Sunteți pe pagina 1din 79

DISCOUNTING AND NET 

PRESENT VALUE

   
Outline
• Cash Flow Diagrams
• Discounting
• Present Value and Future Value
• Net Present Value
• Internal Rate of Return
• Appropriate Time Horizon
• Timing of Cash Flows
   
Readings
• Dixon and Meister, chpt. 7
• Chapter 9 and Appendix 2 of Sinden and 
Thampapillai)
• World Bank pp. 127­132

   
Main Points
• 1. Time value of money and discounting
• Money received in different time periods 
has different values
• Discounting is essentially a technique that 
allows comparing the value of dollars in 
different time periods.

   
Main Points
• 1. Time value of money and discounting
• 2. Present value
• Value in present time period of stream of 
benefits and costs received in different 
time periods
• PV is used to analyze the profitability of 
an investment or project

   
Main Points
• 1. Time value of money and discounting
• 2. Present value (PV)
• 3. Net present value (NPV)
• NPV is traditional valuation technique and 
key investment criteria

   
Main Points
• 1. Time value of money and discounting
• 2. Present value (PV)
• 3. Net present value (NPV)
• 4. Internal Rate of Return (IRR)
• IRR is rate of return on money invested in 
project
• A second investment criteria

   
Main Points
• 1. Time value of money and discounting
• 2. Present value (PV)
• 3. Net present value (NPV)
• 4. Internal rate of return (IRR)
• 5. Benefit­cost ratio
• Gives discounted benefits per dollar of discounted cost
• Third investment criteria

   
Cash Flow Diagrams

•Below horizontal line is negative values


•Negative values typical in first years of project, when have
investment costs and little or no revenues
•Above horizontal line is positive values
•Positive values typical in later years of project, when have positive
cash flow
•Here, negative value in final (terminal) year due to dismanteling
•Could have positive value in final (terminal) year if positive salvage value

   
Typical Time Stream of Project 
Net Benefits
Net Benefits ($)

Time

   
The Issues
• Projects generate stream of costs and 
benefits over time
• How can a stream of net benefits be 
converted to a single value at a point in 
time?
• What is the present value of these net 
benefits received as a cash flow?

   
The Issues
• Consider constant NB
• NBt ≠ NBt+1
• Weighting device required to convert NBs in 
different time periods into common units in 
present time period
• Convert NB stream into its present value
• Present value converts benefits and costs from 
different time periods into a common unit, their 
present value
• Otherwise, comparing apples and oranges
   
Famous quotes on discounting
• Keynes: “In the long run we’re all dead”
• Ramsey (1928): discounting is “ethically 
indefensible”
• Harrod (1948): discounting is “a polite 
expression for rapacity”

   
Discounting
• Discounting is essentially a technique that 
enables us to compare the value of 
dollars in different time periods.
• All benefits and costs of different time 
periods made comparable by converting 
into their equivalent dollar present value
• Gives a single number  ­ present value

   
Rationale for Discounting
• Would you rather receive $100 today or 
$100 in 3 years?
• Why?

   
Rationale for Discounting
• $100 received today is preferred to $100 
received 3 years from now
• Individuals prefer receiving dollars sooner 
rather than later
• Why?

   
• Because we can increase our 
consumption today, whereas the dollar 
received in the future can increase only 
future consumption.
• Having to postpone consumption makes 
tomorrow's dollar less valuable than 
today's

   
Rationale for Discounting
• Alternatively, receiving money sooner is better, 
because can reinvest money at interest rate r
• Allows greater future consumption
• The declining value of money over time has 
nothing to do with inflation, only with the 
postponement of consumption.
• Individual preferences count

   
Rationale for Discounting
 Present Value                                            Future 
Value
     0                     1                        2                         3

Option A: Receive $100 today

$100 $100 + interest

Option B: Receive $100 in 3 years

Option B: $100 - interest $100

   
Rationale for Discounting
• Suppose P0 dollars were reinvested for 
one year at interest rate r, compounded 
annually
• Sum received at end of one year = P1
• P1 composed of principal P0 and interest 
earnings rP0
• Then:
                  P1  =  P0[1 + r]  =  P0 + rPo
   
