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TOURISM INDUSTRY
IN MALAKAND;
Opportunities &
Challenges.

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Mohammad Alam
Department of Tourism & Hospitality
Hazara university
ALLAH Subhanahu wa ta'ala Say:
“Travel through the earth and see what was the end of those who rejected truth.”
(Surah al-An`am: 11).

In this context, travelling and touring are encourgable and will normally go together with
hospitality.
OBJECTIVES

To study the perspective from the current statistics and publications. The aim to investigate:

 To highlight the importance of Tourism in Malakand Division?


 The discuss the Opportunities?
 How to over comes with the Challenges?
WHAT ACTUALLY TOURISM (& Hospitality) IS
Travel+ Tourism+ Hospitality Ancient Greek tornos =1811 Tourism
Travel, logging, food, recreation, entertainment, other services

Travel and tourism is considered as the biggest and most renowned industry in the world.
Many countries know this dynamic industry as the main source of income, employment, and
private sector growth.

The industry is with out any doubt a people industry. It is so called a Service industry, have a
Global role, in economic, environmental and socio-cultural aspects but it also have the issue
in addition.

In 1941, Hunziker and Kraft defined tourism as "the sum of the


phenomena and relationships arising from the travel and stay of non-
residents, insofar as they do not lead to permanent residence and are not
connected with any earning activity."
Domestic T: Estimated 4.8 billion
TOURISM TYPES
BY ACTIVITY
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$19.4 billion to Pakistan's economy 6.9% GDP. The
WTTC expects rise to $36.1 billion within a decade.
 1.75 million tourists visited Pakistan in
REGIONAL COMPARISON….. 2017 (www.dawn.com/news/1403800)
 Over 56 million DT.
Basic natural ingredients of a destination

The Share of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa in domestic tourism was


about 19% which 8.8 million domestic tourists visited KP in
2009.
Share in foreign tourist 5.6% which 47,900 foreign tourists.
Share in receipts was PKR 974 million.
Total economic impact was calculated to be PKR 12.26
billion (USD 141 million).

Shrine, Water, Air (weather), Trees,


7As OF TOURISM INDUSTRY
The 7 components of Tourism are important as base for tourism development;

ATTRACTIONS ACCESSIBILITY ACCOMMODATION


• (e.g the flora • (e.g. Roads etc), • (e.g. hotel, youth ACTIVITY AMENITY ACTS ACTORS
fauna, landscape hostels etc),
(e.g. to keep (e.g. telephone, (stakeholders-
etc), private and (stakeholders-
the people bank, hospitals public sector private and public
engaged), etc), both). sector both)
“The traveller sees what he sees;
the tourist sees what he has come to see…”
G. K. Chesteron, an English Writer, Poet, and Philosopher.

A tourist destination has certain characteristics that attract tourists to spend time there. It can attract
tourists for its inherent or exhibited natural or cultural values, historical significance, flora and fauna,
natural or built beauty, offering leisure, adventure and amusement.
TOURISM & PHYSICAL i. Conflict
ENVIROMENT ii. Symbiotic
iii. coexistence
 The environment in which tourism prevail as industry is Biotic/ abiotic
Tangible /Non tangible Resources.

 Tourism Interaction with Physical Environment in 3 ways.

three main characteristics


Physical Environment &

Tourism resources have


Tangible objects that
Environment as
Pleasant background are considered of economic value to the
tourism sector.
Tourism

Environment as Focus Themselves are often not used solely by


of Activity tourists.

Environment as setting Perishable. Not only are they vulnerable to


Place alteration and destruction by tourist
pressure
CLASSIFICATION OF TOURIST ATTRACTION
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Attractions into four main categories, which can be defined as:

Natural

•Including beaches, caves, scenic features and wildlife.

Man-made but not originally designed to attract tourists –

•Such as historic houses, forts, and cathedrals

Man-made and purpose-built to attract tourists –

•Includes museums, art galleries, Parks, exhibition centers, clubs, and a


growing range of leisure attractions for a ‘day out’ such as theme parks and
water parks

Special events

•These ‘event attractions’ differ from the others, which are ‘site attractions’,
in that they occur only periodically and in some cases, change venues.
WHY THEY COMES TO YOU

 A tourist destination has certain characteristics that attract tourists to spend time there.
(attract tourists for its inherent or exhibited natural or cultural value, historical significance, flora and
fauna, natural or built beauty, offering leisure, adventure and amusement.

