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What are Project Partnerships?

Project Partnerships are the basis for a preservice teachers developing practice within the Bachelor of Education and the Graduate Diploma in Secondary Education program at Victoria University. They are school-university partnerships designed to enhance the learning of school students and preservice teachers. They provide opportunities for curriculum inquiry, curriculum development and teaching practice for preservice teachers. Strong partnerships enable preservice teachers to express responsibility for school students and their learning while working with mentor teachers on a curriculum project or initiative. Project Partnerships provide extended opportunities for preservice teachers to develop practice in and understanding of teaching in their major general studies.

How are Project Partnerships organised?


Teams of preservice teachers work collaboratively in schools on long-term, schoolbased curriculum initiatives that directly support the learning of school students. School teams include preservice teachers, mentor teachers, the school partnership coordinator and a university colleague. Partnership projects are discussed, negotiated and developed at the school with the participation of all team members.

Specific Details
Project Partnerships are the basis of study in the core education and curriculum subjects at each year level of the 4 year Bachelor of Education and the Graduate Diploma in Secondary Education. Project Partnerships usually include one day per week over an extended period as well as block times. They are organised so that: Year 1 preservice teachers work in primary schools for 15 days, including 5 days of paid supervised school experience. More details about Year 1 can be found on page 15. Year 2 preservice teachers work in primary schools for 30-35 days, including 15 days of paid supervised school experience. More details about Year 2 can be found on page Error: Reference source not found. Year 3 preservice teachers work in secondary schools for 30-35 days, including 25 days of paid supervised school experience. More details about Year 3 can be found on page Error: Reference source not found. Year 4 preservice teachers work in primary schools for 50-55 days, including 35 days of paid supervised school experience. More details about Year 4 can be found on page 19. Year 5 preservice teachers work in secondary schools for 53 days in schools including 40 days of paid supervised school experience. More details of the GDSE can be found on page 18 and 19

How to initiate a Project Partnership with Victoria University.


Identify an educational need or curriculum priority in your school, which directly relates to the learning needs of your school students. Form a small team of teachers who would be interested in working with preservice teachers. Think of a way in which the preservice teachers could work with you to help you meet the need or develop the curriculum initiative.

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Consider how the preservice teachers would work with you, your school students and colleagues in a curriculum initiative of mutual educational benefit. Consider how supervised teaching practice and the development of the curriculum initiative can be integrated to develop a complete Partnership. Prepare a brief outline of the Partnership and email, fax or mail it to the Partnerships Coordinator in the School of Education at Victoria University.

Developing and sustaining successful partnerships


Here are some suggested strategies to facilitate successful partnerships: Exchange contact details with each member of the partnership team and make sure that all information is accurate and forwarded to the Partnerships Administrator for the database. Discuss the original project partnership proposal which was suggested by the school to Victoria University and negotiate how it may be shaped to meet the learning needs of school students. Questions which would help to design a successful partnership might include: What was the original proposal? What are the preservice teachers strengths and interests? How can the project build on the preservice teachers strengths and interests? Does this project provide an opportunity for preservice teachers to investigate curriculum, teaching, learning and assessment in educational settings? How does this project meet the learning needs of students at this school? Discuss the Project Partnership and negotiate how it may build on the preservice teachers and school colleagues strengths, interests and expertise. Discuss and negotiate how the Project Partnership will provide opportunities for preservice teachers and school colleagues to conduct collaborative inquiry into the development of curriculum, teaching, learning and assessment in educational settings. Document the Project Partnership proposal on the form (see Section 7), then copy for all members of the team and forward to the Partnerships Administrator. Check the Project Partnerships website regularly: http://education.vu.edu.au/partnerships/ The university colleague is the primary contact for each team and regular contact is important. If there are any problems mentor teachers should: Discuss the problem or issue immediately with the preservice teacher Include the school partnership coordinator in the discussion and negotiate a set of strategies to address the problem. If the problem is not resolved, the mentor teacher should contact the university colleague. For complete information on When Things Go Wrong / Preservice Teachers at Risk, please refer to Section 2 on page 10.

How are Project Partnerships different from 'teaching rounds' or supervised teaching practice?
In teaching rounds and supervised teaching practice, preservice teachers meet requirements set by the University only. A supervising teacher takes responsibility for each preservice teacher. Normally preservice teachers work through a set sequence of complexity in practice as they move from Year 1 to Year 4 in a four year degree. The GDSE is a one-year program where preservice teachers are expected to work through a range of complexities through the year. In Project Partnerships, preservice teachers, mentor teachers and a university colleague work as a team on a curriculum initiative that benefits the learning of school students. This will also involve some formal teaching as well as a wide range of other curriculum and teaching activities. The Project Partnership enables each preservice teacher at each level of the Bachelor of Education and the GDSE to work on complex educational tasks negotiated with mentor teachers. Mentor teachers are encouraged to explore with preservice teachers a range

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of possibilities that support the learning of school students. The following examples show what is possible in Project Partnerships. See the Partnerships website http://education.vu.edu.au/partnerships/ for extended descriptions of a selection of recent Project Partnerships.

Examples of Successful Project Partnerships


1. Literacy Program - Middle Years/Secondary School Literacy support program for students in years 7, 8 & 9. Preservice teachers in Year 1 have trained as tutors and work with individuals in literacy support. Preservice teachers are responsible for planning, implementing and evaluating the Making a Difference program. They work with the teaching teams of those students and attend social education, English, Science classes with the students to develop their knowledge of curriculum development and implementation and to integrate Education Practice in their method areas. 2. Publishing/ Literacy Early Years/Primary School Three Year 2 preservice teachers who are responsible for the planning, implementation and delivery of a program on literature, writing and publishing for a group of students in years prep2. Preservice teachers also work with their mentor teachers in classrooms. This project was designed to run in semester 1, but has continued in semester 2 with additional support of a team of year 1 preservice teachers. Preservice teachers spend the one morning session working with students in classrooms in a variety of curriculum areas, one session working as a team on the publishing project and the afternoon session planning and evaluating as a team. Students meet regularly with preservice teacher mentor. 3. Outdoor Education Upper Secondary School A team of Year 1 preservice teachers works with the Outdoor Education teacher to assist with curriculum planning, delivery and evaluation of Outdoor Education curriculum in years 10 and 11. This includes supporting physical activity programs, planning and supporting camping programs, preparing curriculum materials and resources and mentoring school students as they engage in activities. Where the preservice teachers have appropriate skills, they plan the teaching and learning program and lead activities with the support and supervision of mentor teachers. 4. Year 10 Elective Program Upper Secondary School Three Year 3 preservice teachers AND one GDSE preservice teacher work in the year 10 elective program. Their involvement in the program is specific to their method areas and includes curriculum planning, delivery and evaluation. For example, in dance/ drama studies a preservice teacher works with a group of students on development of the school musical, as well as taking drama classes in the elective program, under the guidance of a mentor teacher. Third year preservice teachers and GDSE teach 4- 5 periods, with 1 -2 off for planning and documentation. First year preservice teachers teach 2 -3 periods in term 3. 5. Lunch time Physical Activity Program Primary/Upper Primary One school expressed its concern about the lack of organised activity for its students at lunchtime and the increasing bullying in some areas of the playground. The school developed a Partnership which enabled a team of Year 2 B. Ed preservice teachers who were studying a major in primary physical education or outdoor education as part of their course to survey current activity in the playground, space and equipment use and also to inquire about the interests and leisure pursuits of schools students. The preservice teachers developed a wideranging physical activity program which included, dance, major games, team building and adventure activities and which was conducted over 2 terms. Attendance at the program was high and school students contributions were strong. There was an increase in positive playground activity at other recess breaks. Preservice teachers worked in classrooms in the mornings supporting, inquiring about and teaching in literacy and numeracy. 6. Information and Years/Secondary Communications Technology and Mentoring Middle

