports). (10-Gbps ports (FC10-6) are E_Ports only.)

Data cryptographic (encryption/decryption) and data compression capabilities through the

Brocade FS8-18 Encryption Blade.

Fibre Channel over IP (FCIP) functionality through the FX8-24 blade.

Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE) capability through the FCOE10-24 blade.

The

Brocade DCX features a modular and scalable mechanical construction that allows a wide range of flexibility in

installation, fabric design, and maintenance. The chassis can be mounted with the cables facing the front of the equipment rack or to the rear, and consists of the following:

Up to eight hot-swappable port blade assemblies that can be configured in a single chassis, delivering up to 512 Fibre Channel ports.

Two slots for control processor blades (CP8):

A single active CP8 blade can control all 512 ports in the chassis.

The standby CP8 blade assumes control of the Brocade DCX if the active CP fails.

Two slots for core switch blades (CR8):

CR8 blade interconnects all port blades.

Two inter-chassis link (ICL) connectors per blade to connect to another chassis.

Both CR8 blades are active.

Modular hot-swappable port blades:

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16-port, 8-Gbps blades (FC8-16)

32-port, 8-Gbps blades (FC8-32)

48-port, 8-Gbps blades (FC8-48)

64-port, 8-Gbps blades (FC8-64)

6-port, 10-Gbps blades (FC10-6)

Modular hot-swappable application blades:

FA4-18: 18-port (16 FC + 2 10/100/1000 BaseT Ethernet copper interfaces), up to 4 blades per chassis, supporting Fibre Channel Application Services and blade management.

FR4-18i: 18-port (16 FC + 2 GbE), up to 4 blades per chassis, supporting Fibre Channel Routing Services and FCIP.

FX8-24: 24-port (12 FC, 10 GbE, 2 10GbE) FCIP extension blade enabling long distance communication over existing IP infrastructure.

FCOE10-24: 24-port (24 10GbE) CEE-based FCoE blade enabling enhanced connectivity using existing Ethernet infrastructure. This blade cannot be used in the same chassis as the high density port blade FC8- 64 or any of the other application blades (FA4-18, FR4-18i, FX8-24, or FS8-18).

Modular hot-swappable encryption blades:

FS8-18: 16-port, up to 4 blades per chassis, supporting data cryptographic (encryption/decryption) and data-compression capabilities.

Modular hot-swappable field-replaceable units (FRUs):

Three blower assemblies.

Up to four power supplies (100-240 VAC auto-sensing).

At 240 VAC: A minimum of two power supplies is required, regardless of the number of port or application blades. 240 VAC is recommended for efficiency and high availability.

At 120 VAC: Four power supplies are required when using the FA4-18, FR4-18i,

FS8-18, FX8-24, or FCOE10-24 blades.

Redundant AC primary power connections to ensure high availability. Each power supply has its own connector, so the number of primary power connections varies from two (recommended minimum) to four (optimum efficiency and redundancy).

Two WWN cards.

Small Form-factor Pluggable (SFP, SFP+, and mSFP) optical transceivers. SFP transceivers support speeds of 1, 2, and 4 Gbps. SFP+ and mSFP transceivers support speeds of 2, 4, and 8 Gbps.

Extended Form-factor Pluggable (XFP) optical transceivers (10 Gbps)

NOTE: The 8-Gbps SFPs and mSFPs auto-negotiate at 2, 4, and 8 Gbps. The 4-Gbps SFPs auto-negotiate at 1, 2, and 4 Gbps.

Blades that are serviced from the port side of the Brocade DCX. Blowers, power supplies, and power cables that are serviced from the nonport side.

World Wide Name (WWN) cards on the nonport side, to maintain chassis-specific information such as WWNs, IP addresses, and summary status information of each port blade and power supply through LEDs.

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Redesigned cable management comb and chassis door.

Constant intake and FRU temperature monitoring.

Port-side of Brocade DCX Backbone

temperature monitoring. Port-side of Brocade DCX Backbone Overview of Brocade DCX-4S Backbone The Brocade DCX-4S is

Overview of Brocade DCX-4S Backbone

The Brocade DCX-4S is part of Brocade's industry-leading Backbone-class product line, a highly robust class of network switching platform that combines breakthrough performance, scalability, and energy efficiency with long- term investment. Supporting open systems and System z, DCX Backbones are designed to address the data growth and application demands of evolving enterprise data centers, achieve server, SAN, and data center consolidation, and reduce infrastructure and administrative costs.

Key features of the Brocade DCX-4S include:

Up to 256 external ports in a single chassis, enabling high density SAN configurations with reduced footprint.

Support for 1, 2, 4, and 8 Gbps auto-sensing Fibre Channel ports. Trunking technology groups up to eight ports to create high performance 64-Gbps ISL trunks between switches (10 Gbps ports (FC10-6) are 10 Gbps only).

Support for all of the application, port blade, and control processor (CP) blades supported in the Brocade DCX Backbone (with the exception of the Brocade DCX Core Switch Blade), thereby providing flexible system configurations and fewer types of new blades.

Up to 768 ports in one rack can connect with the use of inter-chassis links (ICLs).

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Support for high-performance port blades running at 1, 2, 4, 8, or 10 Gbps, enabling flexible system configuration.

Redundant and hot-swappable CP8 and CR4S-8 blades, power supplies, blower assemblies,and WWN cards that enable a high availability platform and enable nondisruptive software upgrades for mission-critical SAN applications.

Universal ports that self-configure as E_Ports, F_Ports, FL_Ports, EX_Ports and M_Ports (mirror ports). 10 Gbps ports (FC10-6 blade) are E_Ports only.

Data cryptographic (encryption/decryption) and data compression capabilities through the

Brocade FS8-18 Encryption Blade.

Fibre Channel over IP (FCIP) functionality through the FX8-24 blade.

Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE) capability through the FCOE10-24 blade.

The Brocade DCX-4S features a modular and scalable mechanical construction that allows a wide range of flexibility in installation, fabric design, and maintenance. The chassis can be mounted with the cables facing the front of the equipment rack or to the rear, and consists of the following:

Up to four hot-swappable port blade assemblies that can be configured in a single chassis, delivering up to 256 Fibre Channel ports.

Two slots for control processor blades (CP8):

A single active CP8 blade can control all 256 ports in the chassis.

