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SURVEY RESEARCH

& CORRELATIONAL
RESEARCH
NARRIDO – MACASA – NATIVIDAD
SURVEY RESEARCH
WHAT IS A SURVEY?

•“A survey is defined as a brief interview or


discussion with individuals about a specific
topic.”
• “The term survey is often used to mean
'collect information.’”
(Devin Kowalczyk, 2018)
SURVEYS CAN BE ADMINISTERED IN THREE (3) WAYS..

• THROUGH THE MAIL..


low cost but low response rate
• BY TELEPHONE..
high response rates but higher cost than mail
• FACE-TO-FACE..
highest response rates but most expensive
(Research Connections, 2018)
WHAT IS A SURVEY RESEARCH?

•“Survey research is a commonly


used method of collecting
information about a population of
interest.”
(Research Connections, 2018)
TWO (2) KEY FEATURES OF SURVEY RESEARCH:
1. QUESTIONNAIRES – “a predefined series of
questions used to collect information from
individuals.”
2. SAMPLING – “a technique in which a subgroup of
the population is selected to answer the survey
questions; the information collected can be
generalized to the entire population of interest.”
(Research Connections, 2018)
EXAMPLE

THE DAVAO CITY-WIDE SOCIAL SURVEY


(CWSS) CONDUCTED BY THE SOCIAL
RESEARCH TRAINING AND
DEVELOPMENT OFFICE (SRTDO) OF
ATENEO DE DAVAO UNIVERSITY
CORRELATIONAL RESEARCH
WHAT IS A CORRELATION?

•“A correlation is simply


defined as a relationship
between two variables. “
(Devin Kowalczyk, 2018)
WHAT IS CORRELATIONAL RESEARCH/STUDY?
• “Correlational research is a type of
nonexperimental research in which the
researcher measures two variables and assesses
the statistical relationship between them with
little or no effort to control extraneous
variables.”
(Price, et. al., 2018)
•“Correlation research is looking for
variables that seem to interact with each
other, so that when you can see one
changing, you have an idea of how the
other will change.”
(Devin Kowalczyk, 2018)
TYPES OF CORRELATION

•POSITIVE CORRELATION – “as variable A


increases, so does variable B.”

•NEGATIVE CORRELATION – “when variable


A increases, variable B will decrease.”
(Devin Kowalczyk, 2018)
EXAMPLE
• “When looking for correlations, a researcher will look
for patterns - what they have seen happen again and
again. A simple pattern known to every teacher, but
unfortunately not every student, is the link between
studying and grades. The studious student who
studies is more likely to score a higher score on their
test. Students who don't study much are less likely to
score as high as those who do.”
(Devin Kowalczyk, 2018)