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Year 3 Bachelor of Education preservice teachers, GDSE preservice teachers and Year 10 College students have formed a Partnership in the application of Information and Communications Technology across the curriculum. The challenge is teaching young people who may be unmotivated for school work to present learning on a website or Powerpoint display. The long-term goal is for preservice teachers to assist all Year 7-10 College students develop their own home pages. Preservice teachers must develop and apply advanced IT skills, plan a general strategy for web page development with the teachers and teach the College students how to use the technology to make electronic presentations of their learning. Year 3 and GDSE preservice teachers contribute to activities in classrooms in specific curriculum areas which leads to opportunities for more formal teaching. Year 1 preservice teachers joined the team working with small groups of College students in literacy support programs, in assisting a Maths teacher in making a video with students about buying a car and through their personal expertise (eg in music) to assist in classrooms.

A Sample Partnership Day (This is a suggestion only)


The School of Education expects its preservice teachers to take on the demands and conditions of professional life when they are working in Project Partnerships in schools and other educational settings. That means that each preservice teacher should:

Have prepared for teaching and applied curriculum project work in the days before attending school Arrive at school in good time (at least an hour before school day commencement) to meet mentor teacher(s) and Project Partnership colleagues to finalise planning and preparation Undertake teaching and applied curriculum project tasks during the day Arrange to meet mentor teacher(s) at mutually convenient times (these arrangements may need to be completed the week before) Meet with University Colleague as negotiated Stay at school throughout the day and participate enthusiastically in all activities undertaken by mentor teachers: Yard duty Preparation and cleaning up of classrooms Volunteer to take on any administrative duties Staffroom preparation and cleaning Remain at school throughout the day mentor teacher and school partnership coordinator should be notified if preservice teachers need to leave the school during the day Participate in any staff, level and team meetings involving mentor teacher(s) Leave school after completing all necessary preparations for future teaching and applied curriculum project activity (eg no earlier than mentor teacher).

A typical school day might comprise of the following: (PS: specific arrangements need to be negotiated between the preservice teacher and the mentor). 8.15am. Arrive at school. Discuss the day's program with mentor teachers. Preservice teachers meet in partnership teams to plan, prepare and organise for the implementation of the program, gather materials and meet with school partnership coordinator. Preservice teacher assists mentor teacher in welcoming students to school and assists in introductory and administrative tasks. Preservice teacher commences classroom support alongside mentor teacher. Mentor teachers work alongside preservice teachers in implementing the program, suggesting strategies, demonstrating implementation. Preservice teachers involved in team teaching or small group teaching. During APT time, mentor teachers and preservice teachers discuss work samples and learning outcomes, the program goals, its implementation and evaluation, as well as suggestions for further development.

9.00am. 10.00am. 12.30pm.

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1.00pm.

3.30-3.45pm. 3.45pm

Preservice teacher team research and plan the next stage of development for the program, consulting journals, texts and experts to gather information, ideas for teaching strategies and documenting the development of the project. Meet with university colleague. Mentor teachers and preservice teachers briefly review the days progress and confirm arrangements for the following week. Preservice teachers attend staff meetings, school professional development activities or extra-curricular activities (eg parent-teacher presentations and report nights). OR Preservice teachers work with mentor teachers to complete planning and preparation for future classroom practice or applied curriculum project.

NB

Alternative meeting arrangements to these eg meeting mentor teachers on more suitable days should be clearly negotiated and agreed by the mentor teacher and preservice teacher. The university colleague must be informed by the preservice teacher of any alternative meeting arrangements.

University colleagues will arrange at least one visit to the school every three weeks to monitor the progress of preservice teachers during single days. This visit will include discussion with preservice teachers and, if required, discussions with mentor teacher/s and /or the school partnership coordinator. Each school will need to tailor its daily program to meet the needs of the project.

UNDER THE BANNER OF LEARNING AND PRACTICE IN PROJECT PARTNERSHIPS

Links with the Bachelor of Education and the Diploma of Secondary Education
Partnerships are linked to core education and curriculum subjects at each year level (see shaded sections in the Bachelor of Education Course Map on page 23 and the GDSE Course Map on page . In addition all preservice teachers have at least one, usually two major study areas. This means that they bring strong interest in these areas in Years 1 & 2 and a strong background in these areas by Years 3, 4 & 5. Most are studying two areas from the options: Information and Communication Technology, Language and Literary Studies (English), Physical Education, Outdoor Education, Visual Art, Social Inquiry, Mathematics, Health or Drama. Some preservice teachers select alternative majors for example Psychology, Environmental Science or LOTE.

Flexibility in Year Level Expectations


Section 4 summarises the practical expectations for preservice teachers at each year level of the Bachelor of Education and in the GDSE. Mentor teachers, school partnership coordinators, preservice teachers and university colleagues should recognise, however, the focus of Project Partnerships is on the needs of the school, classroom and school students. Thus, the specific details of each Partnership will be a negotiated agreement which seeks to meet the needs of the school, its teachers and students, and the preservice teachers, too, in their progress through the course. Prior to the start of each year, the School of Education will ask schools to nominate Project Partnerships for teams of Bachelor of Education students. In early March, the initial visits by

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preservice teachers and university colleagues to schools will be focused on negotiating the Partnership. Project Partnerships often evolve over a year. The regular meetings of mentor teachers, preservice teachers and university colleagues will ensure that changes to Partnerships will meet the needs of the school as well as enabling preservice teachers to fulfil their course requirements.

Focusing on School Students and Their Learning


Through ongoing research and evaluation, the School of Education has concluded that a partnership between a school and/or community organisation and the University is established as a collaborative engagement. This involves school teachers, preservice teachers and teacher educators focussing on a question or a task which benefits the school or community organisation. In a school, the distinctive character of Project Partnerships is its focus on the learning needs of school students. That is, Project Partnerships are based on the understanding that the primary interest of teacher education should be its direct contribution to the learning of school students. The developing competence of preservice teachers is therefore demonstrated by their contribution to the learning of school students. Teacher education is reformed when schools and teachers invite preservice teachers to participate directly in the teaching of school students. Preservice teachers clearly identify that their work in schools is the most important and challenging aspect of their learning. Working in schools on an ongoing basis, over an extended period leads preservice teachers to become committed to schools and their priorities and most importantly to school students. The expectation of Project Partnerships is that preservice teachers develop a sense of personal responsibility for the school students with whom they are working; they should come to share in the professional responsibilities of their mentor teachers. As a result of this focus on school students, the School of Education hopes that mentor teachers will be supported, especially through the improved participation by school students in teaching/learning programs. The outcome for preservice teachers is that they have direct personal experience in sharing in the responsibility for the care and teaching of school students. Project Partnerships provide preservice teachers with the opportunity to document the authentic practices they experience in schools. Recording the practices of teaching and learning enables preservice teachers to inquire into practice and to understand teaching so as to improve it. Documenting practice thus has two purposes: it directly supports preservice teachers coursework in the Bachelor of Education and GDSE; and it also is the basis for enhancing preservice teachers understanding which occurs when teams of preservice teachers, mentor teachers and teacher educators engage in thoughtful inquiry into, analysis of and reflection on practice.