The standby CP8 blade assumes control of the Brocade DCX-4S if the active CP fails.

Two slots for core switch blades (CR4S-8):

CR4S-8 blade interconnects all port blades.

Two inter-chassis link (ICL) connectors per blade connect to another chassis.

Both CR4S-8 blades are active.

Modular hot-swappable port blades:

16-port, 8-Gbps blades (FC8-16).

32-port, 8-Gbps blades (FC8-32).

48-port, 8-Gbps blades (FC8-48).

64-port, 8-Gbps blades (FC8-64)

6-port, 10-Gbps blades (FC10-6).

Modular hot-swappable application blades:

FA4-18: 18-port (16 FC + 2 10/100/1000 BaseT Ethernet copper interfaces), up to 4 blades per chassis, supporting Fibre Channel Application Services and blade management.

FR4-18i: 18-port (16 FC + 2 GbE), up to 4 blades per chassis, supporting Fibre Channel Routing Services and FCIP.

FX8-24: 24-port (12 FC, 10 GbE, 2 10GbE) FCIP extension blade enabling long distance communication over existing IP infrastructure.

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FCOE10-24: 24-port (24 10GbE) CEE-based FCoE blade enabling enhanced connectivity using existing Ethernet infrastructure. This blade cannot be used in the same chassis as the high density port blade FC8- 64 or any of the other application blades (FA4-18, FR4-18i, FX8-24, or FS8-18).

Modular hot-swappable encryption blades:

FS8-18: 16-port, up to 4 blades per chassis, supporting data cryptographic (encryption/decryption) and data-compression capabilities.

Modular hot-swappable field replaceable units (FRUs):

Two blower assemblies.

Two 100 to 240 VAC (auto-sensing) power supplies. 240 VAC is recommended for efficiency and high availability.

Redundant AC primary power connections to ensure high availability. Each power supply has its own connector.

Two WWN cards.

Small Form-factor Pluggable (SFP, SFP+, and mSFP) optical transceivers. SFP transceivers support speeds of 1, 2, and 4 Gbps. SFP+ and mSFP transceivers support speeds of 2, 4, and 8 Gbps.

Extended Form-factor Pluggable (XFP) optical transceivers (10-Gbps).

Port-side of Brocade DCX-4S Backbone

transceivers (10-Gbps). Port-side of Brocade DCX-4S Backbone Brocade DCX 8510-4 has: –– Up to 192 ports

Brocade DCX 8510-4 has:

––Up to 192 ports (equivalent to 256 with ICLs) at 16 Gbps ––512 Gbps bandwidth per slot ––4.1 Tbps chassis bandwidth

3.1 Tbps universal ports

1 Tbps ICL bandwidth

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CHAPTER 2: BASIC CONFIGURATION

BASIC CONFIGURATION TASKS

HAPTER 2: B ASIC C ONFIGURATION BASIC CONFIGURATION TASKS Assigning IP address The Ethernet (network) interface

Assigning IP address

The Ethernet (network) interface provides management access, including direct access to the Fabric OS CLI, and allows other tools, such as Web Tools, to interact with the switch. You can use either Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) or static IP addresses for the Ethernet network interface configuration. On Brocade enterprise-class platforms you must set IP addresses for the following components:

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Both CPs (CP0 and CP1)

Chassis management IP

Setting the chassis management IP eliminates the need to know which CP is active and connects to the currently active CP.

Creating serial connection

Connect the serial cable to the RJ-45 serial port (shown in Figure 1 as number 2) on the switch and to an RS-232 serial port on the workstation. If the serial port on the workstation is RJ-45 instead of RS-232, remove the adapter on the end of the serial cable and insert the exposed RJ-45 connector into the RJ-45 serial port on the workstation.

Open a terminal emulator application (such as HyperTerminal on a PC, or TERM, TIP, or Kermit in a UNIX environment), and configure the application as follows:

In a Windows environment:

the application as follows: • In a Windows environment: • In a UNIX environment, enter the

In a UNIX environment, enter the following string at the prompt:

tip /dev/ttyb -9600

If ttyb is already in use, use ttya instead and enter the following string at the prompt:

tip /dev/ttya -9600

Assigning IP addresses

Static IP address

The Brocade DCX, DCX-4S, DCX8510-8 and DCX8510-4 require three IP addresses, which are configured using the ipAddrSet command. IP addresses are required for both CP blades (CP0 and CP1) and for the single logical switch (shown as SWITCH under the ipAddrShow command) in the Brocade DCX.

NOTE: The default IP addresses and host names for the Brocade DCX are:

10.77.77.75 / CP0 - the CP blade in slot 6 at the time of configuration

10.77.77.74 / CP1 - the CP blade in slot 7 at the time of configuration

ATTENTION: Resetting an IP address while the Brocade DCX has active IP traffic such as DCFM, Fabric Watch, SNMP, or other applications can cause traffic to be interrupted or stopped.

Perform the following steps to configure the IP addresses for both CP blades (from the active CP blade).

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1. Log in to the active CP as admin using the serial cable connection.

2. Set up the Brocade DCX IP address by entering the ipaddrset -chassis command:

swDir:admin> ipAddrSet -chassis

Enter the information requested by the prompts. Specify the -chassis IP address. The -sw 0 IP address is no longer valid on this chassis.

NOTE: The addresses 10.0.0.0 through 10.0.0.255 are reserved and used internally by the Brocade DCX. External IPs must not use these addresses.

1. Set up the CP0 IP address by entering the ipaddrset -cp 0 command:

swDir:admin> ipAddrSet -cp 0

2. Enter the information requested by the prompts.

3. Set up the CP1 IP address by entering the ipaddrset -cp 1 command:

swDir:admin> ipAddrSet -cp 1

4. Enter the information requested by the prompts.

This is a sample IP configuration:

swDir:admin> ipaddrset -chassis Ethernet IP Address [0.0.0.0]: 123.123.123.120

Ethernet Subnetmask [0.0.0.0]: 123.123.123.123 Fibre Channel IP Address [0.0.0.0]:

Fibre Channel Subnetmask [0.0.0.0]:

Done.