Rationale for Discounting
• Thus, P0 dollars now worth same as             P1 
=  P0[1 + r]  dollars received at end of year
• Hence:
•             P1  =  P0[1 + r] 
• Rearranging gives
                         P1
            P0  =  ­­­­­­­­  =  present value of P1
                      [1 + r]

   
Rationale for Discounting
• If P0 dollars invested for two years:
• In one year, P0 grows to P1 = P0[1 + r]
• In second year, P1 grows to
         P2  =  P1[1 + r]
               =  P0[1 + r][1 + r]
               =  P0[1 + r]2

   
Rationale for Discounting
• Rearranging gives
                           P2
            P0   =   ­­­­­­­­­
                        [1 + r]2

  =  present value of P2 receivable in two years

   
Rationale for Discounting
• Similarly, discounted present value of PT 
dollars receivable in T years is:

                       PT                       1
          P0  =  ­­­­­­­­­­  =   ­­­­­­­­­ PT
                    [1 + r]T        [1 + r]T

   
Discount Factor
• Discount Factor in time t
                           1
                      [­­­­­­­­­­]t  = ρt 
                         1 + r
   Discount Factor in time t=0
                            1
                      [­­­­­­­­­­]0  = ρt = 1
                         1 + r

   
Discount Factor
• Discount Factor time t=1
                        1                        1
                    [­­­­­­­]1  = ρ1 = ----
                     1 + r                   1 + r

   
Discount Factor
• Discount factor in time t=3
                               1
                          [­­­­­­­­]3  = ρ3
                            1 + r

• Discount factor in time T (terminal time)
                              1
                          [­­­­­­­]T  = ρT
                           1 + r 
   
Discount Factor Example
• Discount Factor in time t=3
            1                1         1          1
        [­­­­­­­]3  =   ­­­­­­ x  ­­­­­­ x  ­­­­­­
         1 + r           1 + r    1 + r     1 + r
         1                1         1         1          
   [­­­­­­­­­­]3  =  ­­­­­­ x ­­­­­­ x ­­­­­­ = 0.8638
    1+0.05         1.05    1.05     1.05    
   
Discounting Example
Time Value at Discount Discount Discounted
Period (t) time t ($) rate (r) factor ρ in Value
time t Bt x ρ t
t=0 100 0.05 1 100

t=1 100 0.05 0.9524 95.24

t=2 100 0.05 0.9070 90.70

t=3 100 0.05 0.8638 86.38

   
Present Value (PV)
• Value in present time period of stream of 
benefits and costs received in different 
time periods
• Period t=0 value
• PV is used to analyze the
profitability of an investment or
project

   
Present Value
• Present Value of Income Stream (Cash 
Flow)
                P0       P1       P2              PT
   PV  =  ­­­­­­ + ­­­­­ + ­­­­­­ + ∙∙∙ + ­­­­­­
              [1+r]0  [1+r]1  [1+r]2               [1+r]T
                       T    Pt
                  =  ∑  ­­­­­­­ 
                     t=0 [1+r]t               
   
Present Value
• Using discount factor rather than discount 
rate
                
                           T     Pt          T      
               PV   =  ∑  ­­­­­­­   =  ∑ ρT Pt
                          t=0 [1+r]t      t=0        

   
Future Value
• FV = PV x (1 + r)t

• FV (t=3) = PV x (1 +r)3

• FV = $100 x (1 + 0.05)3 
         = $100 x (1.05) x (1.05) x (1.05)
         = $100 x 1.157625
= $115.7625
   
Present Value and Future Value
• FV = PV x (1 + r)t

                 FV
• PV  =  ­­­­­­­­­

              (1 + r)t

   
Present and Future Value
• r or ρ is assumed constant in each time 
period
• No inflation assumed 
• Constant or real dollars

   
Net Present Value
• Traditional valuation methodology
• Expresses how much value an 
investment will result in
• Provides investment criterion
• Sum of discounted cash flow expected 
from investment less investment costs 

   
Net Present Value
• Formula for NPV

              B0 – C0          B1 – C1         B2 – C2
NPV  =  ­­­­­­­­­­­  +  ­­­­­­­­­  +  ­­­­­­­­­­­
               (1 + r)0       (1 + r)1       (1 + r)2