 Tourism belongs to relatively low resource consumption and relatively small environmental
destruction. It is a typical environment-friendly industry.
 However, there are still a lot of "non-ecological" phenomena and certain energy consumption and
pollution emission, which have certain impacts on the ecological environment.
EXPERIENCE
An event or occurrence which leaves an impression on someone. It is practical contact with
and observation of facts or events

Some people might include the experience as one of the tourist components, but no product can
provide an experience, only an opportunity to have an experience. Mount Everest, The tour operator
does not provide an experience. Only the VISITOR can create the experience based on certain factors.
COLOURS OF TOURISM

1. Green, grass, trees


2. Blue, water, sky
3. White, clouds, snow, white water
4. Gary/brown, soil, autumn
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MALAKAND
Spiritual Land
Malakand Division was formed from the princely states
of Chitral, Dir and Swat and Malakand Protected Area.
Including 7 administrative areas.
THE GEOGRAPHY
HEAVEN within Hindukush mountains,
the Caucasus Indicus
The Malakand Division
Scholars believe that proper Swat valley, Buner, Shangla and part of
Dir were included in ancient Uḍḍiyāna.  1970, Malakand Division
 Nearly 29% of the area of
the Chinese pilgrims, Sòng Yùn extends its limits to the mountains KP, an area of
called ‘Tsung Ling’ (Upper Dir) and Gandhara its south. nearly 29,800 sq. km
 7 Administrative areas
Alexander Cunningham has described the geography of ancient Swat  about 6.0 million.
as “the present districts of Pangkora, Bijawar, Swat, and Bunir”  Terichmir 25,289 ft, Falaksar
(Cunningham 1871: 81; Watters 1904: 226) 19,416 ft
 Access: Road via Malakand
pass, shangla pass, Ambela
pass, Lawari pass
 Airport; saidu sharif, Chitral
INGRIDENTS FOR SUCCESSIFUL
TOURISM PRODUCT

 The area, a mountainous region, is a hub of natural resources,


scenic beauties, stunning landscapes, snow-capped mountains,
fertile fields and sprinkle in mountains.
 The area enjoys a rich historic legacy and has many places of
tourists' interest
 Alpine Lakes are a source of un-forgettable memories for those
tourists who can visit them on foot.
 The fine climate in the hot summer months (June to October) is
another major advantage for the tourism industry in this region.
 variety of local art, crafts, woodwork and embroidery products,
 Archaeological & historical sites
 Cultural landscaping
 potential for various adventure-oriented sporting events like
water sports, mountain sports
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Opportunity – I:
NATURE- RECREATION TOURISM.
(Major Touristic Towns, Hill Stations, sub valleys, Alpine Lakes, ecotourism, agritourism)

Opportunity – II:
ADVENTURE TOURISM.
(Hiking, animal/bird watch, Trekking, Safris, Angling, Lake trails, Rafting, Gliding, soft & hard
sports)

Opportunity - III:
CULTURAL HERITAGE TOURISM /ARCHAEOTOURISM
(Kalsh valleys, Forts, Relics & Ruins of Aryan, Greeks, Gandhara civilization,
Muslim , and Modern, Historic/Archaeological Sites)
Malakand Division

Total Economic
Tourist circle No of Hotels No of Rooms
impact
Swat Valley 405 6480 4440
Chitral/Dir valleys 47 656 288

Total 11,648 PKR


779 12,983
million
Source: FIRM 2008-09
Malakand Division (Two destinations)

variable Kalam Kumrat


Estimated annual arrival 0.4 million 0.05 million

Average spending per tourist Rs; 7,700-11,200 Rs: 6600-7400


per day
Average stay 1.87 days 2.05 days
Economic contribution per year 6-8 billion 0.67-0.76 billion
Malakand Division (Employment)

variable Kalam Kumrat

(employment) Industry (employment) Industry

Hotel
861 124/2537 287 59/68926

Restaurant 466 87 100 26


Shops 1,151 150 190 174
Transportation 238 777 63 53
Total 2716 640
Source: KP 2018
TOURIST FLOW BY AREA
Within
District Foreign
6% 0.4
Sind Within District
12% 14% Punjab
17%