Committing configuration

swDir:admin> ipaddrset -cp 0 Host Name [cp0]:

Ethernet IP Address [10.77.77.75]: 123.123.123.121

Ethernet Subnetmask [0.0.0.0]: 123.123.123.123 Gateway IP Address [0.0.0.0]: 123.123.123.124

IP address is being changed

Committing configuration

swDir:admin> ipaddrset -cp 1 Host Name [cp1]:

Ethernet IP Address [10.77.77.74]: 123.123.123.122

Ethernet Subnetmask [0.0.0.0]: 123.123.123.123 Gateway IP Address [0.0.0.0]: 123.123.123.124

IP address of remote CP is being changed

Committing configuration swDir:admin> reboot

Issuing gratuitous ARP

Done.

Done.

Done.

Done.

Done.

5. Type reboot to reboot the Brocade DCX.

6. If desired, use the serial port to monitor error messages through the serial connection. After using the port, remove the serial cable and replace the shipping cap on the CONSOLE port.

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IPv6 Auto configuration

Here are the steps to enable/disable IPv6 auto configuration.

1. Enter the ipAddrSet -ipv6 -auto command to enable IPv6 auto configuration for all managed entities on the target platform.

2. Enter the ipAddrSet -ipv6 -noauto command to disable IPv6 auto configuration for all managed entities on the target platform.

View IP configuration

To view the IP configuration of the switch use ipaddrShow command

DCX:admin> ipaddrshow

CHASSIS Ethernet IP Address: 10.246.54.79 Ethernet Subnetmask: 255.255.255.0

CP0

Ethernet IP Address: 10.246.54.77 Ethernet Subnetmask: 255.255.255.0 Host Name: cp0 Gateway IP Address: 10.246.54.1

CP1

Ethernet IP Address: 10.246.54.78 Ethernet Subnetmask: 255.255.255.0 Host Name: cp1 Gateway IP Address: 10.246.54.1 IPFC address for virtual fabric ID 128: 10.10.10.10/24

Backplane IP address of CP0 : 10.0.0.5 Backplane IP address of CP1 : 10.0.0.6 IPv6 Autoconfiguration Enabled: Yes Local IPv6 Addresses:

IPv6 Gateways:

DCX:admin>

Domain IDs

Domain IDs are set dynamically on Brocade switches. The default value is 1. You can change the domain ID if you want to control the ID number or resolve conflict while merging fabrics. Conflicts can be automatically resolved if one of the two switch’s domain ID is not set persistently.

Below are the steps to view and set the Domain Ids.

Viewing your Domain ID

1. Log in using account with admin privileges.

2. Issue the fabricShow command

DCX:admin> fabricshow

Switch ID

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Worldwide Name

Enet IP Addr

FC IP Addr

Name

1: fffc01 10:00:00:05:1e:02:0e:de 10.246.54.240

0.0.0.0

"200E"

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2: fffc02 10:00:00:05:1e:02:93:75 10.246.54.241

0.0.0.0

“5100"

4: fffc04 10:00:00:05:1e:44:b6:00 10.246.54.79

10.10.10.10

>"DCX"

The Fabric has 3 switches

The switch with the arrow (>) next to its name is the principal switch. Below is the description of the output.

Switch ID: The switch’s domain_ID and embedded port D_ID. The numbers are broken down as follows:

Example 64: fffc40 64 is the switch domain_ID fffc40 is the hexidecimal format of the embedded port D_ID.

Worldwide Name: The switch’s WWN.

Enet IP Addr: The switch’s Ethernet IP address for IPv4- and IPv6-configured switches. For IPv6 switches, only the static IP address displays.

FC IP Addr: The switch’s Fibre Channel IP address.

Name: The switch’s symbolic or user-created name in quotes. An arrow (>) indicates the principal switch.

Setting your Domain ID

Here are the steps to configure Domain ID manually

1. Connect to the switch and log in on an account assigned to the admin role.

2. Enter the switchDisable command to disable the switch.

3. Enter the configure command.

4. Enter y after the Fabric Parameters prompt:

Fabric parameters (yes, y, no, n): [no] y

5. Enter a unique domain ID at the Domain prompt. Use a domain ID value from 1 through 239 for normal operating mode (FCSW-compatible).

Domain: (1

239)

[1] 3

6. Respond to the remaining prompts, or press Ctrl-D to accept the other settings and exit.

7.

Enter the switchEnable command to re-enable the switch.

Ports

Because enterprise-class platforms contain interchangeable port blades, their procedures differ from those for fixed-port switches. For example, fixed-port models identify ports only by the port number, while enterprise-class platforms identify ports by slot/port notation.

NOTE

For detailed information about the Brocade DCX, DCX-4S, and DCX 8510 family enterprise-class platforms, refer to the hardware reference manuals.

NOTE

On each port blade, a particular port must be represented by both slot number and port number.

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When you have port blades with different port counts in the same director (for example, 16-port blades and 32-port blades, or 16-port blades and 18-port blades with 16 FC ports and 2 GbE ports, or 16-port and 48-port blades), the area IDs no longer match the port numbers.

blades), the area IDs no longer match the port numbers. TABLE 5 Port numbering schemes for

TABLE 5 Port numbering schemes for the port and application blades

Setting port names

Perform the following steps to specify a port name. For enterprise-class directors, specify the slot number where the blade is installed.

1. Connect to the switch and log in using an account with admin permissions.

2. Enter the portName command.

Example of naming port 0 ecp:admin> portname 1/0 trunk1

Port identification by slot and port number

The port number is a number assigned to an external port to give it a unique identifier in a switch. To select a specific port in the enterprise-class platforms, you must identify both the slot number and the port number using the format slot number/port number. No spaces are allowed between the slot number, the slash (/), and the port number.

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Example of enabling port 4 on a blade in slot 2 ecp:admin> portenable 2/4

Port identification by port area ID

The relationship between the port number and area ID depends upon the PID format used in the fabric. When Core PID format is in effect, the area ID for port 0 is 0, for port 1 is 1, and so forth.

For 32-port blades (FC8-32, FC16-32), the numbering is contiguous up to port 15; from port 16, the numbering is still contiguous, but starts with 128. For example, port 15 in slot 1 has a port number and area ID of 15; port 16 has a port number and area ID of 128; port 17 has a port number and area ID of 129.

For 48-port blades (FC8-48, FC16-48), the numbering is the same as for 32-port blades for the first 32 ports on the blade. For ports 32 through 47, area IDs are not unique and port index should be used instead of area ID.