                       BT ­ CT
          + … +  ­­­­­­­­­­
                       (1 + r)T
   
Net Present Value

• Formula for NPV
T     Bt – Ct                  T      NBt
                                   

NPV  =   ∑    ­­­­­­­­­­­    =    ∑    ­­­­­­­­
              t=0  (1 + r)t            t=0  (1 + r)t 

where:
                 Bt   =  dollar value of benefits at time t
                 Ct   =  dollar value of costs at time t
                 NBt =  dollar value of net benefits at time t
                 r      =  discount rate
                 T     =  terminal time (last period of project) 
          

   
Net Present Value
• Note that:

                 T   Bt ­ Ct       T    Bt         T    Ct
  NPV  =   ∑  ­­­­­­­­­  =  ∑ ­­­­­­­­  ­  ∑ ­­­­­­­
               t=0  [1 +r]t         t=0 [1+r]t      t=0 [1+r]t

   
NPV Investment Criterion
• Maximize present value of net benefits 
accruing over life of project:

                               T     Bt ­ Ct 
         max NPV  =   ∑   ­­­­­­­­­­  
                               t=0   [1 +r]t       

   
NPV Investment Criterion
• NPV > 0
• Positive contribution to economic welfare

• Alternative with highest NPV is best
• Contributes most to goal of economic welfare

   
Version A Version B B-A: Incremental
Investment
Year K Cost Net Benefits K Cost Net Benefits K Cost Net Benefits
1 20 4 40 8 20 4
2 4 8 4
3 4 8 4
4 4 8 4

5 4 8 4
6 4 8 4
7 4 8 4
8 4 8 4

9 4 8 4
10 4 8 4

PV @ 10% 20 24.58 40 49.16 20 24.57

NPV @ 10% = ∑t=0… 4.58 9.16 4.58 →


T (NB/[1+r]t) - K Accept
NPV and Discount Rate
NPV • At low discount rates, A superior to B
• At high discount rates, B superior to A
A • At discount rate r*, NPV(A) = NPV(B)
• Illustrates importance of sensitivity analysis of discount rate
• Indicates whether discount rate crucial factor in
• decisions and if so, critical ranges of discount rate

Crossover discount rate

B Critical discount rate


= internal rate of return (IRR)

Discount Rate r

r*
Internal Rate of Return
• Keynes called IRR marginal efficiency of 
capital
• IRR is rate of return on money invested in 
project
• IRR sometimes called critical discount 
rate

   
Internal Rate of Return
• Discount rate that makes NPV = 0
• Solve for r in:

   T     Bt – Ct                          T     Bt        T    Ct
   ∑   ­­­­­­­­­­­  =  0  or  ∑   ­­­­­­  =  ∑   ­­­­­­
  t=0    [1 + r]t                       t=0 [1+r]t     t=0 [1+r]t

   
Internal Rate of Return
  NPV T Bt – Ct T Bt T Ct
∑ ----------- = 0 or ∑ ------- = ∑ ------
t=0 [1 + r]t t=0 [1+r]t t=0 [1+r]t

Internal Rate of Return

Discount Rate r

   
Internal Rate of Return
• Decision Criterion
 Undertake investment if IRR > social 
discount rate

   
Problems with IRR
• (1) IRR doesn’t preclude problem of 
choosing a discount rate to discount and 
obtain NPV
 Because IRR endogenously determined
 However, still have to choose discount rate
 to compare IRR with discount rate in decision rule

   
Problems with IRR
• (2) Multiple Roots
 In computing IRR, possible to obtain more 
than one solution (more than one value)
 Because IRR is solution to polynomial 
equation
 If polynomial of degree n, there are n 
possible solutions

   
Problems with IRR
• (2) Multiple Roots
         B1 – C1       B2 – C2                Bn ­ Cn
        ­­­­­­­­­­­­ + ­­­­­­­­­­ + ∙∙∙ + ­­­­­­­­­­
           [1 + r]1      [1 + r]2               [1 + r]n
 Negative and imaginary numbers discarded 
and only positive roots remain
 Negative root has no meaning
 What is meaning of ­2% ?

