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Also known as tendonitis is an inflammation of a

tendon (a band of fibrous tissue that connect


muscle to bone) that causes pain, tenderness and
occasionally, restricted movement of the muscle
attached to the affected tendon.

Created by Hanna H.
Presented for Dr. Ryan Lambert Bellacov, chiropractor in West Linn, OR

Tendinitis can cause permanent damage to the


tendons. The natural tendency to favor the
painful area also can lead to stiffness. A vauge
discomfort at the age of 30, if overuse is
continued for years, this can lead to a loss of
flexibility due to scarring of the tissue.

Presented for Dr. Ryan Lambert Bellacov, chiropractor in West Linn, OR

There are three types of knee tendinitis:


1. Patellar tendinitis (also called jumpers knee) affects
the patellar tendon just below the patella. (knee cap).
The person complains of pain during an activity such as
landing from a jump and going downstairs, or lack of
activity, such as sitting for long periods of time.
2. Quadriceps tendinitis affects the patellar tendon just
above the knee cap. The condition is likely to be found
in athletes who do a lot of rapid acceleration and
deceleration.
3. Popliteus tendinitis affects the sight of insertion of the
popliteus tendon on the lateral epicondyle of the femur.
Runners particularly runners who run down hills or
sloping surfaces, are likely to complain of this
tendinitis.

Tendinitis can affect four different tendons of the foot


The achilles tendon
The posterior tibial tendon
The anterior tibial tendon
The peroneal tendon
Symptoms of achilles tendinitis are pain and tenderness
anywhere along the back of the tendon, limited ankle
flexibility, redness or heat over the painful area, a
nodule growth forming on the tendon and a crackling
sound that can be heard when the ankle moves. This
condition is caused by tight or fatigued calf muscles,
inadequate warm up of muscles, overtraining, excessive
hill running, speed work and inflexible running shoes.

Presented for Dr. Ryan Lambert-Bellacov, chiropractor in West Linn, OR

Elbow Tendinitis affects the lateral epicondyle and the


medial epicondyle. The lateral epicondyle is the outside bony
portion of the elbow where the large tendons attach to the
elbow from the muscles of the forearm, when strained, this is
called lateral epicondyleitis or tennis elbow
Tennis elbow results in pain over the outside of the elbow
with flexion (bending down) or extension (bending up) of
the wrist and tenderness, warmth and swelling of the
affected area.
The treatment for tennis elbow includes ice packs, resting
the elbow, anti-inflammatory medications ( such as aspirin,
naproxen and Motrin) and bracing the elbow. Injecting
cortisone and a local anesthetic into the area surrounding
the tendon usually provides substantial relief within 24 to 72
hours.

Presented for Dr. Ryan Lambert Bellacov, chiropractor in West Linn, OR

There are three types of shoulder tendinitis.


1. rotator cuff
2. calcific tendinitis
3.biceps tendinitis
The rotator cuff consists of four muscles around the shoulder joint that help control the
shoulders position and keep it stable. With rotator cuff tendinitis the pain is located
about three inches below the top of the shoulder and is felt when reaching over head or
behind the back. Rotator cuff tendinitis will usually resolve with rest, anti-inflammatory
medications or an injection of cortisone and a local anesthetic into the areas surrounding
the tendon, as well as exercising using light weights.
Calcific tendinitis is caused by calcium deposits in the rotator cuff region. Symptoms include
excruciating pain and sever restriction of shoulder motion. X-rays reveal calcium
deposits within the rotator cuff or overlying the head of the humerus. Treatment includes
injection of cortisone and a local anesthetic into the area surrounding the tendon.
Multiple needle punctures into the calcium deposit may break up the deposit.
Biceps tendinitis is inflammation of the biceps tendons that attach to the shoulder. Biceps
tendons that attach to the shoulder. Biceps tendinitis usually affects individuals whose
occupation involves repetitive biceps flexion against resistance or whose activities
include forceful throwing of a ball. Biceps tendinitis will resolve with rest, antiinflammatory medications or an injection of cortisone and a local anesthetic into the area
surrounding the tendon, as well as a sling to immobilize the shoulder. Surgery is
occasionally required to stabilize a displaced tendon

Presented for Dr. Ryan Lambert-Bellacov, chiropractor in West Linn, OR

Proper conditioning
Gradual introduction of activity
Warm-up and stretching prior to exercise
Wearing appropriate shoes for the activity

The most common causes of tendinitis are


injury, overuse, infection of the tendon sheath
or disease (tendinitis is evident in rheumatoid
arthritis, gout and psoriatic arthritis). More
often than not, the cause of tendinitis is
unknown

Presented for Dr. Ryan Lambert-Bellacov, chiropractor in West Linn, OR

In order to properly and accurately diagnose


tendinitis a careful study of medical history and
physical examination is required by the health care
provider. X-rays are of great help for excluding any
bone abnormalities or conditions like arthritis. As
tendons are not generally visible to the naked eyes
on x-rays. MRIs and ultrasound are often found to
be useful in the detection of tendinitis. Blood tests
may be taken in order to confirm presence of any
other underlying conditions. But such tests are
generally not necessary in the process of
diagnosing tendinitis.

Presented for Dr. Ryan Lambert-Bellacov, chiropractor in West Linn, OR