For the 64-port blade (FC8-64), the numbering is the same as for 32-port blades for the first 32 ports on the blade. For ports 32 through 64, area IDs are not unique and port index should be used instead of area ID.

If you perform a port swap operation, the port number and area ID no longer match. On 48-port blades, port swapping is supported only on ports 0–15.

To determine the area ID of a particular port, enter the switchShow command. This command displays all ports on the current (logical) switch and their corresponding area IDs.

Port identification by index

With the introduction of 48-port blades, indexing was introduced. Unique area IDs are possible for up to 255 areas, but beyond that there needed to be some way to ensure uniqueness.

A number of fabric-wide databases supported by Fabric OS (including ZoneDB, the ACL DDC, and

Admin Domain) allow a port to be designated by the use of a “D,P” (domain,port) notation. While

the “P” component appears to be the port number, for up to 255 ports it is actually the area assigned to that port.

ATTENTION

Port area schema does not apply to the Brocade DCX-4S and DCX 8510-4 enterprise-class platforms. If two ports are changed using the portSwap command, their respective areas and “P” values are exchanged. For ports that are numbered above 255, the “P” value is actually a logical index. The first 256 ports continue to have an index value equal to the area_ID assigned to the port. If a switch is using Core PID format, and no port swapping has been done, the port index value for all ports is the same as the physical port numbers. Using portSwap on a pair of ports will exchange those ports’ area_ID and index values.

NOTE The portSwap command is not supported for ports above 256

Swapping port area IDs

If a device that uses port binding is connected to a port that fails, you can use port swapping to make another

physical port use the same PID as the failed port. The device can then be plugged into the new port without the

need to reboot the device.

Use the following procedure to swap the port area IDs of two physical switch ports. In order to swap port area IDs, the port swap feature must be enabled, and both switch ports must be disabled. The swapped area IDs for the two ports remain persistent across reboots, power cycles, and failovers.

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NOTE

You can swap only ports 0 through 15 on the FC4-48 and FC8-48 port blades. You cannot swap ports 16 through

47.

1. Connect to the switch and log in using an account assigned to the admin role.

2. Enable the portSwapEnable command to enable the feature.

3. Enter the portDisable command on each of the source and destination ports to be swapped.

ecp:admin>portdisable 1/2

4. Enter the portSwap command.

ecp:admin>portswap 1/1 2/2

5. Enter the portSwapShow command to verify that the port area IDs have been swapped. A table shows the physical port numbers and the logical area IDs for any swapped ports.

6. Enter the portSwapDisable command to disable the port swap feature.

By default, all licensed ports are enabled. You can disable and re-enable them as necessary. Ports that you activate with the “Ports on Demand” license must be enabled explicitly, as described in “Ports on Demand”. If ports are persistently disabled and you use the portEnable command to enable a disabled port, the port will revert to being disabled after a power cycle or a switch reboot. To ensure the port remains enabled, use the portCfgPersistentEnable command as instructed below.

Enable a port

1. Log in with account that has admin privileges

2. Issue the portEnable slot/portnumber command.

switch:admin> portenable 2/10

3. Issue the portCfgPersistentEnable slot/portnumber command to enable a port that has been persistently disabled.

switch:admin> portcfgpersistentenable 2/10

Disable a port

1. Log in with account that has admin privileges

2. Issue the portDisable slot/portnumber command.

switch:admin> portdisable 2/10

3. Issue the portCfgPersistentDisable slot/portnumber command to persistently disable a port.

switch:admin> portcfgpersistentdisable 2/10

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Setting Port Speed

1. Log in with account that has admin privileges

2. Issue the portCfgSpeed slot/portnumber <speed> command.

The following example sets the speed for port 3 to 8 Gbps:

ecp:admin> portcfgspeed 2/3 8 done.

The following example sets the speed for port 3 to autonegotiate:

ecp:admin> portcfgspeed 2/3 0 done.

3. Issue the switchCfgSpeed <speed> command to set all ports to same speed setting.

The following example sets the speed for all ports on the switch to 8 Gbps:

switch:admin> switchcfgspeed 8

Committing configuration

done.

The following example sets the speed for all ports on the switch to autonegotiate:

switch:admin> switchcfgspeed 0

done.

Committing configuration

Following things can be entered for speed settings:

Speed_Level: 0 - Auto Negotiate (Hardware)

1

2

4

8

ax - Auto Negotiate (Hardware) + retries s - Auto Negotiate (Software)

- 1Gbps

- 2Gbps

- 4Gbps

- 8Gbps

If you do not specify slot/portnumber then the settings are applied to all the ports in the switch.

Setting Port name

To set a name for the port we use the portName command. The name of the port is shown in portShow output. It is not to be confused with the port World-Wide Name (pWWN).

1. Log in with account that has admin privileges

2. Use command portname slot/portnumber -n “desired name

switch:admin> portname 1/1 -n "To 5100"

switch:admin> portshow 1 portIndex: 1 portName: To 5100 portHealth: No Fabric Watch License

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Blades

(output truncated)

The different blades that can be inserted into a chassis are described as follows:

• Control processor blades (CPs) contain communication ports for system management, and are used for low-level, platform-wide tasks.

• Core blades are used for intra-chassis switching as well as interconnecting two enterprise-class platforms.

Port blades are used for host, storage, and interswitch connections.

• AP blades are used for Fibre Channel Application Services and Routing Services, FCIP, Converged Enhanced Ethernet and encryption support.

The Brocade DCX and DCX 8510-8 each have 12 slots that contain control processor, core, port, and AP blades:

• Slot numbers 6 and 7 contain CPs.

• Slot numbers 5 and 8 contain core blades.

• Slot numbers 1 through 4 and 9 through 12 contain port and AP blades.

The Brocade DCX-4S and DCX 8510-4 each have 8 slots that contain control processor, core, port, and AP blades:

• Slot numbers 4 and 5 contain CPs.

• Slot numbers 3 and 6 contain core blades.

• Slot numbers 1 and 2, and 7 and 8 contain port and AP blades.