Critically Reflective Practice: Professional Conversations about Practice and Learning


As the work of preservice teachers and mentor teachers changes in Project Partnerships, university teacher education will evolve. The principal feature driving change in the university program is the affirmed knowledge and theorising about practice which preservice teachers bring to their coursework. When preservice teachers are able to apply their school-generated understanding directly in coursework they have a powerful stimulus for inquiry. For example a team of preservice teachers, in a Project Partnership in a secondary school, asking the question How can we use our IT knowledge to stimulate the learning of the disengaged Year 8 students with whom we work? should be investigating an issue with a depth of personal significance which a conventional essay about Teaching in the Middle Years is quite powerless to provide. Any success that Project Partnerships has in developing improved preservice teacher practices, as well as in reforming teacher education, is thus dependent on the quality of the knowledge

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and understanding which preservice teachers bring from schools and community settings to their university coursework. The critical step for preservice teachers is to transform their local personal and practical insights into validated knowledge and understanding. That will occur best in professional conversations with mentor teachers and university colleagues in schools where preservice teachers can inquire and present evidence to analyse and reflect on practice openly, collaboratively and respectfully. Thus Project Partnerships moves beyond the normal conversations which supervising teachers might have with preservice teachers about teaching a lesson to a different kind of professional discourse. These conversations, which will commence with the essential and enduring commitment of Project Partnerships to the learning of school students, can be framed around the following inquiry. By reporting experiences or cases of teaching and learning, preservice teachers, mentors and university colleagues can collaboratively frame critical questions for inquiry about improving practice. Such a discussion will provide the basis for directing and supporting important learning and professional research about teaching, learning, curriculum and assessment. For example, preservice teachers who are concerned about the behaviour of students in a maths class may begin by describing a particular teaching incident and reflecting on samples of students work. By constructing, in discussion with mentor teacher, a set of questions for investigating that practice, it is possible to move beyond conversation to collegial learning about a range of practices such as the importance of appropriate curriculum for all students, how they can be engaged in learning and how teaching can take account of different learning interests, preferences and styles. Such a conversation can be supported by the following questions and opportunities for all participants to share their thinking and ideas: How did students learn in my class today? What questions do we have about what happened and about student learning? How do we feel about this experience? What do we know that could improve teaching and learning in the class? How can we find out more information about improving teaching and learning in this class and similar situations? What questions can I take with me as I continue to plan my teaching for successful student learning? Mentor Feedback Check List Mentors are encouraged to use the following protocol to assist them in providing constructive advice to their preservice teachers. Having observed the lesson, what are some constructive comments that you can make in reference to the following areas: Classroom Management Time Management Curriculum Preparation Inclusive Education The facilitation of content material Catering for the diverse need of students Were the learning outcomes that were set in this lesson met? If so how? If not, why and in what areas and what strategies will the preservice teacher need to focus on in order to ensure that these outcomes are met in the future? What contributed to the success of the lesson? What practical and theoretical understanding do you feel the preservice teacher should investigate in order to improve his/her approach to teaching and learning? The mentor and preservice teacher are encouraged to discuss the mentor feedback and then the preservice teacher will describe/list how he/she will use the feedback to enhance the quality of future lessons.

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Lesson Preparation
The writing of a lesson plan is only one aspect of lesson preparation. Preservice teachers will also be expected to have all resource and learning materials ready for each lesson they will teach. Normally, all stages of lesson preparation should be completed at least one day before the lesson is due. Successful lesson preparation requires explicit and detailed professional conversations between the mentor teacher and preservice teacher. It is the responsibility of the preservice teacher to initiate these conversations and to clarify all aspects of the preparation needed: timing and location for each lesson, equipment to be collected, teaching materials to be readied, learning materials to be prepared, room arrangements to be made. Preservice teachers should aim to present mentor teachers with a completed copy of each proposed lesson plan at the commencement of each school day. The School of Education expects preservice teachers to be supporting mentor teachers in classrooms at all times. The practice of preservice teachers preparing for lessons during school hours is to be avoided, unless agreed with mentor teachers.

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Lesson Plan Format


Preservice teachers are encouraged to use a variety of lesson plan formats. Identifying suitable formats should be done in negotiation with their mentor. The lesson plan below is one example of an effective lesson plan format.
Topic/Theme/Question: Year level/s: Number and age of students: Special learning conditions / requirements (if applicable): Setting or location for the lesson. Particular organisation/ grouping of students for the lesson. Context for the lesson/session/activity: Identified student engagement/learning need. Relationship to previous and future lessons on this topic or curriculum area. Relationship to previous or future activities for the day. Previous experiences that the students bring to the lesson. Aims: Broadly, what do you want the children to experience and learn during the lesson? Expected Learning Outcomes: Draw from or relate to the learning outcomes in the CSFII. Note the indicators which might relate to each CSFII learning outcome. What other learning outcomes might result from the lesson activities? Preparation: Identify materials and equipment and pre-lesson organisation. Reference the source of lesson materials (teacher references, course advice, text book) Attach copies of printed material for distribution or text for display to be written on the board. Procedure: Think of this as a running sheet. Document each step to be taken or stage of the lesson. Include Lesson/Session/Activity Introduction Outline what the students will learn, and why it is important. An explanation which stimulates students interest State what the students will need to start and successfully complete during the lesson Developmental Activities What are the expectations for students For each stage of the lesson identify what the teacher and the students will be doing. What are the main questions I will ask? Closed questions, open questions; questions related to recalling content knowledge; and/or those demanding higher order thinking and responses from students Timing for each stage of the lesson What variations have I planned to cater for differences in learning? What preparations have I made if activities dont work out as planned? Details concerning the organisation of students Room organisation eg table arrangements Strategy for grouping students Changes which the lesson requires eg changes of groups; movement of students Concluding the Session/Lesson/Activity Opportunity for review by students Possibilities for subsequent opportunities for learning, eg in later classes or at home Organisational matters room re-arrangement for next session; time for tidying the room; where students need to go for their next class. Lesson Plan Format Continued

Preservice teacher Self- Evaluation: How did the lesson go? Which learning outcomes were met? How was the learning assessed? What should be the next lesson? What did I do well? What should I do differently? What understandings have I developed/considered? What questions or insights do I have which I want to follow up in my university coursework? Mentor Teacher Evaluation: How did the lesson go? Were the learning outcomes met? What contributed to the success of the lesson? What strategies/ideas could be added to the lesson to improve learning outcomes? What practical/theoretical understandings could be encouraged/considered?