   
Problems with IRR
• (2) Multiple Roots
• Number of positive roots found by 
Descartes’ “Rule of Signs”
• Cash flow stream of signs ­ + + + + ∙∙∙ has 
one positive root since one sign change
• Cash flow stream of signs ­ + + + ­ may 
have two roots since two signs changes

   
Problems with IRR
• (2) Multiple Roots
• Fairly common sequence with initial 
expenditure (­ sign) followed by positive 
returns (+ sign), followed by negative 
returns (­ signs) at end of project when it 
is dismantled and scrapped

   
Problems with IRR
• Which solution root to use?
 (2) Multiple Roots • Complex rules available to
choose

NPV      
• But difficult to handle all possible
cases

0
Discount Rate r
Two solution roots

   
Problems with IRR
• (3) IRR provides no information about 
relative and absolute sizes of NPVs for 
different investment alternatives
 With no budget constraint, decision criterion 
for both independent and mutually exclusive 
projects is maximize NPV
 Gives maximum potential Pareto 
improvement

   
Problems with IRR
• (4) IRR cannot be applied to mutually 
exclusive projects
 IRR cannot be used when project alternatives 
preclude one another

   
Problems with IRR
 (4) IRR cannot be applied to mutually exclusive projects
      NPV • Two mutually exclusive projects, A and B
A • NPVs at different discount rates represented by
curves A and B
• IRR criterion implies choose B
NPVA • But at current discount rate q, NPVA > NPVB

NPVB
B Critical discount rate = IRR

Discount rate r

IRRB IRRA
q
   
Problems with IRR
• (5) Sensitivity of IRR to length of project
 Can have high IRR for short­lived project, but 
low NPV of total net benefits
 Can high lower IRR for longer­lived project 
with higher NPV
 Goal is to maximize NPV of net benefits, not rate 
of return

   
Problems with IRR
• (6) Sensitivity of IRR to phasing of costs 
and benefits
 IRR may give higher ranking to projects 
which bunch benefits into early part of 
economic life

   
Problems with IRR
• (7) IRR cannot be used to choose among 
portfolio of projects subject to budget 
constraint
 IRRs are ordinal, not cardinal
 IRRs cannot be summed
 IRRs don’t put projects on common basis
 E.g. IRR per dollar of cost

   
Benefit­Cost Ratio
• Third of three basic decision criteria
• Definition
                     T       Bt
                     ∑   ­­­­­­­­
          B       t=0  [1 + r]t
         ­­­  =  ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­
          C        T       Ct
                     ∑   ­­­­­­­­
          B       t=0  [1 + r]t
   
Benefit­Cost Ratio
• Gives discounted benefits per dollar of 
discounted cost
         B         Discounted gross benefits
       ­­­­­  =  ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­
         C            Discounted total costs

Costs include capital plus operation, 
maintenance, and replacement costs
   
Problems with Benefit­Cost 
Ratio
• (1) Not correct ranking criteria
• Smaller of two projects may have higher 
B/C but smaller total NPV
• Example
• Two projects, A and B, each with economic 
life of one year
• Discount rate of 5%

   
Problems with Benefit­Cost 
Ratio
• Project A has higher B/C but lower NPV
• Higher NPV preferred, because yields greater 
increase in society’s total net benefits

Project B0 C0 B1 C1 B/C NPV

A 0 1 2 0 1.9 0.9

B 0 5 8 0 1.5 2.6

   
Problems with Benefit­Cost 
Ratio
• (2) Value of Benefit­Cost Ratio depends on 
where netting out of different costs and benefits 
occurs in time stream of costs and benefits
• Affects values in numerator and denominator, and 
hence B/C ratio
• Different conventions for netting out benefits and 
costs
o Can move a cost from denominator and subtract it 
from numerator

   
 Conclusion
• NPV is preferred investment criterion
• Gives correct ranking of projects
• Want largest net benefits
• Should not discriminate against costly 
investments (which may also have largest net 
benefits)

   
Appropriate Time Horizon
• Issue
• For how long of a period should an economic 
analysis be conducted?
• Time horizon of analysis is comparable to 
economic life of project