TABLE 6 below lists Brocade enterprise-class platform blade terminologies

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TABLE 6 Brocade enterprise-class platform blade terminologies

CP blades

The control processor (CP) blade provides redundancy and acts as the main controller on the enterprise-class platforms. The Brocade DCX, DCX-4S, and the Brocade DCX 8510 family support the CP8 blades. The CP blades in the Brocade DCX, DCX-4S, and the Brocade DCX 8510 family are hot-swappable. The CP8 blades are fully interchangeable among Brocade DCX, DCX-4S, DCX 8510-4, and DCX 8510-8 platforms. You can correct this issue by upgrading the firmware on the CP blade in a Brocade DCX or DCX-4S chassis.

Brocade recommends that each CP (primary and secondary partition) should maintain the same firmware version. For more information on maintaining firmware in your enterprise-class platform, refer to Chapter 9, “Installing and Maintaining Firmware” in Brocade Fabric OS Administrator’s Guide.

Core blades

Core blades provide intra-chassis switching and ICL connectivity, between DCX/DCX-4S platforms and between DCX 8510 platforms.

• Brocade DCX supports two CORE8 core blades.

• Brocade DCX-4S supports two CR4S-8 core blades.

• Brocade DCX 8510-8 supports two CR16-8 core blades.

• Brocade DCX 8510-4 supports two CR16-4 core blades.

The core blades for each platform are not interchangeable or hot-swappable with the core blades for any other platform. If you try to interchange the blades they become faulty.

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Port and application blade compatibility

Table 7 identifies which port and application blades are supported for each Brocade DCX, DCX-4S,

DCX 8510-8, and DCX 8510-4 enterprise-class platform.

DCX 8510-8, and DCX 8510-4 enterprise-class platform. TABLE 7 Blades supported by each platform NOTE During

TABLE 7 Blades supported by each platform

NOTE During power up of a Brocade DCX or DCX-4S, if an FCOE10-24 is detected first before any other AP blade, all other AP and FC8-64 blades will be faulted. If a non-FCOE10-24 blade is detected first, then any subsequently-detected FCOE10-24 blades will be faulted. Blades are powered up starting with slot 1.

The

maximum number of intelligent blades supported on a Brocade DCX or DCX 8510-8 is eight.

The

maximum number of intelligent blades supported on a Brocade DCX-4S or DCX 8510-4 is four.

Table 8 lists the maximum supported limits of each blade for a specific Fabric OS release. Software functions are not

supported across application blades.

specific Fabric OS release. Software functions are not supported across application blades. Brocade Directors 36 of

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TABLE 8: Blade compatibility within a Brocade DCX, DCX-4S, and the Brocade DCX 8510 family backbone

FX8-24 compatibility notes

Note the following guidelines:

• The FR4-18i and Brocade 7500 GbE ports cannot be connected to either the FX8-24 or Brocade 7800 GbE ports. The ports may come online, but they will not communicate with each other. Running physical cables between the FR4 -18i and FX8-24 blades is not supported.

• The port configuration is maintained separately for the GbE ports of the FR4 -18i and FX8-24 blades. The port configuration data of one blade is never applied to the other type even if an FX8-24 replaces an FR4-18i in the same slot of a chassis. However, if an FR4 -18i blade is replaced with an FX8-24 blade and then replaced back with an FR4 -18i, the FR4 -18i previous IP configuration data would be applied to the new FR4 -18i. The same behavior applies if you were to replace the FX8-24 with an FX8-24.

• When Virtual Fabrics is disabled, replacing an FR4 -18i with an FX8-24 (and vice-versa) is allowed without any pre- conditions

• When Virtual Fabrics is enabled (regardless of whether the FR4 -18i or FX8-24 blade is in the default switch), replacing an FR4 -18i with an FX8-24 (and vice-versa) without rebooting or power cycling the chassis will fault the blade with reason code 91. However, after blade removal, if you reboot or power cycle the chassis, inserting the other blade type is allowed.

• The data paths in both blades are interoperable between FC ports. FR4-18i FC ports can stream data over FX8-24 GbE ports and vice versa.

• The FX8-24 blade cannot co-exist with the FS8-18, and FCOE10-24 blades. For example, you cannot have an FA4-18 virtual device exported to an edge fabric, getting encrypted over an FS8-18 blade and then going over an FX8-24 FCIP distance VE_Port. There is no software enforcement to detect the above configuration.

Enabling blades

1. Connect to the switch and log in as admin.

2. Enter the bladeEnable command with the slot number of the port blade you want to enable.

ecp:admin> bladeenable 3 Slot 3 is being enabled

FC8-48, FC8-64, and FC16-48 port blade enabling exceptions Because the area IDs are shared with different port IDs, the FC8-48, FC8-64, and FC16-48 blades support only F_ and E_Ports. They do not support FL_Ports.

Port swapping on an FC8-48, FC8-64, and FC16-48 is supported only on ports 0–15. For the FC8-32 and FC16-32 port blades, port swapping is supported on all 32 ports. This means that if you replace a 32-port blade where a port has been swapped on ports 16–31 with a 48-port blade, the 48-port blade faults. To correct this, reinsert the 32-port blade and issue portSwap to restore the original area IDs to ports 16–31.

NOTE:

When an FC8-16, FC8-32, FC10-6, FS8-18, or FX8-24 blade is replaced by an FR4-18i blade, the current port configuration continues to be used, and all ports on the FR4-18i blade are persistently disabled.

• When an FR4-18i blade is replaced by an FC8-16, FC8-32, FC8-48, or FC8-64 blade, then the

EX_Port configuration is retained, but the ports are persistently disabled. All remaining port configurations are retained.

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Disabling blades

1. Connect to the switch and log in as admin.

2. Enter the bladeDisable command with the slot number of the port blade you want to enable.

ecp:admin> bladedisable 3 Slot 3 is being disabled

Blade Swapping

Blade swapping allows you to swap one blade with another of the same type; in this way, you can perform a FRU replacement with minimal traffic disruption. The entire operation is accomplished when the bladeSwap command runs on the Fabric OS.

Blade swapping is based on port swapping and has the same restrictions:

Shared area ports cannot be swapped.

Ports that are part of a trunk group cannot be swapped.

GbE ports cannot be swapped.

Swapping ports between different logical switches is not supported. The ports on the source and destination blades need to be in the same logical switch.

Undetermined board types cannot be swapped. For example, a blade swap will fail if the blade type cannot be identified.

Blade swapping is not supported when swapping to a different model of blade or a different port count. For example, you cannot swap an FC8-32 blade with an FC8-48 port blade.