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Under the Banner of PROJECT PARTNERSHIPS AT EACH LEVEL: Overview


The Bachelor of Education has been planned to enable preservice teachers to base their developing understanding and competence on authentic experiences of teaching and learning in Project Partnerships. The following table presents an outline of the Bachelor of Education emphases at each year level. Year 1 2 3 4 5 Practice Responding to learners Focused teaching Extended teaching (eg whole unit) Competence Competence Curriculum Development Inquiry experiences Lesson Planning and Assessment Unit planning and evaluation Whole curriculum Planning Whole curriculum Planning Theory Inquiry in education Teaching, learning and development Management and policy in education Reflective Practice Reflective Practice

Year 1 2 3 4 Total

To ensure that graduating teachers meet the expectations of school system authorities, the Total Number of Partnership Days of Supervised Location Days Teaching Practice (School) 20 38 42 50 150 5 15 25 35 80 Normally Primary Normally Primary NormallySecondary Normally Primary

Bachelor of Education course structure locates Supervised Teaching Practice within Project Partnerships. The distribution of Teaching Practice Days in the four years of the course is: Year 5 Total Number of Partnership Days 53 Days of Supervised Teaching Practice 40 Location (School) Normally Secondary

Year One
The aims, questions and expectations at each Year level of the B Ed P12 Year 1
Year 1 is a general introduction to teaching and learning with a focus on development of self as a learner and teacher. Preservice teachers normally work in curriculum support and participate in introductory activities focussed on initial teaching practice in primary schools. These activities not only support preservice teacher induction and inquiry about the nature of planning, teaching and learning, but also about the school, its community, the students, and teachers work. Preservice teachers are expected to be fully involved in teaching and learning activities, including a curriculum support activity that draws on their interests and expertise.

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Preservice teachers are expected to move from classroom participant to teacher of small groups and if appropriate, to teacher of the whole class during the time at the school. They are expected to document at least 5 lesson plans in literacy and other areas of interest and expertise, but most preservice teachers will record many more teaching opportunities as they experience life in classrooms. Some lessons will be planned collaboratively with the mentor teacher ahead of teaching and others described in detail after an informal or unexpected teaching experience. An example of a Year 1 Project Partnership would be one where preservice teachers work as support teachers in an Early Years program in the mornings> They plan, develop and deliver a special lunchtime activities program for students and in the afternoon prepare the following weeks session and return to classroom for teaching activities with small groups. A Year 1 preservice teacher is expected to: establish professional relations with young people and teachers in schools; develop an awareness of the characteristics of teaching and learning; establish links between practice and theory; experience the role of the teacher, through the teaching of individual and small groups of learners support school programs, initiatives and events, eg.sports days, camps, etc. document at least 5 lesson plans in literacy and other lesson in areas of interest and expertise. Year 1 preservice teachers are usually in schools, or an alternative education setting, for 20 days. Supervised teaching practice payments for 5 days is allocated in Year 1. Focus questions The focus of inquiry in Year 1 is: How do teachers relate with students so that learning occurs? Assessment Preservice teachers will be asked to report their learning through Project Partnerships in the following compulsory studies. They may also be asked to draw on Project Partnership experience for assessment in general studies subjects. Semester 2: HEB 1210 Understanding Learning Refer to current year Essentials document for specific details regarding assessment.

Year Two
In Year 2 Preservice teachers are usually placed in primary schools and Project Partnership teaching practice, curriculum inquiry and curriculum development activity is connected to preservice teacher inquiry and learning in Mathematics, Literacy and the Arts curriculum. Teaching practice in other curriculum areas, especially in the preservice teachers major study areas is also desirable. Students are asked to inquire about the nature of teaching and learning and the connections between curriculum planning, successful achievement of student learning outcomes and assessment and reporting. In Year 2 a sample partnership might be one where preservice teachers work with students and teachers to develop the use of information technology in the classroom. This becomes the catalyst for teaching and learning in mathematics, literacy and the arts. Integrated approaches to curriculum are encouraged. Preservice teachers in Year 2 usually spend 38 days in partnerships, in primary schools. Supervised teaching practice payments for 15 days are allocated in Year 2. Focus Questions The focus for inquiry in Year 2 is: How do teachers develop teaching and learning relationships with school students?

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How do teachers plan and implement learning programs in Literacy, Mathematics/Numeracy and the Arts? How is the classroom curriculum constructed for successful school learning outcomes? Assessment Semester 1: HEB 2110 Teachers Knowing Students and HEB 2150 Reasoning for Problem Solving Refer to current year Essentials document for specific details regarding assessment. Semester 2: HEB2210 Making the Conditions for Learning and one of the following: HEB 2250 Healthy Activity, Community and Wellbeing HEB 2251 Imagination, Creativity and Design HEB 2252 Science, Environment and Society. Refer to current year Essentials document for specific details regarding assessment.

Year Three
Aims In Year 3 curriculum inquiry is usually undertaken in secondary schools and involves initiated projects, investigation of integrated and inclusive curriculum and teaching practice in Science, Social Education and Technology. Partnership experiences may also be connected to preservice teachers major study areas. A sample partnership in Year 3 might include preservice teachers with major studies in Information Technology developing and implementing the incorporation of Information Technology across the curriculum. Special focus is given to integrated approaches and teaching and learning in Science, SOSE and Technology. Additional teaching practice in other major study/ method areas is developed across the year. Preservice teachers in Year 3 spend approx 42 days in Partnerships. This work is completed at the university in conjunction with secondary schools or other educational settings. Year three preservice teachers are normally in a secondary school which involves teaching practice, curriculum development and inquiry. Supervised Teaching Practice payments for 25 days are allocated in Year 3. Focus Questions How are the school and teachers' work organised in order to improve student learning outcomes? How is preservice teacher inquiry encouraged through planning and teaching Science, Technology and SOSE? How does preservice teacher inquiry about teaching and learning build on their elective General Studies and possible integrated curriculum approaches? Assessment Semester 1: HEB3110 Responding to Student Diversity Refer to current year Essentials document for specific details regarding assessment. Semester 1: HEB3150 Engagement and Pathways Refer to current year Essentials document for specific details regarding assessment. Semester 2: HEB3210 Collaborating for Access and Success. Refer to current year Essentials document for specific details regarding assessment. Semester 2: HEB 3250 Pedagogy for Inclusion Refer to current year Essentials document for specific details regarding assessment.