   
Appropriate Time Horizon
• Two Factors Important in Selecting Appropriate 
Time Horizon
• (1) Expected Economic Life
• When beneficial project outputs become very 
small or end, effective project life is over
• Technical life of project could be longer than 
economic life
• Due to technological obsolescence

   
Appropriate Time Horizon
• (1) Expected Economic Life
• Examples
• Tree Crops (rubber, palm oil, fruit, cocoa) 
• Yields are zero for initial period, rise rapidly, continue for 
some years, then decline but still provide yield
• But declining yield in later years combined with new, higher­
yielding varieties makes later years technologically obsolete
• Economic life shorter than technical life due to technological 
obsolescence

   
Appropriate Time Horizon
• (1) Expected Economic Life
• Examples
• Information Technology: Personal Computers
• PCs may continue working for many years
• But technological advances make PCs incapable 
of running new software and operating systems or 
at too slow of speed
• Economic life shorter than technical life due to 
technological obsolesence

   
Timing of Cash Flows
• Issues
 1. Designation of initial year of project
 2. Assumptions are required on timing of 
cash flows (benefits and costs)
 In which part of year do cash flows occur?
 Beginning or end of year?
 3. All costs (capital and operating) and 
benefits treated same way as cash flows

   
Timing of Cash Flows
• 1. Designation of Initial Year of Project
 In principle, the initial year of any project can 
be designated as year 0 or year 1
 In practice, initial year is designated as year 
0
 Then cash flow ranges from t = 0 to t = T
 T = terminal period or end of project

   
Timing of Cash Flows
• 2. Timing of Cash Flows
 Do cash flows (costs or benefits) take 
place at beginning or end of year?
 Cash flows can be discounted 
beginning with the first project year or 
only with the second project year.

   
Timing of Cash Flows
• 2.1. Cash flows take place at end of year
 Any cost or benefit occurs at end of year
 Any cost or benefit occurring during a year is 
discounted for entire year
 Example: 
 Cost incurred any time in year 5 is discounted for 
entire 5 years

   
Timing of Cash Flows
• 2.1. Cash flows take place at end of year
 With this assumption, begin discounting only 
with second year of project
 Rationale is that investment must be made before 
first year is ended
 First year is not discounted
 Some international agencies and most 
private firms adopt this approach

   
Timing of Cash Flows
• 2.1. Cash flows take place at end of year
 This assumption introduces a small error, 
since actual expenditures or receipts should 
theoretically be discounted from time when 
they actually occur
 These errors overlooked in interest of 
simplicity
 If desired, all cash flows can be discounted 
from exact time they occur

   
Timing of Cash Flows
• 2.1. Cash flows take place at beginning of 
year
 Any cost or benefit occurs at beginning of 
year
 Costs and benefits occurring in first year are 
discounted
 Can potentially lead to present value less 
than actual value
 World Bank sometimes adopts this approach

   
Discounting from Project Year 1 and from Project
Year 2 Compared

Discounting from Year 1 Discounting from Year 2

Project Amount Discount Discount Present Discount Discount Present


Year ing Factor Value ing Factor Value
Period 12% 12% Period 12% 12%
1 1.09 1 0.893 0.97 0 1.00 1.09

2 4.83 2 0.797 3.85 1 0.893 4.31

3 5.68 3 0.712 4.04 2 0.797 4.53

4 4.50 4 0.636 2.86 3 0.712 3.20

5 1.99 5 0.567 1.13 4 0.636 1.27

6 0.67 6 0.507 0.34 5 0.567 0.38


Discounting from Project Year 1 and from Project
Year 2 Compared

Discounting from Year 1 Discounting from Year 2

Project Amount Discount Discount Present Discount Discount Present


Year ing Factor Value ing Factor Value
Period 12% 12% Period 12% 12%
7 0.97 7 0.452 0.44 6 0.507 0.49

8 1.30 8 0.404 0.53 7 0.452 0.59

9 1.62 9 0.361 0.58 8 0.404 0.65

10-30 1.95 10-30 2.727 5.32 9-29 3.054 5.96

Total 63.60 8.056 20.06 9.022 22.47


Next Lecture
• Topic
• Pareto optimality and the efficiency goal
• Readings
• Sinden and Thampapillai, Chpts. 2 and 3