NOTE This feature is not supported on the FX8-24 DCX Extension blade.

1. Connect to the director and log in using an account assigned to the admin role.

2. Enter the bladeSwap command. If no errors are encountered, the blade swap will complete successfully. If errors are encountered,

the

command is interrupted and the ports are set back to their original configuration.

3. Once the command completes successfully, move the cables from the source blade to the destination blade.

4. Enter the bladeEnable command on the destination blade to enable all user ports.

Blade power management

Powering off a port blade

1. Connect to the switch and log in as admin.

2. Enter the slotPowerOff command with the slot number of the port blade you want to power off.

ecp:admin> slotpoweroff 3 Slot 3 is being powered off

Powering on a port blade

1. Connect to the switch and log in as admin.

2. Enter the slotPowerOn command with the slot number of the port blade you want to power on.

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Verifying High Availability features

High Availability (HA) features provide maximum reliability and nondisruptive management of key hardware and software modules.

1. Connect to the switch and log in using an account assigned to the admin role.

2. Enter the chassisShow command to verify the model of the field-replaceable units (FRUs).

3. Enter the haShow command to verify HA is enabled, the heartbeat is up, and that the HA state is synchronized between the active and standby CP blades.

4. Enter the fanShow to display the current status and speed of each fan in the system. Refer to the hardware reference manual of your system to determine the appropriate values.

5. Enter the psShow to display the current status of the switch power supplies. Refer to the hardware reference manual of your system to determine the appropriate values.

6. Enter the slotShow -m command to display the inventory and the current status of each slot in the system.

Example of the slot information displayed for a DCX and DCX8510 chassis

DCX:FID128:admin> slotshow -m Slot Blade Type ID Model Name Status

--------------------------------------------------

1 SW BLADE 55 FC8-32 ENABLED

2 SW BLADE 51 FC8-48 ENABLED

3 SW BLADE 39 FC10-6 ENABLED

4 SW BLADE 51 FC8-48 ENABLED

5 CORE BLADE 52 CORE8 ENABLED

6 CP BLADE 50 CP8 ENABLED

7 CP BLADE 50 CP8 ENABLED

8 CORE BLADE 52 CORE8 ENABLEDpo

9 SW BLADE 37 FC8-16 ENABLED

10 AP BLADE 43 FS8-18 ENABLED

11 SW BLADE 55 FC8-32 ENABLED

12 AP BLADE 24 FR4-18i ENABLED

Customizing the switch name

1. Connect to the switch and log in using an account assigned to the admin role.

2. Enter the switchName command and enter a new name for the switch.

switch:admin> switchname newname

Record the new switch name for future reference.

Checking Switch Status

1. Log in with account that has admin privileges

2. Use the switchShow command to check the status of the all ports

3. Use switchStatusShow command to check the status of switch

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Chassis names

Brocade recommends that you customize the chassis name for each platform. Some system logs identify devices by platform names; if you assign meaningful platform names, logs are more useful. All chassis names have a limit of 15 characters, except for the Brocade 300, 5100, 5300, and VA-40FC switches, and the 5410, 5424, 5450, and 5480 embedded switches, which allow 31 characters. Chassis names must begin with a letter, and can contain letters, numbers, or the underscore character.

Customizing chassis names

1. Connect to the switch and log in as admin.

2. Enter the chassisName command.

ecp:admin> chassisname newname

3. Record the new chassis name for future reference.

Switch activation and deactivation

By default, the switch is enabled after power is applied and diagnostics and switch initialization routines have finished. You can disable and re-enable it as necessary.

Disabling a switch

1. Connect to the switch and log in using an account assigned to the admin role.

2. Enter the switchDisable command.

All Fibre Channel ports on the switch are taken offline. If the switch was part of a fabric, the fabric is reconfigured.

Enabling a switch

1. Connect to the switch and log in using an account assigned to the admin role.

2. Enter the switchEnable command.

All Fibre Channel ports that passed POST are enabled. If the switch has interswitch links (ISLs) to a fabric, it joins the fabric.

Enterprise-class platform shutdown

To avoid corrupting your file system, Brocade recommends that you perform graceful shutdowns of Brocade enterprise-class platforms. Warm reboot refers to shutting down the appliance per the instructions below, also known as a graceful shutdown. Cold boot refers to shutting down the appliance by suddenly shutting down power and then turning it back on, also known as a hard boot.

Powering off a Brocade enterprise-class platform

1. From the active CP in a dual-CP platform, enter the sysShutdown command.

NOTE When the sysShutdown command is issued on the active CP, the active CP, the standby CP, and any AP blades are all shut down.

2. At the prompt, enter y.

3. Wait until you see the following message:

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This command will shutdown the operating systems on your switch. You are required to power-cycle the switch in order to restore operation. Are you sure you want to shutdown the switch [y/n]?y HA is disabled Stopping blade 10 Shutting down the blade Stopping blade 12 Shutting down the blade Broadcast message from root (pts/0) Fri Oct 10 08:36:48 2008 The system is going down for system halt NOW !!

4. Power off the switch.

Setting the date and time

1. Connect to the switch and log in using an account assigned to the admin role.

2. Enter the date command, using the following syntax:

date "mmddHHMMyy" The values represent the following:

• mm is the month; valid values are 01 through 12.

• dd is the date; valid values are 01 through 31.

• HH is the hour; valid values are 00 through 23.

• MM is minutes; valid values are 00 through 59.

• yy is the year, valid values are 00-37 and 70-99 (year values from 70-99 are interpreted as 1970-1999, year values from 00-37 are interpreted as 2000-2037).

Example of showing and setting the date

switch:admin> date Fri Sep 29 17:01:48 UTC 2007 Stealth200E:admin> date "0204101008" Mon Feb 4 10:10:00 UTC 2008

Synchronizing the local time with an external source

The tsClockServer command accepts multiple server addresses in IPv4, IPv6, or DNS name formats. When multiple NTP server addresses are passed, tsClockServer sets the first obtainable address as the active NTP server. The rest are stored as backup servers that can take over if the active NTP server fails. The principal or primary FCS switch synchronizes its time with the NTP server every 64 seconds.