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Year Four
In Year 4 preservice teachers will be involved in the development of a curriculum-focused Action Research project and extensive teaching practice, usually in a primary school. In Year 4 preservice teachers might develop, implement and evaluate a curriculum initiative, normally drawing on their major studies background, using an Action Research approach. Extensive teaching practice is essential. Preservice teachers in Year 4 of the Bachelor of Education: Seek explanation of classroom and schooling experience for change and improvement; Develop ideas regarding teaching and learning throughout the year through participation in a community of inquiry, leading to an informed and defensible viewpoint; Integrate school and university experiences around the principles of Action Research Establish partnerships between schools and the university and work with mentor teachers on an investigation of teaching and learning Are considered as beginning teachers, with developing responsibility for their own learning Demonstrate their capacity to engage in professional discourse Work towards teacher professionalism, becoming more competent and reflective over the year. Project Partnerships are arranged during Year 4 so that beginning teachers are working in either a primary school or secondary college for 50 days, comprising individual days during Semester 1 and a continuous period of 6 weeks during Semester 2. Supervised teaching practice payments for 35 days are allocated in Year 4. Assessment Assessment in Year 4 is designed to support beginning teachers' growth towards teaching competence. The principal components of assessment in Year 4 are: Planning, assessing and reporting at least 20 fully documented lessons and at least another 20 to be recorded as recommended by mentor teachers Successful report of supervised teaching practice and Project Partnerships activity. The report must be finalised before the end of Semester 2. A Professional Portfolio, structured within the Victorian Institute of Teaching Professional Standards, which is a record of the graduating teacher's understanding and practical experiences in throughout the course, but most notably in this fourth year. Semester 1 HEB4110 Change and Social Justice Refer to current year Essentials document for specific details regarding assessment. Semester 1 HEB4150 Curriculum and Innovation and two of the following HEB 2250 Healthy Activity, Community and Wellbeing HEB 2251 Imagination, Creativity and Design HEB 2252 Science, Environment and Society. Refer to current year Essentials document for specific details regarding assessment. Semester 2 Semester HEB 4210 Practice in Partnership; HEB 4250 Professional Orientation, HEB 4211 Joining the Profession. Semester 2 in the Bachelor of Education is fully committed to preservice teachers demonstrating the competence required of beginning teachers. This development will be documented in a Professional Portfolio. Refer to current year Essentials document for specific details regarding assessment.

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Accelerated Program
The students at Sunbury Campus have joined the course having completed or nearly completed their majors/methods and they are beginning their education studies. During Semester 1 their curriculum inquiry and curriculum development activities are connected to Literacy, The Arts and SOSE and in Semester 2 the focus shifts to Maths, Science and Technology. This means that in 2006 they are embarking on their first teaching experience. During this year each student will spend 29 days in a secondary setting and 29 days in a primary setting. Students will inquire into the nature of teaching and learning, the connections between curriculum planning, successful achievement of student learning outcomes and assessment and reporting. While they will adopt a broad focus in relation to curriculum inquiry and teaching practice particular attention to their major study area/s is also desirable. Normally, student teachers will commence their placements with introductory teaching activities and by the end of the placement they will be expected to teach a sequence of lessons with support from a mentor teacher. The mentor teacher, student teacher and university colleague usually negotiate the precise requirements for formal teaching practice.

Requirements All Accelerated preservice teachers are expected to:


Complete a minimum of 29 days in a secondary school Complete a minimum of 29 days in a primary school work with a team to complete an Applied Curriculum Project in a primary school work with a team to complete an Applied Curriculum Project in a secondary school teach at least 20 lessons related to their General Studies (methods) in a secondary school teach at leat 20 lessons in a primary school.

Expectations of a preservice teacher


Take on normal duties of a teacher Attend school on all assigned days, at least hour before school commences to at least an hour after school finishes Participate in normal activities of their mentor teachers: meetings, yard duty and extra-curricular activities Develop professionally and educationally competent relationships with school students Take on other responsibilities as negotiated with mentor teachers and university colleague. Applied Curriculum Project (ACP) Use extended time in schools to inform practice-based assessment requirements by: Participating in an induction into the school led by school mentors Working in a team with colleagues and mentor teachers Describing personal teaching practice and the learning of school students Participating in staff and planning meetings, staff development days, school council and other community meetings Partnership Folio Document Project Partnerships including lesson plans, samples of school students work, curriculum planning and reflective journal entries. These documents will eventually become part of each persons Inquiry Portfolio (see assessment details on final page).

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Graduate Diploma in Secondary Education

Graduating preservice teachers in the Graduate Diploma in Secondary Education Seek explanation of classroom and schooling experience for change and improvement Develop ideas regarding teaching and learning throughout the year through participation in a community of inquiry, leading to an informed and defensible viewpoint Integrate school and university experiences around the principles of Action Research making use of the Praxis Inquiry Establish partnerships between schools and the university and work with mentor teachers on an investigation of teaching and learning Are considered as beginning teachers, with developing responsibility for their own learning Demonstrate their capacity to engage in professional discourse Work towards teacher professionalism, becoming more competent and reflective over the year.

Requirements for Preservice Teachers


The Graduate Diploma in Secondary Education is designed to support beginning teachers' growth towards teaching competence. All graduating preservice teachers are expected to: Work within a team to complete an Applied Curriculum Project (see below) and associated supervised teaching practice both of which should which support school students' learning and advance the interests of the school Have completed by the end of the year, approximately 53 days in Project Partnerships comprising 13 days (approx) in an applied curriculum project and 40 days of supervised teaching practice at the level expected of a graduating teacher Successfully undertake extended teaching practice at the level required of a graduating teacher - with planning, assessment and reporting of at least 50 lessons documented using the recommended VU lesson planning format (or in one preferred by the mentor teacher). Assessment The principal components of assessment in the Graduate Diploma are: Successful report of supervised teaching practice and Project Partnerships activity, including the Applied Curriculum Project (see below). A Professional Portfolio, structured within the Victorian Institute of Teaching Professional Standards, which is a record of the graduating teacher's understanding and practical experiences in throughout the course. Successful completion of core subjects and two approved discipline studies undertaken across two semesters

Core Subjects Semester 1 HEG1652 Social Context of Teaching & Learning Refer to current year unit guide for specific details regarding assessment. Semester 1: HEG1653 Approaches to Teaching and Learning

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NOTE: HEG 1653 & HEG1654 Approaches to Teaching and Learning incorporate 45 days of supervised teaching practice and 20 days Project Partnership over 2 semesters. (One semester unit, incorporates Applied Curriculum Project, Teaching Practice and development of Professional Portfolio). Details regarding assessment of Applied Curriculum Project are offered below. Refer to the unit guide for other specific details regarding assessment in this subject. Discipline Studies Semester 1: Discipline Study 1 and 2 Two Discipline Studies drawn from the following: HEG1682 Teaching Science 1 (semester long unit) HEG1678 Teaching Mathematics 1 (Each subject is a semester long unit) HEG1670 Teaching Computing 1 (Each subject is a semester long unit) HEG1680 Teaching Physical Education 1 (Each subject is a semester long unit) HEG1676 Teaching Languages other than English 1 (Each subject is a semester long unit) HEG1684 Teaching Studies of Society & the Environment 1 (Each subject is a semester long unit) HEG1674 Teaching English as a Second Language 1 (Each subject is a semester long unit) HEG1672 Teaching English 1 (Each subject is a semester long unit) HEG1686 Teaching Technology 1 (Each subject is a semester long unit) HEG1688 Extended Discipline Study 1 (Each subject is a semester long unit and is designed to offer pre-service teachers in nominated or high demand areas an opportunity to focus on an in-depth study of their discipline. This unit of study is designed as the equivalent of a double teaching method.) HEG1690 Teaching Vocational Education & Training 1 (Each subject is a semester long unit) HEG1692 Teaching Music 1 (Each subject is a semester long unit) HEG1694 Teaching Student Welfare (Each subject is a semester long unit)

Semester 2
Core Subjects
Semester 2: HEG1651 New Learning (One semester unit). Semester 2: HEG1654 Approaches to Teaching and Learning 2 (One semester unit, incorporates Applied Curriculum Project, Teaching Practice and development of Professional Portfolio).

