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ABB Group

May 5, 2014 | Slide 1


MV Metal-Clad Switchgear
The safest, most reliable Switchgear in the market today


February 2008


ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 2
Arc-Resistant Standards
Introduction Todays Topics
What is Arc Flash and the risks it represents
Arc-Resistant Switchgear Standards
ABB Switchgear Offering
Characteristics of SafeGear Arc-Resistant Switchgear
Other Safety Features available in Switchgear today

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 3
What is an Arc Flash?
The result of a rapid release
of energy due to an arcing fault
between phases, neutral or a
ground.
An arc arises when at least part of
the current passes through a
dielectric, usually air
Maximum peak power up to 40 MW
Arc temperature up to five times the
surface temperature of the sun
(20,000C)
Light intensity more than 2000 times
that of normal office light
Volumetric expansion approximately
40,000+ - 1

Temperature of
the sun surface is
about 5000C.

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 4
Arcing Incidents Do Happen
Fault characteristics
An arc arises when at least part of the current
passes through a dielectric, usually air
Maximum peak power up to 40 MW
Arc temperature up to five times the surface
temperature of the sun (20 000C)
Light intensity more than 2000 times that of
normal office light


ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 5
Arc Flash Danger Statistics
Currently, OSHA lumps Arc Flash incidents in with
electrical incidents.
A recent survey showed that 5-10 people per day go to
burn centers due to arc flash incidents that does not
include those going to local and regional hospitals
That is 2000-3500 people a year in the US!
With the high mortality rate of burn injuries, this can translate to
hundreds of deaths a year
IEEE did a study with a large utility and over the last 53
years, they have had 1 arc flash incident every 18 months.


ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 6
Arcing Incidents Do Happen
Security Video of Arc flash incident
Distributed by NFPA

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 7
Arc-Resistant Switchgear
Causes of internal arc faults
Improper maintenance, mechanical, and interlock
failures
Failure to follow procedures
Gradual component or insulation breakdown
Foreign objects, rodents, snakes, etc.
Effects of an internal arc fault
Pressure increase in an enclosed compartment
Function of arc voltage, current, number, and duration
of arcs, volume
Rapid onset (10-15 ms) results in explosive forces
Thermal effects, hot gases
Catastrophic to nearby personnel and equipment


ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 8
Evolution of Arc-Resistant Standards
Interest in Europe uninsulated bus was common
Annex AA to IEC 298 was approved in 1981
EEMAC G14-1 was published in 1987 in Canada
Type A arc-resistant construction at the front only
Type B arc-resistant construction at the front, back, and sides
Type C arc-resistant construction at the front, back, and sides, and between
compartments
IEEE C37.20.7-2007 includes
Type 1 similar to EEMAC Type A above
Type 2 similar to EEMAC Type B above
Annex A addresses suffixes B and C
Type 1C Type 1, but also with arc-resistance designs or features between
adjacent compartments
Type 2B Type 2 with LV instrument compartment door open relay and
maintenance personnel survive
Type 2C Type 2 with arc-resistance features between adjacent compartments
switchgear survives with minimum damage
Type 2BC The ultimate in protection combines types 2B and 2C

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 9
Industry Recognized Arc-Resistant Standards
OSHA 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 1910, Subpart S
NFPA 70E-2004, Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace
IEEE 1584-2002, Guide for Arc Flash Hazard Analysis
IEEE C37.20.7-2007, IEEE Guide for Testing Medium-Voltage Metal-Enclosed
Switchgear for Internal Arcing Faults






ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 10
Arc-Resistant Standards
Current Requirements and How They Apply
OSHA 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 1910, Subpart S
Safe practices to prevent electrical shock or burns must be
implemented
Mandates that exposed workers must be qualified
Requires provisions for the appropriate personnel protective
equipment (PPE)
NFPA 70E-2004, Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace
Details steps to comply with the OSHA requirements
Worker training
Appropriate, safe tools
Safety program
Arc flash hazard calculations
PPE
Equipment warning labels


ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 11
THE NEW NFPA 70E 2009, TABLE 130.7 (C) (9) Arc-Resistant
SWITCHGEAR TYPE 1 OR 2
Hazard/Risk Category for Arc-Resistant Switchgear











Applies to clearing times of <0.5 sec with a perspective fault current not to exceed the arc-
resistant rating of the equipment.