1. Connect to the switch and log in using an account assigned to the admin role.

2. Enter the tsClockServer command:

switch:admin> tsclockserver "<ntp1;ntp2>"

In this syntax, ntp1 is the IP address or DNS name of the first NTP server, which the switch must be able to access. The second variable, ntp2, is the second NTP server and is optional. The operand “<ntp1;ntp2>” is optional; by default, this value is LOCL, which uses the local clock of the principal or primary switch as the clock server.

Example of setting the NTP server

switch:admin> tsclockserver LOCL switch:admin> tsclockserver "10.1.2.3"

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Example of displaying the NTP server

switch:admin> tsclockserver

10.1.2.3

Example of setting up more than one NTP server using a DNS name

switch:admin> tsclockserver "10.1.2.4;10.1.2.5;ntp.localdomain.net"

Updating Clock Server configuration

Updated with the NTP servers Changes to the clock server value on the principal or primary FCS switch are

propagated to all switches in the fabric.

done.

FIPS Support

Federal information processing standards (FIPS) specify the security standards needed to satisfy a cryptographic module utilized within a security system for protecting sensitive information in the computer and telecommunication systems. For more information about FIPS, refer to Chapter 7, “Configuring Security Policies” in Brocade Fabric OS Adminstrator’s Guide.

Fabric OS v7.0.0 firmware is digitally signed using the OpenSSL utility to provide FIPS support.To use the digitally signed software, you must configure the switch to enable Signed Firmwaredownload. If it is not enabled, the firmware download process ignores the firmware signature and performs as before.

If Signed Firmwaredownload is enabled, and if the validation succeeds, the firmware download process proceeds normally. If the firmware is not signed or if the signature validation fails, firmwareDownload fails.

To enable or disable FIPS, refer to Chapter 7, Brocade Fabric OS Adminstrator’s Guide.

Webtools

Configuring IP and netmask information

1. Click the Network tab.

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DATA CENTER COOKBOOK 2. In the appropriate IP address section, enter the IP address you want

2. In the appropriate IP address section, enter the IP address you want to use for the IP interface.

3. Use the IPv4 Address section or the IPv6 Address section to specify IP addresses.

4. In the IPv4 Address section:

a. In the Ethernet IP field, enter the Ethernet IP address.

b. In the Ethernet Mask field, enter the Ethernet Mask address.

c. In the GateWay IP address field, enter the gateway IP address.

5. In the IPv6 Address section, in the Ethernet IPv6 field, enter the Ethernet IP address.

6. You can also enable automatic configuration of IPv6 addresses by selecting Enable IPV6 Auto Configuration. The automatically generated IPv6 addresses are displayed under Auto Configured IPV6 Addresses. Eight auto- configured addresses are created per switch, and up to 24 for a 48000, DCX, or DCX-4S chassis (eight per chassis, and eight per each installed CP).

Blade management

Web Tools provides the ability to enable and disable blades, and to set slot-level IP addresses for blades. The procedure in this section applies only to the Brocade DCX, DCX-4S, DCX8510-8 and DCX8510-4enterprise-class platforms.

Enabling or disabling a blade

Use the following procedure to enable or disable a blade.

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1. Open the Switch Administration window.

2. Click the Blade tab

the Switch Administration window. 2. Click the Blade tab The Firmware Version columns display the firmware

The Firmware Version columns display the firmware loaded onto each blade. A blade can have more than one

firmware image loaded onto it. The Enable Blade column in the Blade tab pane indicates whether the blade is enabled.

3. Select the Enable Blade check box for each blade you want to enable. Clear the check box to disable

cannot enable or disable the CP blades.

4. Click Apply.

the blade. You

Setting a slot-level IP address

Use the following procedure to set an IP address.

1. Open the Switch Administration window.

2. Click the Blade tab.

3. Click Set IP address.

4. Select a slot number from the list.

5. Enter the IP address, subnet mask, and Gateway IP address.

6. Select a type from the list.

7. Click Add to add the new entry to the table. When you click Add, the values remain in the fields. The Clear Gateway and Clear IP buttons are available for clearing fields in the table. To remove a configuration, select a row in the table and click Delete.

8. Click Apply to save the values currently shown in the table or click Cancel to close the dialog box without any of your changes. To update the switch with your changes, you must update the table using the Add and Delete buttons, and click Apply.

To update the switch with your changes, you must update the table using the Add and

saving

then

Viewing IP addresses

If you want to view the IP addresses configured on the switch for the currently populated slots, use the Show IP Address button.

1. Open the Switch Administration window.

2. Click the Blade tab.

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3. Click Show IP Address.

4. Scroll through the list to view all the information.

5. When you are finished, click Close.

Switch configuration

Use the Switch tab of the Switch Administration window to perform basic switch configuration.

Enabling and disabling a switch

You can identify whether a switch is enabled or disabled in the Switch Administration window by looking at the lower-right corner. If you rest the cursor over the icon, the system displays text that indicates the status of the switch. The steps are as given below.

1. Open the Switch Administration window.

2. Click the Switch tab.

3. In the Switch Status section, click Enable to enable the switch or Disable to disable the switch.

4. Click Apply.

The system displays a confirmation window that asks if you want to save the changes to the switch. You must click Yes to save the changes.

Changing the switch name

Switches can be identified by IP address, domain ID, World Wide Name (WWN), or switch names. Names must begin with an alphabetic character, but otherwise can consist of alphanumeric, hyphen, and underscore characters. The maximum number of characters is 30, unless FICON mode is enabled. When FICON mode is enabled, the maximum number of characters is 24.

NOTE Some system messages identify a switch service by the chassis name. If you assign meaningful chassis names and switch names, system logs are easier to use.

1. Open the Switch Administration window.

2. Click the Switch tab.

3. Enter a new name in the Name field and click Apply.

Changing the switch domain ID

Although domain IDs are assigned dynamically when a switch is enabled, you can request a specific ID to resolve a domain ID conflict when you merge fabrics. Follow the steps below.

1. Open the Switch Administration window.

2. Disable the switch.

3. Click the Switch tab.

4. Enter a new domain ID in the Domain ID field. The domain ID range depends on the switch interop mode:

• For IM0, the range is between 1 and 239

• For IM2, it depends on the selected offset value

• For IM3, it depends on the selected offset value

5. Click Apply.

6. Enable the switch.

Viewing and printing a switch report

The switch report includes the following information:

• A list of switches in the fabric

• Switch configuration parameters

• A list of ISLs and ports

• Name Server information

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• Zoning information

• SFP serial ID information

Perform the following steps to view or print a report.

