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DAYANANDA SAGAR COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

DEPARTMENT OF CONSRUCTION TECHNOLOGY & MANAGEMENT


FINAL PROJECT PRESENTATION

STABILIZATION OF EXPANSIVE SOIL USING C&D


WASTE - An EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION

BY
DODAPPA 1DS16CT406
UPENDRA NAIK 1DS15CT040
UNDER THE GUIDANCE OF

Prof. SUHAS R
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR
DEPARTMENT OF CTM
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SL.NO CONTENTS

1 INTRODUCTION
2 LITERATURE REVIEW
3 OBJECTIVES OF THE PRESENT WORK
4 MATERIALS AND EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES
5 EXPECTED OUTCOMES
6 SCHEDULED PLAN OF WORK COMPLETION
7 REFERENCES
OBJECTIVES OF PRESENT STUDY
•To demonstrate the use of construction &
demolition (C&D) wastes in stabilization of expansive
soils for the use in low-volume road subgrades

•To evaluate & compare the mechanical properties of


C & D waste stabilized BC soil & Un-stabilized soil

•To analyse & compare the costs of construction


between stabilized & Un-stabilized soil
INTRODUCTION
• Black Cotton/Clayey soil is the most common type of soil which usually requires stabilization
and this is mainly due to control its swell-shrink behaviour which to a significant extent can
negatively impact any construction activity taken upon it.

• Soil stabilization is one of the most common methods resorted to for enhancing the
engineering properties of a soil by altering the original properties of the soil.

• Use of waste materials in stabilizing soil is being operational all over the world from few
decades

• The main reason behind this trend is the excessive production of waste materials like fly ash,
rice husk ash etc. These wastes will not only create environmental hazards but also create
deposition problems. This problem can be avoided if used in construction practices.

• Today, crushed concrete is available in large quantities which results from the demolition
wastes. The land area for filling this waste is huge. Therefore, using construction waste is vital,
in the sense that it reduces the amount of open land needed for disposing
LITERATURE SURVEY
• The experimental studies conducted by Okagbue (2007) show that the geotechnical parameters of clay soil
are improved substantially by the addition of wood ash; plasticity was reduced by 35% and CBR and
strength increased by 23–50% and 49–67%, respectively, depending on the compactive energy used.
However, the strength gain was short lived as the strength quickly decreased after 7–14 days of curing.
These results indicate that one should search a substitute for wood ash stabilizer to achieve long term
performance

• A study by Rahman et al. (2015) show the improvement in physical and shears strength characteristics of
unbound C&D material. However, the target improvement required for pavement application is entirely
different from the foundation scenario. One expects substantial improvement in safe bearing capacity of
the soils. Very limited studies have been conducted so far using C&D waste in geotechnical applications.

• Saltan et al.(2011) examined the potential of pumice waste as a stabilizing additive to clayey subgrade of
pavements. The tests conducted were solidity, strength, Atterberg limit, CBR and dynamic repeated load
Tri-axial The results of the experimental research showed that pumice waste can be used as a soil stabilizer
for clayey sub grades.
• The stabilization of expansive soils using in procurement of materials
the materials used in this project shoud be black cotton soil & C&D
waste.
• To conducting the lab evaluation tests shoud be conducted on black
cotton soil.
• The test results shoud be based on accurate values suitable for black
cotton soil.
• The test methodoly will be refered based on pavement design IRC-
37-2015.
METHODOLOGY
MATERIALS AND EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE
Soil - Black Cotton Soil:
• Source: Viduraswatta, Gauribidanuru Talluk
• Consists of inorganic clays of medium to high compressibility.
• Very hard when dry, but loses its strength completely when in wet
condition.
• Occurs mostly in the central and western parts and covers apprx. 20%
of the total area of India
Construction & Demolition
• Source: Dayananda Sagar College of Engineering
• Includes the crushed concrete blocks and debris
• Fine materials passing thru 4.75 µ sieve size
• Will be mixed with soil in different proportions to carry out the tests
EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES

• Atterberg Limits(Liquid Limit,Plastic Limit)


• Specific Gravity
• Particle Size Distribution
• Standard Proctor Compaction
• Modified Proctor Compaction

Tests for Strength:


• Direct Shear Test(DST)
• Unconfined Compression Test (UCStest)
RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONS
1.Specific Gravity

TRAIL NO. 1 2 3 4

Empty weight of
60.1 57.6 22.1 25.2
bottle, W₁

Weight of bottle+⅓
100.1 102.1 47.4 52.6
soil, W₂

Weight of bottle+⅓
167.6 167.8 80.4 84.6
soil+⅔ kerosene, W₃

Weight of bottle+ full


137.9 136.6 62.1 64.6
kerosene, W₄

Specific gravity, G 2.42 2.59 2.79 2.86

Average specific
2.66
gravity

Result: The specific gravity of black cotton soil was found to be 2.66.
Particle size distribution
4.1.2.1 Dry Sieve Analysis

Weight of soil Cumulative % of


Sieve size % of soil retained %Finer
retained weight retained

mm W1 (g) (W1/W)*100 100-C

4.75 255 25.5 25.5 74.5

2.36 145 14.5 40 60

1.18 186 18.6 58.6 41.4

0.6 133 13.3 71.9 28.1

0.3 103 10.3 82.2 17.8

0.15 71 7.1 89.3 10.7

0.075 59 5.9 95.2 4.8

Pan 47 4.7 99.9 0.1


Grain Size Distribution
4.75 mm 0.075mm
Gravel Sand Silt and Clay
100
Percent Finer by weight

80
60
40
20
0
10 1 Grain Size, mm 0.1 0.01
(Log Scale)
TEST RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS
• The specific gravity of black cotton soil was found to be 2.66 this
value will be suitable for low volume road subgrades.
• The liquid limit of black cotton soil was found to be 61.2%.
• The plastic limit of black cotton was found to be 36.3%.
• The modified proctor compaction test of black cotton soil of
MDD=1.64g/cc & OMC=24.8%.
• These tests to be conducted accurately based on black soil using
C & D waste these results will be accurate & suitable for low
volume roads.
FUTURE SCOPE

• Strength & swelling properties can be checked for more varying


percentages of C&D wastes beyond 14%.
• Fatigue behaviour of the soil sample can be checked wrto that of
normal untreated soil.
• A test track can be constructed with this soil & subjected for more
accurate testing.
REFERENCES

• Nelson, J. and Miller, D.J., 1997. Expansive soils: problems and practice in
foundation and pavement engineering. John Wiley & Sons.
• Wray, W.K. and Meyer, K.T., 2004. Expansive Clay Soil... A Widespread and
Costly Geohazard. Geo-Strata—Geo Institute of ASCE, 5(4), p.24.
• Katz, A., & Baum, H. (2011). A novel methodolgy to estimate the evolution of
construction waste in construction sites. Waste Management, 353-358
• Sabat, A.K. and Pati, S., 2014. A review of literature on stabilization of expansive
soil using solid wastes. Electronic Journal of Geotechnical Engineering, 19,
pp.6251-6267.
• Okagbue, C.O., 2007. Stabilization of clay using woodash. Journal of materials in
civil engineering, 19(1), pp.14-18
• Rahman, M.A., Imteaz, M.A., Arulrajah, A., Piratheepan, J. and Disfani, M.M.,
2015. Recycled construction and demolition materials in permeable pavement
systems: geotechnical and hydraulic characteristics. Journal of Cleaner
Production, 90, pp.183-194.
THANK YOU