Insertion or removal of CBs from cubicles, doors open 4
CB operation with enclosure door closed 0
Insertion of removal of CBs from cubicles, doors closed 0
Insertion or removal of ground and test device with door closed 0
Insertion or removal (racking) of voltage transformers on or off the
bus, door closed
0
Work on control circuits with energized electrical conductors and
circuit parts 120V, exposed
2

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 12
Arc Flash Introduction - Mitigation Techniques
Redirecting energy away from workers
Reducing the arcing current (En ~Ia)
Not effective method as test data is required for current
limiting devices (fuses)
Increasing the working distance (E~1/D)
Using remore racking device, remote operating devices
incident energy might be reduced
Reducing the clearing time (E~t)
Zone selective interlocking
slow (100ms) + breaker operate time)
can not be used for retrofit installations
Bus bar protection
expensive to install due to number of CTs
Light Detection

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 13
ANSI C37.20.7 Accessibility Types
1
Front only
1C
Front plus between compartments within a section or between adjacent
vertical sections (except main bus compartment)
2
Front, back, and sides
2B
Isolation of the Low Voltage Compartment with the instrument door open
2C
Front, back, and sides, plus between compartments within a section or
between adjacent vertical sections (except main bus compartment)
2BC
Offers compartment to compartment and low voltage isolation. Offers the
very best solution for personnel protection and system reliability.

SafeGear meets IEEE C37.20.7-2007
Type 2, 2B, 2C and 2BC!


ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 14
Arc Faults
SafeGear Conventional Switchgear

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 15
Pressure Buildup
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
900
13579
1
1
1
3
1
5
1
7
1
9
2
1
2
3
2
5time (ms)
P
S
I
enclosure
rupture
Pressure measurements
vent flap
opens
Successful SafeGear test
SafeGear
conventional

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 16
Introduction to ABB ANSI Switchgear
5 to 15 kV metal clad switchgear
Advance
Traditional non-arc-resistant switchgear
SafeGear
Meets ANSI Standard C37.20.7-2007 for arc-resistance
Four versions Types 2, 2B, 2C and 2BC available
Vacuum circuit breakers
AMVAC
Magnetically actuated mechanism
ADVAC
Spring operated mechanism

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 17
Ratings
Nominal Voltage 4.16 7.2 13.8
BIL (kV) 60 95 95
Continuous Current (A) 1200 1200 1200
Main Bus 2000 2000 2000
3000 3000 3000
Forced Air Cooled* 4000 4000 4000
Short Circuit (kA) 20 20 20
K Factor = 1.0 25 25 25
31.5 31.5 31.5
40 40 40
50 50 50
Ratings
4000 A rating available for Advance only.

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 18
ABB Metal-Clad Switchgear
Features
Galvanic construction
Hem bending
Modular design
Bolted frame
Instrument compartment
Breaker compartment
Bus and cable compartment
Potential transformer compartment
Arc-resistant switchgear
SafeGear
Power distribution center
Plenum
Circuit breaker technology
ADVAC
AMVAC magnetically actuated circuit
breaker option

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 19
Galvanic Construction
Resistant to rust,
corrosion and
scratches
No paint required
Highly reflective
(Side view with covers removed)

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 20
Hem Bending
No sharp edges for
increased safety
Improved rigidity
Reduces arc propagation
Forms a self-supporting
structure

Hem bending creates a rigid structure and sturdy
construction in metal-clad switchgear (reinforced,
arc-resistant door construction shown).