Punjab
49%

Within KP Within KP
32% 69%
TOURIST FLOW IN KALAM TOURIST FLOW IN KUMRAT
CHALLENGES
Kalam Kumrat
 Accessibility (beyond kalam  Road
 Pressure on Forest  Tourist in infancy stage
 Landscape degradation  Unregulated
 Mushroom Development of hotel  Temporary structures
 Water supply  Poor hygiene condition
 Solid waste Mgt & sewerage Mgt  Lowest service standards
 Shortage of LPG in Peak season  Damaged to landscape
 Limited health services  Stress on natural forest
 Emergency evacuation  Solid waste & water pollution
 Bank/ATM  Health services
 Emergency evacuation
 Bank /ATM
Prospective Tourism
 Nature-based Tourism (ecotourism, adventure
tourism)
 Sports Tourism
 Ethnic Tourism
 Sacred/Spiritual Tourism Sites
 Cultural tourism
 Agritourism
 Heritage Tourism
 Culinary Tourism (organic food)
What is Planned
for them!!!

What the User needs

WHAT THE VISITORS EXPECTS FROM;

1. Visitor expectations and motivations for visiting your site/destination.


Qty Exp =Exp-Re
1. Customer care needs (booking for accommodation, food service, gift shops etc.).
2. Market mix sustainability (school tourism, Ethnic market, domestic market etc.).
CROSS CUTTING ISSUES

We are facing problems in regulations as well as


implementation, economic, technical and professional
constraints. The local potential has not been realized
and harnessed properly the reason can be;

 Research & documentation of sites.


 Promotional policies, tourism focus: Natural tourism
 Infrastructures, Superstructure, Hotels, park, Restaurants etc
 tourist services, (facilitations)
 Public participation and involvement in tourism trough SME, Ecotourism,
Cultural heritage tourism.
 Absence of entertainment contents related with tourism,
 Benefits to the local and stake holders,
 Training and education of stake holders
 Media projection.
 ACTIVITY base tourism.
PROGRAMS
 Awareness and Trainings in the community for the protection,
promotion, education
 Homestay accommodation in will increase community involvement and
will enhance economic benefits.
 Awareness in young generation for heritage properties and their protection,
(school Tourism)
 Creating packages and joint promotion of hospitality industry
 Motivating the private sector for marketing and business.
 Creation of Theme park (Heritage Park) Development
 Camping site for school tourism and adventure tourism and interlinking
with cultural heritage tourism.
 Promotional shopping squires
 Promotional documents, maps, brochures, dvd,s booklets and stucco
models of the most important monuments.
 Heritage souvenir shops, Tea shirts, cups, keychains, D2W shoppers.
WHAT SHOULD BE IN A MARKETING
PLAN FOR HERITAGE ATTRACTIONS?

 To create physical products (books, trail guides, guided tours, videos, post
cards, T-shirts, videos, photo opportunities etc.).
 To organize promotional/ famtours to tour operators, editors, writers and
intellectual.
 Seasonal visitation patterns, Ad mix designs and pre-testing.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

• MPhil research
• KPTourism
• PTDC Saidu Sharif
• Ministry of Tourism (MoT)
• USAID-FIRM Project
• ALL SWAT HOTEL ASSOCIATION (ASHA)
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RIVERS; THE LIFE LINE……
i) The River Swat (Length 240 km)
Its source lies in the Hindukush Mountains, flows through the narrow gorge with a rushing
speed up to Madyan and lower plain areas of Swat Valley up to Chakdara for 160 km. In the
extreme south of the valley, the river enters to a narrow gorge and joins the Panjkora River,
at Qalangi, and finally empties into Kabul River, near Charsadda. It is used for irrigation and
power generation purposes. plays an important role in the economy. And habitat for diverse
species of birds & fishing industry. The aesthetic scenery of river attracts thousands of
tourists from all over Pakistan during the summer season.

ii. The Kunar (Length 220 Km)


It flows south through the Upper Dir District and the Lower Dir District. Its confluence with
the Swat River is in the Malakand District near totakan. The Swat River is a tributary of
the Kabul River, part of the Indus River basin.

iii. The Punjkora (Length 480 km long)


It emerges just south of the Broghil Pass, in the upper part of Chitral District of Khyber
Pakhtunkhwa near the Afghan border. The river system is fed by
melting glaciers and snow of the Hindu Kush mountains. The Kunar River is a tributary of
the Kabul River, which is in turn a tributary of the Indus River.