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THE FIRST CRY OF

REVOLUTION
In August 26, 1896 Bonifacio assembled
the katipuneros in the hills of Balintawak
to discuss plans for an impending
revolution. During the meeting on August
23 – 26, heavy discussion from the
different ranking members took place.
The event is regarded as the
starting signal for the
Philippine revolution.
However, the first cry became
one of the controversial
events in the history of
Philippine Revolution.
Thus, this position paper was
made to provide clarification in
the controversy of where the
Philippine Revolution started.
Was is it in Balintawak or in
Pugadlawin?
The
proponents
respectfully
submit this
the First Cry of
position
paper, and
Revolution
state that:
happened in
BALINTAWAK.
The contention of the
proponents is based on the
following accounts (Buehler,
1998):
• A. The El Comercio Report on 27 August
1896 carried news on the “disturbances”
in Balintauac, jurisdiction of Caloocan.
The contention of the proponents
is based on the following accounts
(Buehler, 1998):

• B. Sastron account described the


“disturbances” which affected far beyond
the Balintawak-Caloocan vicinity.
The contention of the
proponents is based on the
following accounts (Buehler,
1998):

• C. British consular reported the 26 August


uprising in Balintawak.
The contention of the proponents
is based on the following accounts
(Buehler, 1998):

• D. The written account of Guillermo


Masangkay manifested that the first cry of
revolution happened in Balintawak.
Moreover, the contention of the
proponents is based on the
following accounts (Zaide, 1990):
• E. Cedulas were torn by the katipuneros at
Apolonio Samson’s place in Pook Kangkong
and the first encounter in Banlat, Pasong
Tamo.
Moreover, the contention of the
proponents is based on the
following accounts (Zaide, 1990):

• F. Dr. Pio Valenzuela’s linked with the “Cry of


Balintawak” as the first staging point of the
Philippine Revolution.
Moreover, the contention of the
proponents is based on the
following accounts (Zaide, 1990):

• G. The Guardia Civil’s Report stated that the


first “Cry” occurred at Balintawak on August
25, 1896.
Counterclaims

Teodoro Agoncillo, as a historian


claimed the so-called “cry” happened in
“Pugad Lawin.” But he considered only
one source -- the so-called Valenzuela
memoirs; and the tale of Pugad Lawin
appeared some thirty years after the
“Cry,” when tearing of cedulas became
an issue (Buehler, 1990);
Counterclaims
Guillermo Masangkay disclaimed in public the
statements of Pantas and Pacheco. The published
responses of Pantas and Pacheco were
contradicting as well as with the statement of
Valenzuela. For which Buehler (1990) said, “they
are unsubstantiated in the historical sources and
are clearly intended to discredit Masangkay as a
source of information.” Furthermore, Pantas
admitted that he fled Balintawak and could not
provide information on the tearing of cedulas
(Buehler, 1990); and
Counterclaims

“Pugad Lawin” was never officially recognized


as a place name on any Philippine map before
the Second World War. “Pugan Lawin”
appeared in historiography only from 1928 or
32 years after the events took place. The
revolution was always traditionally held to
have occurred in the area of Balintawak, which
was distinct from Kalookan and Diliman
(Guerrero, 2015).
THEREFORE, BASED ON THE FACTS OF
THE CONTROVERSY PRESENTED ABOVE,
THE PROPONENTS STRONGLY ADHERE
THAT THE FIRST CRY OF REVOLUTION
HAPPENED IN BALINTAWAK.

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