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Discipline Studies Semester 2: Discipline Studies 1 and 2 (units follow on from Semester 1) HEG1683 Teaching Science 2 HEG1679 Teaching Mathematics 2 HEG1671 Teaching Computing 2 HEG1681 Teaching Physical Education 2 HEG1677 Teaching Languages other than English 2 HEG1685 Teaching Studies of Society & the Environment 2 HEG1675 Teaching English as a Second Language 2 HEG1673 Teaching English 2 HEG1687 Teaching Technology 2 HEG1689 Extended Discipline Study 2 HEG1691 Teaching Vocational Education & Training 2 HEG1693 Teaching Music 2 HEG1695 Teaching Student Welfare 2

UNDER THE BANNER OF ROLES AND RESPONSIBILTIES

Preservice teacher (PST)


Each preservice teacher is expected to: Undertake the roles and responsibilities of teachers at the school. This includes: being in attendance at school on all assigned days from at least hour before school commences to at least an hour after school finishes; notifying school coordinator of intended absence. Preservice teachers are required to make up for the days of absence. Preservice teachers should negotiate with their mentor to determine suitable day(s) to make up the absences. participating in the normal activities with mentor teachers, including staff and planning meetings, yard duty, extra-curricular activities, staff development days, school council and other community meetings; and working in teams for teaching, planning curriculum etc Develop professional and educational relationships with school students. Actively inquire about teaching and learning. Actively participate in all activities which involve students and/or the class teacher Begin teaching small groups and team teaching, moving to whole classes as negotiated with mentor Record planning and reflections for all lessons taught and discuss these with the mentor. Complete the Preservice Teacher & Mentor Communication Protocol (see pp 31-32) Collect copies of worksheets, work samples and other artefacts which reflect participation in teaching and learning activities Maintain a diary of activities, thoughts and events Work in a team with colleagues, mentor teachers and university colleagues to complete a project. The project (which could focus on curriculum development, teaching support, community action etc) should support the school students' learning and advance the interests of the school

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Use the regular and extended time in schools to inform practice-based assessment requirements Document Project Partnerships by developing a folio of lesson plans, samples of school students' work, curriculum planning and reflective journal entries which describe personal teaching practice and the learning of school students Arrange, provide and discuss appropriate information with the mentor teacher for the timely completion of the Applied Curriculum Project Plan, Mid Year and Final Partnership reports. Applied Curriculum Project Plan to be submitted to PP Administrator no later than March 30. The Mid Year Report should be submitted to the PP Administrator no later than the end of Semester 1 (Week 12) and the Final Report no later than end of Semester 2 (Week 12). Take on other responsibilities as negotiated with mentor teachers, school partnership coordinator (student teacher coordinator) and the university colleague.

School Partnerships Coordinator (SPC)(Student Teacher Coordinator)


The school partnerships coordinator is expected to: welcome preservice teachers and provide an orientation to the school and an ongoing supportive environment; allocate preservice teachers to mentor/class teachers, ensure that mentor teachers, the teaching and the negotiated applied curriculum projects are appropriate to the preservice teachers plan a program and monitor preservice teachers participation in the planned program; meet regularly with preservice teachers and mentor teachers to facilitate discussions about relevant curriculum areas for each year level and other curriculum/ partnership issues; distribute preservice teacher report forms to mentor teachers and return completed forms to Victoria University; facilitate the resolution of ongoing problems which may arise with preservice teachers and their mentor teachers and contact the university colleague immediately if there are concerns (follow up contact can also be made with the University Partnerships Administrator or B.Ed/GDSE PP Coordinator).

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Mentor Teacher (MT)


The Mentor Teacher is expected to: welcome and involve the preservice teacher in the teaching and learning environment; clearly guide the curriculum support work of the preservice teacher in the project partnership; discuss goals, programs and individual lessons with the preservice teacher; guide and give critically constructive feedback in relation to any teaching responsibilities which may be assigned to the preservice teacher; please refer to the questions on page 11. They are a useful starting point for a professional conversation assign and guide the preservice teacher in planning and preparing of formal teaching activities; complete the Project Partnerships Report in consultation with the preservice teacher prior to returning it to the school partnership coordinator; alert the preservice teacher to problems which may have arisen and negotiate strategies for their resolution negotiate with the university colleague and the preservice teacher to complete the Partnerships report(s) in a timely and constructive manner. contact the Schools Partnership Coordinator if there are any concerns. If concerns or problems persist, the mentor teacher or School Partnership Coordinator should inform the relevant University Colleague immediately.

University Colleague (UC)

The University Colleague is expected to: Liaise introduce preservice teachers to the School Principal and School Partnerships Coordinator clarify expectations for all partners: this will include the presentation and explanation of Project Partnerships for all partners especially at the initial visit, but also throughout the Partnership experience contact the school to establish appropriate visiting arrangements (usually an initial meeting with preservice teachers at University, a meeting of all partners on the first day at the school and then every 3 4 weeks); negotiate / clarify with preservice teachers, mentors and school partnership coordinators about the amount of time and levels of support that you will be able to offer based on your UC time allocation; Communicate develop and maintain an email list for communication purposes between the UC, school colleagues and the preservice teachers; promote the PP web site as a source of information with school partnership coordinators, mentors and preservice teachers negotiate opportunities to engage in conversation with preservice teachers and mentors about student learning engage with and provide feedback to preservice teachers as negotiated engage with and provide feedback to graduating preservice teachers Grad Dip Secondary and B.Ed Year 4) about their work in classrooms/ learning sites during their respective block placements. attend four School of Education UC meetings during the academic year (refer to Meeting timetable) communicate with mentor teachers and individual preservice teachers in the preparation of the Applied Curriculum Project Plan and Report and Partnerships Report in a timely and constructive manner. Problem solve respond to any school concerns immediately; respond to preservice teacher and / or mentor concerns regarding preservice teacher progress (Refer to When Things Go Wrong/Preservice teachers at risk)

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meet the school partnerships coordinator to discuss each preservice teachers program and progress; meet with each preservice teacher and the mentor/class teacher to discuss the preservice teachers program and progress;

Report facilitate the timely completion of preservice teacher reports with the preservice teacher, mentor and school partnerships coordinator. facilitate the timely completion of the Applied Curriculum Planning and Final report with the preservice teacher, mentor and school partnerships coordinator. complete a Preservice Teacher Progress summary at the end of Semester 1 (See Preservice Teacher Progress proforma) indicating satisfactory or unsatisfactory progress. UCs who have serious concerns about the provision of support (within their UC time allocation) for one or more preservice teachers should contact the PP Partnerships Administration Coordinator. Discussions will be organised to determine additional support and the nature of the support with the UC, preservice teacher, the Course coordinator and PPR nominee. Negotiate with the School Partnerships Coordinator a date and time (within 5 days of PP completion) to collect preservice teacher reports (Mid Semester and Final); read and sign the reports and then submit them to the PP Office. Notify the PP Administration Office in writing of any preservice teacher reports that are unsatisfactory or are of concern.