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 21
Modular Design
Bolted construction enables faster replacement and modification in the
field
Allows for easy replacements, repairs, and specialized configurations
Maintains the smallest, compact product

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 22
Instrument Compartment
Total isolation from medium voltage
components
No instruments on breaker door
Galvanic interiors provide superior
reflectivity inside compartments
Available in four sizes
19, 38, 57, 95
Gasketed door
Easy accessibility for operators
Truck operated cell switches
located in the low voltage
compartment for easy access and
to minimize exposure


ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 23
Breaker Compartment
Dual safety shutter actuators
Interlock prevents manual
operation
Mechanically forced by breaker
movement
Shutters grounded by cable
Clear Lexan shutters available
Position indicator
Connected
Test
Disconnected

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 24
Breaker Compartment
Automatic secondary
disconnect
Provides improved safety for
workers while operating the
breakers when using
SafeGear
Single or double plug
secondary contacts
Grounding contact
Interference block
Prevents installing undersized
breakers

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 25
Bus & Cable Compartments
Copper bus
Epoxy coated bus insulation system
No sleeve insulation
Silver plating standard
Tin plating available
Porcelain or glass polyester standoff
insulators
Molded vinyl boots with re-useable
hardware
Catalog number embossed on each
boot to make reordering easy
No tape used

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 26
PT Compartments
One to three potential
transformers (PTs)
In SafeGear, less than 40kA duty
is 19 inches high. 40kA and 50kA
duty is 38 inches high
Closed door racking in and out
adds element of safety
Drawout construction with
extension rails makes the
compartment easily accessible
Lift truck not required to replace
fuses
Delrin snuffer contact technology

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 27
CPT Compartments
15 kVA, single-phase, truck mounted
Larger size CPTs are fixed mounted in
the rear compartment
Fuse truck with fixed mounted CPT
Closed door racking adds element of
safety
Drawout construction with extension
rails makes the compartment easily
accessible for fuse replacement.
Compartment is 38 inches high
Lift truck not required to replace fuses
Delrin snuffer contact technology

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 28
Arrangements

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 29
SafeGear Arc-Resistant Switchgear
Enhanced safety for personnel and
equipment
Flap/vent system to relieve pressure
Patented collection chamber
Gases are safely expelled out the roof
through the plenum
Built to EEMAC G14-1 1987 type B and
C construction and IEEE C37.20.7-2007
Types 2, 2B, 2C and 2BC
More than 25 years experience in arc-
resistant switchgear
Design allows for flexibility in
configurations and promotes superior
safety performance
Certified by an independent test lab


ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 30
SafeGear Demonstration

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 31
ONE-HIGH 1200A 1200A W/2 VT UNITS TWO-HIGH 1200A
1200A W/FUSED CPT 2000A W/1 VT UNIT ONE-HIGH 3000A
Location of Flaps and Vents in SafeGear

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 32
SafeGear Patented Internal Collection Chamber

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 33
SafeGear Construction
Breaker doors secured with heavy
duty hinges and bolts
Multi-point handle and latching
available
Double thickness of steel
Gasketed construction
Seals gases inside
Lexan arc-resistant window
largest in industry allows the
operator to check position and
status of circuit breaker without
opening the cell door



ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 34
Plenum Benefits
Channels gases out of PDC
Provides room for flap operation
Allows gases to expand
Protects cable trays
Maintains weather protection
Allows lower building height

Plenum
PDC ceiling
PDC Aisle
Two-high SafeGear

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 35
Plenum Design
Sealed duct across top of switchgear, covering all vent flaps
Sized and shaped to minimize turbulence and back-pressure
Allows room for cable trays and conduit entry
Channels gases safely out of building, through wall penetration and
vent

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 36
Plenum End Flap
Flaps normally
closed
Opens with pressure
in case of arc fault

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 37
Circuit Breaker
Closed door racking to all positions
adds element of safety
Three position breaker
Positive stop in all positions
Breaker positively latched in the
compartment (Disconnect)
Racking mechanism is integral to the
breaker element
Auxiliary switches are breaker-mounted
and wired out through the secondary
disconnect, eliminating the need for
separately mounted mechanism
operated cell switches
Front access mechanism
Centered racking mechanism for easy
alignment
Embedded pole design

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 38
ADVAC

Circuit Breaker
Manual open and
close push buttons
Non-re-settable
operations counter
Open/close indicator
Racking access port
Manual spring
charge port
Spring charge
status indicator
Cell locking tabs
and handles
Racking release lever
Racking padlock provision for
lockout and safety procedures