1. Open the Switch Administration window.

2. Click the Switch tab.

3. Click View Report.

4. In the new window that displays the report, view or print the report using your browser.

Switch restart

When you restart the switch, the restart takes effect immediately. Ensure that there is no traffic or other management on the switch, because traffic is interrupted during the restart; however, frames are not dropped. Be sure to save your changes before the restart, because any changes not saved are lost.

Performing a fast boot

A fast boot reduces boot time significantly by bypassing the power-on self test (POST).

1.

Open the Switch Administration window.

2.

Click Fastboot.

3.

On the Fastboot Confirmation window, click Yes to continue.

4.

Click Apply.

Performing a reboot

Use the following procedure to reboot the CP and execute the normal power-on booting sequence.

1. Open the Switch Administration window.

2. Click Reboot.

3. On the Reboot Confirmation window, click Yes to continue.

4. Click Apply.

Configuring fabric settings

Perform the following steps to configure the fabric settings.

1. Open the Switch Administration window.

2. Disable the switch.

3. Click the Configure tab.

4. Click the Fabric subtab.

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DATA CENTER COOKBOOK 5. Make the fabric parameter configuration changes. 6. Click Apply. 7. Enable the

5. Make the fabric parameter configuration changes.

6. Click Apply.

7. Enable the switch.

Assigning a name to a port

Port names are optional. You can assign a name to an FC or FCIP port to make port grouping easier. You can rename FC and FCIP ports too. You cannot rename GbE ports. The Port Name column in the Ports tab displays the port name, if one exists. Port names can be from 1 through 32 alphanumeric characters, unless Ficon Management Server (FMS) mode is enabled; if FMS mode is enabled, port names should be limited from 1 through 24 alphanumeric characters. The comma (,), semicolon (;), and “at” symbol (@) are not allowed.

NOTE Although it is not required, it is recommended that port names be unique.

1. Click a port in the Switch View to open the Port Administration window.

2. Click the FC Ports tab.

3. From the tree on the left, click the switch or slot that contains the port you want to rename.

4. From the table, select the port you want to rename

5. Click Rename.

6. Type a name for the port and click Rename.

To delete the existing port name, leave the field blank and click Rename.

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Enabling and disabling a port

Use the following procedure to enable or disable a port.

1. Click a port in the Switch View to open the Port Administration window.

2. Click the FC Ports or GigE Ports tab.

3. From the tree on the left, click the switch or slot that contains the port you want to enable or disable.

4. From the table, select one or more ports.

Use Shift+click and Ctrl+click to select multiple ports. You can select multiple ports from the table. You cannot select multiple ports from the tree.

5. Click Enable or Disable. If the button is gray (unavailable), the port is already in the enabled or disabled state. For example, if the Enable button is unavailable, the port is already enabled.

If you select multiple ports in both enabled and disabled states, both buttons are active. When you click button, the action is applied to all selected ports.Click Yes in the confirmation window.

either

Persistent enabling and disabling ports

Use the following procedure to enable or disable an FC port so that it remains enabled or disabled across switch restarts.

NOTE Ports cannot be persistently enabled or disabled when FMS is enabled.

1. Click a port in the Switch View to open the Port Administration window.

2. Click the FC Ports or GigE Ports tab.

3. From the tree on the left, click the switch or slot that contains the port.

4. From the table, select one or more ports. Use Shift-click and Ctrl-click to select multiple ports. You can select multiple ports from the table. You cannot select multiple ports from the tree.

5. Click Persistent Enable or Persistent Disable.

NOTE Persistent Enable or Disable is not supported in FMS mode.

If the button is gray (unavailable), the port is already in that state or FMS mode is enabled on the switch. For example, if the Persistent Enable button is unavailable, the port or ports are already persistently enabled over restarts. If you select multiple ports in both enabled and disabled states, both buttons are active. When you click either button, the action is applied to all selected ports. 6. Click Yes in the confirmation window.

Enabling and disabling NPIV ports

The NPIV license must be installed on a switch before NPIV functionality can be enabled on any port. For detailed information about understanding and configuring NPIV ports, refer to the Fabric OS Administrator’s Guide. With Web Tools, you can only enable or disable the NPIV functionality on a port. Perform the following procedure to enable or disable NPIV ports.

NOTE NPIV feature cannot be disabled when Access gateway mode is enabled.

1. Click a port in the Switch View to open the Port Administration window.

2. Click the FC Ports tab.

3. From the tree on the left, select the logical port you want to enable or disable.

4. Click Enable NPIV or Disable NPIV.

Configuring BB credits on an F_Port

From 6.3.0 you can configure the BB credits value on an F_Port. Follow the steps given below.

1. Click a port in the Switch View to open the Port Administration window.

2. Click the FC Ports tab.

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3. Click Show Advanced Mode.

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4. Click F-Port BB Credit.

3. Click Show Advanced Mode . 4. Click F-Port BB Credit. 5. Enter the BB credit

5. Enter the BB credit value in the Enter BB Credit field. The default value is 8.

NOTE You cannot modify the default BB credit value for VE and ICL ports.

6. Click Ok.

The value is displayed in the table of the Port Administration window. If no value is configured the F-Port BB Credit column displays the default value.

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Chapter 3: Account Management

Overview

In addition to the default accounts—root, factory, admin, and user—Fabric OS supports up to 252 additional user- defined accounts in each logical switch (domain). These accounts expand your ability to track account access and audit administrative activities.

Fabric OS provides three options for authenticating users—remote RADIUS services, remote LDAP service, and the local switch user database. All options allow users to be centrally managed using the following methods:

Remote RADIUS server: Users are managed in a remote RADIUS server. All switches in the fabric can be configured to authenticate against the centralized remote database.

Remote LDAP server: Users are managed in a remote LDAP server. All switches in the fabric can be configured to authenticate against the centralized remote database.

Local user database: Users are managed using the local user database.

User Roles

Admin: All administrative commands excluding chassis-specific commands.

BasicSwitchAdmin: Mostly monitoring with limited switch (local) commands.

FabricAdmin: All switch and fabric commands, excludes user management and Admin Domains commands.

Operator: Routine switch maintenance commands.

SecurityAdmin: All switch security and user management functions.