The Purpose of the University Colleagues Visit


Project Partnerships work best when there are explicit negotiations which satisfy the hopes, expectations and needs of all partners: the school, its students and teachers; and the university, its preservice teachers and teachers. Establishing the communication necessary for this negotiation is the principal responsibility of the University Colleague. The essential task for the University Colleague is supporting the school-based work of preservice teachers, their mentor teachers and School Partnerships Coordinator. In Project Partnerships, the observation and assessment of the classroom practice of preservice teachers does not have priority. The School of Education trusts the professional understanding and expertise of mentor teachers and School Partnership Coordinators in their making of judgements on the progress towards professional competence being made by preservice teachers. What should happen during the visit by the University Colleague? University Colleagues should:

Work through the expectations for Project Partnerships as outlined in the Project Partnerships booklet and accompanying Essentials which are made available in hard copy and are also available at the Project Partnerships website: http://education.vu.edu.au/partnerships/ Demonstrate and explain the contents of the Project Partnerships website. Regularly meet (every 3 or 4 weeks) with preservice teachers, individually and in groups to evaluate the development in their understanding and their sense of professional understanding and commitment; and to respond to areas of doubt and concern Regularly meet (every 3 or 4 weeks) with School Partnerships Coordinator and mentor teachers to obtain reports of progress; to confirm developments in the applied curriculum project and preservice teachers classroom practices; to respond promptly and directly to doubts and concerns about the participation, competence and commitment of preservice teachers; and to work through the formal reports of preservice teachers progress in the Mid-Year and End-of-Year Project Partnership Reports. Ensure that communication between preservice teachers, mentor teachers and School Partnership Coordinator is open, explicit and prompt. In particular, the University Colleague needs to ensure that concerns expressed by mentor teachers about preservice teachers participation and practice are heard, understood and acted on by the preservice teacher. The University Colleague role is critically important in the identification of preservice teachers who are at risk of failing; and in planning strategies to support them.

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If problems regarding preservice teacher progress cannot be resolved through advice and counselling at the local school level, then the University Colleague should contact the University Bachelor of Education Partnerships Coordinator (Dr Marcelle Cacciattolo) Or the University Graduate Diploma in Secondary Education Partnerships Coordinator (Dr Merryn Davies). Plan visits to schools as outlined below in Specific Year Level Expectations. Note that the Expectations include classroom observation of Year 3, Year 4 and Year 5 preservice teachers. The observation of Year 4 and 5 preservice teachers is essential in confirming the judgements made by mentor teachers that graduating teachers are ready to join the teaching profession.

Specific Year Level Expectations Bachelor of Education Years 1 and 2 (Primary school settings) Normally university colleagues working with B Ed Year 1 and 2 preservice teachers will keep in regular contact with each school through regular school visits, telephone calls and emails. Where possible, and after negotiation with school colleagues, a university colleague will visit classrooms where preservice teachers are working and meet with their mentor teachers. Under normal circumstances, university colleagues will not formally observe the teaching of preservice teachers in Years 1 and 2. Formal class observation is appropriate when mentor teacher(s) and school partnership coordinator are concerned about aspects of preservice teachers practice. At those times, mentor teacher and school partnership coordinator should make immediate contact with the university colleague to arrange a prompt visit. The expectation of the School of Education is that the preservice teacher, mentor teacher(s) and university colleague will meet towards the end of Semester 1 (end of school Term 2) and at the end of Semester 2 (either end of school Term 3 or at the beginning of school Term 4) to discuss and agree on the evaluation of the preservice teachers practice in the Mid-Year and End-of-Year Project Partnership Reports. Bachelor of Education Year 3 (Secondary school settings) Normally university colleagues working with B Ed Year 3 preservice teachers will keep in regular contact with each school through regular school visits, telephone calls and emails. Where possible, and after negotiation with school colleagues, a university colleague will visit classrooms where preservice teachers are working and meet with their mentor teachers. The expectation of the School of Education is that university colleagues will make extended visits to schools during Semester 2, most likely during the three-week teaching block early in Term 4. During these longer visits, after negotiation with preservice teacher, mentor teachers and school partnership coordinator, university colleagues will undertake at least one classroom observation of each preservice teacher. In addition, the School of Education expects that the preservice teacher, mentor teacher(s) and university colleague will meet towards the end of Semester 1 (end of school Term 2) and at the end of Semester 2 (either end of school Term 3 or at the beginning of school Term 4) to discuss and agree on the evaluation of the preservice teachers practice in the Mid-Year and End-ofYear Project Partnership Reports. Bachelor of Education Year 4 (Normally Primary school settings) Normally university colleagues working with B Ed Year 4 preservice teachers will keep in regular contact with each school through regular school visits, telephone calls and emails. Where possible, and after negotiation with school colleagues, a university colleague will visit classrooms where preservice teachers are working and meet with their mentor teachers. The expectation of the School of Education is that university colleagues will make extended visits to schools during Semester 2, during the extended 6 week teaching block in school Term 3. During these longer visits, after negotiation with preservice teacher, mentor teachers and

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student teacher coordinator, university colleagues will undertake at least one classroom observation of each preservice teacher. The purpose of the observation is to confirm the evaluations being made by the mentor teacher of the graduating teachers classroom practice. This is an essential responsibility. In addition, the School of Education expects that preservice teacher, mentor teacher(s) and university colleague will meet towards the end of Semester 1 (end of school Term 2) and at the end of Semester 2 (either end of school Term 3 or at the beginning of school Term 4) to discuss and agree on the evaluation of the preservice teachers practice in the Mid-Year and End-ofYear Project Partnership Reports. For Year 4 graduating teachers the End-of-Year Report is an evaluation of their Readiness to Teach.

Graduate Diploma in Secondary Education Normally university colleagues working with GDSE year 5 preservice teachers will keep in regular contact with each school through regular school visits, telephone calls and emails. Where possible, and after negotiation with school colleagues, a university colleague will visit classrooms where preservice teachers are working and meet with their mentor teachers. The expectation of the School of Education is that university colleagues will make extended visits to schools during Semester 1 & 2, during the extended 4 week teaching blocks in terms 2 and 3. During these longer visits, after negotiation with preservice teacher, mentor teachers and student teacher coordinator, university colleagues will undertake at least one classroom observation of each preservice teacher. The purpose of the observation is to confirm the evaluations being made by the mentor teacher of the graduating teachers classroom practice. This is an essential responsibility. In addition, the School of Education expects that preservice teacher, mentor teacher(s) and university colleague will meet towards the end of Semester 1 (end of school Term 2) and at the end of Semester 2 (either end of school Term 3 or at the beginning of school Term 4) to discuss and agree on the evaluation of the preservice teachers practice in the Mid-Year and End-ofYear Project Partnership Reports. For GDSE year 5 graduating teachers the End-of-Year Report is an evaluation of their Readiness to Teach.

Partnerships Coordinator (PC)


The University Partnerships Administrator is expected to; coordinate the general establishment of partnerships and information distribution. receive and organise information about preservice teachers, school colleagues and partnerships; be the primary contact for school colleagues who are: seeking information about Project Partnerships needing clarification about the organisation of Project Partnerships (eg details on payments for supervised teaching practice) reporting concerns about the participation of preservice teachers (contact should be made with the schools assigned university colleague in the first place) refer inquires to the appropriate university colleague for action; liaise with Bachelor of Education Project Partnerships Coordinator and the Chair, Partnerships, Practice and Research Portfolio about the progress and development of Partnerships.

