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Boys Vs.

Girls

How boys and girls


learn differently

Overview
Brain

differences
Effects of Hormones
Learning Strategies
Statistics
Conclusion

The Female Brain


Matures

Speak in sentences earlier

Brocas

earlier

area & frontal lobe are more active

Improved verbal communication

Cerebrum

Greater ability to multi-task

Copus

**

is always active

callosum is larger

Coordinate the two sides of their brain better

Better at listening and communicating

The Male Brain


Amygdale

More aggressive behavior

Cerebral

**

cortex is thicker on right side

Better at solving abstract problems

More

is larger

developed right hemisphere

Better at measuring and using models

Better at problem solving and building


projects

Female Hormones
Progesterone

& Estrogen

Make females bond more easily


Fluctuation creates moodiness

Male Hormone
Testosterone

Aggressive
Socially ambitious
Muscular

Learning Strategies for Girls


Visual

Use pictures and charts

Verbal

learners

Enjoy talking and discussing topics

Less

learners

likely to take risks

Need to be encouraged

Learning Strategies for Boys


Kinesthetic

Like to be active while learning

Like

learners

numbers and symbols

Like to decipher codes, solve pattern games and


use formulas to solve problems

Statistics
Boys

earn 70% of the Ds and Fs


Boys account for 2/3 of the learning disability
diagnoses
Boys represent 90% of the discipline referrals
80% of high school dropouts are male
Males make up fewer than 40% of the
college students

(Gurian, 2001)

Observations of female students


Girls

like background information


Girls like story problems
Girls are more concerned with pleasing
adults.
Girls have more concern for their grade

Observations of Boys
Boys

get bored easily


Boys like to solve equations instead of
reading story problems
Confrontation works well with boys
Boys respond well to noisy classrooms

Conclusion
Boys

and Girls learn differently


Educators need to be aware of these
differences
Create classrooms that are conducive to all
learners
Consider single sex classrooms at the junior
high level

Bibliography

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http://www.partnershipforlearning.org/category.asp?CategoryID=20
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