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Silicon–Controlled Rectifier (SCR)

What is a Silicon–Controlled Rectifier (SCR)?


SCR is a device that is
widely used for controlling
or switching power and
Schematic often high voltage AC or DC
symbol
circuits.
Equivalent
Schematic Thyristors or silicon
controlled rectifiers, has
many uses in electronics,
particularly for power
control. These devices have
Physical
diagram
even been called the
workhorse of high power
electronics.
Silicon–Controlled Rectifier (SCR)
Silicon–Controlled Rectifier (SCR)
Thyristor are group of semiconductor devices used for
switching purposes. Like the transistor, thyristors have two
terminals for “working current” and one terminal for “control
current.”
Unlike transistor, thyristor don’t require any control current
once they are turned on. All they require to snap on is momentary
pulse of current.

An SCR is a semiconductor that normally


blocks conventional current attempting to
pass, either way, between the anode &
cathode. But when current is attempting to
flow from anode to cathode, a quick pulse of
current into the gate will turn on the SCR.

Silicon–Controlled Rectifier (SCR)


Silicon–Controlled Rectifier (SCR)
Thyristor as it is more commonly known, is similar to the
transistor. It is a multi-layer semiconductor device, hence the
“silicon” part of its name. It requires a gate signal to turn it “ON”,
the “controlled” part of the name and once “ON” it behaves like a
rectifying diode, the “rectifier” part of the name.

An SCR is a semiconductor that normally blocks conventional


current attempting to pass, either way, between the anode &
cathode. But when current is attempting to flow from anode to
cathode, a quick pulse of current into the gate will turn on the
SCR.

Silicon–Controlled Rectifier (SCR)


Silicon–Controlled Rectifier (SCR)

Thyristors are able to switch high voltages and


withstand reverse voltages making them ideal for
switching applications, especially within AC scenarios.

Silicon–Controlled Rectifier (SCR)


Silicon–Controlled Rectifier (SCR)
Thyristors are able to switch large levels of power are
accordingly they used in a wide variety of different
applications. Thyristors even finds uses in low power
electronics where they are used in many circuits from
light dimmers to power supply over voltage protection.
The term SCR or silicon controlled rectifier is often
used synonymously with that of thyristor - the SCR or
silicon controlled rectifier is actually a trade name used by
General Electric.

Silicon–Controlled Rectifier (SCR)


Silicon–Controlled Rectifier (SCR)
SCR discovery
The idea for the thyristor was first described by Shockley in
1950. It was referred to as a bipolar transistor with a p-n hook-
collector. The mechanism for the operation was analysed further
in 1952 by Ebers.
Then in 1956 Moll investigated the switching mechanism of
the thyristor. Development continued and more was learned
about the device such that the first silicon controlled rectifiers
became available in the early 1960s where it started to gain a
significant level of popularity for power switching.

Silicon–Controlled Rectifier (SCR)


Silicon–Controlled Rectifier (SCR)
Thyristor applications
Thyristors, or silicon controlled rectifiers, SCRs are used in many
areas of electronics where they find uses in a variety of different
applications. Some of the more common applications for them are
outlined below:
 AC power control (including lights, motors, etc.,).
 Overvoltage protection crowbar for power supplies.
 AC power switching.
 Control elements in phase angle triggered controllers.
 Within photographic flash lights where they act as the
switch to discharge a stored voltage through the flash lamp,
and then cut it off at the required time.

Silicon–Controlled Rectifier (SCR)


Silicon–Controlled Rectifier (SCR)

Silicon–Controlled Rectifier (SCR)