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 39
ADVAC

Circuit Breaker
Precision cam
On-board auxiliary contacts
eliminate the need for cell-
mounted MOC switches and
related mechanical linkages
4a, 4b standard
9a, 8b optional

Auxiliary switch
operating shaft



Main drive shaft


Charging
motor

Toroidal
spring

Close &
trip coils

Simple, front-accessible operating mechanism
and control components

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 40
AMVAC Circuit Breaker
Operating mechanism rated for
100,000 operations
10 times ANSI requirement
Interrupter assemblies rated for
30,000 full load operations
Virtually maintenance free (minor
lubrication needed)
Only seven moving parts
90% less parts
Permanent magnet for holding force
and latch
Dual capacitors store energy
Full operation for up to 90 seconds
after loss of control power
Interchangeable with ADVAC


ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 41
AMVAC Circuit Breaker
1. Upper Primary Terminal
2. Vacuum Interrupter
3. Epoxy Potting Compound
4. Lower Primary Terminal
5. Flexible Connector
6. Wipe Springs
7. Insulated Pushrod
8. Jackshaft
9. Stroke Adjustment
10. Position Sensors
11. Close Coil
12. Permanent Magnets
13. Armature
14. Open Coil
15. Manual Opening Actuator
16. Mechanism Enclosure

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 42
AMVAC Circuit Breaker
Manual opening
mechanism
Auxiliary contacts
Sensor for switching
position detection
Magnetic actuator
Electronic controller
Electrical energy storage

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 43
AMVAC vs. ADVAC
AMVACs simple design reduces moving elements and the need
for spare parts

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 44
Accessories
Racking crank, manual close bar
Test cabinet
Test jumper
Ground & test device
Electric racking device
Lift truck
Ramp
Shutter actuator truck
Breaker release handle
Wear test device
Dummy circuit breakers
Slow close device
IR Viewing Ports

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 45
Arc Flash Mitigation Relays
REA 101 Arc Protection Relay
Fast trip time (< 2.5 ms)
Unique fiber optic sensor technology
with self supervision
Current supervision for secure and
reliable arc detection
Easy to configure via front mounted
dip switches
Suitable for existing LV / MV
switchgear installations or new
applications
Minimize potential risk of injury or
death while increasing reliability
Includes standard 12 year warranty


ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 46
Arc in the right bus
compartment with the
tie breaker open
Right REA 101 detects
overcurrent
Right REA 101 detects light
REA 101s send the current
information to all connected
units
Right bus is disconnected
REA Application Example #1
REA
101
REA
101
REA
105
REA
105
REA
105
REA
105

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 47
IR viewing Ports
SAFE: Successfully Arc-Flash tested
in accordance with IEEE C37.20.7
RUDGGED: Certified by UL, SIRA
and Lloyds of London for installation
into both indoor and outdoor
equipment
FLEXIBLE: Broadband optic suitable
for all IR cameras.
SECURE: Unique mounting system
allows for safe, single person
installation & retro-fitting with No
dangerous internal fasteners
required.
1. Eliminate need to
enter the switchgear
while energized.
2. Frequent
monitoring possible
without impacting
production.
3. Easy to use system
requires little
training

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 48
Product description
Applicable to any unshielded medium
voltage system from 3 kV to 36 kV
For permanent installation information
on voltage presence available all the
time
Outdoor and indoor application
Good visibility under all lighting
conditions
Maintenance free; passive device no
power supply needed
Simple and robust construction
resistant to overvoltages
(does not use electronic elements)
Very compact construction
Easy to install
Economical solution
Indicator of voltage presence
installed directly on bus bars,
conductors etc.
Advantages of VisiVolt

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 49
In Summary
Advance & SafeGear available at 5 and 15kV
SafeGear arc-resistant switchgear Types 2, 2B, 2C and 2BC
provide the highest level of personnel protection
AMVAC breaker
100,000 mechanical operations mechanism
30,000 load break operations interrupter
Virtually maintenance free
REA Relays
Protects you personnel and equipment with the most advanced arc
flash mitigation relays on the market.

ABB Group
May 5, 2014 | Slide 50
ABB