Bachelor of Education Project Partnerships Coordinator and Graduate Diploma in Secondary Education Project Partnerships Coordinator (PPC)
The Project Partnerships Coordinator will, in conjunction with the B Ed /GDSE Course Coordination Team (i.e. Student Progress Coordinator, Project Partnerships Coordinator, Staffing/Room Allocation and Timetable Coordinator, Courses Selection Coordinator)

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liase with the Project Partnerships Administrator, Chair of the Partnerships, Practice and Research Portfolio and all University Colleagues to support the development of Project Partnerships in schools and community settings support the achievement of appropriate learning outcomes for all beginning teachers. ensure that each Project Partnership meets the expectations required for the appropriate Year level of the course coordinate the placement of preservice teachers in schools, in cooperation with the Project Partnerships Administrator chair an ongoing process of review of Project Partnerships and its place in the Bachelor of Education work with the Partnerships Administrator and Chair of the Partnerships, Practice and Research Portfolio in the induction of new schools and new school colleagues into Project Partnerships; and based on advice from school colleagues, establish appropriate Project Partnership curriculum initiatives.

Partnerships, Practice and Research Portfolio Coordinator (PPR)


The Chair of Partnerships, Practice and Research Portfolio will: Chair the meeting of the Partnerships, Practice and Research Portfolio meeting. Coordinate an ongoing process of planning and review of Project Partnerships and its place in the B Ed and the Graduate Diploma of Education (Secondary). Coordinate in cooperation with the University Partnerships Administrator the induction and work of the University Colleagues. Coordinate research and development related to Project Partnerships and preservice teacher education. Coordinate a Project Partnerships communication and reporting process via staff meetings within the School of Education / Faculty of Arts, Education and Human Development

UNDER THE BANNER : ABOUT THE BACHELOR OF EDUCATION (P-12) AND THE GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN SECONDARY EDUCATION
Teaching and Learning in the Bachelor of Education (P-12). Course Structure
The School of Education offers the 4 year Bachelor of Education degree at Footscray Park, Melton and Sunbury Campuses with a range of studies on each campus. Preservice teachers prepare to teach in both primary and secondary schools and choose general studies for secondary teaching. All preservice teachers have at least one but usually two major study areas. This means that they bring strong interest in these areas of curriculum in Year 1 and 2 and are completing their major studies for teaching in Year 3 and 4. Most preservice teachers select two areas of major study from the following fields of study; information and communications technology, language and literary studies (English), mathematics, outdoor education, physical education (for primary teaching), health, visual art, drama or social inquiry. A small number of students select other areas of study, such as psychology, history, science or LOTE. Partnerships Partnerships provide the authentic context for preservice teachers, their school mentors and teacher educators to collaboratively understand and enhance teaching competence. The practical experiences of preservice teachers in partnerships are also the basis of their critical reflection and theorising of practice which leads to sustainable improvement and change. Practice-Theory

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The School of Education at Victoria University has an ongoing commitment to teacher education which connects practice and theory. The 1991 Bachelor of Education Course Approval Submission was framed within an intention to project education as a 'practical social science'. Other similar terms are action research, reflective practice, teacher as researcher, social philosophy and practical theorising. Teaching in the course will require teacher educators to make explicit links between preservice teachers' experiences in partnerships and the development of understanding in classes and through the completion of assessment tasks. Practice-theory develops when preservice teachers: Describe Practice the practices of teaching and learning described with particular emphasis on recording how young people's learning is an outcome of teaching; the practices of teaching and learning understood through the application of appropriate educational theory understanding used to generate explanations for practical teaching and learning experiences which become the basis for changed and improved practice the trialing of new practice.

Interpret Practice Theorise Practice

Change Practice

Thus teaching in all stages in the course should be constructed so that preservice teachers become researchers of their own practice. In all subjects, teacher educators, even when directly proposing curriculum methodology and teaching strategies, should locate their own classroom practice within a spirit of mutual respect, inquiry and research. The focus for such research is the connection between teaching and learning.

BACHELOR OF EDUCATION - 2006 COURSE PLANNING AND PROGRESS MAP


Year 1 Sem 1 HEB1101 Learning in a Changing World 12pt HEB1210 Learning 12pt Understanding HEB1102 Inquiry for Understanding 12pt HEB1250 Communication and Social Action 12pt Gen St 1A 12pt Gen St 1B 12pt Gen St 1C 12pt Gen St 1D 12pt

Sem 2

Year 2 Sem 1

HEB2110 Teachers Knowing Students 12pt HEB2210 Making the Conditions for Learning 12pt

Sem 2

HEB2150 Reasoning for Problem Solving 12pt Curriculum Option (see below) 12pt

Gen St 2A 12pt Gen St 2C

Gen St 2B 12pt Gen St 2D 12 pt

Year 3 Sem 1

HEB3110 Responding to Student Diversity 12pt HEB3210 Access 12pt Collaborating for and Success

Sem 2

HEB3150 Engagement and Pathways 12 pt HEB3250 Pedagogy for Inclusion 12pt HEB4150 Curriculum

Gen St 3A 12pt Gen St 3B 12pt Curriculum Option (see below)

Gen St 3C 12pt Gen St 3D 12pt Curriculum Option (see below)

Year 4 Sem 1

HEB4110 Change and Social Justice

and

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Sem 2

12 pt HEB4210 Practice in Partnership 24 pt

Innovation 12pt

12 pt HEB4250 Professional Orientation 12pt

12pt HEB4211 Joining the Profession 12 pt

Curriculum Options (All three units are to be completed in Year 2 and Year 4.)
HEB2250 HEB2251 HEB2252 Healthy Activity, Community and Wellbeing Imagination, Creativity and Design Science, Environment and Society

In the map above, units of study which include both partnership and coursework components are shaded. The Bachelor of Education program comprises 8 x 48 pt semesters. To complete the course of study, preservice teachers must complete 384 credit points, including all defined education units of study.

About the Graduate Diploma in Secondary Education Graduate Diploma in Secondary Education - 2006 COURSE Structure and Course Map
Sem 1

HEG1652 Social Context of Teaching & Learning (One semester unit) 12 pt

HEG1653 Approaches to Teaching and Learning 1 (12 points).


NOTE: HEG1653 & HEG1654 incorporate 45 days of supervised teaching practice and 20 days Project Partnership over 2 semesters.
12pt

Discipline Study 1.1 (Each discipline study is a semester long unit) 12pt

Discipline Study 2.1 (Each discipline study is a semester long unit) 12pt

Sem 2

HEG1651 New Learning HEG1654 (One semester unit). Approaches to 12 pt Teaching and Learning 2 (12 points ).

Discipline Study 1.2 (Each discipline study is a semester long unit) 12pt

Discipline Study 2 .2 (Each discipline study is a semester long unit) 12pt

In the map above, units of study which include both partnership and coursework components are shaded.

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The Graduate Diploma in Secondary Education program comprises 2 x 48 pt semesters. To complete the course of study, preservice teachers must complete 96 credit points, including all defined education units of study. See also pp. 18-21

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